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The

E FRE

Magazine of CV Baru di Bali

www.newinbali.com | Issue No.33 | January 2011

In Focus

Fishermen of Jimbaran Believe it or not

The Sacred Gate Feature Story

Road Trip to Tabanan Check out our Gili Section! Island Information

Reviews

Restaurants

Stories

Shopping

and more‌


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THE MAG No.33

SHORTCUTS

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Team's Note

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Bali Flash (The Latest Happenings in Paradise)

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Typical Bali (Alang-alang)

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A View from the Curbside

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Explore Bali (Mangrove Forest)

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Up Close (Made Switra)

30 34 36 42 44

Feature Story (Road Trip to Tabanan)

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Selamat Makan (The Junction)

48 54 56 76

Bali Barrels

Believe It or Not (The Sacred Gate)

In Focus (Fishermen of Jimbaran)

Getaway (Tenganan Village) The Ten (Balinese Hindu Ceremonies) Highlights (Om Shanti Shanti Shanti) Heart of Bali (Stay Healthy)

Bali Maps & Information Bali Directory The Gilis Section (Diving in the Gilis)


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REG NO. 841/22-08/PK/XII/2009

THE MAG is brought to you by Baru di Bali Visit us online www.newinbali.com Visit our office Jalan Laksmana No. 9-A, Seminyak - Bali Business hours Monday to Friday, 09.00 – 17.00 Call us by phone: +62 (0) 361 737 913 Advertising Sales: media@barudibali.com Employment Opportunities: jobs@barudibali.com Management Consulting by PT Baru d iBali THE MAG is Published by CV Baru di Bali Directors Charlott, Peter Editor Fred Photographer Tudik Webmaster Budi Magazine and The Bali Bag Distribution Sapta

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Happy New Year! Welcome to 2011 and another year in beautiful Bali. Whether you are here for a short break or lucky enough to be a resident here, there are so many enjoyable places to visit and so much to learn about the culture, nature and people of Bali. We at The Mag will of course continue to entertain you with our special blend of stories and information,

as we have done since our inception. To us, Bali is an endless source of experiences; from the busy bars in Kuta to the quiet beaches on the north coast. You can take your camera on a walk through the rice paddies in Ubud or learn to scuba dive at the famous Liberty Wreck in Tulamben. Whatever you desire, Bali has the answer. To find out more about the things you can do in Bali, visit our Explore Bali tour stand in Jalan Oberoi opposite restaurant Mykonos and the Bali Clinic. Or go to www.explore-bali.com. In this issue of The Mag, we get around Bali a lot. Our feature story takes us on a road trip to Tabanan where we have a look at Echo Beach, a popular spot with its great surf and its beachside restaurants, and we visit some villages away from the main road. We also visit the hard-working fishermen in Jimbaran as well as Tenganan Village in Gyanyar. So many places to see, so many things to do! Please enjoy our voyage through the sights and sounds of Bali—some you will know, some you will have never experienced before. And enjoy Bali!


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BALI FLASH

Leading Light Bali’s capital city has come out top of the league—the least corrupt of 10 cities surveyed by Transparency International Indonesia (TII). Denpasar scored 6.71 points on TII’s Corruption Perception Index released following a survey of businesses in the 10 cities between April and October. Denpasar mayor IB Rai Dharmawijaya Mantra said this week acknowledgement of the city’s low corruption was a stimulus

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to officials to work even harder. “To stay the winner is much tougher than to win the competition,” he said. Last year Denpasar received the highest points (7.48) in a survey of public service integrity by the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK). The new Corruption Perception Index was compiled from surveys of businesses. Worst performing city in the survey was Lhoksemauwe, in Aceh. (BALI DISCOVERY)


Tommy Suharto’s Bali Resort Adds On a Waterpark The 400-hectare Pecatu Indah Resort being developed in Bali’s Badung district welcomed its latest addition on Monday: a waterpark with its own supply of desalinated seawater. The three-hectare attraction, called the New Kuta Green Park, is one of several projects that will eventually make up part of the resort, which is owned by Hutomo “Tommy” Mandala Putra, the youngest son of former president Suharto. Made Putrawan, president director of Bali Pecatu Graha, the developer in charge of the resort, said on Monday that the desalination plant for the newly opened waterpark would also serve other facilities in the resort area. He said these included the New Kuta Condotel, a 278-room hotel, as well as the New Kuta Golf Course, site of the 2009 Indonesian Open, and the Kelapa nightclub. “The desalination plant can produce up to 3,000 cubic meters of fresh water every day,” Putrawan said Hamdani Pane, another BPG executive, said the desalination plant, located 300 meters from the water’s edge, worked by filtering the seawater twice. He said the result was water that was technically clean enough to drink, with all of the solid particles and 99 percent of the salt removed. He added the waste produced from the plant was carted away to a special treatment facility. Badung district head Anak Agung Gde Agung, who officiated at the waterpark’s opening, praised the developers for building the desalination plant, which he said would prove invaluable in the midst of the current groundwater shortage across the district. He added that the New Kuta Green Park would become a key alternative destination for domestic visitors, who he said were being crowded out of Kuta and other resort areas by rising prices targeted at foreign tourists. “Not everything should be valued in dollars,” Agung said. “It’s time we started building tourism attractions that domestic tourists can afford to visit.” Entry to the waterpark is Rp 35,000 ($3.90) for Indonesians and Rp 100,000 for foreigners. Other attractions at the Pecatu Indah Resort include four more hotels as well as a clutch of luxury holiday villas. Putrawan said the investors included local outfits as well as those from South Korea and the Middle East. “Tommy wants this resort to replace Kuta as the go-to place in Bali,” he said.(JAKARTA GLOBE) WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/WELL-BEING-SPA


T Y P IC A L B A L I

Alang-alang

Although the use of alang alang as a traditional roofing system has been applied for hundreds of years in several areas of Indonesia, the neatest and strongest form is found in Bali. The blades of alang alang thatching are constructed from Imperata cylindrica (known as elephant grass) that grows best in harsh conditions and poor ground with some of the strongest examples found at the edge of beaches and cliff tops. Balinese roofs are commonly, though not always, made with bamboo rafters—the alternative is timber which is more expensive. The rafters for alang alang roofs have additional short rafters, set at a lower pitch, overlapping the bottom end of the main rafter. Both the main rafter and this additional rafter are finished with bamboo. The alang alang roof is good insulation against heat and is very attractive to look at, both inside and out. It is durable, with reports of it lasting to twenty years, although by this time it would be very thin and unattractive. More commonly it has a life span of seven or eight years. The only negative comment made about alang alang roofs in Bali is the amount of dust from the small insects that have their life cycle in the bamboo rafters and the battens that form the spines of each individual piece of alang alang. There is very little dust, however, from the inner surface of the alang alang as it is not attacked by insects and is hardly decomposing.

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BELIEVE IT OR NOT

The Sacred Gate Thanks to today’s advancement in technology, people are having the freedom to explore the imaginative world and becoming more adaptable to new, wacko ideas—in fact people love them. Let’s take as an example some of the ideas behind many science fiction movies: war that takes place in between the stars, things that can transform into many different shapes and functions, time machines and even teleporting. Excuse us please, for the latter might not be that technologically advanced or 21st century-ish afterall. Well, at least not here in Bali because this island has a gate that can transport you to a different world, and the gate has been there for centuries! The gate is located in Puri Agung in Kerta Gosa, Klungkung. The local belief says that when the gate is opened from within the Puri Agung yard, whoever opens it will be facing a wide, endless, dark ocean. The fact that all you can see on the other side of the gate is a residential area causes the gate to be considered sacred; thus, the gate has now turned into a place where the Balinese Hindus lay their offerings and worship their Gods. This gate may look like all the other traditional Balinese wooden gates, the ones with all the detailed engraving. However, testimonials from the neighborhood—some several generations old— make for strong beliefs about the magic this gate can do. It has been years now since the last time the gate was opened; and the person who opened it was a thief trying to escape after burgling one of the houses in the area. Unsuccessful in his escape, the thief was found in the morning lying on the steps in front of the gate. Residents in the area found him in trance-like condition, saying: “ocean… ocean… dark… dark…” After this last incident, no one has the courage to open the gate. Honestly, we don’t recommend you trying it either.

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A VIEW FROM THE CURBSIDE

Bali Villa Guests—You Get All Kinds

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fter talking to other expats here in Bali, I realise how lucky I have been with my villa guest experiences to date. Not so for some other Bali expats though. Hearing some of the horror stories about guests who have ‘crossed the line’ have caused my eyebrows to climb well up into my receding hairline and a shiver of apprehension to course through both my belly and my wallet. Despite being really lucky so far, their stories make me question the wisdom of future sharing. “Where’s the shampoo? There’s no shampoo!” complains a guest, irritated at having to march out of her quarters while wrapped only in a towel. Her compressed 20

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by Vyt

lips betray her annoyance at the lack of consumables in her bathroom. “Umm … didn’t you bring any?” asks the perplexed host. “Well of course not!” is the terse retort. “This is supposed to be a luxury villa, isn’t it? You’d expect that a place like this would provide some basic bathroom stuff. You should talk to your landlord, you know.” The irascible guest, staying for free, seems to be under the impression that she is in a hotel. The host, a paragon of patience (which far exceeds mine), explains that this is her home, and like all expats, she buys her own bathroom goodies, or brings in the locally unobtainable highquality potions from overseas.

Instead of apologising, the guest from hell promptly demands to ‘borrow’ the host’s personal shampoo, her conditioner, a different towel and some toothpaste. She then complains about the soap provided which apparently is no good for her ‘sensitive skin’. During her subsequent three day stay, she not only avoids returning the expensive bathroom supplies, she ‘accidentally’ packs them in her bags on her departure. I suggest to my villa-dwelling friend that she lay in a stock of Drain Cleaner in shampoo bottles, conditioner seasoned with sump oil and some soap embedded with glass slivers specifically for obnoxious guests. The expat demurs, feeling that my proposal is a little extreme, but does hint that this guest won’t be invited back. What is it with some of these people? Are they just ignorant, or stupid, or just incredibly selfish? Remember that these stories are from private homes, not commercial villas. We expats are happy to absorb the cost of being hospitable to friends and acquaintances because it is part of normal social interaction. In my case, I have been fortunate, because my guests have been delightful company as well as good friends. But to the users and losers out there, how about you stay at a hotel—I suspect we will all enjoy the experience much more. BORBORIGMUS.WORDPRESS.COM


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IN FOCUS

Fishermen of Jimbaran

A

lthough Jimbaran has now turned into the home of a number of the finest luxury hotels in the world, its original color as a fisherman’s village still remains especially with the hectic activities of fishermen along the beach. Unlike many other coastal areas in the island that have totally turned from fishing villages into tourist spots crowded with umbrellas, hawkers and surf boards, Jimbaran exploits its natural potential as a fisherman’s village with the establishment of ranks of seafood restaurants serving the freshest fish and crustaceans. Thanks to the fishermen in Jimbaran, the place is now known to be the heaven of the finest seafood (both raw and processed) in Bali. In doing their activities, the Balinese fishermen in the area use the same boat, which is a narrow outrigger—home made, easy to launch, easy to fix, cheap to make and very stable. These small boats don’t sail too far from shore and the proximity to resort hotels provides a 22

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handy market. The fresh catch is delivered straight to the fish market (Kedonganan Market), which is also located on the beach, later to be bought not only by residents from Jimbaran and thereabouts (including Denpasar) but also a lot of the island’s finest restaurants. The beautiful white-sandy beach on the northern edge of Jimbaran is full with the colorful traditional boats, the fishermen and their nets as they moor after fishing in the morning and afternoon. Only one or two fishermen usually go to the sea, while many men will be on standby to help the fishermen drag the boat onto the sand. The women will help place the fish in the washbasin before taking them to the market. At night, both tourists and residents often flock to Jimbaran to enjoy the fresh seafood on the beachside restaurants.


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EXPLORE BALI

Mangrove Forest

I

magine the canopy of leaves overhead is shading the boardwalk, absorbing the sunlight and breathing air, providing shade for comfortable walks. Just inside the bark of these trees, water is being slowly pumped through the trunk to the leaves where sunlight, air, water and some nutrients absorbed from the mud are converted to useful materials for the surrounding ecosystem. A walk along the wooden boardwalk at the Mangrove Forest on Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai provides greenery of mangrove trees. Don’t worry, for there are a number of wooden shelters for everyone to rest including a couple of towers from where the visitors could enjoy the view of these vast swamps—little boards are also provided in these shelters to give the information about the various types of mangrove trees and the other species that live in the forest. It’s a perfect place for those who enjoy bird watching, or just to rest for a while after the walk. Mangrove trees produce enough plant materials to feed the hundreds of types of animals, large and small, which live or just visit the area. Visitors can also watch the various species of birds and mammals, including storks, kingfishers, and monitor lizards. It’s not surprising to see such a variety of marine species here, because

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the mangrove forest serves as a nursery ground, feeding ground, and spawning ground for many types of fish, shrimp and crabs. When the tide goes out, dozens of crabs can be seen scurrying along the ground, popping into holes and emerging again. Strange noises from the swamp sometimes provide an eery setting, making you wonder where or what is the source of the noise. But again, this even makes a more perfect sense to spice up the ‘jungle adventure’ within the swamps area. The functions and benefits of the mangrove forests can no longer be ignored, and it is essential that we preserve them. Unfortunately, the areas’ natural beauty is marred by certain people’s littering. The many problems that the forests face, such as trash and land conversion must be mitigated immediately, by raising public awareness.


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UP CLOSE

How old were you when you started surfing? How old are you now? I started when I was 8 years old. Now I’m 37. Tell us a bit about your surfing history. I come from a family of fisherman. As a child I used to go to Kuta Beach with my mother to pick up the fresh fish that just arrived. I always loved the ocean and when I was 8 years old I started surfing with a very old board that someone left in the village. It was a very big board, we could stand up on it with two people! After that, when I was about 11 years old I met Ketut Menda and started to hang around Bali Barrel (Menda`s Surf Shop). A short while after that I met Made Kasim and Wayan Ganti and they took me to surf other places, like my first time at Padang-Padang when I was 14 or 15 years old.

Made Switra

Surfing Artist: Past, Present and Future of Bali

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O

ne of the best athletes of his time, Switra surfed in many places around the world, including nine Hawaiian seasons. Today Switra is a soul surfer, surfing for himself and only when the waves are good. Coming from a traditional family of fisherman, Switra loves the sea and is always near it, whether through his paintings, fishing or surfing.

Do you still surf? How often? When it`s good I go surfing, but not so often nowadays. Today I surf to enjoy myself, no stress. What are your favorite waves? When was the last time you surfed there? Padang-Padang and Sanur Reef, last time I surfed there was 2 years ago. CONTINUES TO PAGE 28


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UP CLOSE

How was your career as a competitor? I won many contests in Bali, I also got 5th Place in the ISA world amateur championship in Japan, I think it was in 1990. I finished in second place twice at the Quicksilver Grommet comp and 3rd once. I used to compete against guys like Rob Machado and Ross Williams.

What do you do for a living now days? I have a surf shop TRAS (Jl. Tegal Wangi), a restaurant with an art gallery together Laut Kute (Jl.Kubu Anyar) and a boat for surfing or fishing trips. Is fishing a profession or hobby? It`s a hobby but I go fishing almost everyday especially this time of the year, it`s Spanish Mackerel season.

What`s your advice for the new generation of Indonesian surfers? Be yourself. If you really want to be a surfer be one hundred percent into it and push your limits. Tell us about this picture, what do you remember from it? This is my brotherhood(looking the pic nostalgically), this is forever for me, I was so into surfing in those days. Do you still have contact with the guys from the picture? Yes, I feel sorry for Jarut (he is the one with the cap on) passing away. As to the others, sometimes we meet up and when it happens we talk a lot about the old times. We sit together and enjoy ourselves and one day we will be one again. 28

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What do you miss the most about the old times? I miss empty 6-8ft Padang Padang at a medium tide with a SW swell. And 6ft Sanur Reef early in the morning with a big high tide. What do you think about all the development in Bali? I really don`t mind. Whether it`s busy and noisy or empty and quiet, it’s all the same. I just want to be myself. It`s also a cultural shock but it`s ok, growing and developing are a part of life.

When did you start painting? Seriously 5 years ago but I have loved art since I was a child. Before when my wife had a shop in Kuta, I had to go to Ubud very often for work and I don`t know how or why but I always found myself inside the galleries there! Where did you learn your technique? A painter from East Java lived in my house for 2 years, I learnt from watching him painting. Do you have kids? Do they surf? I have two daughters 12 and 13 years old who live in Japan and they don`t surf.


WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/MANNEKEPIS


FEATURE STORY

Road Trip to Tabanan

Tanah Lot 30

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his time we strolled down the road of Petitenget towards Batu Belig on our motorbikes, aiming for the beaches of Tabanan. The journey to the lower plain was pretty smooth—no, we’re not talking about the road condition here—and relaxing, provided that we only topped at 60km/hour under the glaring midday sun. The wind was with us then, sweeping and cooling our skins, helping us to enjoy the surrounding views mostly comprised of villas set amongst the rice fields. Passing Canggu Club, in an area called Banjar Tegal Gundul, the pace of life seemed to slow down. We could only see houses with no people around; of course, with the occasional motorbike and/or car passing by. But then as the road led us to the main stream, which is a bigger lane directing to Kerobokan or otherwise Canggu, all the sudden heat of the sun was striking hard on us. It was probably only autosuggestion due to the many vehicles on the road. Yet, we continued the journey; and this time, we went a little faster at 80km/ hour—or so, at least that was what my speedometer said. We don’t recommend speeding, though. As the sun was rising higher on top of our heads, and a sign board that said “Echo Beach” was put up appearing some twenty meters ahead of us, an image of an bottle of ice-cold beer bottle started to fill my head. then I then pointed to Andri on his motorbike behind me to make a left-turn to the beach. Only within minutes from that main road, there we were, sitting, facing the somewhat raging ocean as its

Cemegi

waves were hitting hard on the concrete wall and landing soft on the front area floor. Certainly, each of us had a bottle of ice-cold beer in our hands. Perfect! Echo Beach itself is largely popular among the expatriate community in Bali; though you can’t swim here, because of the rips. The small strip of the beach-side restaurants, however, is very pleasant if you feel like having a lazy midday accompanied by cold drinks and nice meals away from the bustling areas. Anyway, it was funny how this restaurant that we sat in put catchy lines on a blackboard: “No shoes… No t-shirt… No problem. No happy hour, only happy endings!” We really couldn’t help but laugh hard, reading and re-reading the lines. We got back again on the road after spending around an hour in Echo Beach. Being back on the main road, we made a quick stop and looked at each other while thinking, “We’re on THE MAG ISSUE 33

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FEATURE STORY

On almost in all of the beaches that we visited, we could spot the remnants of ceremonies scattered around the black volcanic sand

black sandy beach

motorbikes! Why on earth should we take the main road?�. And so we took the immediate left-turn and travelled down the smaller roads behind the rice fields in the area. Entering any left-turn in this area will lead you to a black-sandy beach, which from stories heard, has a very strong association with spiritual activities (like ceremonies) in Bali. Anyway, through the narrow, bumpy roads behind the rice fields, we visited several blacksandy beaches that are actually interconnected with each other. However, each of these beaches is given a different name in referral to the name of the village where it sits. On almost in all of the beaches that we visited, we could spot the remnants of ceremonies scattered around on the black volcanic sand. We asked the locals why many rituals had taken place, but no one seemed to give us our required answer.

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Although, we have to say, the beaches are nothing to shout about, joining the villagers sitting in a warung gazing at the waves was fun. The villages in the area also provided different attractions to enjoy. We visited the black-sandy beaches that belong to the villages of Pererenan, Seseh, Cemegi and Nyanyi. These villages are renowned for retaining the traditional Balinese lifestyle; thus, resulting in breathtaking natural, traditional surroundings. It was harvesting season when we were there; and the villagers were all busy yielding the harvest, at around five in the afternoon, and looked like a wavy, golden ocean. Tents were set up along the sides of the road by the rice fields. We were surprised to see this; it was like a refugee camp, but we soon learned that the tents were only up during the harvesting season. Different areas of the rice fields were in different stages and it is interesting to see the ripening crop next to a section of young shoots. Of course, there are several villas that are constructed adjacent to the rice fields and designed to harmonize with its natural and cultural environment. Only a small number of these villas were blessed with stunning ocean views and sunsets. Six o’ clock came around, which meant sunset would be within around an hour. So, we got back to the main road and headed for Tanah Lot—a Hindu temple that seemingly sails the ocean, and probably the most photographed place of interest on the island. Though sunset is really stunning at Tanah Lot, it can be crowded. So, for the early-birds among us, it might be a recommendation to visit this tourist sight in early morning.


WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/LIO-COLLECTION


GETAWAY

Remnants of Bali’s Past enganan is one of the oldest Balinese traditional villages, a heritage that is rich in cultural diversity and traditional practices. As a Bali Aga village, an original Balinese village that still practices a way of life that pre-dates modern civilization, Tenganan owns a very unique life pattern within its local community system. This village retains its ancient pre-Hindu customs through a strong code of non-fraternization with outsiders, which means that the villagers should marry with someone from within their own community. Tenganan is charming with its fascinating authentic traditional festivals such as Mekare-Kare, a ritual which is a duel between two young men armed with two pieces of thorny pandan leaves on the right hand and an armor made of plaited rattan on the left. Not only that, the people of Tenganan are skilled in the unique technique of weaving, known as the ‘double ikat’ cloth, where the belief in the magical power of the fabric is essential in bringing out the beauty of the cloth. Tenganan own huge tracts of fertile and well cultivated lands capable of satisfying the needs of the village. This village, located near Candidasa, is of a long rectangular shape, which is laid out in tiers, with wide stone steps in between. The houses are constructed out of bricks with no outer layer covering them. Visitors are welcome to step into a number of houses there to watch a villager weave the ikat and/ or making the basket. The best thing is there’s no pressure for every visitor to buy their products.

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WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/THE-JUNCTION


THE TEN

The Ten Balinese Hindu Ceremonies

Y

ou might have heard it before, and now we’re reconfirming it: there’s never a day in Bali without a ceremony of any kind. Of course, it is not always obvious for visitors to really notice each of these daily ceremonies. However, during certain times like big holidays or full moons, when all the Balinese Hindus across the island are flocking the temples and make their areas so colorful with many traditional decorations such as bamboo poles, the religious festivities become highly apparent. Another aspect that makes the ceremonies seem somewhat endless is the respect and gratitude for life cycle (birth, puberty and even death) which the Balinese people translate into different forms of ceremonies. Yet, that is not all, for Balinese Hinduism is also influenced by animism traditions, where every living thing has a soul, and ancestor worship. This means, there are also ceremonies addressing specific non-human objects or materials. We’re just going to cut the story short here—below are ten of the many ceremonies in Bali. 36

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Ngaben This is the ceremony for death. This ceremony is carried out to help the deceased’s soul free from worldly ties and carry on to the other world. The philosophy behind Ngaben is to return the five elements making up the microcosm of the human body to their signal residence, the universe. The five elements, known as Panca Maha Bhuta, are the earth (pertivi), water (apah), fire (teja), air (bayu), and ether (akasa). Since the primordial dimension can only be attained through water and fire, the ashes are dispersed in the water of the sea or if the distance is too far, in a river.

1

Galungan Galungan is the day when the Balinese Hindus celebrate the victory of justice and truth (Dharma) over evil (Adharma). This celebration lasts for ten days, and during that period of time it is believed that all the Balinese Gods will visit the Earth. In order to welcome and appease the Gods, ancestral temples are cleaned, specials prayers and offerings are made, and dances are presented. Also, for ten days, the ancestors are feted in the family temples, many temple festivals occur at this time of year and there is great feasting.

2


Saraswati The Balinese Hindus believe that knowledge plays a very important role in achieving the goal of life as human beings. Thus, they celebrate Saraswati, a special day devoted to the Goddess of Learning, Science and Creative Realm, and is the patron saint of libraries and schools. Ceremonies and prayers are held at the temples in family compounds, villages and businesses from morning to noon. Prayers are also held in school temples. Children bring fruit and traditional cakes to school for offerings at the temple.

3

Menek Kelih Menek Kelih means puberty; thus, this ceremony is held when children enter puberty age, which is when a girl gets her period and boy’s voice cracks. They are paraded around the village announcing to all that they are now adults (and in the olden days, ready to marry). This ceremony also acts as a reminder for the teenagers of their next phase in the cycle, to shed the childish attitude and prepare for the challenges of adolescence. At this stage of life, as adolescents, they have to practice what is called with Trikaya Parisudha, which are the grounds for each individual to do nothing but good deeds in order to achieve nirvana. However, not all castes perform this ceremony.

4

Kuningan Kuningan marks the end of Galungan, which is on the tenth day. Kuningan earns its name from special offerings of yellow rice. This is a day when families will gather, pray and lay yellow offerings because it is believed as the time when their ancestors return to heaven. However, most Kuningan celebrations take place in the privacy of the home, in the shrines of the family temple and house compound. The day after Kuningan is a time for a holiday, visiting and having fun.

5

Gedong-gedongan This ceremony is carried out during pregnancy; in the 8th month according to the Gregorian calendar (7th month according to the Balinese Calendar) to ask blessings for an easy delivery process. Aside from that, this ceremony is aimed to appeal to the baby’s salvation to Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa (superior God) and is considered as an important ritual passage. One of the rituals in Gedong-gedongan has the pregnant woman and her husband wade into the river, where eels and small fish are placed face down on her protruding belly to show the baby the right way out.

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THE TEN

Tumpek Kandang Tumpek Kandang is a celebration dedicated to Sang Hyang Rare Angon, the God of All Cattle and Livestock. On this day Balinese show their appreciation and gratitude to all domesticated animals (such as cows, pigs, chickens, ducks and birds) that help them in everyday life. On this day, ceremonies will be held and domesticated animals in Bali receive great attention: the cows are washed in the river and dressed-up like human beings, with special cone-shaped spirals of coconut leaf placed on their horns; the pigs are decorated, with their bellies wrapped with a white or yellow cloth. They will afterwards be fed the best food.

7

Tumpek Landep Tumpek Landep is the day when the Balinese Hindus hold ceremonies dedicated to Sang Hyang Pasupati, the God of Steel Implements especially the weapon that has been invested with magical power. On this day Balinese show their gratitude to the god of all the steel implements that make Balinese life easier and safer. Traditionally, on this day tools and family heirlooms of weaponry, such as sacred swords or known as keris (double-edgeddagger with wavy blade), are sanctified. But as time passes, great change occurs in celebration of this holy day.

8

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Odalan Odalan is a temple ceremony that usually lasts for three days—larger ones that occur every 5, 10, 30 or 100 years can last for 11 days or longer. The idea of this ceremony is to respect the deities that rule over the temple by giving them a myriad of offerings and music and dance performances. During the ceremony, the Balinese Hindus will ‘invite’ them to come down from their dwelling on Mount Agung, the most sacred mountain in Bali, to partake in the activities.

9

Tumpek Pengatag Tumpek Pengatag is a special ceremony devoted to the God of All Food. On this day, ceremonies will be held in every plantation and farm throughout the island to bless all plants to give human beings good crops and products. The Balinese Hindus pay great honor to the plants and trees because they provide the breath of Earth, oxygen, fruits, leaves, food and cool breeze.

10


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HIGHLIGHTS

Om itself is used to address the highest being, the almighty God Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa, to whom all of the hopes are directed to. Although in general the word means peace, Shanti is chanted thrice; it’s not for emphasis, but because disturbances are of three distinct categories. In Sanskrit, these are referred to as adhi-daivikam, adhi-bhautikam and adhyatmikam. Adhi-daivikam literally means “mental disturbances that come from God”—i.e. things that are utterly beyond our control: hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, etc. So the first Shanti means, “O God, may we be protected from these obstacles that are beyond our control.” Adhi-bhautikam means “disturbances that come from the world.” That means anything stemming from the world around us— noisy neighbors, barking dogs, family arguments. As opposed to the first category, we have some control over this second category of disturbances. So this Shanti means, “O God, may we be protected from the people and surroundings.”

Om Shanti Shanti Shanti he Balinese have already owned their belief and culture since thousands of years. The stronghold of their religion and traditions may be the main factor that enables them to preserve their culture from outside influences. Religion is inseparable from everyday life, from the simple daily rituals to big temple festivals. No opportunity is lost to worship God in an unending series of ceremonies that stretches from birth up to after death. Mantras are also chanted endlessly, screaming out hopes and prayers to the sky. Om Shanti Shanti Shanti would likely be the most heard, for the phrase acts as the opening and closing of all prayers. 42

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The third type of disturbance is the most powerful and, at the same time, the only one which we have total control of. Adhyatmikam means “disturbances stemming from the self.” The third Shanti is therefore the most important one, because even if we are free from outside disturbances, if the inner realm is not calm we will never know peace. Conversely, once we have found inner peace, no external force can ever disturb us. So chanting this third Shanti is akin to praying, “O God, please remove all the inner obstacles.” In addition to that, “Shanti, Shanti, Shanti” has recently been made Bali’s new branding tag line. The phrase is considered to speak and best represent the island as a highly spiritual place. Also, the richness of Bali’s belief system and cultural diversities are all icely symbolized within the triangle logo that goes together with the phrase “Shanti, Shanti, Shanti.”


WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/BALI-DELI


How to avoid: 1. Avoid any mosquitoes. 2. Put insect (mosquito) repellent lotion on your skin. 3. Put mosquito coil or spray your room before leaving so when you ‘re back, it’s mosquito-free! 4. Wear long sleeves and long pants, especially between 10am–2 pm and 4 pm–6 pm. ( This is when these guys are extra active). Sounds all a bit scary but don’t worry too much. Dengue infections are rare, especially in tourist areas and your hotel probably smokes out their garden every few days to kill these mosquitoes.

Stay Healthy Great, you have finally arrived in Bali! Got all your plans sorted out? You probably know that there are many things you could do here on your holiday. If you are here for the culture, look no further. If you are looking for a quiet getaway, it’s probably not far from where you are now. So, go and enjoy yourselves, but remember to stay healthy. Here is some information to keep in mind and a few tips on how to keep your health during your holiday:

Bali Belly or Diarrhea Running to the toilet every time can be a bit embarrassing and annoying. And next to that, the stomach cramps can be quite painful. Most diarrhea cases begin abruptly but will resolve in a few days without treatment. Make sure, when you’re suffering from diarrhea, that you drink enough liquids (i.e. water and juices, beers and liquors don’t count guys!) to avoid dehydration. If the symptoms like nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps or fever continue for more than 3 days, seek some treatment.

Dengue Fever Dengue fever is a kind of virus that is transmitted by the bite of an infected mosquito (the black tiger mosquito). During the raining season you have to be extra careful because that is the time these mosquitoes breed. The symptoms of dengue are high fever, severe headache, backache, joint pains, nausea and vomiting, eye pain and rash.

How to avoid: Drink purified water only. Avoid eating or drinking beverages from street vendors or other establishments where unhygienic conditions are present. Avoid eating raw or under cooked meat and seafood. Avoid eating raw fruits and vegetables unless peeling before eating. But don’t let this information stop you trying new types of food during your holiday, but just remember to be careful.

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Severe Sunburn or Heat Stroke It’s great when you go back to your home country and show off your exquisite brown tan. But be careful not to burn too much of that skin of yours or let your body literally get overheated. Now you might have already heard all the warnings about skin cancer and that you should protect your skin with sunscreen. Well, here we are, warning you again; buy sunscreen, wear a hat, limit the tanning session and try to stay out of the sun at least from 11 am till 3 pm. A heat stroke is caused by dehydration or a overheated body. Avoiding a heat stroke is based on the same principles of avoiding a sunburn, plus, keep your body hydrated (again alcohol, tea or coffee don’t count) and be careful with vigorous physical activities in the sun. Symptoms of a heat stroke are: high body temperature, the absence of sweating (with hot red or flushed dry skin), rapid pulse, difficulty breathing, strange behavior, hallucinations, confusion, agitation, disorientation, seizure or even a coma. How to treat a heat stroke victim: In severe cases, get medical assistance immediately. The important thing to achieve is to cool the victim. Get him or her in a shady place, remove the clothes and apply cool or tepid water to the skin. Get some ice

Hotel Safety Whether you are staying in a five-star hotel or a youth hostel, do take care of slippery floors, the pool, stairs, etc. There are many cases of broken bones, severe bruises, cuts, and some need serious treatment for it, such as an operation. Most of these cases happen to the senior tourist, where their bones aren’t as strong as they used to be. So take things easy and don’t rush. Better safe than sorry!

packs and place them under the armpits and groins. Fan the victim to promote efforts until the temperature drops to 101/ 102 ⁰F (38.5 ⁰C) Traffic Safety We are not proud of the traffic conditions in Bali. Most local drivers are use to it, but for first timers in Bali, it can be a total different experience from back home. For them we recommend to take a taxi instead of renting a motorbike. More expensive? Yes. Safer? Absolutely.

Water Safety Be careful when you swim, some beaches have strong currents, sea urchins and sharp corals. Diving and surfing is fun, but it can also be dangerous. Many accidents happen from lack of concentration and underestimating the danger of the sea. Major injuries or even death can happen during these activities. So always be extra cautious when you are having fun surfing, diving or just plain swimming. Make sure to swim with a good swimmer, never swim alone, and only swim in safety zones (between the red/ yellow flags, a one-colored red flag means danger, do not swim there). As for swimming in general (including swimming at your hotel’s pool) make sure you warm up, to avoid any cramps during your swim.

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Groovy Design And Delicious Food in The Heart Of Seminyak

THE JUNCTION

Thai Beef Salad with Mango

Pizza Nutella


SELAMAT MAKAN

Tuna Tataki

he Junction, which recently was refurbished and has reopened in a chic new look, sure stands out in the busy Jalan Oberoi, also known as “Eat Street”. The ceilings and outside walls are made of reclaimed wood, as is the modern, minimalistic furniture. The Japanese designer Nara of “9 Design” has created a funky building style, which provides an airy, bright and modern décor. The restaurant seats 50 people, soon to be more when the upstairs area opens. At the back, the bar and comfortable lounge beckon the thirsty visitor who can enjoy one of many delicious cocktails in this cozy ambience. The walls have inbuilt bookcases which contain not books, but large glass jars with a collection of “everything Bali”. Spices and other food ingredients, sand, ornaments and even writing chalk can be seen in this eclectic collection which makes for a very decorative ambience. It took the staff three months to collect all the items for this display. On the back wall you find the same kind of bookcases, but here filled with stylish soft dolls so visiting children have something to occupy themselves with during the meal. Both menus, lunch and dinner, offer a great cross-section of international cuisine.

Lunch guests can enjoy items such as the popular “Shoarma” Baguette Sandwich, the delicious Prawn Ravioli or the Thai Beef Salad with Mango. We were lucky enough to get to test this signature dish. The salad was beautifully presented and caressed our palates with its subtle blend of red chili flavours and calming sweet mango. The beef was thinly sliced and sautéed to perfection. It is easy to understand why this dish is so popular. It combines the lightness of a salad with the full beef flavour and exquisite seasoning.

From the dinner menu, we tried the Tuna Tataki, a seared, pepper coated tuna served with grilled vegetables and an organic red paprika sauce, available on the dinner menu. The tuna was seared just right, raw on the inside and pleasantly charred on the outside. The grilled squash and bell peppers complemented it perfectly and the sauce tied everything together. All vegetables and salads used at The Junction are organic and local and brought in farm fresh every day. The beef is imported from Australia and the head chef was imported from France. No wonder the cuisine is global! The few select Indonesian dishes on offer have been “Westernized” to suit foreign palates—but you can always ask for “spicy” if you like it hot. The service is attentive and friendly, from the moment you enter till you have enjoyed your meal and are ready to be on your way. In short, The Junction offers a great blend of chic modern style and great international food at very reasonable prices. Opening hours from 11:00 to late every day. The Junction Jl. Laksmana, Seminyak-Bali Phone: 0361 735 610 www.newinbali.com/the-junction

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Bali Barrels

WWW.INDOSURFLIFE.COM

Mustofa Jeksen

Top 10 Indonesian Surfer without Sponsor

MICK CURLEY PHOTOGRAPHY

The question is why is the surf industry dropping their riders? Why they are dropping Top Surfers?

F

or many of us, when we are younger our dream is to become a Pro surfer. To travel around the world chasing perfect waves, meeting different people, partying with friends, and the best part of it is to get paid for that. Yes, those are the good sides of being a professional surfer, but many people forget that there is a darker side. Mustofa was still a kid when he signed his first contract. As a teenager he was already going on trips with world champions to surf heavy 6-8ft waves. At XX he was internationally known for getting deep barrels in pumping 8ft PadangPadang waves. Recipient of awards for charging big waves, collecting various titles and magazine covers Mustofa is a cover-boy of Indonesian surfing. Now-a-days Bali is the place to be for all surfers. It has the worlds’ largest numbers of surf shops in one city, more than Huntington Beach in California (USA), or Hossegor. France or anywhere else for that matter. 48

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Situations similar to Mustofa’s have cropped up time and again throughout the history of professional surfing, including South America a few years ago. But the industry there decided to take a different approach. Surf companies invested more in events, turning national contests into WQS 5 and 6 star competitions that would provide more prestige for the brand and for the local surfers who would surf a heat with internationally established names. Mainstream mass media wanted part of the action as they realized people want to watch the best surfers and enjoy their life style. As a result, people living 1000 km away from the ocean were buying surf apparel; they wanted to be just like the surfers they saw on TV. The result is obvious; More people buying, more budget for marketing, more investment, more results. Indonesian surfers have great potential to be world’s best surfers but they need support. They need help to become accustomed to surf mediocre waves and travel outside of Indonesia. And if they do well, they deserve a bigger bonus from their sponsors. They need support to understand that the importance for the future of Indonesia’s surfing is to have surfers going to other countries and bringing back good results. This will not happen overnight, it requires longterm industry commitment, which will in-turn reap the long-term rewards. We all hope Mustofa will sign a contract soon because Indonesian surfing will not be the same without these name pushing the envelope of the sport.


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Bali Surfspots Medewi Medewi is a fun wave for all surfers. It can be a bit fat, but has its day. Come early to avoid onshore winds. This spot handles bigger swells also. Balian Balian is a swell magnet and a quiet spot in North Bali. This break is getting more crowded as more accommodation is built daily. Its playful lefts and rights are great for beginners and advanced surfers alike. Canggu & Perenan Canggu always gets more swell than Kuta beach. It consists of a few different breaks; The right breaks better on a mid to high tide and is a great performance wave. The sandbank is better on a lower tide and is in front of the restaurants, it's fun to watch the surfers hit the lip whilst enjoying the delicious food. Kuta Reef Kuta Reef is an exposed reef break that is quite consistent. There are a few breaks here: Airports rights and left, Middles and Kuta reef. May–October (dry season) is the best time of the year for waves here. Nusa Dua To get to this reef you have to drive into the hotel area itself and weave your way south. There is no channel which caught inside on a big swell quite annoying. There are a couple of other good waves in this area so it pays to do a bit of exploring. Dreamland Dreamland was famous because it was a 'dreamy' spot. The wave is still there, a nice peak and a fun beach break.

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Bingin Bingin is a consistent, mechanical barrel machine. It's a short wave with a very small take off spot so if hassling is not your thing, it will be quite hard to get waves here.

Padangbai Padangbai has the flat bottomed mixed reef and sandy bottom with some wally waves. This break needs a bit of swell.

Padang Galak Padang Galak is a reliable rivermouth beach break north of Sanur. The break is quite popular, but only works under certain conditions.

Green Ball Green Ball is a left and a right, situated at the bottom of a steep cliff. No worries going down but after you have been surfing for a couple of hours the return trip is quiet challenging.

Impossibles Impossibles gets fun on a big swell. It is located between Bingin and Padang Padang. If you are sick of dealing with the crowds at either of those two places you can paddle to Impossibles and get some long walls.

Keramas Keramas has a nice barrel after take-off which turns into a wally lip. This break is very popular with visiting and local pro's and if you don't want to deal with them in the water it is nice to watch them surf from the warung right in front of the break.

Belangan Belangan is known for its longs peeling walls. It does get sectiony, so you have to race a bit. Belangan handles big swells and can offer good barrels on the right direction.

Padang Padang Padang Padang only starts to work when a big swell is running. It offers an amazing barrel but breaks in front of trocks, so experts only!

Sri Lanka In the northern part of Nusa Dua lays Sri Lanka, a bowly right which breaks into a deep water channel. This break is better on a bigger swell but is shifty.

Uluwatu There are 4 different sections: Temples is a hollow wave which works on the mid to high tide. The Peak can offer a nice barrel and is right in line with the cave. Racetracks is the low tide section, it's superfast and gets seriously shallow. Outside Corner is an world class wave which won't even start breaking unless the swell is at least in the 8 foot range.

Nyang Nyang Nyang Nyang beach is a ‘secret’ spot, which is less crowded due to its uneasy access. This beach is like a secret paradise for every surfer. Kuta Beach The warm water and sandy bottom make Kuta beach one of the best places in the world to learn to surf. Also for advanced surfers this beach is very popular.

Sanur Reef Sanur Reef is a right and considered another world class wave. It's the local break of many expats and locals so gets very busy. The wave

Bali Tide Chart time

day date 6 JANUARY 2011 Sat 01 1.3 Sun 02 1.2 Mon 03 0.9 Tue 04 0.6 Wed 05 0.3 Thu 06 0.1 Fri 07 0.1* Sat 08 0.1 Sun 09 0.2 Mon 10 0.5 Tue 11 0.8 Wed 12 1.0 Thu 13 1.2

breaks better on a mid to high tide and is usually better in the early morning or in the rainy season (November–April).

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1.2

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1.0

0.9*

1.0

1.3

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1.9

1.2

1.4

1.6

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1.5

1.3

1.1

0.9

0.9*

1.0

1.2

1.6

0.9

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1.6

1.7*

1.7

1.5

1.3

1.0

0.8

0.8*

1.0

1.3

0.7

1.1

1.5

1.8

1.9*

1.8

1.5

1.2

0.9*

0.7

0.7

1.0

0.4

0.8

1.3

1.7

1.9

2.0*

1.8

1.5

1.1

0.8

0.6*

0.7

0.2

0.6

1.0

1.5

1.9

2.1*

2.0

1.7

1.3

0.9

0.7

0.6*

0.1*

0.3

0.8

1.3

1.8

2.1

2.2*

2.0

1.6

1.2

0.8

0.6

0.1*

0.2

0.6

1.1

1.6

2.0

2.2*

2.2

1.9

1.5

1.1

0.7

0.2

0.2*

0.4

0.8

1.3

1.8

2.1

2.2*

2.1

1.8

1.4

1.0

0.4

0.3*

0.4

0.7

1.1

1.6

2.0

2.2

2.2*

2.0

1.7

1.3

0.7

0.5

0.4*

0.6

0.9

1.3

1.7

2.0

2.2*

2.1

1.9

1.6

1.0

0.7

0.6*

0.6

0.8

1.1

1.5

1.8

1.0

2.1*

2.1

1.9

Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

GMT+

1.4

1.2

1.0

0.8

0.8*

0.8

1.0

1.3

1.5

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2.0

1.4*

1.3

1.2

1.1

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0.9

1.1

1.3

1.5

1.8

2.0

2.1*

1.3

1.3

1.4*

1.3

1.2

1.1

1.0

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1.1

1.3

1.5

1.8

2.0

1.0

1.3

1.4

1.5*

1.4

1.3

1.2

1.0*

1.0

1.0

1.2

1.5

1.7

0.8

1.1

1.4

1.6

1.7*

1.6

1.4

1.2

1.0

0.9*

0.9

1.1

1.4

0.5

0.8

1.2

1.6

1.8

1.8*

1.7

1.4

1.1

0.9

0.8*

0.9

1.1

0.3

0.6

1.0

1.5

1.8

2.0*

1.9

1.7

1.3

1.0

0.7

0.7*

0.8

0.1*

0.3

0.8

1.3

1.7

2.0

2.1*

1.9

1.6

1.2

0.8

0.6*

0.6

0.0*

0.2

0.5

1.0

1.6

2.0

2.2*

2.2

1.9

1.4

1.0

0.6

0.5*

0.1

0.1*

0.3

0.8

1.4

1.9

2.2

2.3*

2.1

1.7

1.3

0.8

0.5

0.3

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0.2

0.6

1.1

1.7

2.1

2.3*

2.3

2.0

1.6

1.1

0.7

0.5

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0.5

0.9

1.4

1.9

2.2

2.3*

2.2

1.9

1.4

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0.8

0.5

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0.4

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1.6

2.0

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2.1

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0.7

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0.7

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1.4

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1.6

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0.8

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0.7

0.9

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1.5

1.8

2.0

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2.1

1.9

1.3

1.2

1.0

0.9

0.9*

0.9

1.1

1.3

1.6

1.8

2.0

2.0*

2.0

1.3*

1.3

1.2

1.2

1.1

1.0*

1.0

1.1

1.3

1.5

1.7

1.9

2.0

1.2

1.3

1.4*

1.4

1.3

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1.1

1.1*

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1.2

1.4

1.6

1.9

NEW MOON

04

FULL MOON

19

G-LAND


WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/LA-CASA

WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/PRO-SURF


Bali is a beautiful island to visit and like many other tourist destinations, being such a popular spot brings many problems. One concerning problem that we at The Mag have come to notice is the ever growing environmental problems that effect this paradise island. We at The Mag hope that all travelers will take (little) time to read these points and take them to action, in order to lessen the damage. So please, keep Bali beautiful. 1. Please do not litter It’s a habit that we should all try to keep, and that is just “don’t litter”. If no trashcan is in sight, just keep it in your bag or pocket until you come across one, and then dispose of it correctly. 2. See some rubbish, pick it up! Add that little extra in keeping Bali clean by picking scraps of trash ignorant people have discarded carelessly and find the appropriate place to dispose of it. 3. Reuse or refuse plastic bags Sometimes shops will still put your goods into plastic bags. It’s fine to refuse the plastic bags, if you are carrying your own. You may get a strange look from the cashier, if so; just explain your good intention to “keep Bali beautiful”. 4. Walk more! To keep the air of Bali cleaner, it’s always better to walk. Other than being a healthy alternative, you may accidentally stumble onto a small store or unseen bars which you may have missed. 5. Eco-traveling What better way to enjoy the beautiful scenery of nature in Bali than to take an eco-tourism tour. Many companies provide trips into the untouched wilderness of Bali, or the unspoiled coral reefs.

SUDOKU

GO GREEN BALI

6. Lights out! Leaving your AC on is a huge waste of valuable electrical energy. It’s better to turn off your AC and lights before heading out. 7. It’s better to go out for dinner It is sometimes tempting to take away food to enjoy in the comfort of the place you are staying, but the packaging of the food adds up to the pile of trash that is thrown away. 8. Support local industries Sending imported goods uses up much of the worlds fossil fuel resources, compared to using products already available in Bali. By supporting local industries we can also improve the economy for the community in Bali. 9. Water preservation The amount of clean water in Bali is slowly becoming scarcer due to overuse. Small things we can do to help over come the water crisis are by taking shorter showers and turning off the taps when brushing teeth.

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CRASH COURSE BAHASA INDONESIA Bahasa Indonesia is the language spoken through the whole Indonesia. The Balinese speaks Bali language with each other, yet you will be fine with these words and short phrases.

How are you? Fine, thank you Good morning Good afternoon (< 3 pm) Good afternoon (> 3 pm) Good evening Good bye See you later My name is… Here you go Excuse me No/ Yes I’m hungry I’m thirsty Do you have beer? I want mixed rice Where is the hotel? Right/ Left Sorry

Apa kabar? Baik, terima kasih Selamat pagi Selamat siang Selamat sore Selamat malam Sampai jumpa lagi Sampai nanti Nama saya… Silahkan Permisi Tidak/ Ya Saya lapar Saya haus Ada bir? Saya mau nasi campur Dimana hotel? Kanan/ Kiri Maaf

BARGAINING IN BALI 1. No matter how much the vendors give as the opening price, you have to bargain for as much as half (or even less) of the price. 2. It is better for you to go to the shop that has everything: t-shirts, shorts, wood handicrafts, etc. By doing a onestop-shopping, which means you will buy quite a lot, it is easier for you to get a bigger discount. 3. Try not to be so apparent that you really want the thing you are looking at on the shop; the vendors are not stupid and can ‘smell’ your desire, thus will take the advantage by putting the price high.

BEFORE ENTERING A TEMPLE, PLEASE REMIND YOURSELF : 1. To respect the place and its people: it is sacred, so do not make noise or damages. Act normal.

4. Since there are ranges of shops offering pretty much the same things, you can always walk away from one shop to another if a deal cannot be reached. But walk slowly. Normally, if you offer a reasonable price on a bargain, in which the vendor can still make some profits and the price is good for you, the vendor would call you back to his/ her shop as you walk away. 5. Tell the vendor that if he/ she gives you a good price, then you will tell your other friends to shop from him/ her as well. 6. Know the market prices, or, pretend that you do. By saying “I’ve seen this product before way cheaper” will probably lead to lower price. 7. Have fun and stay friendly. Bargaining is part of the culture here and it should be a fun activity.

2. That a woman who is having her period, is not allowed to enter the temple. 3. To not walk in front of a praying person. 4. That a priest is very important, so whenever he is praying, don’t sit higher than him and don’t bother him with your camera’s flash. 5. That you should also not take flash pictures of other people praying. 6. To wear a sarong and an ambet when you attend a ceremony (those are often provided to you when necessary).


Bali Information A Amed Amed is one of the Bali's best-kept secrets that hosts some of the island's enchanting beaches. With not much is going on for the nightlife, Amed is a perfect destination for families and the more mature travelers.

Batubulan Batubulan is is an artistic countryside located in west part of Gianyar regency. It has been famous in Indonesia and all over the world which has been built based on an artistic blessing dance of Barong. The villagers sustain by both wood carving and stone sculpting, whereby the craftsmen can make up your order and arange the shipment to your home address.

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Candi Dasa Candi Dasa is located in Karangasem regency with less than 10km distance to Tenganan village. It was once a fishing village which later undergoing rapid tourism development, as now it becomes the best destination for embracing tranquility.

Candi Dasa beach

Batubulan Bedugul Bedugul is a village located in the mountainous area connecting northern and southern Bali. Besakih Temple Besakih is the most important, sacred temple in Bali. Known as the Mother Temple, Besakih provides spectacular views of the natural surroundings.

Celuk Celuk, in the sub-district of Sukawati, owns the individuality and excellence in production of gold and silver crafting. Most of them are Balinese professional, artistic and skillful of design development related to the silver and gold crafting.

D Denpasar Denpasar is the capital city of Bali, with an estimated population of 500,000 people from different background living in the area. A number of Bali’s notable museums is located in Denpasar.

Asahduren (Clove Plantation) Asahduren Clove Plantation is located 20km inland from Negara. It Offers the beautiful sight from the greenery of clove plantations.

B Bali Barat National Park Bali Barat National Park lies at the western side of Bali and occupies an estimated 10% of Bali’s total land area. The park is the last refuge of one of the most endangered birds in the world: the Bali Starling.

Pura Besakih - Mother Temple

Blahmantung Waterfall Blahmantung Waterfall is located in the Pupuan area of Tabanan. This part of Bali is very fertile and receives a lot of rain. You can swim here, or at least go for a soak in the shallow water.

Bangli Bangli offers beautiful views of Mount and Lake Batur. Situated hundreds of meters above sea level, the breeze in Bangli is cool and refreshing.

Botanical Garden Eka Karya Botanical Garden in Bedugul was founded in 1959 and is the youngest yet the largest of the four Indonesian botanical Gardens.

Garuda Wisnu Kencana Garuda Wisnu Kencana is a cultural park and a landmark with gigantic statue of Vishnu sitting on his ride, which is half man half Garuda bird.

Banjar Banjar is a worth visit place to watch cockfight and Brahma Vihara Arama, Bali’s only Buddhist mastery. You can as well bathe at the Banjar’s hot springs during your visit there.

Butterfly Park The Butterfly Park is located 7 km from Tabanan on the way to Panebel. It is the biggest butterfly park in Asia and it is perfect venue to relax with family.

Gianyar Gianyar is the regency famous for artistic and high culture. As a tourism area, Gianyar has beautiful natural sceneries such as mountains and coasts.

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Goa Gajah Goa Lawah Goa Lawah is inhibited by thousands of bats hanging down on the ceiling and flying around. It is also the home of one of the most sacred temples in Bali, Pura Goa Lawah.

J Jimbaran Jimbaran is a fishing village which also houses some of the finest luxury hotels in the world. The beaches of Jimbaan are cluttered with seafood restaurants, where you can dine with your feet on the sand.

Bali Bird Park Bali Bird Park provides a home to almost 1,000 birds of 250 different species. Here you can find the largest and finest collection of Indonesian birds in the world plus fantastic birds from Africa and South America.

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Gitgit Located on busy traffic,11km south of Singaraja, Gitgit is the most visited waterfall in Bali. Goa Gajah Goa Gajah (Elephant Cave) comes outstanding with the shape of its entrance: a skillfully carved depiction entangling leaves, rocks, animals, ocean waves and demonic human shapes running from the gaping mouth.

Amlapura Amlapura is the main town in Karangasem Regency. It hosts some of the island’s enchanting attractions such as the Tirta Gangga (the Water Palace).

Amlapura - Tirta Gangga

Gilimanuk Gilimanuk is the main port for traffic between Bali and Java island. Gilimanuk can be reached by heading west from Negara, or west through the National Park from Singaraja.

Denpasar - War Monument

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K Kintamani Kintamani is the village with its impressive panorama located in plateau and also encircled by mountain atmosphere with the windblast from Mount Batur. Klungkung Klungkung holds a special place in Bali’s history and culture. As artistic centers, the palaces wherein the Kings of Klungkung and noblemen patronized and developed the styles of music, drama and the fine arts that flourish today.


Kuta Kuta is the most celebrated area in Bali. The beach area is also known as the center of nightlife activities and a shopping Mecca with its lines of shops, boutiques and galleries.

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Tanah Lot Tanah Lot, one of the most popular places of interest in Bali, is located in the Tabanan regency. it is the home of a dramatic ocean-front Hindu temple, which is one of the main temples in worship of Balinese Gods.

Mount Agung Mount Agung is Bali’s highest and holiest mountain as it is believed that the mountain is the home of the Gods. Bali’s most sacred temple, the Mother Temple of Besakih, sits on its slope.

N Negara Negara is mainly known as the place to see Makepung or the Bull Race. This area is rarely visited by tourists, while it actually also offers a glimpse of the real Bali.

Kuta - Poppies Lane Lake Batur Lake Batur is the widest lake in Bali which is surrounded by scenic view and cool atmosphere. It lies down in the feet of Mount Batur and Mount Abang, with hot spring activity right by the lake. It is considered as sacred place by the Balinese.

Nusa Dua Nusa Dua is known as the home of large international five-star resorts. Many beautiful beaches with peaceful atmosphere can be found in this area.

Petulu - Bird Watching

S Sangeh Monkey Forest Sangeh Monkey Forest is located in the southwestern of Bali. The main attraction here is the monkeys inhabiting both the trees and the temple.

Lake Bratan Lake Bratan is located in Bedugul and is the second largest lake in Bali. Bratan offers stunning view of Pura Ulun Danu temple that solemnly guards the lake.

Sangeh Monkey Forest Sanur Sanur is one of the Bali’s largest traditional villages and is also an established tourist area. It is known as the best spot for diving and snorkeling, especially surfing. It is also known as the ‘Sunrise Beach’.

Nusa Penida The main attraction in Nusa Penida lies on the chance to see turtles, sharks, and reefs in crystal-clear visibility.

Seminyak Seminyak is one of the Bali’s top tourist spots with its natural appeal and great collection of fine restaurants. It also houses many of nice places to stay (hotels and villas).

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Lovina Lovina Beach is a 12 km stretch of coast to the Northwest of Singaraja in North Bali. It is considered one of the best places for family trip with its famous morning dolphin trip as well as other activities such as snorkeling and sightseeing.

Tegallalang - Rice field

Nusa Menjangan Nusa Menjangan is a small island in the northwestern off the Bali Barat National Park. Only a limited number of divers are allowed to visit the island daily. All dive sites are only a short boat trip away.

Nusa Serangan (Turtle Island) Serangan Island is used as a turtle breeding ground with beautiful coral reefs. Another thing Serangan is known for Pura Sakenan, the famous Balinese temple facing the mainland.

Lake Bratan - Ulun Danu temple

Tegallalang Tegallalang is a major area for handicraft production in Bali. There are several business in this area, but they are not visible to the passing-by tourits. The view here on the rice is amazing.

Nusa Ceningan Nusa Ceningan offers many tourist attractions such as cockfighting and the unique seaweed farming. Nusa Lembongan Nusa Lembongan is a small island located 20km off the eastern coast of Bali. The island is known as a ‘virgin island’ with crystal-clear water and the local seaweed farming.

Lake Batur

Tanjung Benoa Tanjung Benoa is a scenic area full of coconut palms. It is one of the perfect spots for water sports with no shortage of shops catering to marine sports enthusiasts.

Padangbai Padangbai is a small fishing village in East Bali. It offers the visitors with some of Bali’s most beautiful white sandy beaches. Petulu Petulu is a heaven for photographers who love the nature shots. Petulu provides awesome bird watching activity, where around 6,000 egrets living around the area.

Sing Sing Waterfall Located 1km out of Lovina town, Sing Sing Waterfall is the perfect place for people who wish to see a waterfall and do not want to deviate far from the main food. Singaraja Singaraja was once the capital city of bali before Denpasar. It was Bali’s main port during the Dutch occupation and still retains colonial feel, especially with its clean, quiet and distinctve culture.

Tulamben Tulamben is a small town on the north-east coast of Bali. It is now popular for its most famous dive site that contains a stunningly diverse underwater ecosystem, especially around the wreck of the Liberty Glo, a US Army Transport ship torpedoed by Japanese submarines in 1942.

U Ubud Ubud is largely known as a remarkable center of fine arts, dance and music. The spectacular view of green paddy terraces makes Ubud as one of the most visited areas in Bali. Uluwatu Uluwatu is known for its breathtaking cliff views, with its spectacular temple overlooking the clear blue water of the ocean below. Plenty of monkeys inhibit the area. Kecak dance is also regularly performed in Uluwatu’s amphitheatre.

T Tabanan The regency of Tabanan is the home of the dramatic temple of Tanah Lot, which probably is known as the most photographed temple in Bali.

Uluwatu - Kecak Dance

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Bali Directory RESTAURANTS ASIAN FUSION RESTAURANTS Chandi A Gastronomic Twist on Pan Asian Cuisine Jl. Laksmana No. 72 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 173 106 www.newinbali.com/chandi Sarong The Next Experience Jl. Petitenget No. 19-X (Kerobokan) Phone: +62 361 737 809 www.newinbali.com/sarong BELGIAN RESTAURANTS Mannekepis Jazz & Blues Bistro Jl. Raya Seminyak (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 847 5784 www.newinbali.com/mannekepis CHINESE RESTAURANTS Chinoiserie Modern Singaporean Cuisine Jl. Sunset No. 7 (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 8088 777 www.newinbali.com/chinoiserie Fortune Cookie Fresh & Healthy Food with no MSG Jl. Sudamala No. 5 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 283 342 www.newinbali.com/fortune-cookie DUTCH RESTAURANTS Bugils Bali Café & Restaurant Jl. Dewi Sartika No. 1-BB (Tuban) Phone: +62 361 758 322 www.newinbali.com/bugils-bali Double Dutch Dutch Bar and Restaurant in Sanur Jl. Cemara Semawang No. 29 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 270 554 www.newinbali.com/double-dutch 56

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FRENCH RESTAURANTS Atelier 13 French Cuisine Jl. Kunti No. 7 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 733 671 www.newinbali.com/atelier-13 GERMAN RESTAURANTS Mama’s German Restaurant in Bali Jl. Raya Legian (Legian) Phone: +62 361 754 831 www.newinbali.com/mamas INDIAN RESTAURANTS Queens Tandoor Enjoy the Taste of India! Jl. Raya Seminyak No. 73 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 732 770 www.newinbali.com/queenstandoor INDONESIAN RESTAURANTS Cabe Rawit Not Just a Warung! Jl. Kunti No. 8 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 744 0995 www.newinbali.com/cabe-rawit Warung Ocha Indonesian & Western Restaurant Jl. Raya Seminyak No. 52 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 736 222 www.newinbali.com/warung-ocha INTERNATIONAL RESTAURANTS Barcode Mediterranean Resto and Tapas Bar Jl. Petitenget No. 2001-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 730 629 www.newinbali.com/barcode Biku Bali Tea House, Restaurant and Book Store Jl. Raya Petitenget No. 888 (Petitenget) Phone: +62 361 857 0888 www.newinbali.com/biku

Black Canyon Coffee A Drink from Paradise… Available on Earth Seminyak Square (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 738 029 www.newinbali.com/black-canyoncoffee Café Bali With Love Jl. Laksmana (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 736 484 www.newinbali.com/café-bali Grocer & Grind Bistro - Delicatessen - Catering Jl. Kayu Jati No. 3-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 737 321 www.newinbali.com/grocer-andgrind Ifiori Ristorante Food - Wine - Chill Out Jl. Kartika Plaza (Tuban) Phone: +62 361 750 158 www.newinbali.com/ifioriristorante Karma Steakhouse Jl. Bukit Permai (Jimbaran) Phone: +62 361 708 848 www.karmasteakhouse.com Kopi Pot Fine Coffee, Great Food, Outrageous Cakes Jl. Legian (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 752 614 www.newinbali.com/kopi-pot

Ma Joly Enjoy the Finer Things in Life Jl. Wana Segara (Tuban) Phone: +62 361 753 708 www.newinbali.com/ma-joly Poppies Fine Dining and Cottages in the Hanging Gardens of Kuta Jl. Poppies 1 (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 751 059 www.newinbali.com/poppies Rio Restaurant Bar & Grill Jl. Raya Seminyak (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 732 685 www.newinbali.com/rio-restaurant

ITALIAN RESTAURANTS Il Cielo Delizioso Momento Con Cucina Italiano Jl. Kartika Plaza No. 172 (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 762 027 www.newinbali.com/il-cielo Café Marzano Authentic Italian Cuisine Jl. Double Six (Legian) Phone: +62 361 874 4438 www.newinbali.com/cafe-marzano Massimo Jl. Danau Tamblingan (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 128 8942

Rumours Everything You Hear is True Jl. Laksmana No. 1 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 738720 www.newinbali.com/rumours

Osteria Telese Cucina Italiana Jln. Laksmana No. 14 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 734 566 www.newinbali.com/osteria-telese

Tekor Bali Beachside Restaurant with Amazing Food Jl. Double Six (Legian) Phone: +62 361 735 268 www.newinbali.com/tekor-bali

Rustica Cucina Italiana Jl Batu Belig No. 1 (Batu Belig) Phone: +62 361 360 4562 www.newinbali.com/rustica

The Junction Street Side Café with Air-Conditioner Jl. Laksmana (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 735 610 www.newinbali.com/the-junction

Ku De Ta Jl. Oberoi No. 9 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 736 969 www.kudeta.net

Waroeng Bonita Home Cooking from the Island Jl. Petitenget No. 2000-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 731 918 www.newinbali.com/waroengbonita

La Casa From Bali with Love! Jl. Werkudara No. 25 (Legian) Phone: +62 361 751 822 www.newinbali.com/la-casa

Zappaz Piano Bar & Grill with Live Music Jl. Laksmana (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 742 5534 www.newinbali.com/zappaz

Sorriso Jl. Drupadi (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 738 307 Trattoria Cucina Italiana Jl. Laksmana (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 737 082 www.newinbali.com/trattoria-bali Ultimo Where Everything is Excellent Jl. Laksmana No. 104-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 738 720 www.newinbali.com/ultimo Warung Italia Italian Restaurant Jl. Kunti No. 2 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 737 437 www.newinbali.com/warung-italia


Zanzibar Follow Your Senses Jl. Pantai Blue Ocean No. 21 (Legian) Phone: +62 361 733 529 www.newinbali.com/zanzibar JAPANESE RESTAURANTS Canang Bali Yakiniku House Restaurant Jl. Kartika Plaza No. 21 (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 766 203 www.newinbali.com/canang-bali Dahana Japanese Dining at Petitenget Jl. Petitenget No. 98-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 730 131 www.newinbali.com/dahana Fresh Sushi Lounge The Best Original Japan Fusion Jl. Laksmana No. 5 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 736 834 www.newinbali.com/fresh Kaizan / K2 Fine Japanese Dining Jl. Laksmana No. 33 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 747 2324 www.newinbali.com/kaizan www.newinbali.com/k2 Kuni’s Jl. Laksmana No. 80 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 730 501 Ryoshi Fresh Sushi & Sashimi Everyday! Jl. Raya Seminyak No. 17 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 731 152 www.newinbali.com/ryoshi MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANTS Khaima Moroccan Restaurant, Lounge & Bar Jl. Laksmana (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 742 3925 www.newinbali.com/khaima Pantarei Jl. Raya Seminyak No. 17-A (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 732 567

Di Mare @ KarmaKandara (Ungasan) Phone: +62 361 848 2223 www.newinbali.com/di-mare MEXICAN RESTAURANTS TJ’s California-Mexican Bar Restaurant Gg. Poppies I (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 751 093 www.newinbali.com/tj-s SWISS RESTAURANTS Yut’s Place Excellent Swiss Steaks and Tasty Sausages Jl. Werkudara No. 521 (Legian) Phone: +62 81 2395 1454 www.newinbali.com/yuts-place THAI RESTAURANTS

Prana Spa at The Villas Jl. Kunti No. 118-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 730 840 www.newinbali.com/prana

Jl. Laksmana No. 49 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 731 769 www.newinbali.com/sea-gyspy

Double Six Club Jl. Double Six (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 731 266

Vitamin Organic Jl. Drupadi No. 3-B (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 884 3222

Espresso Bar Live Music Every Night Jl. Legian No. 83 (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 752 576 www.newinbali.com/espresso-bar

Well Being Therapeutic Massage & Beauty Care Jl. Laksmana No. 66-B (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 735 573 www.newinbali.com/well-being-spa

Nico Nico Underwear - Sleepwear - Swimwear Jl. Raya Seminyak (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 730 805 www.newinbali.com/nico-nico

Bali Joe Gay Nightlife Destination Jl. Dhyana Pura (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 730 931 www.newinbali.com/bali-joe

Mixwell Bar & Lounge Jl. Dyana Pura No. 6 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 736 846 www.newinbali.com/mixwell-bar

Anantara SOS Jl. Abimanyu (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 737 773

Obsession Jl Dhyana Pura (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 730 269

Lemongrass Experience the Taste of Fine Thai Food Jl. Raya Seminyak No. 37 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 736 149 www.newinbali.com/lemongrass

Santa Fe Jl Dhyana Pura (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 731 147

VEGETARIAN RESTAURANTS Aromas Jl. Legian (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 751 003 Neno We Care about Your Well-being Jl. Petitenget No. 2-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 910 3003 www.newinbali.com/neno

BARS & NIGHTLIFE Bahiana Salsa Bar in Bali Jl. Dyana Pura No. 4 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 738 662 www.newinbali.com/bahiana

Sky Garden Bar & Lounge Jl. Legian No. 61 (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 755 423 www.newinbali.com/sky-garden

FASHION Becik Boutique Boutique and Mini Bar Jl. Dhyana Pura No. 4-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 737 816 www.newinbali.com/becik Discovery Shopping Mall Jl. Kartika Plaza (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 769 629 Innuendo Fashion Store Seminyak Centre Blk. 75-H (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 730 790 www.newinbali.com/innuendo

SURF & SWIMWEAR

Rip Curl The Total Surfing Experience Jl. Sunset No. 89 (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 705 089 www.newinbali.com/rip-curl

OTHER SHOPPING Bali Deli Jl. Kunti No. 117-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 173 8686 www.newinbali.com/bali-deli Bali Soap Bali’s Natural Soap Specialist Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai Ruko Surya Indah C-1 (Jimbaran) Phone: +62 361 705 089 www.newinbali.com/bali-soap

Paul Ropp Jl. Laksmana (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 735 613

Canopy Art We are here to keep your head cool Jl By Pass Ngurah Rai (Denpasar) Phone: +62 361 725 795 www.newinbali.com/canopy-art

Bodyworks Relaxation - Rejuvenation - Wellness Jl. Kayu Jati No. 2 (Seminyak) Phone:+62 361 733 317 www.newinbali.com/bodyworks

Mal Bali Galleria Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 761 945

Casa Gourmet Jl. Laksmana (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 738 026

Equilibre Jl. Laksmana No. 117-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 887 0111

Scandi Contemporary Jewelry Jl. Raya Seminyak No. 26 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 733 446 www.newinbali.com/scandi

SALONS & SPAS

Fabulously Feet Reflexology & Foot Massage Jl. Sunset No. 888 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 847 5764 www.newinbali.com/fabulously-feet

JEWELRY

Sea Gypsy Jewelry Inspired by the Ocean Jl. Raya Seminyak 30-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 847 5765

Celepuk Bali Retail & Wholesale Online Store Jl. Raya Seminyak No. 36 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 274 2323 www.newinbali.com/celepuk

PROPERTY Ray White The Paradise Property Group Jl. Laksmana (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 737 357 www.newinbali.com/ray-white THE MAG ISSUE 33

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DIVING Absolute Scuba Diving in Bali - 100% Professional Jl. Danau Tamblingan No. 27-C (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 282 664 www.newinbali.com/absolute-scuba Atlantis International Five Star Dive Center Jl. By Pass Ngurah No. 350 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 284 312 www.newinbali.com/atlantisinternational Blue Oasis Dive (Rip Curl) Come Dive with Us! Jl. Danau Tamblingan (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 287 749 www.newinbali.com/blue-oasis-dive Blue Season Bali 5 Star Instructor Development Resort Jl. Danau Tamblingan 69-X (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 282 574 www.newinbali.com/blue-seasonbali Crystal Divers Striving for Perfection in Diving Jl. Danau Tamblingan No. 168 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 286 737 www.newinbali.com/crystal-divers

ACCOMMODATION Annora Bali Villas Villas in Seminyak Jl. Abimanyu No. 999-X (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 734 793 www.newinbali.com/annora Bali Eco Village A Green Hideout Bjr. D. Lawak Perbekel Belok/Sidan www.newinbali.com/bali-eco-village Batu Karang Escape, Relax, Enjoy Lembongan Island, Bali Phone: +62 366 24 880 www.newinbali.com/batu-karang 58

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Cicada Luxury Townhouses in Seminyak Jl. Pura Telaga Waja No. 1 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 862 0805 www.newinbali.com/cicada Danoya Villa Jl. Batu Belig No. 559 (Kerobokan) Phone: +62 361 735 305 www.newinbali.com/danoya DeKuta Hotel Modern Boutique Hotel in Kuta Beach Gg. Poppies II No. 8 (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 753 880 www.newinbali.com/dekuta-hotel Ellora Villas An Exotic Blend of East and West Jl. Danau Tamblingan No. 60 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 282 496 www.newinbali.com/ellora-villas Harris Resort Simple - Unique - Friendly Jl. Raya Pantai Kuta (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 753 868 www.newinbali.com/harris-resort Mata Bali Bali Villa Rental & Property Maintenance Jl. Basangkasa No. 151-A (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 730 233 www.newinbali.com/mata-bali Villa Bugis Villa Investment Seminyak Jl. Laksmana Gg. Bugis No. 6 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 744 8592 www.newinbali.com/villa-bugis Villa Coco Affordable Private Villas Jl. Double Six, Gg. Villa Coco (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 730 736 www.newinbali.com/villa-coco Villa Sunset Terrace Apartment in Seminyak Jl. Oberoi Gg. Mertasari (Seminyak)

Phone: +62 81 2366 8110 www.newinbali.com/sunset-terrace Villa Uma Sapna My Own Private Villa, Just the Way I Like It Jl. Drupadi No. 20-XX (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 736 628 www.newinbali.com/uma-sapna

BOAT TRANSFER Blue Water Express Fastboat to the Gili Islands & Lombok Jl. Raya Pelabuhan Benoa Phone: +62 361 723 479 www.newinbali.com/bluewaterexpress Mahi Mahi Fastboat in Comfort & Safety Serangan Harbor Phone: +62 361 877 6599 www.newinbali.com/mahi-mahi Indonesia Cruises Holiday Cruises & Leisure Expeditions Kuta Poleng D-7, Jl. Setiabudi (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 766 269 www.newinbali.com/indonesiacruises Scoot Fast Cruises The Easy Way to Get Away Jl. Hangtuah No. 27 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 285 522 www.newinbali.com/scoot-cruises

LEISURE & SPORTS AJ Hackett Bungy Jump Are You Hard Enough to Jump? Jl. Double Six (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 731 144 www.newinbali.com/aj-hackett Bali Adventure Tours Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai, Pesanggaran Phone: +62 361 721 480 www.newinbali.com/baliadventure-tours

Canggu Club Sport, Recreation, Relaxation Jl. Pantai Brawa (Canggu) Phone: +62 361 844 6385 www.newinbali.com/canggu-club

CAS Cargo Bali International Freight Forwarder Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai No. 109-X (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 720 525 www.newinbali.com/cas-cargo-bali

Pro Surf Learn 2 Surf Jl.Pantai Kuta (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 744 1466 www.newinbali.com/pro-surf

You Shop We Ship Trading with Peace of Mind Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai No. 461 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 720 606 www.newinbali.com/you-shop-we-ship

ART & GALLERIES Agung Rai Museum of Art Jl Bima Pangosekan (Ubud) Phone: +62 361 974 228 Antonio Blanco Museum Jl. Raya Campuhan (Ubud) Phone: +62 361 975 502

ARCHITECT & ORGANIZER Bali Architecture & Construction Fully Licenced Construction Company Jl. Raya Petitenget No. 6-X (Kerobokan) Phone: +62 361 735 780 www.newinbali.com/baliarchitecture-and-construction Fabulous Bali Wedding Defining Your Amazing Moment Jl. Raya Petitenget No. 112-B (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 734 766 www.newinbali.com/fabulousbaliwedding

EXPORT & CARGO Artisan Asia You Design It, We’ll Make It. Perfectly Jl. Braban No. 69 (Kerobokan) Phone: +62 361 744 0948 www.newinbali.com/artisan-asia Bali Prefab Pre-fabricated Construction Jl. Pemelisan No. 8-X (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 781 7098 www.newinbali.com/bali-prefab

Hammock Nomad’s Land Jl. Petitenget No. 22 (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 742 1475 www.newinbali.com/hammock SKR Express Domestic Transportation Service Jl. Teuku Umar No. 80 (Denpasar) Phone: +62 361 221 186 www.newinbali.com/skr-express

EDUCATION Little Stars Bali Early Learning & Kindergarten Jl. Tirta Akasa No. 50 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 285 993 www.newinbali.com/little-stars

HOSPITALS & CLINICS ARC Clinics Look and Feel Years Younger Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai No.1 (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 767 543 www.newinbali.com/arc-clinics BIMC Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai No. 100-X (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 761 263 SOS International Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai No. 505-X (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 710 505 Penta Medica 24-Hour Medical Assitance Jl. Teuku Umar Barat No. 88 (Denpasar) Phone: +62 361 490 709 www.newinbali.com/penta-medica


The Gilis Directory GILI EATS CAFÉS Coco’s Coffee, Great Sandwiches and Café Food INTERNATIONAL RESTAURANTS Beach House Fresh Seafood BBQ and International Cuisine Phone: +62 370 642 352 Sama-Sama Reggae Bar Cool Rhythms, Cold Beer IRISH RESTAURANTS Tir Na Nog Irish Bar World’s Smallest Irish Bar - Food, Drinks, Fun Phone: +62 370 639 463

GILI SLEEPS RESORTS Beach House Resort Contemporary Resort Set in Tropical Gardens Phone: +62 370 642 352 Gili Eco Villas Eco-friendly Accommodation Phone: +62 361 847 6419 Gili Villas Luxury Villas in Tranquil Surroundings Phone: +62 81 2375 5721 Ko-Ko-Mo Exquisite Luxury Villas in HighClass Resort Phone: +62 370 642 352 Manta Dive Bungalows A/C Bungalows in a Central Location Phone: +62 370 643 649

Luce d’Alma Exclusive, Modern Cottages in Tranquil Resort Phone: +62 370 621 777 Villa Ombak Biggest Resort on the Island Phone: +62 370 642 336

GILI ADVENTURE DIVING Big Bubble PADI and SSI Dive Centre Phone: +62 370 625 020 Dream Divers 5-Star PADI IDC Centre Phone: +62 370 693 738 Lutwala Dive Boutique Dive Resort Phone: +62 370 689 3609 Manta Dive 5-Star PADI and SSI Centre Phone: +62 370 643 649 Villa Ombak Diving Arcade Resort Dive Centre Phone: +62 370 642 336

GILI SHOPS SHOPPING Innuendo Exclusive Fashion Shopping Phone: +62 361 742 8814

WANT TO BE LISTED HERE ? Join us as a member of Newinbali.com

0361 737 913 WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/SURYA-CHANDRA


CONSULATES & EMBASSY Australia (Canada & New Zealand) Jl. Empu Tantular No. 32 (Denpasar) Phone: +62 361 241 118 E-mail: bali.congen@dfat.gov.au Brazil (Honorary Consulate) By The Sea Shop, Jl. Legian (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 757 775 E-mail: brazilcocnsul@bali.net Chile (Honorary Consulate) Jl. Pengembak Gg. 1/3 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 756 781 E-mail: chilehonconsulate@bali-villa.com France (Consular Agency) Jl. Mertasari II No. 8 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 285 485 E-mail: consul@dps.centrin.net.id Germany (Consulate) Jl. Pantai Karang No. 17 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 288 535 E-mail: germanconsul@bali-ntb.com Hungary (Honorary Consulate) Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai No. 219 (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 287 701 E-mail: huconbali@telkom.net

AIRLINES Mexico (Honorary Consulate) Astina Tours & Travel Building Jl. Prof. Moh. Yamin No. 1-A (Renon) Phone: +62 361 223 266 E-mail: astina@denpasar.wasantara.net.id Netherlands (Honorary Consulate) Jl. Raya Kuta No. 127 (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 761 502 E-mail: dutchconsulate@kcb-tours.com Royal Danish Consulate Jl. Drupadi No. 23-A (Seminyak) Phone: +62 361 821 6979 E-mail: danishconsbali@gmail.com Royal Norwegian Consulate Mimpi Resort Jimbaran Kawasan Bukit Permai (Jimbaran) Phone: +62 361 701 070 Fax: +62 361 701 073/ 074 E-mail: norwayconsbali@mimpi.com Spain (Honorary Consulate) Kompleks Istana Kuta Galeria, Blk. Vallet 2, No. 11, Jl. Patih Jelantik (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 769 286/ 287 Fax: +62 361 769 186

Air Asia I Gusti Ngurah Rai International Airport Phone: +62 361 760 108 China Airlines I Gusti Ngurah Rai International Airport Phone: +62 361 757298 Garuda Indonesia I Gusti Ngurah Rai International Airport Phone: +62 361 751 011 (ext. 5216) Japan Airlines Jl. Raya Kuta No. 100-X (Kuta) Phone: +62 361 757 077/ 764 733 Malaysia Airlines I Gusti Ngurah Rai International Airport Phone: +62 361 764 995/ 766 925 Singapore Airlines I Gusti Ngurah Rai International Airport Phone: +62 361 761 574 Thai Airways Ground Floor, Bali Beach Hotel (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 288 141

EMERGENCY

Italy (Honorary Vice Consulate) Lotus Enterprise Building Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai (Jimbaran) Phone: +62 361 701 005 E-mail: italconsbali@italconsbali.org

Sweden & Finland (Honorary Consulate) Segara Village Hotel Jl. Segara Ayu (Sanur) Phone: +62 361 282 223 Fax: +62 361 282 211 E-mail: sweconsul@yahoo.com

Police Phone: +62 361 424 436

Japan (Consulate General) Jl. Raya Puputan No. 170 (Renon) Phone: +62 361 227 628 E-mail: konjpdps@indo.net.id

United States of America (Consular Agency) Jl. Hayam Wuruk No. 188 (Denpasar) Phone: +62 361 233 605 E-mail: amcobali@indo.net.id

Blue Bird Taxi Phone: +62 361 701 111

60

THE MAG ISSUE 33

Ambulance Phone: +62 361 118

TAXIS

Fire Department Phone: +63 361 113


N

Kubutambahan Menjangan Island Mt. Prapat Agung Pemuter an Pulaki Banyuw Banyup edang oh Labuha Gilimanuk n Lalang Sumbe rklampo Celukanbawang k Bakungan Cekik Gerokgak Mt. Sangiang

Mt. Merbuk

Tuwed

Banjarasem

Mt. Musi

Dalem

Tedjakula

Kintamani

Yeh Kuning Perancak

Lake Buyan Subuk

Batukaru

B A D U N G

Lebih Wongayagede

Asahduren

Pekutatan

Rubaya

BANGLI

Besakih

Tulamben Mt. Agung

Batukaru Rambut Siwi

Pengotan

Ulun Danu Bratan Lake Bratan

Lake Tamblingan Pupuan

Tegalcantel

Lake Batur

Peludu

West Bali National Park

Pengambengan

Tembok Tianyar

Ulun Danu Batur

Batur

Mayong

Mendoyo

Les Sambirenteng

Dausa Penulisan

BULELENG

JEMBRANA Negara

Bondalem

Lovina Beratan Anturan Kalibukbuk Kaliasem

Seririt

Mt. Mesehe

Pangkung Melaya

Yeh Sanih Ponjok Batu

Sangsit Singaraja

TA B A N A N

Buruan Wanasari

Antosari

Tabanan

Bajra

Tampaksiring Tegalalang Payangan G

I A NPejeng Ubud Y Bedulu A R

Mengwi

Taman Ayun

Sempidi Ubung

Kerobokan Canggu

Legian Kuta

Sidemen

Benoa

Sakenan

Jimbaran Pura Luhur Uluwatu Uluwatu

Mumbul Ungasan Pecatu

Benoa Nusa Dua

Amlapura Ujung

Tenganan Klungkung Padang Bai Gianyar

Goa Lawah

KLUNGKUNG

Kusamba

Jungut Batu

Penida

Toya Pakeh Sampalan Peed

Serangan Kedonganan

Amed Bunutan Lempuyang

Tamanbali

Denpasar Renon Sanur Pedungan

Culik

KARANGASEM

Celuk Batubulan

DENPASAR

Seminyak

Selat

Rendang Bangli

Batuan Blahbatuh Lebih Sukawati

Beraban Tanah Lot

Menanga

Tirta Empul Pujung

Batu Madan

Candi Dasa

Seraya


Kuta/ Tuban/ Legian

Legian Kuta Kuta is dedicated to those seeking fun and sun in affordable ways. The area consists of busy laneways lined with bars and restaurants, basic accommodations and various stalls selling multitudes of items. Although often considered the ‘absolute ugliest’ area of the island due to its mix-bag tourism projects in combination with rampant commercialism, Kuta still manages to retain a slice of Balinese charm. The smell of incense wafts down the crowded gangs and offerings of brightly colored flower petals are laid out each morning to appease the gods.

The current Legian is packed with venues that turn this used-to-be sleepy hollow area into a spot that knows no rest with almost non-stop activities and crowds. More and more amusement centers like nightclubs, restaurants and shops are now making Legian a vibrant area that never sleeps.

Tuban Being a part of Kuta, Tuban doesn’t really share the loud noises and crowds of Kuta’s main party scenes. Villas and fine restaurants in this area are not really seen from the main road as they mostly take place beachside.


S EG A

N GU R A

H

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LANE 1

TJ’s

Il Cielo

DISCOVERY PLAZA

J Boutique

I

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GELAEL

SE

Kimia Farma

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BU

DI

Indosat

Kuta

To Sanur BY PASS NGURAH RAI

SOS

ARC Clinic

Indonesia Cruises BIMC

CARREFOUR Karma Developments

Rip Curl

SIMPANG SIUR

TIA

Vihara Dharmayana

Joger

SUPERNOVA

AIRPOR

IMMIGRATION OFFICE

BuGils Bali

AN

TA RAYA KU

Dapur Sedap

KE

Blue Fin Bali Top Property Waterbom

SINGASAR

KUTA SQUARE

TA RAYA KU

J EL

Bali Kuta Residence

ESC Sky Garden Shinkei

Hard Rock Hotel

POPPIE S

Harris Kuta DeKuta Hotel

TIH PA

ISTANA KUTA GALERIA

Eikon

POPPIES LANE 2

Queens of India

Harris Tuban

Holiday Inn

WAN A

Ma Joly

Gracie Kelly

Maccaroni Espresso Bar

SA

Kama Sutra

Ryoshi

Musro

Mama’s Tambo Cigars

Nero

Shoot Images

Bali Mode

Roma RI Amor

B EN E

Papas Café

Hotel Etnik

Red Square

I MELA ST

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AN AP R AY AZ A KARTIKA PL

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ROAD SUNSET


Seminyak/ Petitenget/ Canggu

Seminyak Owing to its high density of upscale shopping, combined with the clustering of many fine-dining establishments, Seminyak has rapidly become one of the most wellknown tourist areas in Bali. In addition to a few commercial strips with popular and lively restaurants, bars and good crafts, furniture, and antique shops, there are a few notable establishments that have earned numerous titles as the best venue or party spot in Bali in various magazines. Land and accommodation prices are amongst the highest in Bali and plenty of luxury spas and hotels abound.

Petitenget & Canggu Petitenget is where the chic ambiance of Seminyak continues. Although recently there have not been as many happening scenes as in Seminyak, emergence of a number of new stylish venues in Petitenget should indicate that this area would serve as the extension of Baliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s southern fashionable playground. Canggu, on the other hand, is where the ricefields are still widely spread and clearly seen, even due to its close proximity with Seminyak and Petitenget. A number of luxurious villas can be found within Canggu area â&#x20AC;&#x201C; most of them are blessed with the tranquil view of the ricefields.


Bali Architecture & Construction

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Sanur/ Jimbaran/ Nusa Dua

Sanur

One of the most pleasant aspects of Sanur is its large expanse of beachfront. A footpath that covers about five kilometers allows visitors to casually stroll and explore, stopping when they feel like it for a drink or snack at one of the many beach side restaurants. A large reef shelters Sanurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s white-sand beach, resulting in low-key surf that is ideal for beginner surfers and families with small children. However, swimming is only possible at high tide as low tide exposes the reef. Well-stocked bars and decently priced food and drinks have turned this area into a popular nighttime destination as well.

Jimbaran

Nusa Dua

Some of the most luxurious hotels in the world find their home in Nusa Dua. Yet, unknown to even some of its loyal visitors, Nusa Dua actually offers more than just ranks of five-star hotels and up-market restaurants and shops. For instance, the thousands who stay in the luxurious hotels within the Nusa Dua complex and Tanjung Benoa are largely unaware of a beautiful white-sand beach located just five minutes away on the southern edge of the peninsula, named Geger beach. Immediately north of Nusa Dua enclave is the peninsula of Tanjung Benoa that includes less exclusive hotels and Benoa village. As a mixed culture area, visitors can see a mosque and Chinese and Hindu temples in close proximity.

Although Jimbaran now houses some of the finest luxury hotels in the world, its original color as a fishing village still remains. Unlike many other coastal areas in Bali that have wholly converted from fishing villages into tourist spots crowded with umbrellas, hawkers and surfboards, Jimbaran exploits its natural potential as a fishing village with the establishment of row upon row of seafood restaurants serving that dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s catch of fresh fish and crustaceans. Jimbaran is now known to be a haven of the finest seafood (both raw and processed) in Bali.


BY

PA

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RA

HR

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Bali Prefab

To Kuta

GOLF COURSE

GEGER

NGE

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AS

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To Nusa Dua

PEMELISAN AGUNG

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FISH MARKET

GU

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Fortune Cookie

N GUR A H

PO DANAU

PANTAI SARI

N

Kopi Bali House

PANGRACIK AN

TUKA D BA DU

NG

To Tuban

INGA

Double Dutch

LU W ATU

TAMB L

La Piccola

BY PASS NGURAH RAI

U LU W ATU

DANA U

Crystal Divers Blue Oasis Dive Blue Season Bali

R AYA

Atlantis International

Jimbaran

BY PASS NGURAH RAI

Bali Diving Triana Scuba Seraya Joe Kennedy Photo

Koki Pub

Sanur

BY PA SS

Piccadily Nogo Textile

To Jimbar

NGURA

Street Café Amparos Law

Nusa Dua

H RAI

SINDHU

TEGEH AGUNG

an / Kut a

SEGARA AY U

LU W ATU

N

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DANAU BU YA

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TANJUNG BENOA

Tj. Benoa

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R AY AU

Scoot Fast Cruise

HANG TUAH

To Denpas ar


Ubud

As the home of Bali’s legendary artists, Ubud is all about culture, inspiration, meditation, nature and comfort. The area’s scenic rice fields, villages, art and craft communities, palaces and rivers are probably some of the top reasons that bring people to Bali. For more than a century, Ubud has been the island’s preeminent centre for fine arts, dance and music. Accommodations range from the cheap ones sited in the town’s center to the jet set retreats that sit high up on the edge of green valleys. There are plenty of interesting things on the main streets, but most of the magic of Ubud is hidden away on the backstreets, backwaters and courtyards.


To Chedi, Bagawan-giri

To Kintamani

CAMPUAN

AYUNG RIVER

Ubud

WAN A

RA W ANA

DEWI SITA

BU

G JERO G

AY AU

D

HANO MAN SUGRIW A JEMBAW AH SU K MA

UBUD PALACER

SA N

PAINTING MUSEUM

AYUNG RIVER

AN DIN

DAT

SU

WE

TIRTA TA

K AJ ANG TA

MAN

NEKA MUSEUM

GUNUNG SARI TEMPLE

COK PUTRA

SIWA RATIH TEMPLE

TEBING KALEMBUTAN TEMPLE PENATARAN SASIH TEMPLE PUSERING JAGAD TEMPLE KABOEDAN TEMPLE

MONKEY FOREST

ARCHEOLOGICAL MUSEUM ARJUNA METAPA TEMPLE ART MUSEUM GOA GAJAH

YEH PULUH RELIEF To Denpasar

To Denpasar

To Kemunuh

To Gianyar


WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/TEKOR-BALI


Nusa Lembongan Nusa Lembongan is one of Baliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three small offshore islands (the other two are Nusa Penida and Nusa Ceningan) with tourist infrastructure; thus making it a popular destination for visitors to Bali. Lembongan is a destination to experience the abundance of marine life, coral beds, drop off walls and exhilarating drift dive. Lembonganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s white-sand beaches and clear water are just perfect for visiting sun

worshippers. Unlike most beaches in Bali, there are no hawkers in Nusa Lembongan, with the sole exception of the boat guys who wander along the beach in the morning and ask you if you would like to join the snorkeling or fishing trips. Getting to or from Nusa Lembongan is easy due to the numerous options. From Sanur, visitors are provided with several fast boat services as well as the traditional jukung boats (wooden boats). Alternatively, travelers can depart from Benoa Harbour, any of the Gili islands, or even charter their own helicopter.

Malibu Point

Light House Shipwreck Surfbreak

Nusa Penida

Mangrove

Lacerations Surfbreak Playgrounds Surfbreak

Seaweed Farms Police Station

Manta Point

Jungutbatu Village

Coconut Beach

Mushroom Beach

Toyapakeh

Hospital

Song Lambung Beach

Devil Tears

Nusa Lembongan

Ceningan Point

Underground House Dream Beach

Lembongan Village

Bias Tugel Beach

Bakung Temple

Gamat Bay

Nusa Ceningan

Ceningan Surfbreak

Crystal Bay Swallow Cave

Nusa Penida


The Gilis

Lombok’s three sister islands of Gili Terawangan, Gili Meno and Gili Air are currently amongst the top alternative destinations for tourists visiting Bali. The three are tiny coral-fringed islands blessed with white sandy beaches and crystal-clear water swarming with an array of coral fish. Known as budget stopovers in the old days, the Gilis with their rapidly increasing popularity now have diversified accommodations ranging from luxury villas to rustic yet chic bungalows for rent. Oceanfront restaurants and bars are also scattered around. Water activities, of course, are some of the highlights on the must-do list during a stay in these islands. Each Gili has its own character and charm; Terawangan is known as the party scene, Meno is very mellow (perfect for honeymooners) and Air’s ambiance falls somewhere between the two. The three islands, very fortunately, are pleasantly free from air pollution due to the absence of motorized land vehicles. Transportation means vary from the traditional cidomo (horse-drawn carts), horses and bicycles. However, it’s important for you to note that the Gilis are homes to Muslim locals. Although bikinis are tolerable, it is advised for you to avoid any excessive skin displays — including public affection displays. You also need to tolerate the loud call for early Morning Prayer at around four or five in the morning. Restaurants and bars will run as normal during the fasting month of Ramadan. The Gili islands are easily accessible direct from Bali with the current fast boat services available. Ferry services from Padangbai to Lombok run 24 hours a day. Morning flights from Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport to Lombok’s Selaparang Airport are also available daily.


10 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR BEING A RESPONSIBLE TOURIST 1. Be a good role model Set a good example and show people that your interactions with the environments can make a difference. 2. Do not throw anything in the toilet Non-organic wastes thrown into the toilet can cause grey water to flow into the land and sea. This will increase pollution and kill the fragile underwater eco-system. 3. Refill your water bottle Contribute to the waste management and help recycle plastic by reusing your water bottle. It will also save your money and is an easy way to be green. 4. Save water Turn the water off when you are not using it. The Gilis are small islands with very limited supply of fresh water; so please be conservative. 5. Switch off the AC, fan and lights when you leave your room Electricity comes from petrol generators on the Gili islands. Do not waste the energy as the island can barely cope already. 6. Throw rubbish in the bins provided Encourage a responsible behavior by walking a few extra steps to collect the rubbish and put it in a bin.

7. Do not collect seashells from the sea or beach Seashells are living animals and taking them out of their natural habitat will kill them. Hermit crabs will also look for new and bigger seashells as they grow up; thus collecting seashells will leave hermit crabs homeless. 8. Do not touch or walk on the reef Corals are very fragile organisms and it takes tens of years for them to grow. Please respect their space and observe from a distance. 9. Report environmental disturbance and destruction Touching aquatic life, walking on reefs, boat anchoring and discarding plastic are not eco-appreciative behaviors. Please respect and look after the environment. 10. Get involved in local environmental activities and issues No matter how small, your contribution can have a great impact on the corner of the planet in which you live or spend holidays. There are plenty of opportunities to show your support for a clean environment, including practicing a good eco role model behavior, participating in beach cleanups, educating the local people about rubbish and plastic and supporting ecological activities.

GILI ECO TRUST

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR PROJECT AT WWW.GILIECOTRUST.COM. HELP OUR PROJECTS BY HAVING AN ECO-BEHAVIOR WHILE ON THE GILI ISLANDS.


The Gilis Section Karma Kayak Gili Eco Villas

Ba

lik

Lu tw an ala a

Coral Beach 2

Desa Dunia Beda Villa Almarik Luce d’Alma Light House

Kelapa Villas Good Heart Bungalows Bale Sampan Trawangan Dive Gili Divers Horizontal Aquaddiction Wrap-a-Snapper

Bugi Light House Balenta Resto/ Bar

Blue Coral

Amber House Zoriah

Harbour

Manta Dive

Casablanca

Lake

Sama-Sama Coco’s Gili Villas

Clinic

Terminal Blue Marlin Dream Divers Big Bubble

Clinic Jetty

Rudy’s Bar Buddha Dive Tir Na Nog Beach House

Sunset Point

Villa Ombak Ko Ko Mo

Gili Trawangan

Royal Reef Resort

Bird Park

Rustia

Blue Marlin Tropical Hideaways Villa Nautilus Malias Child Bounty Resort Gazebo Kontiki Biru Meno

Gili Air Harbour

Harmony Café Mirage Bar Gili Air Hotel Matahari Blue Marlin Space Bar Star Bar Villa Batu Dua Island View es t tag op t Co z y ’s Sh u n o z c O o C Warung Sasak

Gili Meno

Biba Beach Munchies Café Green Café

Salabase

Clinic

Lucky’s Safari Sunset

Bulan Madu Villas Clinic Manta Dive Dream Divers Scallywags 5 s Blue Bar s n a a e e 7S Oc

Villa Karang

Harbour

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WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/BLUE-WATER-EXPRESS


THE GILIS REVIEW

Diving in the Gilis he Gili islands are considered to be one of Indonesia’s top areas for scuba diving—and rightly so. The three little islands and their surroundings offer a multitude of reefs and walls, ridges, slopes and canyons, suitable for all levels from beginner to technical diver. The best thing? The dive sites are within a short boat ride from the islands, enabling divers to choose freely whether to do one, two or more dives in a day. This also makes it possible to do a beginner’s course in just three days. Most famous are reef sites such as Shark Point (need we say more?) off the west coast of Gili Trawangan; and Hans Reef, a superb macro site to the north of Gili Air. But the islands also offer deep walls (such as Takat Tunang and DonYeng), astounding coral canyons at Deep Turbo, Secret Reef and Takat Malang; and even a Japanese WWII patrol boat lying at 45 metres. The marine life is incredibly varied, with great opportunities to see creatures such as turtles, the peaceful whitetip and blacktip reef sharks, the dinosaur-like bumphead parrotfish, cuttle fish, banded sea snakes, pygmy sea horses, trevally, barracuda, jacks, tuna, stingrays, frog fish and even the occasional manta ray.

www.foued.biz

Whereas many of the shallower reefs are dominated by rocks and hard coral, some dive sites offer beautiful barrel sponges, enormous coral fans and pliant anemones swaying in the water. Have a close look at the anemones—many of them are hosts to interesting aquatic life, be it clown fish (Nemo), shrimp or porcelain crabs. CONTINUES TO PAGE 78

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WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/KOKOMO

WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/BEACH-HOUSE


THE GILIS REVIEW

As the Gilis are located next to the narrow and deep Lombok Strait which connects Lombok and Bali, currents are commonplace at most dive sites, hence all dives are conducted as drift dives. Divers just drift gently with the current, and the boat picks them up where they surface with their divemaster.

www.foued.biz

Bumphead Parrotfish www.foued.biz

If you are looking looking to dive in the Gili islands, you will be spoilt for choice, particularly in the biggest of the three islands, Gili Trawangan, where you can choose between no less than 12 dive operators. Manta Dive, located near the harbour on the east side, is the biggest and most popular and offer both PADI and SSI diver certifications. Manta Dive also has a dive centre in Gili Air. The Gili islands with their white coral beaches, swaying palm trees and absence of motorized traffic offer the perfect tropical paradise for divers and non-divers alike, and the inhabitants are keen to keep them that way. Hence, in Gili Trawangan, each diver contributes to the Gili Eco Trust, a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting the oceanic and onland ecology and encourage more environmentally friendly practices. In this way, the dive community contributes to the preservation of our oceanic treasures.

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THE MAG ISSUE 33

Clown Fish


WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/MANTA-DIVE

WWW.NEWINBALI.COM/GILI-VILLAS


THE MAG - Baru di Bali Magazine - Edition 33-January 2011  

THE MAG is free 82-page full color Bali tourist magazine brought to you by Barudibali.com, the worlds leading Bali tourist information webs...

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