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works by Cassandra Ballew

PORTFOLIO


Apartment 3E New York, NY 10040 Qualifications Creative design professional with experience in documentation, design, research, specification writing, surveying, presentation and project management. Detail oriented and well organized; comfortable taking the initiative and working independently. Adept at juggling multiple priorities and working under pressure to meet time-sensitive deadlines. Effective team player with strong interpersonal and communication skills. Thrives in positions that require traveling worldwide. Academic Background Attending Columbia University, Masters of Urban Planning: Candidate for 2013 2006 Philadelphia University, Bachelor of Architecture 2005 American University in Roma, Italy 2006 2006 2005 2005 2004

Academic/Research Experience Teaching Aid and Researcher, Architecture Class at Lankenau High School, Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia University Teaching Aid and Researcher, Sustainable Classroom at Baldie Elementary School, Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia University Research Assistant, Green Advantage Curriculum and Trainings, Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia University Research Assistant, Urban Voids Competition, Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia University Research Assistant, Low Cost Exterior Insulation System, Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia University

Professional Practice 2007-2010 Richard McElhiney Architect LLC, New York, N.Y. Professional Staff-Junior Architect 2006-2007 TBS Services Inc., Glenside, PA Professional Staff-Junior Architect 2004-2006 Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia, PA Intern Technical Skills Autodesk (AutoCAD 2005-2010) (VIZ 4) Microsoft Office (2000-Windows 7) Adobe (Acrobat, Photoshop, Illustrator, In-Design) Woodshop & Carpentry Memberships of Professional Societies American Planning Assocation (APA) American Institute of Architects (AIA) United States Green Building Council (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Architecture for Humanity

Credentials Academic Work: Architecture Professional Work: Architecture Academic Work: Planning Professional Work: Planning


QUALIFICATIONS Creative professional with experience in documentation, design, research, specification writing, surveying, GIS analysis, presentation and project management. Detail oriented and well organized; comfortable taking the initiative and working independently. Adept at juggling multiple priorities and working under pressure to meet time-sensitive deadlines. Effective team player with strong interpersonal and communication skills. ACADEMIC BACKGROUND 2013 Columbia University, Masters of Urban Planning 2006 Philadelphia University, Bachelor of Architecture 2005 The American University of Rome, Italy ACADEMIC/RESEARCH EXPERIENCE 2013 Research Assistant/Fellow, Madison Square Garden/Penn Station Campaign. The Municipal Art Society of New York City, New York 2013 Research Assistant/Fellow, East Midtown: A Bold Vision for the Future Report The Municipal Art Society of New York City, New York 2013 Teaching Assistant, Introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University 2012 Project team member, Park Avenue Safety Project in Brooklyn, NY Architecture for Humanity, New York City Chapter 2012 Studio member, Welheimer Mark Germany Studio, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University 2011-12 Research Assistant, Research Proposal on the Role of Parking Lots in Land Assembly, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University 2006 Teaching Aid and Researcher, Architecture Class at Lankenau High School, Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia University 2006 Teaching Aid and Researcher, Sustainable Classroom at Baldie Elementary School, Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia University 2005 Research Assistant, Green Advantage Curriculum and Trainings, Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia University 2005 Research Assistant, Urban Voids Competition, Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia University 2004 Research Assistant, Low Cost Exterior Insulation System, Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia University

credentials

CURRICULUM VITAE


credentials

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 2012- Municipal Arts Society, New York, N.Y. Planning and Design Fellow 2011-12 Columbia University, New York, N.Y. Research Assistant 2007-11 Richard McElhiney Architect LLC, New York, N.Y. Professional Staff-Junior Architect 2006-07 TBS Services Inc., Glenside, PA Professional Staff-Junior Architect 2004-06 Engineering and Design Institute, Philadelphia, PA Intern TECHNICAL SKILLS ESRI Software (ArcMap, ArcScene) Processing Software STATA Autodesk (AutoCAD 2005-2010) (VIZ) 3D Modeling Software: Sketchup, Rhino, 3DSMax Microsoft Office (2000-Windows 8) Adobe (Acrobat, Photoshop, Illustrator, In-Design) Woodshop & Carpentry MEMBERSHIPS OF PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES LEED AP Certification, BD+C Planning Student Organization (PSO) American Planning Assocation (APA) American Institute of Architects (AIA) United States Green Building Council (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Architecture for Humanity COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 2012 APA, Planning Student Organization, Representative 2011 Volunteer, Statewide APA Convention 2011 Parking Day, Columbia University, NYC 2009- Volunteer, Architecture for Humanity, NYC 2008- Group Member & Competitor, Canstruction, NYC 2007- Volunteer, Habitat for Humanity, NYC 2007- Volunteer, Publi-Color, NYC 2006-07 Volunteer, Community Design Collaborative, Philadelphia, PA


PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS Civic 2010- 2009- 2009- 2009-

Diocese of Newark/Feasibility Study, Newark, NJ Jose V. Toledo Federal Office Building and U.S. Courthouse, San Juan, PR Clemente Ruiz Nazario Courthouse & Federico Degetau Federal Building, Hato Rey, PR Peter Rodino Federal Office Building, Newark, NJ

Academic 2008- Kent Place School/Mabie House & Middle School Renovations, Summit, NJ 2007- Firestone Library, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 2006- Bole Hall, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ 2006- Oak and Laurel Hall, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ 2006- Science and Biology Buildings, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ Corporate/Commercial 2008-09 Realization Center, Inc. Offices, Brooklyn, NY 2008- Lincoln International Offices, New York, NY 2007- Hanjin Shipping North American Headquarters Renovation, Paramus, NJ 2007- Realization Center, Inc., New York, NY 2006- Spring Ridge Corporate Center, Reading, PA 2006- 3-Mill Road, Wilmington, DE 2006- Restaurant Design, Feasibility Study, Las Cruces, NM 2006- Warehouse Renovation, Feasibility Study, North East Philadelphia, PA Residential 2010- Residence in Greenpoint/Feasibility Study, Brooklyn, NY 2010- Residence on Madison Ave/Owner’s Representative, New York, NY 2009- Residential Building/Renovation, New York, NY 2008- Private Residence Central Park West/Renovation, New York, NY 2007- Affordable Housing/Renovation, Newburgh, NY 2005-06 Blake House Renovation, Feasibility Study, Philadelphia, PA

credentials

HONORS AND AWARDS 2012-13 Columbia University Assistantship, Teaching Assistant for Intro to GIS 2007- Awarded Volunteer of the Year by the Community Design Collaborative 2006- Recipient of the Architecture Faculty award for Excellence in Sustainable Design 2006- School Finalist for the John Stewardson Memorial Competition in Architecture 2005- Chosen to speak at the Alumni Scholarship Dinner 2005- Recipient of the Harry Reimer Scholarship for academic achievement 2005- Appointed Vice-President of campus chapter of AIAS 2005- Green Advantage Certified Practitioner (GACP)


: architecture academic work

Artwork These pieces are from various art courses 2001-2013 that I have taken over the past 10 years. They range from still life and portraiture to Architectural perspective.


academic work

: architecture


: architecture academic work

Design VIII: Prometheus Center The focus for this studio was on technology and illustrating

Site: Center City, Philadelphia, PA how it was incorporated through the use of details. This 2004 project, The Prometheus Center, is a place dedicated to exhibiting the technological advances of mankind from early Mesopotamia to the modern 21st century and beyond. My design revolved around the staircase, which I designed as a centerpiece for the center, a barrier to the street and the double skin facade. The exterior facade is composed of several operable louvers which provide shade for the West Facade. The interior facade is composed of colored glass, in various layers. These glass panels display photos and videos of technological advances, each floor representing a different perior in history.


academic work

: architecture


: architecture academic work

John Stewardson Competition This project was done for the John Stewardson Memorial

Site: Philadelphia, PA Competition, held annually in Philadelphia, PA. Students are 2006 given two weeks in which to create a master plan for a given scope and a small building. This year’s project was based around improving the quality of life on the campus of Bethany Medical Center. We were required to propose solutions to the addtion of new patient housing and facilities, showing how they could be tied into the existing campus. In addition we had to design a recreation center for the patients. My design centered around creating a greener medical campus, adding more walking paths and outdoors spaces for patients to enjoy. The new recreation center fit this mentality, responding to the site’s natural elements through sustainable techniques.


academic work

: architecture

At the Bethany Medical Center patients come to receive treatment and maintain a lifestyle that will improve their mental and physical disabilities, and therefore give them a higher quality of life. The campus that currently exists fails to provide a few very necessary elements, one being any connection to the landscape it is on. Instead of uprooting the existing complex we should instead work with it and improve its already positive qualities. Much like the patients who reside here we are working to better themselves so are we trying to do the same for the campus. An answer improving the health of the campus as well as the patients’ is to connect it more to the environment in which it resides. By integrating nature more into the campus and the patients’ daily routines there can perhaps be a way to not only beautify the campus but make it a much more enjoyable place to live for the patients. In order to aid in the connection of existing buildings a path will be developed that leads to the more open part of the site where expansion of the program is possible, making the future of this establishment and its residents a much brighter one.


: architecture academic work

Design IX: Philadelphia Anthenaeum The focus of this studio was to learn to work with a team to

Site: Philadelphia, PA design an Antheneaum. The program consisted of gallery 2006 spaces, a cafe, library, archives and dorms for scholars. In our design we split the program based on public and private spaces. Public spaces (galleries) were located towards the street. While the private spaces (archives) were located at the back of the site. These two were then seperated by a large atrium, or “transition� space. Each team was also instructed to pick one element of their project which was to be heavily detailed. We focused on detailing the space frame structure and concrete stair in the transition space.


academic work

: architecture


: architecture academic work

Thesis: Houston, A Typographical Response The main purpose of my thesis was to explore solutions

Site: Houston, TX to the issue of sprawl plaguing American cities. The city 2006 of Houston, TX was chosen due to its rapid growth which created outlying suburbs void of a sense of place and community. It was my intention to prove that a possible solution may be found for restoring both place and community by developing an architectural typology that uses aspects of critical regionalism topropose a response to “place� and in turn use these same elements to delegate a revitalization of “community in suburban planning, in essence this architectural typology will serve as a solution to revitalize urban areas and be a prototype for suburban planning in Houston.


academic work

: architecture


Rowan University: Bole Hall Rowan University commissioned my firm, TBS Services, Site: Glassboro, NJ Inc. to redesign the layout of the roof for one of their 2007-2008 campus facilities, Bole Hall. Our firm determined that the scope of the project required new membrane, and extensive flashing on all coping stones and adjacent brick walls.

professional work: architecture

professional work: architecture

My role on the project was to prepare a construction document set, draft a roof plan, as well as research and prepare details of the work needing to be done.


professional work: architecture


254 Liberty Place Dillon and Stern Architects commisioned my firm, Richard

Site: Newburgh, NY McElhiney Architects to work with them on the renovation 2007-2009 of several Victorian homes. The project was proposed as the Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative and was being funded by NCAC.

professional work: architecture

professional work: architecture

This is one of the four houses our firm surveyed and documented for the project. We took the work through the contruction documentation phase, afterwhich it was passed to the city and NCAC for approval and funding.


professional work: architecture


Clemente Ruiz Nazario Federal Courthouse The General Services Administration (GSA) awarded my

professional work: architecture

professional work: architecture

Site: San Juan, Puerto Rico firm, Richard McElhiney Architects, with the Green Building 2009-2010 Modernization of the Federico Degetau Federal Office Building and Clemente Ruiz Nazario Federal Courthouse. We teamed with Dattner Architects, who handled the design of the Federal Buidling, and Goshow Architects, who were the prime firm and oversaw the process. Our firm specialized in Courthouses and so our scope focused on the 100,000 sq ft courthouse building. Its renovation included an entirely new HVAC system and new ceilings. My responsibility was to prepare the Reflected Ceiling Plans, Construction Plans, Sections, and diagrams. The renderings seen below were done by an outside firm.


professional work: architecture


The Geographical Significance of Superfund This Advanced GIS project used spatial analysis to

Sites: United States, Florida, North Carolina map superfund sites in the U.S to address the following 2012 questions:

academic work

: planning

Is there clustering of superfund sites in the U.S.? If so, does a site’s location within this cluster have an influence over whether it is remediated? More particularly what implications will an area’s political or economic policies have on whether some sites get redeveloped over others? By geocoding the site data from the EPA’s National Priority List, I created maps showing the count of sites by state and kernel density maps to analyze clustering of remediated sites. I focused on two states, on either side of the spectrum; Florida, which has a large number of remediated sites and North Carolina, which has only one. I concluded that while location does matterin a site’s remediation, policy, funding and politics play a larger role.


DELETED(REMEDIATED) NPL SITES

Nevada: 1 Site

Count by State

FINAL(CONTAMINATED) NPL SITES

Count by State

New Jersey: 29 Sites

New Jersey: 112 Sites

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Cluster Analysis on Zipcode Level

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DELETED(REMEDIATED) NPL SITES IN NORTH CAROLINA Count by Zipcode

Warren County

Population: 20,972 Density per sq. mi: 48.9 Number of Deleted Sites: 1

Population: 2,496,435 Density per sq. mi: 1,315.5 Number of Deleted Sites: 4

academic work

Miami Metro-Region

: planning

Hotspot Analysis Fixed Distance of 5 miles


Cell City: The Market Calls By vizualizing a dataset of cell phone calls over a week

academic work

: planning

Site: Mexico City, Mexico long period, we studied the activity in Mexico City. The 2012 dataset came from Telefonica, the third largest phone company in Mexico. This project focused on life in and around the Mercado de Abastos, in Iztapalapa, Mexico City. We picked this site after months of research, started by analyzing the activity of all the BTS towers in Mexico City over a week long period and then used kernel density heat maps to study the 24 hour cycle of activity in the Mercado. To visualize this activity we created a webpage through which producers, suppliers, retailers and consumers can learn more about the market. The webpage provided a platform where to view a video illustrating our process and the market’s activity on three different scales; neighborhood, city and country. Further exploration is possible through the websites additional pages. Each scale of analysis provides an additional video, showing a snapshot of the activity at that level. At the regional level, we show viewers where regional producers may be located.


academic work

: planning


Re-Envisioning Welheimer Mark The Welheimer Mark studio explored three issues in

academic work

: planning

Site: Welheimer Mark, Ruhr Region, Germany contemporary planning: how regional visions translate 2012 to local initiatives (planning across scales); the role of landscape infrastructure in urban development (transdisciplinary perspectives on planning); and adaptive landuse planning concepts (planning for change). Our site, Welheimer Mark, was situated along the Emscher River in the heart of the Ruhr Region, between the cities of Bottrop and Essen. Our exploration led us to Germany where we met with our client, various stakeholders and experienced our site first hand. Our studio presented three scenarios to our client, Emschergenossenshaft, which were all different interpretations of a neighborhood. As a result, in the final scheme these scenarios were distilled into five goals: re-envision Welheimer Mark, reclaim the river, secure jobs, community growth, and ensure community cohesion.


academic work

: planning


2033 Comprehensive Plan As part of this landuse planning studio groups were

academic work

: planning

Site: Banshee, Washington assigned to design and complete a comprehensive plan 2013 for a typical city in the United States. Using the Hypo-City Handbook and Urban Land Use Planning textbook we were required to create a 30 year master plan. As part of the project, we had to develop a location, background and town history. Using existing statistics and data about the Hypo-City, we were also required to do mapping analaysis of existing infrastructure, land use and environmental conditions. In addition to this analysis these plans also included producing an area plan and a suitability analysis to determine the best areas to direct growth. This large scale analaysis was then followed by a City wide land use plan, small area plan and a development management plan, all which contributed to developing policies for managing proper economic, environmental and equitable growth.


BANSHEE 2033

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Jawaher Al-Sudairy Cassandra Ballew Orrin Evans Jinny Khanduja Chi Zhang

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COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR BANSHEE, WASHINGTON

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STATE OF BANSHEE’S COMMUNITy: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

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MAP 6 SLOPES || BANSHEE TOWNSHIP, 2013

SlOPES

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The landscape of the area is composed of a variety of slopes and elevations, providing approximately 22,933 sq. acres of land with a slope of 0%-5%, 25,229 sq. acres at a slope of 6%-15%, and approximately 13,88 sq. acres of land classified with a slope of 15% or greater. This variation in slopes plays a role in the formation of the natural water resources of the township.

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The slopes within the city reflect those within the township. There are several areas with slopes of 15% or greater. However, 7,550 acres, almost 96% of the City’s land contains slopes of less than 15%, allowing for a variety of development and agricultural uses.

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Support Banshee’s vibrant and successful local economy and encourage its growth and diversification. Specific attention should be given to retaining and promoting locally important industries, lowering unemployment, and achieving a mix of industries that allows for the stability of Banshee’s long term economic growth.

Promote the conservation and preservation of open space in and around Banshee to ensure the projection of natural water resources, wildlife habitats, and local land of particular environmental value. Particular attention will be given to certain environmental assets like the Boulder River Forest, Bannon and Banshee lakes, and the Banshee highlands which surround the City.

Banshee will support the development and construction of safe, sanitary and decent housing for all residents, as well as promote greater densities in residential units in order to reduce development and costs for housing. The city will also ensure the preservation of historic landmarks though legal frameworks and limitations on development.

Increase capacity of public services in the education, healthcare, and utility sectors in order to accommodate future population growth. And improve regional transportation planning and connectivity as well as diversify local transportation options.

Banshee will issue official planning and zoning ordinances to ensure that urban development is consistent with the city’s goals and objectives for land use and community development, and accommodate future regional population, economic and physical growth.

ECONOMIC GROWTH & DIVERSIFICATION

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The following goals set the framework for Banshee’s comprehensive plan.The intiatives and objectives of each goal will be discussed on the following pages.

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ENVIRONMENTAl HOuSING & lIVABIlITy CONDITIONS & RESOuRCES

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COMPREHENSIVE CITy DEVElOPMENT POlICIES

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academic work

: planning

Thesis: Superfund Remediation This Thesis attempted to investigate the differences of

Site: United States, Texas, New York remediation policies and techniques across the United 2012-2013 States in order to understand what conditions facilitate the efficiency of remediation and reuse in a location. This study design had three parts: first, a comparative analysis of the proportion of Superfund sites by state; second, a comparative analysis of the proportion of sites by county within two selected states; and third, a case study analysis of selected sites from selected counties. Research involved secondary data analysis using the Superfund site database, CERCLIS, and population data from the 2010 US Census, resulting in the selection of New York and Texas, and their respective counties, for further analysis. In addition, site visits and documentation were done in New York and Texas. EPA officials, project managers and community leaders were interviewed in order to gain perspective on how remediation is undertaken and how reuse plays a part in the process. Recommendations are made to the EPA, as well as state and local governments, on how to craft better policies and programs in order to improve a site’s chances of being reused.


FINAL & NON-NPL (CONTAMINATED) SITES

DELETED(REMEDIATED) NPL SITES

Kernel Density on Zipcode Level

BRIO REFINING SUPERFUND SITE

Friendswood, Harris County

TEX-TIN SUPERFUND SITE

Texas City,Galveston County

Kernel Density on Zipcode Level

LIBERTY INDUSTRIAL SUPERFUND SITE NORTH SEA MUNCIPAL LANDFILL SUPERFUND SITE

Town of Oyster Bay, Nassau County

Town of Oyster Bay, Nassau County

academic work

Celebrating 10 Years of Returning Superfund Sites to Beneficial Use

: planning

REGION 6 Success Story

Tex Tin Corporation: Texas City, Texas

TEXAS

Pictured: Aerial view of the Tex Tin site prior to remediation. (Source: EPA)

To facilitate6redevelopment the Tex Tin Superfund Sites site, EPA, Texas Counties atwith Remediated City officials, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), and site developers collaborated to put to use several tools offered by EPA. First, EPA’s Superfund Redevelopment Initiative awarded the site a 2001 Pilot Grant, which the City used to gather community perspectives on remediation alternatives and reuse options and fund a reuse assessment plan for the site. In 2003, EPA, TCEQ, and Texas City co-signed the nation’s first Ready for Reuse (RfR) determination for the site’s first operable unit. The RfR determination, which was followed by a second RfR that same year for the second operable unit, stated that the land was protective for commercial uses as long as specific conditions were met. Located on the banks of Galveston Bay, the 170-acre site housed copper and tin smelting facilities from the outset of World War II until

Pictured: Perspective of future redevelopment at the Tex Tin site. (Source: Texas City Phoenix International Terminal Web site)

“The prevalent attitude has been one of cooperation and support, at local, state and national levels. Officials of the City of Texas City, the Texas Commission for Environmental Quality, EPA, and private companies all worked diligently together to get the Tex Tin cleanup safely done. The result now is that, unlike numerous fencedin environmental Superfund sites, we have a property that can once again contribute to the economy of the area, providing jobs and adding tax revenues to local government.” - John Bredthauer, Tex Tin

NEW YORK

16 Counties with Remediated Sites


East Midtown: A Bold Vision for the Future The purpose of this paper was to respond to the New

Site: East Midtown, New York City, NY York City Planning Departments rezoning plan for East 2012-2013 Midtown Manhattan. This response was in the form of a new plan which included four key points: •Create walkable, well-designed streets, open spaces, and below grade passageways — spaces that provide settings or the chance and planned encounters of urban life. •Provide seamless connections throughout the neighborhood, to the region and the world. Essential infrastructure must be in place before new buildings are built. •Strengthen the energy and diversity of New York City — by embracing and encouraging a mix of uses, active retail, and a diversity of businesses.

professional work: planning

•Celebrate and protect buildings that link to the city’s storied past while encouraging those that signal its continued evolution.


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125 Park Avenue (Pershing Passageway), SoconyMobil Building (Mobil Passageway), and the Graybar Building (Graybar Passageway). Certain entrances stand out as a distinguishing feature of the building, such as seen in the Bowery Savings Bank Building. But others do not fully realize the potential to enhance the pedestrian experience. With carefully executed restorations (and possibly more ambitious interventions) existing buildings can enhance and re-establish their connections with the underground network and once again serve a greater public purpose. The Department of City Planning working closely with the MTA and the property owners should explore how these connections can be opened up to facilitate access to this incredible circulation network.

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IN T E RVE N T IO N S :

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STREETSCAPES: MAJOR

RECOMMENDATIONS

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STREETSCAPES: MINOR

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ambitious opportunities for new open space. There is significant potential in an expansion of Pershing Square to the south as well as a re-imagined Park Avenue. A new open space on Vanderbilt is an idea that also offers promise but new buildings along Vanderbilt must be designed so as not to overwhelm the open space.

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meaningful sources of funding to make critical improvements to the public realm. The City’s proposed District Improvement Fund mechanism is insufficient. Public space improvements need to be made before any new density is added.

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significant historic buildings that contribute to the architectural context of the neighborhood.

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In developing a new vision for the public realm around Grand Central and East Midtown there is an opportunity to create a significantly improved network of public spaces.

250 Park Avenue (former Postum Building); Cross & Cross, 1923-1924

661 Lexington Avenue (former Babies Hospital); York & Sawyer, 1901-1902

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Hotel Intercontinental Barclay; 111 East 48th Street; Cross & Cross, 1925-1926

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The Yale Club; 50 Vanderbilt Avenue; James Gamble Rogers, 1913-1915

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Graybar Building; 420 Lexington Avenue; Sloan & Robertson, 1925-1927

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New York Health & Racquet Club (former Grand Rapids Furniture Company Building); 18-20 East 50th Street; Rouse & Goldstone and Joseph L. Steinman, 1915

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Lexington Hotel; 509 Lexington Avenue; Schultze & Weaver, 1928-1929

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One Grand Central Place (former Lincoln Building); 56 East 42nd Street; J.E.R. Carpenter and Dwight P. Robinson, 1928-1929

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These avenues are some of the most crowded in New York City and given the pedestrian volumes on these streets the sidewalks should be expanded by removing portions of a moving lane or curbside loading lane. In cases where sites are at particularly important intersections or streets such as the SL Green site on 42nd street and Madison Avenues, building setbacks to widen the sidewalks should be required. These setbacks should also serve to open up visual corridors helping orient pedestrians to Grand Central and the Chrysler building.

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Vanderbilt Concourse Building; 52 Vanderbilt Avenue; Warren & Wetmore, 1914-1916

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4 East 43rd Street (former Mehlin Piano Company Building); Andrew J. Thomas, 1916

Center for Fiction (former Mercantile Library); 17 East 47th Street; Henry Otis Chapman, 1932

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445 Park Avenue (former Universal Pictures Building); Kahn & Jacobs, 1946-1947

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JP Morgan Chase Tower (former Union Carbide Building); 270 Park Avenue; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1956-1960

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450 Park Avenue (former Franklin National Bank Building); Emery Roth & Sons, 1968-1972

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Swedish Seamen’s Church (former New York Bible Society); 5 East 48th Street; Wilfred Edward Anthony, 1921

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Pershing Square Building, 125 Park Avenue (100 East 42nd Street); John Sloan of York & Sawyer, 1921-1923

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Marriott East Side (former Shelton Hotel); 525 Lexington Avenue; Arthur Loomis Harmon, 1922-1923

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A RE-INVIGORATED PUBLIC REALM

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A RE-INVIGORATED PUBLIC REALM

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rendering of widened sidewalks along Lexington Avenue

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K. Foster + Partners

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A VIBRANT MIX

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The following buildings have been submitted to the Landmarks Preservation Commission for further evaluation:

E 58 ST

M A D I S O N, L E X I N G T O N, A N D 3 R D AV E N U E S

PA R K AV

EAST MIDTOWN . .

PRESERVE

53rd Street

L E X I N G T O N AV

all new development that sits on top of transit, to provide connections to the area’s underground infrastructure. Critically this will include large and gracious passageways linking the sidewalk to the subways and rail transit.

existing open spaces, in particular the approximately 70 privately owned public spaces within the boundaries of the proposed rezoning. For too long these spaces have been afterthoughts; the City needs to work hand in hand with building owners to improve them.

PA R K AV

MANDATE

IMPROVE

M A D I S O N AV

an improved network of open spaces. Rather than create site-specific improvements as new buildings are built, Midtown needs a plan for improving the entire network, in particular congested sidewalks.

F I F T H AV

CREATE

LANDMARK OUTSTANDING BUILDINGS A holistic vision for the future of East Midtown supports a vibrant mix of businesses, people, and of course, the building themselves — over a century’s worth of architecture. Today, of the 587 buildings located in the East Midtown study area, only 6% — 32 buildings — are designated landmarks. MAS identified additional sites of historic and architectural merit not currently protected by New York City landmark status, as determined by site visits, research, and collaboration with experts on the MAS Preservation Committee. MAS proposes 17 buildings for landmark designation. These 17 buildings represent the development periods that define East Midtown, from pre-Grand Central to Terminal City to the post-war Modern Movement. They best convey historic, architectural and cultural significance, and represent a mix of materials, styles and uses that contribute to East Midtown’s visual diversity and sense of place.


Madison Square Garden/Penn Station While part of this campaign at the Municipal Art Society

Site: New York City, NY (MAS), I co-authored and co-designed our policy report, 2013 It’s About Time: Why this is the Right Time to Build a New Penn Station & the Next Madison Square Garden, as well as collaborated with consultants, design groups, and outreach for funding and support. The Alliance for a New Penn Station, a group composed of both MAS and the Regional Plan Association, was formed to respond to expiration of Madison Square Garden’s 50 year special permit as an opportunity to build a new Pennsylvania Station.

professional work: planning

Through this campaign and report, we recommended granting the Garden a permit for a period of 10 years, rather than a permanent extension. This would give the metropolitan region the opportunity to consider the best options for both Penn Station and Madison Square Garden, including potential alternative locations for the arena within Manhattan. New York deserves a new, world-class train station and a new world-­class arena.


super i. At Capacity and Growing

NJT

IT’S ABOUT TIME WHY THIS IS THE RIGHT TIME TO BUILD A NEW PENN STATION & THE NEXT MADISON SQUARE GARDEN

commutes Up 18%

Up 21%

Penn Station is the busiest transit hub in the western hemisphere and is currently operating 2004-2009 2002-2009 over capacity. Its 1960s design—created by architect Charles Luckman—was devised at super a time when both train travel and New York commutes were thought to be in terminal decline and Up 18% Up 21% planners did not anticipate the2002-2009 revival of public 2004-2009 2002-2009 Hudson County, NJ and the economic rebirth of #transportation OF COMMUTERS TRAVELING THOURGH PENN STATION New York City. Today, a station designed for in approximately 200,000 moves more than half extreme commutes a million people a day, more than that of JFK, 2002-2009 2 Further, LGA and Newark #airports combined. OF COMMUTERS TRAVELING THOURGH PENN STATION more than 1,100 columns were dropped to the 2004-2009 2002-2009 station’s narrow platforms to support Madison Square Garden and 2 Penn Plaza tower. This out has compounded the problem of loading and Commutes from to Manhattan areto onManhattan the rise and super ofNew Jersey commutes unloading trains and moving passengers— commutes, those that are 90 minutes or longer, are also on the rise out were on many with wheeled luggage—up and down especially for Hudson County. of commutes to Manhattan the station’s narrow and inadequate stairways, were on PENN STATION # OF COMMUTERS TRAVELING THOURGH escalators and concourses. commuters travel by LIRR and by NJ Transit, the second- and third-biggest commuter rail When redesigned in the 1960s, Penn Station was operators in the U.S. behind Metro-North. meant primarily to serve intercity rail. Today, Flanking the station are the New York subway 10,000/daily SOURCE: Port Authorityservice, system’s fifth (1,2, 3) and sixth (A, C, E), most in addition to an expanded intercity Port Authority it serves primarily 10,000/daily as a regionalSOURCE: commuter heavily used stations, with the third ranked 2004-2009 2002-2009 terminal.3 The station is home to Amtrak, New Herald Square only a block to the east.4 Jersey Transit, Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) , New Jersey Transit (NJT), and the 1, 2, 3 and …and Growing millionThe sq ftlargest = aboutnumber 19 EmpireofState Buildings A, C, E subway44 lines. SOURCE: NYC Department of City Planning SOURCE: NYC Department of City Planning In the last decade, the Projected growth 2002-2009 number of average

Hudson County, NJ

Up 105% in extreme commutes

NJT

Up 21%

3

NEWARK J FK L GA

34

NEWARK L GA

=

NJT Up=21%

super commutes J FK Up 18%

NEWARK

THE HUDSON REDEVELOPMENT THEYARDS HUDSON YARDS REDEVELOPMENT 44 million sq ft = about 19 Empire State Buildings

L GA

# OF COMMUTERS TRAVELING THOURGH PENN STATION

J FK office

office residential residential N E W A R K

4

Hudson County, NJ

Up 105% in extreme commutes

public transit

2002-2009

public transit

3 out

Hudson County, NJ

Up 105% in extreme commutes Projected on growth

of

4 commutes to Manhattan were on

public transit

NEC

weekday Penn Station riders on NJ Transit, LIRR and Amtrak has million (2009) grown by 26% and to SOURCE: Port Authority subway ridership million (2030) (1, 2, 3 and A, C, E) has swelled by out 34%.5 NJT, LIRR Source: The NEC Master Plan and Amtrakof are Working Group, The Northeast currently operating were Corridor on Infrastructure Master Plan, May 2010, ppof ES-5. at capacity, yetNYC SOURCE: Department City Planning ridership for each service is projected to increase. NJ Transit ridership alone is expected to rise 28% by 2030.6

= 10,000/daily

3

13

23

4 commutes to Manhattan THE HUDSON YARDS REDEVELOPMENT

L GA

BY THE ALLIANCE FOR A NEW PENN STATION:

Up 105% super commutes Up 18%

NJT

J FK

public transit 44 million sq ft = about 19 Empire State Buildings

= 10,000/daily

SOURCE: Port Authority

Projected growth

These projections from the Regional Plan Association were underscored by a 2012 Rudin

office residential THE HUDSON YARDS REDEVELOPMENT

ALLIANCE FOR A NEW PENN STATION 5

44 million sq ft = about 19 Empire State Buildings SOURCE: NYC Department of City Planning

Projected growth

office residential

professional work: planning


Cassandra Ballew || 511 W 232 Street || Bronx, NY 10463 || 215.779.2231 ||  ballew2@gmail.com

Cassandra Ballew: Portfolio  

Architectural/Planning/Urban Design Work

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