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Would you call yourself a “contest skater”? Competition isn't really that fun for me, but it's something I need to do. Competition makes you better as a skater. It shapes you and makes you push yourself to gain a different set of skills. You kinda need that. And you get to see how other skaters do their lines. But it the end it doesn’t matter if you win or lose, as long you do it with passion.

internet and other media related to skateboarding didn't exist yet in Indonesia, so most of us just entered every contest we could to try and get noticed. When I was first learning in '98, it was hard to get our hands on skate videos and it was kinda hard to improve because you had to figure out new tricks and how to do them on your own. Now there are new rad clips popping up on YouTube every day. You can progress a lot with all this new media around because it gives inspiration and instruction.

What's your first memory of skateboarding? It was in Jakarta, at the Pulomas horse race track near where I grew up. I was out there with my brother Anggi in the parking lot when my neighbor David brought his board and let us try it out. It was 1998 and I was into rollerblading and I thought I should try skateboarding; it looked more fun. I'm glad I did. Why did you move to Bali? I moved to Bali in 2004. At that time Bali had a better skate scene compared to Jakarta. Most skate spots and skateparks in Jakarta had closed down and Bali had more skateboarders and places to skate. Also, my main sponsor's headquarters are here in Bali, so it's better for me to be close to the people who support me. What was the skate scene in Indonesia like when you were starting out?

Yeah, these days you can spend hours on the internet just watching the guys skating spots here in Asia. How has more people filming skate around here helped pro skateboarding in Indo and Southeast Asia? It’s so much better to film your stuff to show everyone the level of your skating. Of course, for pro skateboarders like me, it's important to show my sponsors that I still skate hard. But it's also, like, skateboarding is my life, and it's so much cooler now to be able to get your art – your skating – out there for people to enjoy, you know. Sharing is caring. Don’t keep your skateboarding to yourself. Get it out there. How would you describe your skate style? I’m more like a stairs and transitions guy, but I’ve been trying to skate more rails these days. What’s more important, style or technique?

Back in the mid '90s to the early 2000s, the skateboarding scene in Indonesia was more competition oriented. The

I think both are equally important.


Bali Belly Issue 003