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he Virginia Tech class ring embodies and invokes memories, traditions and pride that tie Hokies, young and old, together. The tradition began during the 1911–1912 school session when four classes (1911–1914) designed their rings. Since the beginning, each Virginia Tech class has designed a ring distinctive and unique to its class. Today, Virginia Tech is one of only a few colleges and universities that redesign their ring collection each year. Each year, the sophomore class officers select a Ring Design Committee responsible for designing and marketing their class ring collection, adding elements that reflect their class experiences on the class side. All ring designs

have an eagle and crossed sabres or rifles, usually found on the university side, which symbolize the military heritage and traditions of the Corps of Cadets. The chain links that have encircled the ring bezel on Virginia Tech rings since 1940 represent class unity, the strength of many united as one. Since 1991, the design process has included the recognition of a distinguished alumnus, alumna, university president, or administrator. The design, collection, and namesake are presented to the class during the fall of their junior year at Ring Premiere. The Class of 2018 recognizes Frank M. Beamer ’69 as our ring collection namesake.


VIRGINIA TECH CLASS COLORS: ESTATE BLUE, PALE GOLD, BRIDAL BLUSH

®


Jun. 8, 1969 Graduates from Virginia Tech Played 3 years of varsity football

Dec. 23, 1986 Named head football coach at Virginia Tech

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ormer Virginia Tech head football Coach Frank Beamer has a box full of conference and bowl championship rings. He wore each of them for a time, but always came back to “the one that counts,” his Virginia Tech Class of 1969 ring, which he wore during his final season as head football coach, and at his poignant retirement press conference in November of 2015. Beamer’s class ring represents more than 50 years of engagement and service as a Hokie, from his 1965 freshman year, through his time as a football player and member of the Class of 1969, to his 29 seasons as Virginia Tech’s most successful head football coach. Beamer’s legacy extends far beyond the game of football. From raising thousands of dollars for charity over the past decade (more than $400,000) to just treating people right, Beamer has been an exemplary model of the university’s motto in action, Ut Prosim (That I May Serve). Since its founding in 2008, Beamer’s most personal cause, Herma’s Readers, a literary program that honors his late mother, a longtime educator, has raised more than $145,000 for the purchase of new books and has distributed over 100,000 new and used books for low-income children in Virginia. His commitment to academic excellence raised the graduation rate among his student-athletes from 40 percent to nearly 95 percent.

Dec. 6, 2008 Defends ACC Title. Hokies become back-to-back champions.

Dec. 31, 1993 Independence Bowl win begins 23 consecutive bowl appearances

Dec. 31, 1995 First Big East Title Sugar Bowl win vs. Texas, 28-10

With his success and integrity, Beamer earned the respect, trust, and affection of his players, his staff, students, the university administration, Hokie football fans, and the entire Hokie Nation. When the former Spring Road that runs next to Lane Stadium was renamed “Beamer Way” in the fall of 2015, it recognized Beamer’s years of service to Virginia Tech and the community, but most of all, his “Beamer Way” of doing things the right way. On December 26, 2015, the Hokies football team made Coach Beamer’s final game as head coach a memorable one, beating Tulsa 55-52 in a recordsetting performance in the Independence Bowl.

Dec. 4, 2010 ACC Title vs. Florida State

Sept. 6, 2014 Stuns No. 8 Ohio State in Columbus, Ohio


Nov. 7, 1997 Inducted into the Virginia Tech Sports Hall of Fame

Jan. 4, 2000 After undefeated season National Title game at Sugar Bowl

The win marked the 11th bowl win for Beamer, who won three of his final four bowl games. He guided the Hokies to a 238-121-2 record and retired at the end of the 2015 season with an overall record of 280-144-4 over a 35-year coaching career. Under Beamer, Tech football enjoyed unprecedented success with 23 consecutive bowl appearances, recognized by the NCAA as the longest bowl streak in the country. It included four Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) titles, five ACC Coastal Division crowns, three BIG EAST Conference titles, two major bowl victories, six BCS appearances, and a trip to the national championship game in 1999. Beamer was voted BIG EAST Coach of the Year each of those seasons. He was named the ACC Coach of the Year in both 2004 and 2005. In 1997, he was inducted into Virginia Tech’s Sports Hall of Fame, becoming the first active coach at the university to be so honored. He also earned eight National Coach of the Year honors. Beamer was born in Mt. Airy, North Carolina, and grew up in Hillsville, Virginia. At Hillsville High, he earned 11 varsity letters as a three-sport athlete in football, basketball and baseball. He focused on football at Virginia Tech, wearing No. 25 and starting three years as a cornerback. He also played on the Hokies’ 1966 and 1968 Liberty Bowl teams. His No. 25 jersey was retired by

Aug. 6, 2015 Spring Road renamed Beamer Way

Sept. 12, 2002 Beamer’s #25 jersey retired

Dec. 4, 2004 First ACC Title

Tech in a pregame ceremony before the Marshall game in 2002. After graduating from Virginia Tech, Beamer worked as an assistant coach at Radford High School from 1969-1971. Then, after one season as a graduate assistant at the University of Maryland, he went to The Citadel where he worked five seasons under Bobby Ross and one year under Art Baker. During his last two years at The Citadel, he served as defensive coordinator, the same position he held at Murray State after moving there in 1979. Two years later, he was promoted to head coach and went on to compile a six-year record of 42-23-2 before becoming head football coach at Virginia Tech. He is married to the former Cheryl Oakley of Richmond, Virginia. They have two children, Shane, Class of 1999, a former member of his dad’s football team at Virginia Tech and now the special teams coordinator and tight ends coach at the University of Georgia; and daughter Casey, a 2003 graduate of Tech. He has four grandchildren, Sutton, Olivia and Hunter, children of Shane and his wife, Emily. Daughter Casey, who married former Virginia Tech wrestler Canaan Prater in 2012, have two sons, Hudson and Franklin.

Nov. 2015 Announces retirement. Defeats UVa for 12th straight season

Dec. 26, 2015 Beamer finishes with 280 career wins and 23 consecutive bowl appearances


CAPTAIN VINCE HOUSTON

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he Class of 2018 officers recognize Captain Vince Houston of the Virginia Tech Police Department as their Class Sponsor, an honorary role that recognizes a faculty member or administrator who has made a significant impact on Virginia Tech. Originally from Rural Retreat, Virginia, Captain Houston is a 28-year veteran of the Virginia Tech Police Department. Since joining the VTPD in 1988 after receiving a degree in Police Science, Captain Houston has held numerous titles and served in several leadership capacities within the department. Years of experience as a Field Training Officer, Crime Prevention Officer, General Instructor, Rape Aggression and Defense (RAD) Instructor, General Investigator, Investigative Lieutenant and Administrative Captain all prepared him for his current role. Since 2009 as the Operations Captain, Houston’s responsibilities have included overseeing both the Patrol and Investigative Divisions of the Virginia Tech Police Department. Outside of his work with the VTPD, Captain Houston is no stranger to the Virginia Tech community and serves the Hokie Nation in many other ways. For many years he has volunteered

his time on the university’s Commencement Committee, the Day of Remembrance Committee, various search committees, and on special assignment with Virginia Tech Athletics. However Captain Houston’s most visible role has been that of security and protector for head football Coach Frank Beamer for nearly 25 seasons of Hokie football. Houston’s most treasured memories include running through the stadium tunnel alongside Coach Beamer to the Hokie anthem “Enter Sandman”. At a practice after Beamer’s final home game against North Carolina, Houston was recognized by Beamer and the team, with an appreciation football signed by the coach. Of Houston’s many years of service to him, Beamer said, “Best in the business. With a guy his size having your back, it’s pretty easy to feel totally safe.” Captain Houston is married to Kristen Swanson Houston, who also serves the Hokie Nation as the Assistant Director for the Intercultural Engagement Center. In addition to supporting Virginia Tech Athletics, the Houstons enjoy spending time with family and friends and vacationing in the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

1911

1912

1914

1922

Four Virginia Tech rings were realized in the 1911-1912 school session – in this order, 1913, 1912, 1914, and 1911.

Among the earliest Virginia Tech rings, this signet-style ring with a flat stone, used the 1912 class emblem for the design.

First class to select a committee for ring design.

First women’s miniature ring offered. Miniature rings were often used as engagement rings.


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t feels like only yesterday that we first stepped onto Virginia Tech’s campus as students, but in reality it has been two glorious years. At orientation, we all received the classic freshman t-shirt with “What’s a Hokie?” on the front and “I am!” on the back. While that phrase originally seemed cheesy and cliché to me as an out-of-state student entering the Hokie Nation for the first time, it has since matured into one of the truest ways I define myself. Whether we came to our university for its academic excellence, school spirit, or campus food, we were all quickly united through Ut Prosim and the Hokie Community. With everything that has been happening in our world and on our campus in the past two years, I have seen the Class of 2018 come together to support, remember, and celebrate each other. From the momentous win over Ohio State in our freshman year to the somber memorial for the 32 Hokies taken from us nearly 10 years ago, we have stood together as classmates, as friends, and as Hokies. We learned that by coming to Virginia Tech, we are never alone in our endeavors, because there are over 26,000 other undergraduate Hokies with a platform to stand on or a shoulder to cry on. On top of that, over 250,000 Hokie alumni will be there in support when we graduate.

Class Ring that embodies these sentiments and exemplifies what it is that has already and will forever define the Virginia Tech Class of 2018. Go Hokies!

Chris Saunders

President, Class of 2018

It is for this reason that when someone asks me “What is a Hokie?” I can proudly and confidently reply “I AM!” From one Hokie to another, it is my honor to introduce to you a

1934

1940

1942

1958

First ring dance was held on April 27, 1934 by the Class of 1935.

The rope motif that encircled the bezel is replaced by an interlinking chain and is used today to represent class unity, in the form of linking class numerals.

Fred Waring’s “Moonlight and V.P.I.” was first performed at Ring Dance.

First ring to depict the War Memorial Pylons.


1969

1971

1984

1992

Frank Beamer earns his undergraduate degree from Virginia Tech.

First ring to depict the Skipper Cannon.

Hemlock needles form the chain around the bezel. Hokie stone is modeled around the palm side of the ring.

Modern HokieBird first appears on a ring.


WAX RING

METAL RING TREE

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or each class, the Ring Design Committee is chosen during the sophomore year. The committee members brainstorm to gather the most important elements of our Virginia Tech experience. This year’s ring contains elements from our class experience and the rich history of past class rings. In partnership with Balfour, and after many meetings and sketches, the committee presents its work to an artist who professionally renders the design on a ring shank drawing. After several rounds of revisions and improvements, the design is digitized and then drawn in a Computer Aided Design (CAD) program for the manufacturer. Balfour uses this CAD file to create a wax version of the ring for final approval by the committee. Once approved, a master mold is created. The ancient “lost wax process” is used to make the detailed rings that Hokies cherish. Each class ring is made to order, passing through the skilled hands of at least 30 craftsmen, and is subjected to seven detailed inspections to ensure it meets all our quality standards.

FILING

POLISHING

THE HOKIE GOLD LEGACY PROGRAM was established as a Class of 1964 anniversary program to have gold from donated Virginia Tech alumni class rings included in future class rings. On May 3, 2012, the inaugural Hokie Gold melt was held at the Kroehling Advanced Materials Foundry, also known as VT FIRE, a laboratory for students in materials science engineering. With each successive melt, a small portion of the donated gold will be included in the next melt, assuring that each class will have a portion of the original Hokie Gold. The Class of 2018 design committee participated in the melt held on June 19, 2016.

2000

2011

2015

The Millennial ring. Charles Steger ’69 becomes Virginia Tech’s 15th president.

Celebrated 100 years of the ring tradition. First ring to offer the option of genuine Hokie Stone as a stone choice.

First year when the Hokie Tracks were used as a chain in the bezel.


INTERLOCKING CHAIN OF 32 HOKIE TRACKS TREES OF WINTER AND SUMMER

SILHOUETTE OF PRESIDENT SANDS WITH GRAD CAP HOKIEBIRD

SNOWMAN

CHECKERED SCOREBOARD

MOSS ARTS CENTER

CASSELL COLISEUM

DRILLFIELD EVENTS

CLASS OF 2018 MOTTO CLASS OF 2018 LOGO

TURBINE IN GOODWIN HALL HOKIE TRACKS LEADING TO LOGO DOWNTOWN BLACKSBURG (TOTS, SHARKEY’S, LYRIC) MAIN STREET CELEBRATION

COMMONWEALTH

BEAMER WAY

CXLIV

Interlocking chain of 32 Hokie Tracks

HokieBird

Trees of Winter and Summer

Checkered Scoreboard

Moving together forward, a chain of 32 Hokie tracks circle the gemstone in remembrance of the Hokies lost on April 16, 2007.

The HokieBird as we know it today made its first appearance in 1987 and has since become the face of Virginia Tech Hokies.

Two oak trees representing winter and summer reflect on the changing of the seasons and the passing of time. No matter how many times the seasons change, we remain Hokies forever.

Snowman

The snowman represents the special snow days we enjoyed during our time as students, as well as the annual cadets vs. civilians snowball fight on the Drillfield.

Moss Arts Center

The Moss Arts Center brings diverse performances and artists from across the world to showcase their talents to Virginia Tech students.

Drillfield Events

The Ferris Wheel welcomes students back to campus every year at GobblerFest held on the Drillfield. The ribbon celebrates our long-standing tradition of being the number one Collegiate Relay for Life. The tent symbolizes Hokies coming together to serve the community and embody Ut Prosim at The Big Event.

Turbine in Goodwin Hall

The Rolls Royce turbine hanging in the lobby of Goodwin Hall represents Virginia Tech’s stellar academics and cutting-edge research. Goodwin Hall opened in the fall of 2014 and serves as a state-of-the-art facility in our academic community.

Hokie Tracks leading to Logo

During our time here, our footprints become Hokie tracks, as portrayed leading towards the class logo on Main Street. The Hokie tracks we leave behind us are the imprints we make on the world around us.

Downtown Blacksburg (TOTS, Sharkey’s, Lyric)

Founded in 1798, Blacksburg offers a place for the Virginia Tech community to enjoy local restaurants, shopping, town events, and student nightlife.

Main Street Celebration

On September 6, 2014, the Hokies traveled to Columbus, Ohio to take on the eighth-ranked Ohio State Buckeyes. After a resounding 35-21 victory stunning OSU’s largest crowd ever, Hokies flooded downtown Blacksburg in celebration. Virginia Tech was the only team to beat the 2015 national championship-winning Buckeyes that season.

Beamer Way

“Beamer Way,” formerly Spring Road, is named in honor of Coach Frank Beamer ’69 commemorating his 29 years as head coach of the Virginia Tech football team. “Beamer Way” is not just a street name, but a way of respecting others, a way of playing the game with integrity, and living out Ut Prosim in all areas of our lives.

Silhouette of President Sands with Grad Cap

The silhouette of President Sands standing under the summertime tree commemorates his arrival to Virginia Tech in June 2014. His graduation cap signifies that he began his time here with the class of 2018, and will complete his “senior year” with us.

The checkered scoreboard is a tribute to the Battle at Bristol on September 10, 2016. It was the largest collegiate football event to date, with 156,990 in attendance. It stands as a monument to the great tradition of football, as well as all athletics, here at Virginia Tech.

Cassell Coliseum

Since 1962, Cassell Coliseum has been one of Virginia Tech’s most identifiable buildings. It has proven to be an electric environment for basketball games, most notably the Hokies’ win against in-state rival and fourth-ranked UVA on Jan. 4, 2016.

Class of 2018 Motto

Mentes apertae, fines consociati / Minds open, aims united. The Class of 2018 celebrates differences rather than allowing them to separate us. Our minds are open to the diversity we offer one another, to the brilliance of academia, and with our aims united, we can courageously pursue a world of peace and prosperity.

Class of 2018 Logo

The 2018 class logo incorporates the iconic Hokie tracks in the number 18 to represent our graduation year.

Commonwealth Cup

The Commonwealth Cup is awarded to the winner of the annual Virginia Tech vs. UVA football game. At the current date, Virginia Tech has won the Commonwealth Cup 12 years in a row. The Cup is held high by a student to represent the pride we take in winning the rivalry.

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The Class of 2018 is the 144th class to graduate from this university.


AMERICAN FLAG

SEVEN STARS COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA FLAG MOUNTAINS

BURRUSS HALL

TREES OF AUTUMN AND SPRING TORGERSEN BRIDGE 1872

CROSSED SABRES

SCREAMING EAGLE

LEST WE FORGET

FLAMING VT UNIVERSITY SHIELD

THE PYLONS OF WAR MEMORIAL SKIPPER CANNON UT PROSIM HOKIE STONE

CORP OF CADETS CREST MMXVIII

American Flag

Commonwealth of Virginia Flag

Burruss Hall

Lest We Forget

Displayed flying proudly in front of Burruss Hall, the American flag represents pride, freedom, history, and unity. This iconic cornerstone of campus stands at the top of the University Side. The site of many major events, like the presidential installation ceremony in 2014, and more subtle nuances like the comforting chimes played three times a day, Burruss remains an endearing part of campus life.

Trees of Autumn and Spring

Two oak trees representing autumn and spring reflect on our time as students, entering in the fall and graduating in the spring.

Torgersen Bridge

Spanning across Alumni Mall, Torgersen Bridge serves as the gateway to Virginia Tech. Additionally, the Bridge is a constant study space, contributing to Hokies’ drive and ambition for innovation.

1872

As a land grant university in Virginia, Virginia Tech proudly displays the flag of the Commonwealth. Engraved into “The Rock” found at the Upper Quad, these words honor the V.P.I. alumni who lost their lives in World War I.

Corps of Cadets Crest husked, standing ear of corn, which pays homage to the mechanical and agricultural roots upon which the university was founded.

Crossed Sabres

The crossed sabres, an element from the earliest class rings, represent the military heritage, history and tradition of the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets.

MMXVIII

The Class of 2018 is shown in Roman The Virginia Agricultural & Mechanical College numerals. opened its doors to students for the first time Seven Stars on October 1, 1872. The seven twinkling stars in the sky represent the seven Virginia Tech alumni Screaming Eagle who received the Congressional Medal of The symbol of strength and freedom, the Honor, the highest award a member of the screaming eagle has been a traditional United States Military can receive for selfless element on the ring since 1911. service to the nation.

The Corps Crest, designed by Harry D. Temple ’34, embodies the very tradition that the university was founded upon as an all-cadet military college.

The Pylons of the War Memorial

The Pylons evoke Virginia Tech’s core values of Brotherhood, Honor, Service, Loyalty, Sacrifice, Leadership, Duty and Ut Prosim. At their center stands the Cenotaph, which bears the names of the seven Virginia Tech alumni awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Skipper Cannon

Since 1964, the “Skipper” cannon has been a Corps of Cadets tradition and Hokie soundtrack of celebration at football games, Corps, and university events. The “Skipper” was named in honor of President John F. Kennedy, and is operated and maintained by the Corps of Cadets.

Ut Prosim

The foundation of the university side of the ring, as well as the university itself, is the motto Flaming VT Ut Prosim (That I May Serve). Established in The Flaming VT in the shape of the old style VT Mountains 1896, Ut Prosim has long been a cornerstone Every journey home to Blacksburg, Virginia is of the Hokie lifestyle. The motto is in the same rests between the Corps Crest and University welcomed by an embrace of the mountains. location and style as the 1969 class ring, worn Shield symbolizing the strong Hokie spirit The mountain range that stretches across shared by both civilians and cadets. proudly by the 2018 namesake, Frank Beamer. the Class and University side reminds us of the little slice of heaven in the mountains University Shield Hokie Stone when we are feeling homesick. Looking at Originally created in 1896, the University Depicted on the shanks of the ring, Hokie them from a classroom window, or looking Shield’s four quadrants depict the Great Seal Stone which has been mined locally in of the Commonwealth of Virginia; a surveyor’s down across the valley from their peaks, the Blacksburg area since the late 1800’s, these mountains humble us, reminding us level and leveling rod superimposed; a reminds us of the neo-gothic architecture and how big our love is for this place. chemical retort and graduate; and a partially stonework on campus buildings, old and new.


BEAMER OVAL TOP

BEAMER STADIUM TOP

BEAMER SQUARE TOP

ROANOKE

TURNER

HOUSTON

BEZEL OPTIONS FOR THE BEAMER RING

OVAL

STADIUM

SQUARE

TOP

TOP

TOP


PROGRESS (Pylon Top)

GROVE

DRILLFIELD

BEAMER SQUARE TOP

WASHINGTON

BEAMER MINIATURE OVAL TOP

SMITHFIELD

GLADE

METAL TOP OPTIONS FOR THE BEAMER RING

VT

CORPS

HIGHTY TIGHTY

PYLONS

SCHOOL SEAL

SEAL

SEAL

SEAL


at what came before – what made way for this new era. The committee incorporated many of these timeless aspects into the ring design, most notably a tribute to the 2018 Ring Namesake, Frank Beamer ’69. Coach Beamer gave more than 29 years of heart and service to our university, making him the perfect Ring Namesake to represent the spirit of the Class of 2018. “Beamer Way” was experienced by thousands of Hokies. His tenure connects Virginia Tech’s past to its present like only one other tradition: the Class Ring. Virginia Tech class rings are as enduring as the people who make it so special. They are proudly worn by more than a century’s worth of Hokies – those who have passed – and – those to come. It has been a humbling experience for the committee to design this ring on your behalf. We are honored to unveil the unique design, and wish you all the best in wherever your ring takes you.

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Wear the Tradition!

ear Class of 2018, welcome to junior year! With half of our college years behind us and half ahead, we can finally see the light at the end of Avery Tunnel of Lane Stadium, where we will eventually gather to celebrate our graduation in 2018. Meanwhile, we have some celebrating to do, with academic success, extra curricular activities, football games, and service. Those shared experiences with friends and the creation of lifelong memories as Hokies all come together to form our distinctive 2018 class ring. The ring design committee worked tirelessly to capture these lifelong memories and the spirit of the Class of 2018 . We are a renaissance class of sorts, experiencing a new university president and provost, new head coaches, and the nation’s first School of Neuroscience. The 2018 ring looks to this age of innovation and inspiration, featuring elements like Goodwin Hall’s Rolls Royce turbine and the creative technology of the Moss Arts Center. But our distinct spot in the Hokie lineage also provides us with an unparalleled look

HARVEY CREASEY

Ring Design Chair, Class Of 2018


Back to Front, Left to Right: Jonathan Morse, Ring Dance Chair; Harvey Creasey, Ring Design Chair; Ganesh Annan, Member-at-Large; Rex Willis, Male Member-at-Large; Chris Saunders, President; Katherine Kolton, Female Member-at-Large; Maddie Mitcham, Cadet Member-at-Large; Hiba Malik, Member-at-Large.

Back to Front, Left to Right: Row 1: Jeff Krysta, Rex Willis, Drew Biddell Row 2: Ian Imperial, Jacob Eisner, Chris Saunders, Jonathan Morse, Harvey Creasey,Austin Koch, Ganesh Annan Row 3: Tyler Minson, Casey Smith, Katherine Kolton, Jordan Selep, Mahna Ghafori, Lizzie Harrington, Gracen Witt, Kelly Pratt, Matt Remson Row 4: Katy Maher, Natalie Savino, Alicia Curaca, Maddie Mitcham, Hiba Malik, Marissa Milliron, Jenny Hawk, Hadley Carter


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stablished by the Class of 1935, Ring Dance is one of the most beloved and lasting traditions at Virginia Tech. The Ring Dance weekend takes place in the spring of a student’s junior year. The dance is now held on two nights, with Juniors choosing to attend either Friday or Saturday evening. The celebration each night includes a ceremonial ring presentation in Squires Commonwealth Ballroom. Couples receive ribbons in their class colors, used to tie each other’s rings on their wrists for their ring presentation. For both dance nights, time-honored rituals are performed by the Corps of Cadets as they have since 1934. On Friday night, junior Cadets march into the ballroom to form the Ring Figure of their graduating class, followed by the formation of the Sabre Arch. Under this arch, freshmen Cadets escort each Cadet’s date. On Saturday night, a special Corps Sabre Arch is performed. The president of the university ceremonially announces the formal presentation of the rings. “Moonlight and V.P.I,” a song written specifically for the Ring Dance in 1942 by Fred Waring,

with lyrics by Charles Gaynor, is performed in the background as rings are presented to class members. For most junior Cadets, this is the first view of their class ring, since they have been picked up and then hidden by their freshmen escorts until the dance. At the conclusion of the song, hundreds of balloons are released on civilians and students below. The grand finale of the weekend takes place after the Saturday night dance at midnight with a spectacular show of fireworks over the Drillfield. It is traditional for the students to watch from the War Memorial. Finally, “Silver Taps” is played and a report from the Skipper Cannon concludes the event.


A

s we begin our junior year, there is no denying that each member of the Class of 2018 has created and will continue to create lifelong friendships, memories, and engagement with Virginia Tech. Since 1911, every class has created a personalized ring that captures the memories of its time at Virginia Tech. With a tradition this grand, a celebration of equal measure was created, and thus Ring Dance was born in 1934 with the Class of 1935. On behalf of the 2018 Ring Dance Committee, it is my distinct honor to invite you to join us on the weekend of March 24th and 25th for our class of 2018 Ring Dance. The dance will feature two nights of ceremony and dancing in a festive, transformed Squires Commonwealth Ballroom. The weekend celebration is topped off with fireworks on Saturday midnight over the Drillfield. Please join the 2018 Ring Dance Committee, 2018 Leadership Team, and your fellow classmates to celebrate this great tradition. We look forward to seeing you there.

JONATHAN MORSE

Ring Dance Chair. Class Of 2018


RING PRICING

Beamer 40 DWT Beamer 34 DWT Beamer 28 DWT Beamer 22 DWT Turner Roanoke Houston

SIMULATED GEMSTONES

Balfour Premium Silver™ 10K $ 592 $1,406 $ 567 $1,228 $ 535 $1,082 $ 509 $ 924 $ 342 $ 525 $ 342 $ 520 $ 342 $ 520

Beamer 12 DWT Beamer 5 DWT Beamer 3 DWT Progress Drillfield Grove CZ Grove Diamond Washington Smithfield Glade CZ Glade Diamond

$ 433 $ 335 $ 335 $ 335 $ 334 $ 334 $ 424 $ 334 $ 335 $ 334 $ 356

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

638 457 409 423 398 398 488 398 423 398 420

14K $1,893 $1,659 $1,414 $1,179 $ 678 $ 672 $ 672

18K Celestrium™ $2,488 $ 198 $2,138 $ 198 $1,798 $ 198 $1,468 $ 198 $ 828 $ 198 $ 820 $ 198 $ 820 $ 198

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

814 538 457 477 447 447 537 447 477 447 469

983 640 567 583 557 557 647 557 583 557 579

$ 188 $ 188 $ 188 $ 188 $ 188 $ 188 $ 278 $ 188 $ 188 $ 188 $ 210

January Garnet

May Emerald

February Amethyst

June Alexandrite

March Aquamarine

April White Spinel

July August Ruby Peridot

September October November December Blue Spinel Green Tourmaline Topaz Blue Zircon

Onyx

Tangerine

Fireblue

Rose Zircon

Also Available in genuine Hokie Stone! *Stone color will vary

STONE PRICING GENUINE STONES 13x11 12x10 8x6 Citrine Light Aquamarine Medium Aquamarine Swiss Blue Topaz London Blue Topaz Rhodolite Garnet Mozambique Garnet Light Amethyst Medium Amethyst Dark Amethyst Peridot Smokey Topaz Hokie Stone Oval Hokie Stone Square Hope Blue Star Sapphire Brown Tiger Eye Wyoming Jade

$ 168 $ 464 $ 493 $ 220 $ 220 $ 530 $ 215 $ 218 $ 252 $ 325

$ 126 $ 327 $ 409 $ 173 $ 173 $ 352 $ 173 $ 158 $ 189 $ 306

$ 42 $ 97 $ 94 $ 52 $ 52 $ 147 $ 105 $ 55­­­­ $ 84

$ 133­­­­ $ 1455 $ 1392 $ 150­­­­ $ 250 $ 234 $ 52­­­­ $ 28 $ 26 $ 19­­­­ $ 37 $ 32 $ 24 $ 115 $ 105 $ 63 $ 52 $ 52 $ 42 $ 52 $ 42 $ 42­­­­

DIAMONDS 1 Pt. $ 42 2 Pts. $ 52 3 Pts. $ 79 5 Pts. $ 110 10 Pts. $ 121 20 Pts. $ 350 25 Pts. $ 399

MORE OPTIONS:

CUBIC ZIRCONIA 1 Pt. $ 16 2 Pts. $ 21 3 Pts. $ 24 5 Pts. $ 31 10 Pts. $ 31 20 Pts. $ 29 25 Pts. $ 58

• TIME PAYMENT: Your balance will be divided into 2, 4, or 6 equal payments on your MasterCard, Visa, Discover, or American Express and charged at 30-day intervals until the balance is paid in full.

Please visit a Balfour representative at campus ring sale dates for more information.

PAYMENT OPTIONS: • PAYMENT IN FULL: Your payment may be with cash, check, credit card, or a combination of all of the above.

• C.O.D.: Leave a $100 deposit when you place your order and pay the balance due when the ring arrives.


LENGTHS AND CONDITIONS OF GUARANTEE REGARDING DEFECTS IN MATERIAL AND WORKMANSHIP: The rings are warranted to be free of defect in workmanship and materials.

LENGTH AND SCOPE OF GUARANTEE REGARDING STONES AND STONE DECORATION: Any damaged simulated stone will be replaced at no charge regardless of the cause of damage.

CONDITIONS AND ASSOCIATED CHARGES FOR RING RESIZING AND RING ADJUSTMENTS:

The ring will be resized at any time at no charge.

CONDITIONS AND ASSOCIATED CHARGES FOR REPLACEMENT OF DAMAGED RINGS:

If through normal wear and tear a ring is worn beyond satisfaction, it may be exchanged for a new ring. There is no charge for this remake. If a ring is damaged beyond satisfaction outside of these parameters, another ring can be purchased for the cost of Balfour’s existing remake charge.

ONDITIONS AND ASSOCIATED CHARGES C FOR ORDERING ADDITIONAL RINGS:

REFUND POLICY FOR RINGS RETURNED FOR STUDENTS WHO FAIL TO GRADUATE WITH THE CLASS DESIGNATED ON THE RING:

A classmate who fails to graduate with their Class may return the ring for a full refund less Class dues.

RESPONSIBILITY AND PROCEDURES FOR RESOLVING DISPUTES REGARDING THE VALIDITY OF WARRANTY CLAUSES: Disputes as

to the validity of the warranty clauses will be resolved by the Ring Design Committee. With Balfour’s philosophy that the customer is always right, such arbitration by the Committee should never be necessary.

CONDITIONS AND ASSOCIATED CHARGES FOR RESTORING RING FINISH: Should a classmate not be totally satisfied with his or her original choice of finish, refinishing would be completed at no charge.

CONDITIONS ON HOW REPAIRS ARE MADE, WHOM TO CONTACT, AND HOW SHIPPING RATES ARE HANDLED: Prior to graduation, service dates

will be established to handle any adjustments. All shipping, handling and insurance costs will be the responsibility of Balfour during these sessions.­

Additional rings may be ordered at any time. After December 31, 2018, the rings may be ordered at the prevailing price at time of order. Prevailing price will be determined according to cost of gold and stones at the time of ordering.

CONDITIONS AND ASSOCIATED CHARGES FOR CHANGES IN ACADEMIC COLLEGE DESTINATION: A classmate who changes colleges at Virginia Tech after a ring is purchased may return the ring to be remade with proper designation at no charge.

www.vt.edu/classring www.class.alumni.vt.edu/2018 www.alumni.vt.edu/classrings

Class Programs Sponsored by the Virginia Tech Alumni Association.


ALMA MATER Sing praise to Alma Mater dear, For V.P.I. we’ll ever cheer; Come lift your voices, swell the song, Our loyalties to her belong. So stand and sing, all hail to thee. VT, all hail to thee.

BID100VT-0016.25453 ©Balfour 1970–2016, all rights reserved.

VT 2018 Brochure  

VT 2018 Brochure

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