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SMALL TOGETHER

It was never supposed to be

We were supposed to always We were supposed to keep our o the ones we knew and had grow Friendswood, Texas City, Ned

Turner was supposed to sa

We were supposed to be top We were supposed to keep our c

But things change.

contents fall 2015

editor’s note................................................... 02 theme photos................................................. 03 school spotlight.......................................... 04 rule makers.................................................. 06 rule breakers................................................ 08 theme.................................................................. 10 theme applications.................................... 12 type.......................................................................14 NSPA picture finalists............................ 16 great shot photo contest.........................18 studio balfour..............................................20 social media.................................................. 22

Now, we are supposed to be of a new rival just down the of an old rival÷s return, of falling flat on our face And we should be.

We will fail sometime

We will be uncomfortab We will have to change our o We can÷t assume we÷re makin We can÷t wait until Regional co to buckle down.

We can't even fit within our wal

because a switch to 6A doesn÷t an increase in competitio It means an increase in popu It means our book room is in a sto It means some teachers won÷t ha It means we might not all have r

But we are

Photo by J. Smith

6A is big.

BIGGER

editor marilyn scoggins copy judi coolidge contributing writers dane erbach & leland mallett cover & page design oscar mascorro ads oscar mascorro & julie cosby circulation linda smith elements

1 fall 2015


note

editor’s

Marilyn Scoggins, editor Elements is published two times a school year for yearbook advisers and staff members by Balfour, 1550 West Mockingbird Lane, Dallas, Texas 75235, (800) 677-2800. Additional subscriptions $10. Bulk mail paid in Dallas, Texas. Fall Issue 2015. Copyright 2015 by Balfour. Printed in the United States. Reproduction permitted for educational purposes only. Unsolicited manuscripts welcome; magazine assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited material.

You’ve probably been around people who take a little too much pride in themselves, people who come on strong and talk big. Growing up, I received great advice from my mother. She warned me against showboating, encouraged modesty and discouraged boasting. Therefore, a glittery “show off” theme is not in line with my upbringing, but I’m certain even my mother would approve of bragging about yearbook excellence.

Outside of delighting in my grandchildren, I don’t know of anything that brings me more pleasure than boasting about student work. So what are we waiting for? Let’s get this party started. Do you hear the applause? Do you see the audience rising to their feet? We’re here to revel in, rave about and “show off” your designs (p. 6) your theme (p. 10) your theme applications (p. 12) & your type (p. 14). school spotlight – This issue’s school spotlight features Dane Erbach and his staff from McHenry High School, McHenry, Illinois. The adviser shares how he fostered a love of journalism

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2 fall 2015

in a school where no established program existed (p. 4). Years of trial and error help the WARRIOR staff create a plan, organize the workload, learn the ropes, let leaders lead, pick up the slack and celebrate the book. picture of the year finalists – Give it up for eleven student photographers recognized as the best of the best in NSPA’s picture of the year competition. Winners will be announced at the JEA/ NSPA Fall Journalism Convention in Orlando, Florida (p. 16). great shot photo contest – Starting November 1, student photographers can “show off” their best action photos for some recognition and a chance to win $500 (p. 18). studio balfour – Check out the all new studio.balfour.com. It’s where you’ll find everything you need to design, create & manage a stellar yearbook, worthy of showing off (p. 20). social media – Learn how use social media in your staff room. Leland Mallett shares how they got started and what they are doing well at Legacy High School (p. 22).

n’t so, dom le be hu b

w o sh f f o Send me an email (marilyn.scoggins@balfour.com) with your students’ work for us to share & inspire other staffs.


photos

theme

by Judi Coolidge

Face it. Students look at photos first and words later. Much later. As a result, photographs are essential to the understanding and enjoyment of the yearbook. Besides the cover and front endsheet, images in the opening are the readers’ first connection to the book’s theme; they expand, explain and illustrate it.

OPENING BIG just doesn’t happen. It is built piece by piece and DAY BY DAY. A hands-on learning experience illustrates how counting Skittles and M&Ms adds up to BIG understanding.

The title page photo(s) is one of the most important in the book. By capturing the theme concept and its tone, it should evoke an “aha” moment for the reader. Photos on opening spreads are an elaboration of the copy, helping the reader form mental images. They amplify the message. Divider photos illustrate the connection between the section and the theme. Finally, the closing photos offer a sense of finality or completeness, leaving the reader satisfied. What will 2016 look like? The theme, conveyed through the interplay of copy and photos, will stimulate memories, relate history and record names, times and places.

DAY BY DAY

DO LIFE 2

OAK MOUNTAIN

HIGH SCHOOL

DO LIFE

Mill Road 5476 Caldwell AL 35242 Birmingham, 0 office: 205.682.520 5 fax: 205.682.520 www.shelbyed.k12.al.us 155 faculty and staff: 1,615 student population:Sayers Kristi principal: Dr.

2 0 1 5

O N P A R A G

DO LIFE

AIN HIGH SCHOOL

OAK MOUNT VOLUME 16

doing a

Boyd's class, we were SWEET SCIENCE "In Mr.Skittles and M&Ms. Chemistry

lab that involved counting was a pretty fun lab, and at 10 class isn't my favorite, but it the end," Meredith Hayes least we got to eat candy10at uses candy as a handssaid. With Callen Popwell , Hayes Mae Pimentel on learning experience. Photo by

DIVIDER The Color Run, which supported Relay for Life, began BIG. At the start, multicolored powder covered race participants’ bodies and clothes for an IMMENSELY powerful moment.

Fuller

I'M A BELIEVER my life experience in

Next It was a big my first musical. because it was hoping 11 trying out again year I will be Savannah Criswell the for a bigger role," showing of Shrek 10 , 10 said. At the final Cooper Bullock , Lily 12 Musical, Bailey Stewart , 11 Ty Davis , Savannah 11 , and Criswell perform Breanna Allen Photo by Alyssa West "What's up, Duloc?"

Establishing the setting in time and place is an important function of theme-related photos. For example, the eighties are brought to life with big hair, mullets, up-turned collars, Pac-Man, Walkmans and “Just say no.” Imagine celebrating a fiftieth birthday with friends and family and having someone share your 1983 yearbook.

COVER The book urges students to “DO LIFE BIG.” The vibrant green section of the word “BIG” becomes 3-dimensional as it separates from the other two sections of the word.

TITLE The title page captures a BIG moment. Shrek the Musical, with its complex sets and costumes and big musical numbers, stretched the cast and crew to new heights.

3

4

IMMENSELY

A SPLASH OF COLOR "The paint certainly made

the run a lot more fun. It was kinda hard to see at some points, but it was fun to see how many different colors you could get on your shirt, and it was for a great cause," Rob Fuller11 said. With several classmates and participants, Fuller celebrates the success of the Color Run which supported Relay for Life. Photo by Emma Junck

5

Theme-Related Photos for visual validation

DIVIDER Glenda Dawson didn’t “crumble.” In fact, they were ready to “rumble.” “Stop that” becomes “top that” through the magic of typography. The images capture defining moments during the year, including a weekend where students “decked out Dawson” to create a sense of community.

L

GLENDA

SCHOO DAWSON HIGH

TITLE The title page pictures the “Eagle Addicts,” who, win or lose, support their teams.

OPENING Despite their fears, players were pumped as a result of fan support. Reconfiguring divisions pitted the two Pearland schools against each other in “the first ever Pearland Bowl.” Despite the fact that they were “small together,” they were “all together.”

COVER The book commemorates Glenda Dawson’s “ascension” to 6A. With 2,290 students, they didn’t think they could compete against the bigger 6A schools.

023756 24323 0915

Theme-related photos may also do the following: • Establish varied viewpoints, particularly the individual experience and the collective experience. • Contribute to textual coherence by connecting abstract ideas with specific details of the year. • Reinforce the text with photos that are a restatement of the words. • Represent relatively concrete, familiar experiences.

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shofw of

Nick Bellich

your

plans

learning to love journalism SCHOOL SPOTLIGHT

McHenry High School

Dane Erbach McHenry, Illinois

McHenry High School is not a school where an established and hallowed journalism program exists. In fact, it is the only school around us that doesn’t have a newspaper. The closest thing to one is called “The Flush,” a publication that covers the week’s athletic schedule and features a witty meme torn from someone’s Tumblr. All of this is on a succinct single page that hangs in the student bathroom stalls. Traditionally, yearbook – the school’s only official publication – has been a dumping ground for students who needed an extra English credit, particularly those hoping to take it easy their senior year. This has changed for the better in the recent years, but the problem remains the same: A number of the students who take yearbook do not possess an intrinsic interest in journalism – at least not initially. I’m really proud of how McHenry’s yearbook program has evolved in the past few years. It’s not only because we’ve earned some state and national recognition or because we’ve challenged ourselves more and more with each new volume. Instead, I’m gratified that my students, who joined yearbook because they needed a class to fill their schedules, developed into passionate journalists. It may have been limited to the school year, but in some cases, they became committed journalists for life. In order to foster this metamorphosis, I’ve gone through years of trial and error, and found that passion develops more from a dynamic process than a final product.

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Vikki Rivera

Make a Plan Every year, my returning staffers join me at Balfour’s Midwest Yearbook Conference. It’s a busy weekend, but it’s worth it for the students. Not only do they get to visit a college campus, but these veterans play a critical role in developing the yearbook’s theme and design which is an honor for them. Plus, they get to see their ideas materialize during a cover artist session. It is magical. Although the staff members sit through sessions covering things they already know, they come away with a feeling of validation and mastery. They return to the classroom with renewed confidence and fresh ideas.

Sarah Gudgeon, Emily Maye & Kat Ripoli

Organize the Staff This year, my students are organized into teams based on their talents and interests in layout, photography, feature writing, caption writing and sidebars. I know that other advisers organize their staffs this way, but academic classes at our school require assessments that make it difficult to implement this organization. I am required to evaluate my students in design, writing and photography even if it doesn’t support yearbook production. Our old way of working didn’t work, so we’re trying something new. It will require that I assess my students differently (and carefully), but it will also allow each staff member to develop a specialty and work cooperatively with the other teams.

Learn the Ropes Because my students come into class so green, we devote the first quarter of the year learning the basics of layout, photography, caption writing and feature writing. Every year, these weeks make me nervous because there are so many skills to master in only a couple of months. Simultaneously, events are taking place that we need to cover. I let my veteran students take care of fall coverage while I give the “rookies” the strong foundation they will need to create the book. Although I know new staffers are a little deficient, I have learned they will acquire skills as we build the book.

Let Leaders Lead I’ve always enjoyed watching my editors blossom into experts in yearbook, discovering their journalistic passions, but I’ve often struggled to nurture these students into responsible and accountable leaders. Sadly, they’ve left me hanging too often. This year, I hope to resolve this problem by giving them more responsibility. It sounds contradictory, doesn’t it? But I’ve seen students take more ownership and pride when I give them a heavier load. My editorial board this year will be responsible for giving assignments and providing feedback. As a true test of their leadership, they will be held accountable for their team. All of this is in addition to completing their assignments.

Emily Simpson & Nicole Kowalski

Pick Up the Slack Weekly meetings with my editors will help me keep tabs on individual staff members, including my editors. In addition a more organized assignment schedule will allow us to meet our deadlines more efficiently. But I know that, in the end, it’s my job to make sure the yearbook is the best it can be. So I tidy up copy, spell check names, nudge graphics and ensure that photos don’t repeat on multiple pages. Occasionally, I’ll even write a caption or reorganize a layout, and I’ll carry a camera around all year. I don’t like to admit it – after all, it’s the student’s book, right? – but we are steering the ship, and we want to be proud of our work at the end of the day.

Celebrate Together We started sending our yearbook out to more competitions, and we were always surprised to receive positive feedback. Of course, it’s not about what accolades we received; it was about celebrating how much we’ve grown and reveling in the improvements we made. We’re a staff that stumbled into creating a yearbook based on journalistic standards; it’s not where we thought we’d end up. We learned, however, with the right amount of planning and organization, combined with a solid foundation and leadership, we can accomplish things that we never thought wwe could.

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CLUBS AND ACADEMICS army services page by Monica Sheth

Armed and Ready In the Bellaire Church of Christ parking lot, Valeria Martinez, Michael Garza, Angela Velasco, Kevin Koy, Teddy Angulo, Cinthia Landaverde and Brian Viveros march after school. “In rifle competitions we always did well because we were prepared,” Garza said. “We were able to do the best we could because of practice every day.” Christina Valdez

RISING IN

THE RANKS

139

BEFORE THE HOMECOMING game against Chavez, Yasmin Ventura, Katherine Adame, Angel Ayala and Angela Velasco lead JROTC out on the Bulter Stadium field. “I carried out the flags before any event that JROTC participated in,” Velasco said. “I realized that I was important to the program because our group couldn’t bring them out without my help.” Ronnie Jefferson

memorable moments bring cadets together

shofw of

“Thanks to the JROTC program, I faced my biggest fear at the JROTC Cadet Leadership Challenge summer camp. I was always afraid of heights and when my company arrived to the rappelling tower, I was terrified. CSM (Brian) Briggs and MSG (Ronnie)Jefferson encouraged us to face our fears and try it out. When I was on top of that 60 ft tower, my heart was beating hard, but I still jumped. I did have a few tears from being scared, but I was glad I faced my biggest fear.” Luz Rodriguez “For the first time, we organized a Meet and Greet with music, games and food for cadets. I had a blast and met people that I never knew were in the JROTC program. I was surprised to meet so many other members of the program for the first time. Also I created a few games that we played like Musical Chairs and Rank Bingo that were fun. It made me feel like I was a part of something important. The event was a success for its first year and over 100 cadets attended.” Jennifer Iglesias

“One of the most interesting events we conducted was a service learning project in which several groups of JROTC members went to different houses around the city. We put up and decorated a Christmas tree and gave every family a turkey. I liked it because I got to experience something that I have never done before. During the whole process, I felt satisfied because I was helping somebody else.” Jaime Gallegos “When I was scheduled back into the JROTC program again, I wasn’t very confident since I was not the most active cadet my freshman year. However, when I went into class the first day, CSM (Brian) Briggs saw me and pointed out that he saw my name on his roster and was glad to see that I was back in the program. I never thought that he would have remembered or even known who I was. This made me realize how special the program was because no matter who I was, I still belonged in JROTC.” Sabrina Cruz

DURING 6TH PERIOD, MSG Ronnie Jefferson instructs Zyrek Penn, Mya Reese and Darla Munoz how to fold the American flag. “The flag is one of the most important symbols of the United States,” Munoz said. “When I learned how to fold the flag, I realized that this skill was essential to have if I was going to be involved in the Army. It also was one of my favorite parts of the Army since it symbolized respect and honor for the people that spent a portion of their lives defending our country.” Tiara Tanugraha

BEHIND THE SCENES 1:00 p.m.

In the JROTC 6th period class, Selina Gonzalez and Yaquelin Fuentes read a textbook on the history of N. Salas armed services.

LUIS GONZALEZ 3:30 p.m.

After school on the track field, Angel Macias and Ian Sanchez run a mile in physical training practice to build endurance. Brice Song

4:00 p.m.

To prepare for competitons, Brian Ramos and Vilma Matzar work out by doing push-ups and planks on the soccer field. Brice Song

4:30 p.m.

5:00 p.m.

“Exercising was important because it kept me fit. In competition, endurance was essential to win.”

As a part of physical training, For two hours every day, Yesenia Escamilla, Daniela Adriana Landaverde, Lopez and Stephanie Rojo Jonathan Gil, Ricardo do high knee kick drills. Delrio and Paula Vazquez Brice Song practice with rifles. T. Tanugraha

designs

your rule maker

Nychollete Easter

W O R L D

ALL FALL DOWN Freshmen Preston Kopp, Kaleb McAlexander and Reese Jucker race to build a gingerbread house at the German holiday party. The contest was to build a gingerbread house. After the groups built their house they were then judged to win either messiest, most edible or most sugary. "It's awesome being in German," Kopp said.

Gracie Wood and Myralexis Tijerina, 10

BRUSH STROKES Sophomores Gracie Wood and Myralexis Tijerina paint each other's faces at the ASL Deaf Picnic. JUMP HIGH Senior Keegan Washburn and juniors Erianna Thomas and Lauren Connor enjoy jumping on the moon bounce at the ASL deaf picnic. Washburn has been in ASL all of highschool and wants to pursue a course in ASL. “I like interacting with the deaf community,” Washburn said.

JUST ANOTHER LANGUAGE

Mia Gomm, 9

Sarah Wood and Myralexis Tijerina, 10

Nathan Arnold, 10

Abigail Bass and Amaya Chavez, 9

Reese Jucker, Kaleb McAlexander and Preston Kopp, 9

Outspoken

“I enjoy Spanish so much, and I expect to use it when I go to school to be a teacher.”

Reagan Stone

W O R L D L A N G U A G E G R O U P S A D D C U LT U R E T O C L A S S

The reasons vary- whether to look good on college applicaions, an actual interest in Dylan Reep, 12 Ryan Thomas,10 Max Pawloski, 12

Hosted in the library during the first semester, the Hour of Code was a one hour introduction to computer science, focused on making the language of computer coding easier to understand. Librarian Terry Sanchez assisted students who were interested in testing the computer science waters. Senior Rebecca Polk participated in the event. “It was actually quite fun, I had to do this thing where I had to draw a picture using Java Script. It was a very enjoyable experience,” Polk said.

98 World Languages

6 fall 2015

L A N G U A G E S

Macy Frazier, 9, Kate Vana, 11

Claudia Taylor Johnson High School

elements

Tiara Tanugraha

Christina Valdez

Brice Song

JOHNSON HOSTS HOUR OF CODE TO INTRODUCE A NEW LANGUAGE OF SORTS

The dominant module covers traditional foreign language classes, French and Spanish. The secondary modules, however, cover different languages: computer code, American Sign Language and German. Forty students are pictured and quoted on the spread.

“I had additional rifle practice with some friends to get better at it since I knew I could improve.”

“We worked so hard to win the trophy that I couldn’t pass up the chance to hold it at Cardinal Camp.”

HARD WORK PAYS OFF

NATALIE FALS-ROLONG

Bellaire, Texas Mica Segal, adviser

San Antonio, Texas Velissa Jewett, adviser

LIZBETH LEAL

“JROTC helped me to not only be more involved in school but also it helped me with academics. The program pushed me to excel in all my classes. If I needed help, they provided it.”

Bellaire High School Strong verbal/visual connection conveys the message of the spread. Alternative copy tells the story from four distinctive viewpoints. Secondary coverage includes a JROTC timeline and highlights of the year. A total of 36 cadets are covered.

CAMILA WILSON

PARTY DIEM The Latin Club comes together after their meeting to enjoy some pizza and fun times. Max Pawloski, a senior, has been in Latin for the last 4 years. “It’s a good time to talk about the club’s upcoming events,” Rawloski said. photo by Rebecca Polk SAY QUESO Senior Kathryn Pack takes a photo in the Spanish club’s photo booth. This was Pack’s first year in Spanish. “The one fun thing we did was the caroling and I got to give out candy,” Pack said. FELIZ NAVIDAD Juniors Thomas Ling, Alex Ross, freshman Desiree Banda and Senora Henderson stand and wait to sing carols in Spanish to classes. Ross has been in spanish for two years and enjoys it because its fun. "My favorite memory from Spanish class so far has been the caroling,"Ross said.

the language or the fact that it's required for most of the graduation plans, most students will take a language class. For some, the foreign language of their choice will play a part in the near future, like sophomore Reagan Stone, who plans to use Spanish to communicate with others in their native language, as well as open up job oppurtunities. "I enjoy Spanish so much, and expect to use it when I go to school to be a teacher," Stone said. Junior Jessica Lee also expects for her foreign language, French, to aid her down the line. "I took French so I can study abroad, and it'll look good on college applications to know multiple languages," Lee said. However, whatever the reason, students experienced many benefits by immersing into the culture surrounding the language. "My favorite part is getting to know the community and how accepting they are," Katelyn Johnson said. Junior Jakob Bingle also sees a practical side of learning another language. "I took Spanish because it's good to know since we are surrounded by Spanish speaking countries and I can sart to understand people," Bingle said. Zeshaan Dhuka, 12, Andrew Figueroa, 9

BY LAUREN NEFF AND CORINE PEREZ

Organizations 99


teacherisms

Kristin Gunter: Applied Reading Improvement; Inclusion English I, III Darrell Hagemann: Teen Leadership; Boys’ Basketball Scott Hall: Digital and Interactive Media; Banking and Finance; Ad Sales; Sport Marketing; Football Melanie Hardeway: Interpreter Jennifer Harris: Inclusion Social Studies; Applied Government; Applied Economics Naomi Hart-Sobkwiak: ECA; Principles of Health Science; HOSA

1

2

199

3 1. Mr. Daniel Ventura: “Can you feel the PHYSICS?!” – Mason Ruether 11 2. Mrs. Dell Passovoy: “Smart CHON.” – Ryan Walker 9 Mrs. Dell Passovoy: “Chatty CHON.” – Tanner Flores 10

Jackie Hartle: FOCUS; Applied Social Skills; Brony Club Susan Henry: Chemistry; Pre-AP Chemistry Guadalupe Hernandez: Housekeeping Rachel Hirsch: AP Biology; Biology, Inclusion Biology Matt Hoover: World History, Inclusion World History; Boys and Girls Golf Erin Hudson: Deaf Education

3. Mr. Al Balmer: “Oh, my god, look at that.” – Abby Wagner 11

5

4 4. Mr. Travis Ancelet: “Just one more time.” – Sophia Beausoleil 11

Huey Huynh: Chemistry; IPC inclusion; Wrestling; Football Sherilyn Jackson: Child Guidance; Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness; Principles of Education and Training; Principles of Human Service Emily Jensen: Chaos; Pre-Calculus Aaron Johnson: Theater II, III; Production I; Technical Theater; Drama Club, Texas Forensic Association, One Act Play Dr. Chris Karaguleff: Conceptual Physics; Inclusion Conceptual Physics; Physics; Robotics Club Kate Kennedy: Professional Communications; Volleyball; Softball

5. Coach Calvin Guillory: “Nyaa.” – Charlie Stevenson

12

6. Coach Andy Dawson: “Come on, be an athlete!” – Mark Martinez 12

7

8

9 7. Mr. Jason Dimiceli: “Don’t be stupid.” – Michael Mollenhauer 11

Stephanie Kidwell: Counselor (W-Z) Mark Killingbeck: Spanish I, Pre AP Spanish II; Spanish Club Abigail Kleinsmith: Chemistry, Pre-AP Chemistry, Inclusion Chemistry, Sheltered Chemistry Jay Krishnan: Biology, Pre-AP Biology; Serving Our Society Dina Kuempel: Counselor (Scott-V) Laurie Lanier: Administrative Assistant; Substitute Coordinator

8. Mr. Chris Lockamy: “Swag Palace.” – Duncan McAlister 10 9. Mr. Larry Vinklarek: “I’m not say. I’m just saying.” – Luke Proctor 12

Andrea Larson: ESOL I, II; Pure Sheltered ELA III/IV; Practical Writing; ESL Reading; ELL Walter Lee: Principles of Engineering; Digital Electronics; Video Game Club; McNeil Engineering Club Charity Lehr: English I, III Carolyn Lethin: Pre-AP World Geography, Inclusion World Geography; Cheer Ruby Lozano: Administrative Assistant Mandy Lynch: Geometry, Inclusion Geometry; Intervention

Diana Morgan: Attendance Christian Morrow: Pre-AP English I, English I, Inclusion English I; Hip Hop Club Barbara Naylor: Spanish II; Pre-AP Spanish II; Spanish IV Jane Neu: Chemistry; Pre-AP Biology; Intervention; Leadership Team; Science Dept. Chair Daniel Nguyen: Economics; AVID; Key Club; Doctor Who Club Carrie Nuncio: Science and Business Inclusion Support

Sandra O’Donnell: Job Coach Deborah Owen: Special Education Paraprofessional Debbie Palmer: AP English IV; Practical Writing; UIL Literary Criticism; AP Ambassadors Corey Parham: Football; ISS Joanne Passwaters: Inclusion Algebra I John Paulson: FOCUS; Morning Detention

Rod Machen: English IV Diane Martinez: FCC Lynn Matthews: Health Science; HOSA Melony Matthews: Pre-AP Pre Calculus; Intervention; Leadership Team; Math Dept. Chair; BITS; Mu Alpha Theta Elaine McConnell: Administrative Assistant Brittney McDade: Health; Volleyball; Basketball

Michael McDonald: Advanced Automotive Technology; Principles of Transportation, Distribution and Logistics; Energy, Power and Transportation Systems; Automotive Technology Sami McLane: Psychology; Sociology; Professional Communication; Volleyball; Soccer Vicki Miller: Business Information Management I, II Kirk Mollenkopf: Head Athletic Trainer; Student Athletic Trainers Jill Montoro: Spanish I, III; Pre-AP Spanish III; National Spanish Honor Society Jennifer Moore: ISS; Girls’ Basketball; Track

finding your center. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO GAIN

FROM HIGH SCHOOL?

What I want to gain from high school is to get a diploma, a good education, more friends and mainly, to get a scholarship in athletics and academics. – brooke addison 9

6

Designed by: Sarah Han; Photo Editor: Sarah Han; Reporter: Zane Johnson

People: Teacherisms; Faculty: Gunter-Pickens

198

Cindy Peeler: Special Education Paraprofessional Erin Pena: Production II-IV; Advanced Theater I; Costume Design; Fashion Design; Drama Club; One Act Play; Texas Forensic Association; Fashion Design Club Lisa Perez: Inclusion World Geography; World Geography Vanessa Perez: AP Chemistry; Pre-AP Chemistry Lindsey Phillips: US History; Sheltered US History; Philosophy; Intervention; Leadership Team; National Honor Society Ashley Pickens: Deaf Education

I want to get to know computers and have more experience with how they work. I want to bring that to college. – parker tate 10

I want to gain friends that will stick around with me for a long time. – blake willman 10

When I look back on high school, I want to be proud of my grades and the focus I had. – skylynn neal 11

I want to learn new skills in welding because welding is the job that I’m most interested in for my future career. – dylan moss 9

I want to be an aerospace engineer because it’s fascinating to me and I love math and science. – celest reyes 10

McNeil High School Austin, Texas Theresa Proctor, adviser

The circular motif, introduced on the cover, continues through the book with subtle graphic touches. All teachers’ classes and extracurricular activities are listed with their names to the outside of the portrait panel. A whole-book link, running through the book, gives students a reason to check out faculty pages.

Photo by Julian Carvajal (Creative Commons)

bookworms b papercuts

&

ROBINSON MEMORIAL LIBRARY HOSTS READERS AND BOOK FAIR

pop up pictures • Gazing at a pop-up book written by Robert Sabuda, a paper engineer, third grade boys Jordan Mumford, Noah Mitchell, Mark Kuenstle, Jack Arnold, Hari Gokulakrishan, and Keegan Benson listen as librarian Erika Grove reads. “The boys loved it. They were going to make their own pop up pictures but the smartboard had techincal difficulties,” Mrs. Grove said. “The T-rex looked so real, you could tell it took a long time to make,” Jordan said. • photo Jared Tulio little learner • The smallest of the Jimeno clan, Lola Jimeno ’28 works on her English pronunciation. Lola’s older siblings Gonzalo ’24 and Maria ’16 attended the school for three years and became fluent in English. The Jimenos moved to Texas from Madrid, Spain in 2013. • Photo Beatrice Domingo economics • In the silence of the library, Alyssa Miller ’16 reads over the economics textbook. On Wednesdays, Alyssa went over

it one last time before class. The junior class studied government with teacher Nan Wright during the first semester, but then shifted to Economics during the second semester. • photo Beatrice Domingo gulliver’s travels • Doing some casual reading, high schooler Matthew Hrncir ’15 makes some new lower school friends. First graders Wyatt Wire, Matthew Lorch, and Maksim Ilyan, all ’26, decided to get comfortable next to their favorite senior. “I was reading Gulliver’s Travels and they just came and sat on the couch next to me,” Matthew said. Matthew liked the library, because it was one of the best places in school to find a serene, quiet spot. “Honestly the couch is the best part,” Matthew said. • photo Jared Tulio

captions & layout Alex Aultman TEACHER FEATURE rom North Carolina to Houston, Erika Grove has been everywhere. “My dad was in the military, so my family and I moved a lot.” Mrs. Grove said. Mrs. Grove studied Library and Information Science at East Carolina University and taught fifth grade at North Carolina Mountainview Intermediate school. “I thought it was time for a little change,” Mrs. Grove said. In 2013 she moved to Houston. “I heard wonderful things about this school. I love working with Ms. Pat Doyle, and the students of course,” she said. When asked about the weirdest experience she has had as a librarian, an interesting story popped into her head. “I was a librarian at a different school, and a student turned in a book... covered in urine,” she said. “I don’t know why the student wouldn’t just throw the book away.” story & photo Alex Aultman

F BOOK FAIR COSTUMES davy crockett • During the annual book fair, Vedant Patil ’25 dressed as Yoda from the book, “The Strange Case of Origami Yoda.” shows his mask to his classmates Ashton Hall and George Braden. Ashton dressed as the mouse from “The Mouse and the Motorcycle.” George dressed as American hero, Davy Crockett, from the book “Who Was Davy Crockett?”. The boys got to wear their costumes to school the day of the book fair. • photo Beatrice Domingo harry potter and mrs. halsell • Dressed as Harry Potter, Jonathan Li ’25 shows kindergarten teacher Lucy Halsell his book “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”. • photo Beatrice Domingo airplane pilot • In the classroom, Evan McCray and Sawyer Bloesch, listen to homeroom teacher Lali Lane tell them where they will be stopping on their book fair tour of the campus. • photo Sam Morris merida and a penguin • Wearing a Merida and a Penguin costume, Grace Crumley ’26 and Catherine Mackin ’26 line up to parade around the school in their costumes. “I dressed as a penguin from “Mr. Popper’s Penguins” because it’s one of my favorite books. Penguins are also my favorite animal,” said Grace. • photo Beatrice Domingo

64 gym

St. Thomas’ Episcopal School Houston, Texas David Graves, adviser

The shape introduced on the cover is repeated on spreads for visual continuity. The verbal/visual connection between the dominant photo and headline reinforces the message of the spread. To create reader-friendly copy, subheads are inserted into text. Color is used very effectively.

library • book fair 65

elements

7 fall 2015


44

STUDENT LIFE

semester one - 10/6

“IT WAS A GREAT DAY TO GO ALL OUT, MAKE A SCENE AND SHOW PRIDE FOR AMERICA.”

quote by Zach Rahner (12)

1.

6.

10.

14.

1. Max Pagan (8) 2. @baybaywhitley Remy Rudd (12),

Baylee Whitley (11), Ravenel Rudd (12)

3. Brian Putnam (11) 4. Denis Koksal-Rivet (12), Evan Jing

2.

3.

15.

7. 11. 16. 8.

12.

4.

17.

9. 13. 5.

(12), Jenny Ryan (12) 5. Matthew Olinde (8), David Benjamin (8), John Mercaldo (8), Jaden Bonar (8) 6. “It was awesome to be able to play and cheer my team mates on.” Hunter Altman (11), Ricky Berthiaume (11), Sean Taylor (11), Justin Ganiban (11), Josh Moisand (11) 7. Mr. James Clark, Mrs. Jocey Szmidt, Reece Winkler (12), Chass Charroux (12) 8. @suzannah10 Isabel Sims (11), Suzannah Boyle (12) 9. Adriana Melendez (9) 10. “It was exciting to be able to show off my American pride.” Emma Walker (11), Barrett Hess (11) 11. Cindy Hall (10), Zoe Perkins (10) 12. Maria Van Allen (12) 13. “After watching older kids play powder puff for so many years, it was awesome to finally be able to play.” Alex Hernandez (11) 14. “The game was really intense,it was hard to take my eyes off of it.” Stacey Torkelson (11), Madeline Parry (10) 15. @alexischamoun Faith Valenti (12), Alexis Chamoun (12) 16. Katie Merlin (12), Victoria Zeger (12), Katie Hoagland (12), Stuti Mishra (11), Louis Zhao (10), Ann Bostanjian (12), Lauren Folio (12), Rachel Forman (12), Alyssa Nelson (12) 17. Jack Wadsworth (8) see index for photo credits

Holy Trinity Episcopal Academy Melbourne, Florida Sarah Tricano, adviser

“WE LOVE THE SILLY AND GOOFY CHARISMA MINIONS POSSESS SO IT WAS PERFECT FOR TWIN DAY.” quote by Jenny Ryan (12)

Student involvement is critical to a successful Spirit Week. The activities and antics of the fun-filled week cannot be covered with a dozen pictures. As a result, Trinity HS tried a different angle, turning the book on its side, and covering approximately 50 students per page. The pages have a dominant element and all pictures have identifications.

15.

1.

16.

2.

6.

11.

7.

12.

17.

8.

3.

4.

9.

18. 19. 14.

5.

45

page by Emma Walker & Lauren Stevens

SPIRIT WEEK

8 fall 2015

(11), Kathy Jara (11)

2. Thomas Guyton (10), Anna Barger (10) 3. Justin Ganiban (11), Mitchell Kara (11) 4. Lindsey Webb (12), Nick Belsten (12),

13.

elements

1. @itsjustkristian Kristian Del Rosario

10.

Joanna Jara (12) 5. Jordan Vines (9), Anthony Mottarella (9) 6. Myles Chapman (7), Trenton Gowins (7) 7. Gianna Gayles (10), Talia Douglas (10) 8. Jimmy Reinman (12) 9. @oliviakaye15 Matt Austin (11), Olivia Pitten (11) 10. Molly Newlin (7), Brooke Boddy (7), Alexandra Martin (7) 11. “It was such a great and wonderful experience to go up there and know that I am supported by such loving and caring friends and teachers and staff.” Stuti Mishra (11), Joye Oni (11), Chass Charroux (12), Gabo Perez- Alvarez (10) 12. @emilyclarkkkk Gisela Martinez (10), Jalen Brown (11), London Gowins (12), Emily Clark (10) 13. @laurentstevens Kelly Cantelou (10), Lauren Stevens (10) 14. “Tuesday was a fun day to get together with your friends and come up with something funny to wear.” Daniel Cronin (11), Nick Olinde (12), Hunter Altman (11) 15. Jamie Perry (10), Olivia McHenry (10) 16. Lily Rugar (9), Liam Whitfield (9) 17. @lisamariax Lisamarie Richardson (9), Karen Roque (9) 18. Thomas Baez (10), Gavin Pate (10) 19. Victoria Araj (9), Mary Rossi (9) see index for photo credits

d


Get your fat pants ready 1 Southwell's

shofw of your rule breaker

What to order:

1

WORD ON THE STREET: SCRUMPTIOUS “All the food vendors are amazing, and you can't go wrong with any of them." Georgia Van Os | 9

Lunch vendors offer students a world of options Sydney Johnson, Reporter

5 Avalon Diner

5

What to order:

"I like the people who work there. They are always so nice and give me the rainbow sprinkles when I ask for them. Sometimes the line is long, but they make it go pretty fast." Noah Raines | 11

Chicken Fingers Grilled Cheese Hamburger Milkshake

Pancakes Waffles Bacon Biscuits and Gravy

Gabriella Saputelli | 9

2

2 Russo's Pizza What to order:

6 Firehouse

"I order from Russo's because they are always fast, and the food is great. A slice of pizza is the perfect amount of food for lunch. It's not too much, but I'm still full after."

Cheese Pizza Pepperoni Pizza House Salad Greek Salad

"They have really good food, and one order of chicken is enough food for me and my friends. I love the guy who delivers the food. He's so nice, and it makes me want to order more."

Chicken Fingers

What to order:

7

3

"I like Firehouse because their sandwiches are delicious, and knowing that they'll always have a sandwich for me is heart warming. The Italian sandwich is the best." Harris Cooley | 10

Italian Sub Steak & Cheese Sub Hook & Ladder Sub Firehouse Hero Sub

Kendall Simpson | 12

3 Chick-fil-A What to order:

7 Hunan Inn What to order:

"I like Chick-fil-A because it always fills me up, and when I'm not at school, I go there. Also, it's really good and very affordable."

Chicken Sandwich 8-count Nuggets

"I order from Hunan because it is a lot of food. It can feed me and a friend. They are always fast, and the line is way shorter than Jonathan's or Chick-fil-A."

Sesame Chicken Fried Rice Dumplings

4

Waffle Fries

Wesley Jones | 9

Emma Lay | 11

4 Freebirds What to order:

8

8

6

"They always come through with good orders, and you can't go wrong with the queso. Last year, they would forget your order sometimes, but this year, they don't." Breno Nasser | 12

Jonathan's the Rub

What to order:

designs Fashion Trends Burrito Salad

Quesadilla

Chips & Queso

14

"I love to eat Jonathan's because the food is great, and I love food. Everyone needs to have one of their hamburgers before they die. They are the best." Peyton Childress | 10

Rub Burger

Caesar Salad House Salad

Chicken Sandwich

student life

student life

seniors food vendors

seniors food vendors

15

What’s in

Memorial High School

Houston, Texas Holly Hartman, adviser Who wouldn’t stop and check out this spread? (The only drawback is the mention of fat pants.) Students reflect on menu offerings and advantages of patronizing particular vendors.

north face

“I like North Face jackets because they’re warm and they match everything.” Kaitlyn Gooch, 12 “I like them because they’re soft, comfy and cute.” Mariah Kane, 10

$119

jandals These sandals were known as jandals which was a combination of the words Jesus and sandals. They were an alternative to flip flops “They’re in season and and Hayden Taylor, 11, they keep my toesies wore them all the time. warm.” “I really love flip flops, Destiny Hurd, 10 and everyone always tells me what a disaster flip flops are, so I got some jandals and they’re way cuter to look at and more comfortable,” Taylor said.

boots

32

“I like them because they’re beautiful and there are so many

monograms Personalizing things had become the new trend with monograms. Lauren Wilke,, 11, had everything from her school supplies to her car monogrammed. “It goes with my style and I think they’re cute,” Wilke said.

different types.” Nicole Moldenhauer, 10

These sandals were not only great for hiking, they were great to do anything. With their comfortable soles and the straps that would fit to your size, they made every day activities easy. Natalie Von Tress, 12, wore hers all the time. “They have great arch support and you can do anything in them. They’re an alternative to tennis shoes,” Von Tress said.

patagonia “It’s really warm and really soft and it feels like a blanket.” Liesl Prater, 10 “They have a really cool pattern on them and they’re different.” Kennedy Riddle, 9

“They’re cute and they go with a lot of my outfits when I dress up.” Callie Browning, 11

joggers

“I like the fit and I don’t like loose baggy pants. They look good on me.” Caelan Rios, 11

converse

chubbies

“I never eat the last bite of my burger.” -Kenadie Peck, 10

“I am colorblind.” -Haley Whiteside, 12

“They’re more comfortable and they’re awesome.” Garrett Shadwick, 10

“They’re comfortable and they go with anything.” Taylor Kuschel, 11

“They’re functional and easy to match things with.” Sulia Drewery, 10

Fashion trends

Christopher Waggoner

“If my handwriting doesn’t look perfect, I have to get a new piece of paper.” -Bailey Gregory, 11

“I’ve read over 100 books since summer.” -Amy Rowles, 10 X

“I don’t eat fat Cheetos.” -Jordan Hopkins, 11

“I’m bow-legged.” -Daniella Tarango, 11e, X

“I don’t eat peanut butter.” -Paige Stamm, 11

“I played tuba in middle school.” -Madeline Barnes, 11e, X

page by Melissa Kenney

33

“I can’t leave the house without some Chapstick.” -Jaylee Chavera, 9

Rouse High School

“I just loved getting to know girls from other teams.” -Madison Hanson, 10 “My favorite dance was ‘The Innocent’ because it showed how technically good our team is and how we can come together to create such a beautiful dance.” -Cassie Sellers, 11 “I enjoyed meeting the girls I kicked next to in the senior kick. They followed me on Instagram so we’re friends now.” -Lindsey Woods, 12

“Being a part of iDance was an honor and such an incredible experience. It was so cool seeing the talent brought to the floor by all the different teams.” -Brittany Lawrence, 10

“I liked the finale because all the teams came together. It’s cool because we don’t get to see them anymore because of our new district.” -Kaitlynn Morris, 12 “My favorite part of iDance was the energy backstage because it gets me hyped and ready to dance.” -Jocelyn Gomez, 11 “The JV ensemble was my favorite because it was fun getting to know the girls from different schools.” -Maegan Fisher, 10 “My favorite dance was ‘The Wanderer’ because it was the first time dancing for our district as an officer line.” -Jordyn LaFevers, 11

2

“I really enjoyed being around all my friends and dancing alongside other teams.” -Angelina Barba, 10

1

“ ‘The Soldier’ was my favorite because it was fun and energetic.” -Hope Russo-Bell, 11 “ ‘The Innocent’ was my favorite because it was so captivating to the audience and created a whole different vibe.” -Emma Seymour, 11

Winding

gears

“I thought iDance was incredible because you got to really get to know all these different types of people in two days and you get to see what all the other teams are capable of.” -Courtney Woods, 11

Band performs “Clockworks” show for marching season, advances to area

(Below) The Royals reach to the light during their contemporary routine, “The Innocent.” (Right) Senior Kaila Burritt performs during the officer routine “The Wanderer.”

Trumpet & euphonium section

Jonathan Akene, 10

PHOTO BY ASHTIN LAND

PHOTO BY CORINA DOMINGUEZ

Jordan Howard, 10

Band & Color Guard

3

1. For the finale, senior Caitlin Meuth performs the traditional routine with the Royals and dance teams from Cedar Park, Leander, Vista Ridge and Vandegrift. 2. During iDance, sophomore Kaylee Spates performs “RIP,” a zombie hip hop routine. 3. Senior Katy Buchanan dances to “The Hero,” a Ninja Turtle hip hop routine.

LET THERE BE LIGHT

022

PAGE BY JACI CHAVERA, KEESLEY STROHSCHEIN & BETHANY KURDI

“I liked ‘The Hero’ because it was super energetic and entertaining for the audience.” -Meghan Carter, 11

“My favorite dance was ‘The Gossip’ because it was different from what we usually do. I loved the rave at the end because it gave me an adrenaline rush.” -Kailey Einkauf, 11

The band qualified for Area after competing at the UIL Region Marching Band Contest at Kelley Reeves Stadium in Round Rock, Oct. 18. “I’m very proud of us,” freshman Emily Rowe said. “I think we worked really hard the past couple of months, but so did the other bands. They deserved it just as much as we did.” They performed “Clockworks” at Heroes Stadium in San Antonio, Oct. 25 for Area, their final marching contest of the season. “This is a huge accomplishment for band, being in 6A,” Drum Major Sam Acosta said. “It’s a little bittersweet because it’s the end of marching season, but we are still making memories together.”

MUSIC & DANCE PERFORMANCES

center �tage

Autumn

Taking

Royals and Golden Dazzlers share their favorite performances from iDance

Leander, Texas Kel Lemons , adviser Dynamic use of pulled color unifies the spread. The dominant photo contrasts with the b&w photos in the background. A keen awareness of type hierarchy directs eye flow from one area of content to the next.

big t-shirts

“I wear my white Converse because they go with everything, and the high tops look good with joggers.” Cameron Badolato, 12

Student Life

Annie Downs, 12

“My friends call me Jiggy.” -Julianne Barnes, 10

flannels

“I like them because they are really warm and reasonably stylish.” CC Waggoner, 12

“Fashion is important to me because people can really get a sense of who I am by seeing what I wear." Annie Downs

you know....

Fashion spreads are common in yearbooks, but not like this one. Well-researched content features quotes, artifacts, models and prices. The prices provide significant historical data.

kendra scott

$119 $105 $109 $65 $60 $50 $25 $55 $45 $25 $35 $20 $8

Legacy High School

Mansfield, Texas Leland Mallett & Rachel Dearinger, advisers

chacos

vera

michael kors bradley

“It’s pretty and durable.” “It was a surprise Cassidy Regan, 10 Christmas gift from my mom, and I was really excited when I opened it.” “I like Vera Bradley because it expresses Aisha DeBurr DeBurr, 11 my personality and I absolutely love when “I got Michael Kors everything matches.” because I think the Averie Ross, 11 nuetral color matches everyting and I couldn’t find the color in other brands.” Kendall Martinson, 12


-Brian Paul

Glenda Dawson High School

Photo by K. Sanderson

Pearland, Texas Leslie Sanderson, adviser

“WE CAN’T�? Is this their theme? Really? At the beginning of the 2014-15 school year, students at Glenda Dawson were not optimistic. After being bumped up from 4A to 6A, they lost confidence. But as the year progressed, quiet desperation gave way to boisterous bravado as they emerged ready, willing and able to compete with the big schools.

GLENDA DAWSON HIGH SCHOOL

“The week of the Pearland game, I was super pumped; everyone was. I thought we would win. I honestly wasnát even thinking about what would happen if we lost. When we did, I blamed the loss on the referees. I didnát want to accept it. But we kept going. Thatás what Eagle Addicts do. We keep the fans going so they can cheer on the football team and keep the morale up. The fans are the drive for the football players.

The Aerie

2014-2015 Volume 8

Commemorating Ascension to Division 6A

2050 Cullen Boulevard Pearland, Texas 77581 (281)-412-8800 Pearland ISD District 22-6A 2,290 Students Principal: Mr. David Moody (Fall) Ms. Kelly Holt (Spring) Superintendent: Dr. John Kelly

shofw of your

1

theme

A great theme surprises the reader. (“Hey, look at what they did this year!�) To achieve visual impact, the theme pervades every aspect of the design: fonts, textures, color, shapes, patterns, space, etc. Cohesion, continuity and clarity result from the staff’s attention to detail. elements

10 fall 2015

San Fern

Jack Price ’15 takes a photo of Lili Cohen ’15, Matthew Ursin-Smith ’16 and Rachel Persky ’15 on the field on the first day of school during the second joint Convocation. To promote bonding between campuses, Wetzel’s Pretzels were given out to students from both the middle and upper school in the tent behind them. Photo by Dominique Gordon ’15

6

Layout by D. Gordon ’15

Student Life

TAKE A BOW

20

(5/!35/#.),#/'65Jonah Goldman ’165 (5 David Strauss ’16 perform /,#(!5."5&&5)(,.855^ 5&)05",#(!5 &&5 ) 5 #.5 )'5 .)!.",5 (5 -)/(5 '4#(!85  .,5 &&5 ) 5 ."5 *,.##(!65 #.5 *3-5 ) 5 .)5 ",5 ."5 #(&5 *,)/.5 &&5 .)!.",6_5.,/--5-#855").)535 /,(5 Weetman’ 16

MUSICIANS FINE TUNE SKILLS, LEARN NEW MUSIC

At the First Presbyterian Church of (.5 )(#65Russell Davis ’17 plays /2."/]-5Alles Was Ihr Tut. Photo by .(35 ,&/--5]gk5 R5 &3#(!5 1#."5 ."5 Women’s Chorus, Tom Fuller ’15 plays ."5-)&)5&,#(.5#(5 /,#-(]-5Canticle. ").)535(,150(5]gk

7

D

CAMERON ROBERTSON ’15

^"#-5 3,5 5 1-5 #(5 ."5 *#.5 ),"-.,5 ),5 \)'*(3]85 .5 1-5 ,&&35 /(5 .)5 1),%5 1#."5 5 -'&&,5 !,)/*5 ) 5 %#-855 ),'5 5 ,&&35 -.,)(!5 )(5 1#."5 )/,5 )(/.),5 DDaniel FaltusE85 .5 1-5 &-)5 (#5 *&3#(!5 5 # ,(.5 .3*5 ) 5 '/-#85 "5-),5) 5."5'/-#&51-5,&&35",65 /.5 5 ($)35 ."5 "&&(!8_5 ").)5 35 Netanya Perluss ’15

Lauren Kim ’17 plays Faure’s Requiem )(5 ."5 &&)85 ").)5 35 (,15 0(5 ]gk5R5 ',5) 5)(,.5.,#(!-65 Gavin Keipp-Stroud ’17, plays the violin. Photo 35 /,(5 .'(5 ]gl5 R5 ',-5 ) 5 ."5 #(5 (-'&65 5 Daniel Kwak ’15 (5Eric Han ’17 play the clarinet. Photo 35 /,(5 .'(5 ]gl5 R5 &&)5 *&3,5 Lauren Song ’16 *&3-5 (&--)"(]-5The Fair Melusine. Photo by Lauren Weetman ]gl5R5.55."5-.,.5) 5."5)(,., Mark Hilt #(.,)/-5."5-3'*")(35&--. Photo by Lauren Weetman ’16

At the fall concert, Katie Sing ’16 plays the violin. Photo by Lauren Weetman ]gl5 R5 /,#(!5 (&--)"(]-5 The Beautiful Melusina, Marko Fejzo ’15 plays the horn. Photo by Netanya Perluss ]gk5 /,#(!5 5 -3'*")(35 ,",-&65 Hyunseok Choi ’16, Jacob Gold ’155(5 Christopher Han ’15 practice a piece. Photo by Chasia Jefferies ’17

H Y

THE THE

94

Clubs & Arts

US Instrumental Music

Layout by N. Perluss ’15, F. Walker ’16, L. Kim ’17, A. Sraberg ’17 & A. Howell ’18

95

282


n ’15

ell ’18

San Fernando Valley from Mulholland Drive

During a trust-building exercise at Gindling Hilltop Camp, Cosima Elwes ’15 and Ian Watts ’16 learn the importance of working together. “The Peer Support retreat was the best weekend of my life, and the V [apparatus] was the scariest thing ever,” leader Gwynn Pollard ’15 said. Photo by Gwynn Pollard ’15

WHAT’S UP PSUPP?? PEER SUPPORT MEETS MONDAY EVENINGS TO BOND WITH CLASSMATES, DISCUSS ISSUES, SUPPORT ONE ANOTHER SAM RADLOVIC ’18, NOA SCHWARTZ ’18 & AYANNA FREY ’18

ABBY MAPES ’18 & BELLA HEDLEY ’18

JINGLE BALL AT STAPLES CENTER “I had a really fun time hanging out with my friends and seeing a lot of cool singers,” Frey said. The Dec. 5 lineup included Taylor Swift, Pharrell, 5 Seconds of Summer, Ariana Grande, Sam Smith, Iggy Azalea, Meghan Trainor, Charli XCX, Jessie J, Rita Ora, Becky G and Rixton. Photo printed with permission of Frey

EDEN SANDERSON ‘18 & KATIE KIM ’18

CHESTER RANGER ’18

TROJANS AT GALEN CENTER “I love going to USC games because their fans are always so intense and they make the experience even better. Go Trojans!” The Trojans’ season ended at a PAC-12 tournament vs. UCLA at MGM Grand Arena in Las Vegas on March 12. Photo by Annie Ranger

CHANCE WASHBURN ’18

BEVERLY HILLS “I love spending time with my friends in Beverly Hills because there are so many resturants and clothing stores in the area. I am so grateful to live in such a pretty place and I never get bored of the area,” Kim said. The intersection of Bedford Dr. and South Santa Monica Blvd. was just 2.5 miles from the middle school. Photo by Charlotte Bell

SANTA MONICA BEACH “I love living in LA because the beach is so close. It’s one of my favorite places to go and hang out with friends. I always have a great time and it never gets boring.” Santa Monica State Beach was 3 miles of sand 10.4 miles from the middle school. Photo by Bella Hedley ’18

MIKEY CORRIN ’18

I LOVE L.A.

L.A. KINGS AT STAPLES CENTER “I like going to Kings games because hockey is my favorite sport and since my team is also the Kings, it’s cool to see the real L.A. Kings play.” The Kings won the Stanley Cup for the second time in three years in June 2014 and sought backto-back wins this season. Printed with permission of Corrin

LILI COHEN ’15

LA COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART “I took regular Art History in 10th grade and now take AP Art History, which has given me an appreciation and love for going to museums and seeing current exhibits as well as ones on artists that I learn about in class. I love going to LACMA, the Hammer Museum, the Norton Simon, and recently I went to the Museum of Jurassic Technology.” Photo by Ami Cohen

7

20

Student Life

‘WICKED’ AT PANTAGES THEATER “‘Wicked’ had a great cast and I loved all the songs. It was so amazing to watch it again with one of my best friends,” Mapes said. The show ran from Dec. 10 through March 15 and featured Jennifer DiNoia as Elphaba and Gina Beck as Glinda. Photo printed with permission of Carrie Klinger Mapes

JACK PRICE ’15

KATIE SCHLESINGER ’17

COORDINATOR “Peer Support is the most important aspect of my high school experience. I didn’t know how much the program would shape me into who I am today, and I am so lucky to have been elected as a Peer Support Coordinator. Helping PSUPP grow and continue to be a defining part of high school for so many students is something I will look back on and feel honored to have been a part of.” Photo by Rachel Persky ’15

NEW MEMBER “My favorite part about Peer Support is having a support group that I can talk to every week and it’s really nice knowing that they’re not going to tell everyone what I say. It’s completely confidential. I like having an ongoing relationship with people in different grades because I feel like I wouldn’t have met them otherwise.” Photo by Dora Schoenberg ’16

JONAS HIRSHLAND ’16

FROM SPORTING EVENTS, TO MUSEUMS, TO GREAT FOOD AND WEATHER, L.A. OFFERS FUN ACTIVITIES

1,260

Ameci’s Pizzas Ordered In 1 Year for Peer Support

Before each Monday night meeting, members from all groups get together in the Chalmers Lounge to enjoy the pizza provided for the club. The sweatshirts given to all members of Peer Support this year will have “PIZZUPPORT” written on them, with a giant piece of pepperoni pizza saying: “Feelings, ya feel?”

TRAINEE “My favorite moment from this year’s Peer Support was definitely the retreat, because it made me feel part of a really great community. Coming as much as you can is important to keep up a good group dynamic.” Photo by Andrew Ravan ’15

Senior and junior leaders Marc Shkurovich ’15, Gwynn Pollard ’15, Emma Wasserman ’16 and Noah Rothman ’16 start off their Monday PSUPP group by discussing Big C, which stands for confidentiality, and the three red flags: if one shares that he or she is hurting someone else, someone is hurting him or her, or one is hurting him or herself. “Big C makes me feel as though I’m always in a safe environment,” Peer Support member Morgan Choi ’15 said. Photo by Dora Schoenberg ’16

Leaders Isabelle Lesh ’15, Briana Cooper ’15, Jacob Goodman ’15 and trainee Hunter Brookman ’16 have everyone share about their weekends at the beginning of the second group meeting of 2015, after winter break. The makeup of this group is unique in that there are three leaders and one trainee, while there are usually two of each. Photo by Dora Schoenberg ’16

Layout by A. Ravan ’15

Los Angeles

21

74

Clubs & Art

Layout by R. Persky ’15 & D. Schoenberg ’16

Peer Support

75

Harvard-Westlake School Studio City, California Jen Bladen, adviser

VOX outside the box is a visual concept. Because the theme is seen (visual) and not heard (verbal), the box becomes a pervasive visual throughout the book. In one section, background photos serve as texture upon which boxes are placed. In another section, a dynamic full-bleed photo is framed by content in boxes. Dividers have students interacting with type.

PROOFS EDITORS ADVISER DESIGN EDITOR

EXECUTIVE EDITORS HEAD PHOTOGRAPHER

ARTS EDITORS CFO THEME EDITOR

SOCIAL MEDIA & PR EDITOR

HAVEN’T Y’ERD? THE VOX FAMILY IS THE BEST STAFF EVER

95

282

Ads & Index

Colophon

Photographs were edited in Adobe Photoshop CS5.1. Graphics were created in Adobe Illustrator CS5.1. Pages were created in Adobe InDesign CS5.5. Copy was set in Adobe Caslon Pro. Headlines and secondary headlines were set in Avenir Next Ultra Light. The hardcover book contained 296 pages. Content was printed on 100# dull enamel paper. Our publisher was Balfour. The books were printed in Dallas, Texas. Our Balfour sales representative was Corey Mundwiler. Our account executive was Jessica Youngpeter. Our cover was designed by Stephen Williams at thecoverartist.com. While contemplating a theme during yearbook camp, we came to the conclusion to go themeless—to let the design and concept lead and unify the book. The school adopted a new mission statement this fall, and we used the four elements

MANAGING EDITOR

EDITORS-IN-CHIEF SPORTS EDITORS

therein to give our themeless book its backbone: community, educational excellence, integrity and purpose beyond ourselves. It’s a book of the people for the people. So this year, we made it our goal to include a unique and interesting profile on as many students as we could. We looked to Brandon Stanton’s Humans of New York for inspiration on these profiles. “I am most proud of the independence and resilience of my students and how they forged their own way at yearbook camp and the first two weeks of school while I was on medical leave,” Jen Bladen said. “I’m thrilled that the design plan they created at camp and with their fabulous substitute teachers in September is the plan we are still following today.” 1,489 yearbooks were pre-sold. 1,925 books were printed, 250 of which were used as national samples by Balfour.

Editors-in-Chief Dominique Gordon ’15 & Andrew Ravan ’15 Executive Editors Gwynn Pollard ’15, Benny Weisman ’15 & Alan Yousefzadeh ’15 Design Editor Morgan Brown ’15 Social Media & PR Editor Netanya Perluss ’15 Managing Editor Lili Cohen ’15 Theme Editor Cameron Robertson ’15 Chief Financial Officer Grace Kotick ’15, Head Photogapher Clara McCarthy ’15 People Section Editor Benny Weisman ’15 Visual Arts Editor Katie Hohl ’15 Perfoming Arts Editor Lauren Song ’16 Sports Editors Morgan Choi ’15 & Noah Gains ’15

Proofs & Index Editors Rachel Persky ’15 & Libby Sondheimer ’15 Adviser Jen Bladen Upper School Staff: Alexandra Gordon ’16, David Ozen ’16, Dora Schoenberg ’16, Lauren Song ’16, Francesca Walker ’16, Lauren Weetman ’16, Mikaela Wolfsdorf ’16, Pearl Acord ’17, Megan Barnum ’17, Andrew Beyer ’17, Marley Fair ’17, Ashley Frey ’17, Madelynn Harbert ’17, Paige Howard ’17, Chasia Jeffries ’17, Natalie Jones ’17, Elizabeth Kim ’17, Jennifer Lange ’17, Rachel Madhogarhia ’17, Keon Niknejad ’17, Alexa Nourafchan ’17, Haley Perrin ’17, Lexi Scher ’17, Adam Sraberg ’17, Cameron Stine ’17, Madeline Ulloa ’17, Marina Weidmann ’17

Middle School Staff: Gina Choi ’18, Ayanna Frey ’18, Bella Hedley ’18, Abbie Howell ’18, Cami Katz ’19, Katie Kim ’18, Abby Mapes ’19, Lauren Morganbesser ’19, Denise Navarro ’18, Anthony Nararro ’18, Amanda Offor ’18, Ari Shooshani ’18, Chloe Spain ’18, Kate von Mende ’18 Special thanks to Brynda Everman, Jennifer Kelley Lublin, Marlo Neuhaus-Franks, Zaakirah Daniels ’10, Bruce Watterson, Corey Mundwiler, Stephen Williams, Patti Snodgrass, Ann Lasola, Jason Kelly, Scott Bello, the deans, Computer Services, Chris Gragg and all of the librarians, the Board of Trustees, everyone in both bookstores, Student Council, Jessica Youngpeter, Sanders Jackson and the maintenance staff.

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283

elements

11 fall 2015


MARCH 6-7 "Gather Round" was the theme for the annual Escapade, a production by the Dance department.

Escapade

86 MARCH, APRIL, MAY

into Springing Spring

Use your phone to view coverage from the spring months by downloading the free Aurasma application and focusing on the images within each circle.

Graduation

Seniors celebrated the end of their high school career JUNE 5 in the Cedar Park Center.

APRIL 17 Allowing various teams of IB students to face off against each other, Amazing Race also collected cans of food to donate to local food banks.

IBSO Amazing Race

APRIL 18 Raising several thousand dollars, National Honor Society continued the tradition of WarriorFest, a day of carnival booths and concerts by student bands.

NHS WarriorFest

Prom

A team effort by foreign language clubs and honor societies, the first ever World Languages Fair served as a fundraiser.

the

N. RAYAPATI, A. XUE, S. WANG, A. MAGADI

87

World Languages Fair

MARCH 13

APRIL 4 Project Graduation fundraiser Taste of Asia celebrated multiculturalism via various booths and a fashion show.

Taste of Asia

-Rogelio Moreno, 11

SONIC “I prefer going to the Sonic on the Texas side because, overall, their service is better. They bring your food out quicker and the carhops seem to be happier to do their jobs. I love getting a quick drink during happy hour before soccer practice. ”

-Maegan Jordan, 12

WALMART “Personally, I like to go to the Texas side Walmart because it has a better atmosphere than the Arkansas side one. It always seems to be much cleaner, and the people are nicer. The only time I go to the Arkansas side one is when I just happen to be close to it.”

-Connor Anderson, 10

STARBUCKS “Although I live on the Texas side, I prefer going to the Starbucks on the Arkansas side because it seems to be a lot less busy, so I can study there as well as get coffee. It might be a longer drive, but it’s worth it.”

-Blaire Berry, 9

CHICKEN EXPRESS “I like to eat at the Texas side Chicken Express rather than the Arkansas side one. It’s a lot closer to my house, plus it is nicer. The appearance of the building is more inviting and clean. I also believe that the food tastes better at the Texas side one, but that’s just my opinion.”

-Tye Shelton, 10

BOWLING ALLEY “I like Holiday Bowl on the Arkansas side better than the bowling alley on the Texas side because of their new renovations. They have a new snack bar and arcade that is way better than the other place. Bowling is life.”

With a street as a divider between not only two towns, but two states, students develop preferences on restaurants and stores that have a presence on both sides of the state line

taleof twocities

the state line

016

APRIL 11 With a theme based on "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the prom incorporated elements from the Roaring 20's in its decorations.

Baseball and softball came into full swing, soccer went to the playoffs, and water polo arrived at Westwood for the first time.

Spring Sports

Austin, Texas Lanie Catuogno, adviser

CIRCLE GRAPHIC Westwood High School

6

State Line

AUGUST

31

24

17

10

3

Summer Band

25

18

Summer Band

11

4

26

First Day of School

19

12

5

27

20

13

Summer Band

6

28

Varsity tennis vs. Westlake

21

14

7

August 29

Varsity Football vs. Georgetown

22

Fish Bowl

15

8

Summer Band

1

Isaiah Germany Treykeoun Giles Isabel Gonzalez Alex Gooden Latraveyia Gooden Alexis Goodwin Tanner Grace

017 page by m. crawford

k. brinkmeyer

a single road serving as the border is one of Texarkana’s defining characteristics. Students found that living here had its perks, from small things like restaurant choice to big things such as in-state tuition for colleges in both states. “I love having so many choices to pick from when determining where to eat,” sophomore Jonathan Harris Mary Claire Paddock said. “Sometimes, when Laressa Harris a restaurant is closed on the Texas side, like McDonald’s for example, you can go over to the Arkansas side where it’s still open.”

twin city perks Being a twin city with

Alexis Hand Da’shawn Harris

Taylor Hampton Tevin Hampton

Delshun Hampton Quantorreyan Hampton

Jeremy Hamilton Samantha Hamilton

Cody Hambly Dejavonn Hamilton

Isaac Guyton Ryan Hall

Andrew Grant McKenzie Green Quentin Green Tiffany Greer Darrellnisha Griffin Demicua Griffin Roslyn Griffin

page by e. thurman

104

30

23

16

9

2

N. RAYAPATI

7

Meagan Harris Jaren Harvey Dantae Hawkins Deondre Hawkins Jerry Hawkins Spencer Hawkins Jey Shon Hawthorne

i. arias

6. Do you“My check latesthow addiction would be much time is left an play when Black Ops.inI usually episode to sureand it to pass time I’mbe bored won’t stop there? an old game. I play with my 7. Do youofchoose Netflix over yourbrother family? and his friends online,

8. Do younext whisper to me.”“Iasneed to stop” to yourself you start the next -episode? Elias Thurman, 9

2. Do you reward yourself for completed homework by watching another episode? 3. Is “Just one more” a lie you tell yourself? 4. When you’re done with a TV show, do you rush to find another one to watch?

37%

14%

13%

Stratified sampling of 100 students

23%

After completing all the overwhelming work I can thinkenjoy of is onoffthere. received daily at school, students their days I by staying home. Having time atallhome getextra almost my allows ideas from favorite TV Iseries Netflix. 13% students to watch their Pinterest. feelonlike it knows “I can spend my whole weekend, day and night, what’s going on in my mind at watching ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ because you get to see times.” hot surgeons put theirallskills to work,” junior Julia Nations said. “Laying-inDeja bed, I canGibson just imagine ,11 myself laying in the operating room being operated on by McDreamy.”

AMERICAN HORROR STORY ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK GREY’S ANATOMY LAW AND“There ORDER areSVU so many reasons THE WALKING why I’mDEAD addicted to Pinterest.

It speaks to me. Anything

Students discuss their cinematic guilty pleasures

What’s Your Addiction?

If you answered Always to most of the questions, you are beyond the point of return. If you answered Sometimes to most of the questions, you are on the brink of addiction. If you answered Never to most of the questions, you obviously don’t have Netflix.

so it’s like playing with him

until dinner is done. It’s kind

5. Do you ignore text messages because the show is too good to miss?

1. Are you more invested in the character’s lives on the show than your own?

Answer questions using: Never, Sometimes, Always

Are you a NETFLIX addict?

Texarkana, Texas Rebecca Potter, adviser

“I get on Twitter because I’m nosey, and I enjoy knowing what people are doing and what’s on their mind. It’s crazy though because when I first downloaded the app I swore I’d never be addicted to it.” -Ayla Sozen ,10

a.olalde

“Over Christmas break I binge-watched episode after episode only taking breaks to eat and sleep. If I didn’t have Netflix, I would be forced to wait a week for one episode when I could have already watched it.” -Ellie Mohon ,10

k. brinkmeyer

105 addictions/sophomores

TO BE CONTINUED

“I’ve read the majority of the [books in the] school library. I have almost completely finished off the fiction section and am getting started on non-fiction. Finding a book that I haven’t read yet is the real challenge. An unread book is a rare jewel.”

RISING ACTION

“My obsession with books has gone from a habit to an addiction. Reading is my consistent go-to escape plan. There have been times where I neglect my responsibilities [to read]. Countless pages of homework and chores go undone just because diving into a book and drowning myself in the story helps me avoid the actual realities and stress of daily life.”

IN THE BEGINNING

“My love affair with reading started a long time ago with a box set of the ‘Harry Potter’ series. I kept two books in my backpack, one in my purse and countless others on my dresser at home. There are a lot of things you can call me: obsessed, weird, a bibliophile or a lover of books, but I prefer something classy: a bookworm.”

junior Ahja Cherry

CONFESSION OF AN ADDICT

William Hawthorne Alexis Hayes Hannah Hayes Marquese Hayes Brittney Haynie John Hays Destiny Henderson

THEME, COLOR & COVERAGE Texas High School

F. JU, E. CHANG

SUMMER VACATION Akash Thakkar '17 shot this photo of a sunset on his plane ride back to Austin A. THAKKAR from Canada

theme applications

your

shofw of

Push the theme into the book with color, coverage, words, graphics, shapes and fonts. By doing this, you will create a complete package branded to the school and the year. The goal is to provide a consistent, unifying identity – a visual/verbal system to distinguish your book from other years and other schools.

k. mccasland


elements

13 fall 2015

Now

FIRST DAY

“I can be a major US History geek at times.� -Morgan Spring, 11

3

photo by LexiLittle

1

photo by HannahGraves

1st

state qualiďŹ ers

4th

1st

the facts

HERE’S

2 “I’m a 24-year old stuck in a 16-year old’s body.� -Sierra Johnson, 11

“I love to speak different languages.� -Stefanie Braendli, 11

“I breed dogs.� -Taylor Day, 11

i

MORE food & money

“I play the violin and video games.� -Juliet Sanchez-Rivera, 11

“I’ve been a competitive gymnast for seven years.� -Hannah Fousek, 10

HURTS School

DO YOU HAVE TESTS IN ART? No, we actually have an investigation notebook where we put all of our notes in class and our sketches because, for every painting, we have to have three sketches, and those are like our tests.

DO YOU HANG YOUR PAINTINGS AT HOME? 1REHFDXVHWKH\GRQ¡WÀWWKHVW\OHRIRXUKRXVH

WHAT ARE YOUR INSPIRATIONS FOR YOUR ART? It’s always different, because I guess I kind of get inspired with everything that’s going on in my life. Movies or books [also inspire me.]

WE’VE HEARD THAT A LOT OF Emma Borushko ‘16 MR. STEPHENS’ CATCH PHRASES ARE Art 3 FROM A YOUTUBE VIDEO CALLED ‘OLD GREGG.’ WHAT IS OLD GREGG? Yeah, Old Gregg is a really big thing in our class. It’s creepy. I don’t like it‌. I’m still frightened by that. Old Gregg is some weird show from Britain about Old Gregg who is a green man who lives underneath a lake and likes to paint watercolors, and drink creamy Baylis. I would NEVER recommend anyone to watch it‌ it haunts you.

HOW MANY SEMESTERS HAVE YOU BEEN ENROLLED IN ART? I’ve done three so far and I’m planning to do it next year, also.

a little birdie

2

TOLD me

Travis Turner ‘16

a little thing that means a lot to me is... “A rosarythat was given to me because it helped me get through tough times, and whenever those times do happen, I pray with it.�

1

1. Spanish Club member Erin Caracristi sells an Otter Pop to Katherine Cates to raise money for education in underprivileged countries. “It feels really amazing knowing we are continuing the work of previous club members and presidents to educate other countries and provide them with healthy homes and lives,� senior Erin Caracristi said. 2. To raise money and recruit possible new members, the Triathlon Club sells kettle corn to a group of boys. �We want to promote athleticism in our community. Triathlons are a great opportunity for teenagers to combine swimming, cycling and running,� senior Jarred Caines said. Photos by Claudia Moore

t

o represent the theme of Life on a Highway, the senior class chose Highway 15. Senior Tuva Svelland, worked with paper mache to create the Stratosphere Casino, Hotel, and Tower. It became messy when it got stuck to her hands and clothes, but the she managed to finish. Freshman Samantha Small explained how much labor her class put into the Road to Hana oat. “We all put a lot of time and work into the oat this year and gave it our best eort because it is very exciting to be at the game, see the freshmen oat, and think, ‘wow I can’t believe I did that’,â€? Small said. Students in charge of oat building spent more time than expected to help plan what the oat looked like. Not only did they strategize how the oat would appear, but they made sure to have all of the supplies. “A lot of eort goes into oat building! Class presidents and vice presidents put in hours running oat building and trying to secure a location. We all try to perfect everything because we know that everyone sees it,â€? sophomore Cassie Cook said With all of the hours spent on oats, it was sometimes a challenge balancing oat building and school work. “It is hard because I also play a sport, so I have to manage my time and put my priorities ahead of anything else. It can be very stressful,â€? freshman Taylor Stiern said. Unlike Stiern, junior Makenna Johnson didn’t seem to have trouble managing her time, even when she had lots of homework to do.

three years in the program, she developed a motivation to pursue art. In her free time, Berg drew or painted

after school. She joined the class to keep the legacy that her siblings maintained in also having Mr. Myron Stephens. After

for fun.

for success

the work it requires

float building discuss

Students involved in

Amy Johnson ‘18

PSAT

+ HC game vs Nevada Union + Homecoming dance

Friday: Grizzly/Tribe gear day

REDLIGHT GREENLIGHT + Bonfire rally

+ Lunch time activity:

Thursday: Class colors day

+ No school

Wednesday:

+ Float building

+ Lunch time activity: TRIVIA

Tuesday: USA day

+ Float building

TRIKE RACE

Monday: PJ Day + Lunch time activity:

HOMECOMING

a week of

“For me, it is not too hard because I am not the commissioner, so I don’t have to come every day. But since I love coming, I make an eort to come as much as I can, even if it means staying up later to work on homework,â€? Johnson said. Taking up the task of creating the oat put some pressure on the students to do well in order to win. “I think I can say for other people that I am really excited, but also there is a little pressure on us because we don’t want to be remembered as the kids who messed up in the homecoming oat,â€? Stiern said Junior Natalie Krisa had a similar view about the junior Rainbow Road oat. “It is a lot of pressure because so much is expected of us to get it all done in less than three weeks, which is why, if our oat won, I would be oating on cloud nine because then we could rub it in the seniors’ faces and make all the work would pay o,â€? Krisa said. The parents also put in the extra input to make sure that nobody got hurt in the process. “Parents are important because they supervise and help us with materials and of course help us with ďŹ nding a building location,â€?senior Abhi Jadhav said. The sophomore class won with their Highway 101 Hollywood oat. “I was surprised that the seniors did not win because they normally do, but I am happy we won because we did put a lot of eort, and I think it turned out really well,â€? Cook said. Story by Ambreen Siddiqui

CLOUD NINE

ON

n countless hours of working after school, junior Megan Berg revised every detail on her hardest and most time consuming art project: drawing a self-portrait using only graphite. “Graphite is so time consuming because you have to do pencil marks

105

addictions/sophomores

Art students put in extra effort after school to finish before their deadlines

“I absolutely, positively love skyscrapers.� -Maddie Bonvillian, 12

MORE WORK

“Cedar Ridge, “McNeil, that “Cedar Ridge, I “McNeil, despite “Cedar Park, I their for Marysville Pilchuck I got 1.aVarsity lot ofplayers show was mysupport old high got the ballHigh andSchool.having people made a 20 yard 2. Sophomore Lauren Sanders and Junior Rachael Gitnes go up to block the we ball.got two playing time and school so getting we played well.� out, run. I felt good Kaylie Klemp stands next to her parents on Senior Night. I did 3.really well to play my old -Devin Martinez, fast touchdowns because I knew on all my plays.� friends was fun.� freshman gold and defense that I had teamphoto by KiannaGarner -Zach Warner, -Chance Cooper, helped a lot.� mates helping Michael Prag ‘15 freshman gold JV maroon -Michael Forster, me.� -Isaiah JV maroon Poston, freshman Sarah Garcia ‘15 maroon

“I love to dance hip hop.� -Marysol Cruz, 12

“Cedar Ridge because it was a close game, but we played hard and pulled out the win.� -Colton Mitchell, JV gold

PHOTO BY SEAN COMPANION

hard to get to that point and I just feel really excited to cheer them on,� Wiese said.

SPIN-OFFS & MODULES Rouse High School

“Round Rock, it was our ďŹ rst win and I got an interception.â€? -Dax Dalton, freshman maroon

“I can’t swim.� -Dezmond Gil, 11

Freshman and junior varsity players share their best games

1. On the ďŹ rst day of school, freshman Sophia Garcia looks for her ďŹ rst period class. “First day was interesting,â€? Garcia said. “I got lost a lot but it ended up being a really great day.â€? 2. Assistant principal for curriculum and instruction, Connie Bridges (center) assists freshman Shelby Sughrue (left) before

A second year team member,Mann juniorwith Haley Coach Joshua JVTimmons Gold had her best ďŹ nishes at the end of the season, taking second at district and third at regionals. “[State] was great competition, a great experience and great time with my whole team.â€?

Dylon Pegos ‘18

you know...

As the newest member of the varsity boys team, freshman Danny Madrid was third at district and helped the team qualify for regionals and state. “Going to state was a really awesome feeling, because we went with a great team.�

Makenna Lloyd ‘ 16

Tell Uďż˝

Kenna Ramsey

Klemp sets a perfect record

Cross country dominates newisdistrict, hard enough but to do so well to set a school varsity wins boys and girls 13-6A titles record is even harder. On

BY ADRIAN SALAZAR

IT

notes

Unbreakable

Bailey Vassalli Theme

2 but it was an opportunity to improve at the beginning of the season.�

watched it.� -Ellie Mohon ,10

SPIN-OFFS & MODULES Granite Bay High School

For any sport playing a game without any errors knowing that I am leaving my mark at GP,â€? Klemp explained. “I feel so fortunate to have had a team that could help me achieve this goal,â€? she said. With the perfect score of 3.0, no one can beat it so therefore Klemp PHOTO BY SEAN COMPANION PHOTO BY BRIAN ROBINSON September 24th, the Varsity Volleyball team played has made a forever mark at GP as the first and so far only player to achieve Lynwood, a team that has a fair share of good hitsuch a prestigious record that will last at GP for a lifetime. “I’m so glad I ters and district berths. But this game was not like got the opportunity to make a difference,â€? she continued. JV Gold Bayleigh Foret the other well fought battles on the volleyball court, Klemp along with Julia Stepanchanko, Sara McNaughton, and Morgan this win came with a record for Senior Kaylie Klemp, Doyle, being this year’s seniors, all of whom have left a mark as amazing “the feeling was incredible. I had worked so hard in players that made the team achieve a record of 7 and 5 in conference Leander, practice and knowing that allTexas that hard work paid among other years of varsity seasons. adviser by EmmaBollinger off, was amazing. I Kel felt Lemons, like I had PHOTO contributed toSTROHSCHEIN the BY KEESLEY success of the team.â€?CARRY Klemp said. ON varsity boys & Klemp being a DSDuring or defensive specialist forsophthe PHOTO BY BRIAN ROBINSON the Cedar Park game, girls team ďŹ nish GOLDEN TIMES grizzlies means that she is in charge of passing omore Wayne Fieglein tries tothe gain at district Josh Yeilding and trainers Jeremiah Sigler The junior varsity boys team starts extracan yards tackled in ball to the setter so they setbefore up anbeing offensive the district race at Old Settler’s Park. the junior varsity Both JV of James Tisdale, The team, consisting play and she gets points due to how gold wellgame. she passes Evan Rogers, Daniel teamsget played the Timberwolves, a Myers, Noah JV boys team it. Out of the points she’d a total almost like Leos, ArielaSosa, Art Loy, Conor Bryformer rival, Cedar ďŹ nish at district an, Brandon and Ben Escobar, GPA but instead of 4.0, thedistrict highest youatcan getPark, isKing a the won the JV district championship. game the season.player “The Ce3.0 which was never second reached by aofvolleyball CHEERFieglein ‘EM ON dar Park was exciting,â€? until Kaylie Klemp played thatgame night against LynAlong the race route, junior Cameron said. “On a kick-off return I had aonlong Wiese varsity at Liberty Hill. “I wood, meaning that every time she passed thecheers ball varsity boys & run and it was thrilling.â€? really in the moment, because when girls team ďŹ nish to a setter perfectly on point leaving themfeel with a and you see your teamyou’re running Nic Carreon Taye Biel at regionals, you know you’ve worked so widePHOTO spread ofLOPEZ offensive options. “It’s suchmates anrun honor BY IZZY

Snohomish, Washington Annie Green, adviser

Type Glacier Peak High School

coach told me to do, ran and caught the ball.�

a.olalde

Granite Bay, California Bernadette Cranmer, adviser

watching ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ because you get to see times.� hot surgeons put theirallskills to work,� junior Julia Nations said. “Laying-inDeja bed, I canGibson just imagine ,11 myself laying in the operating room being operated on by McDreamy.�

Noah Zahnd ‘15

by Janelle Cruz

PHOTO

Boys and girls teams qualify for state for ďŹ rst time

“Fishing is my life.� -Nathan Wright, 11

�tate of mind

“I model.� -Demi Barrington, 11

At the starting line, varsity runners Nico Escobar, Daniel Guidry, Danny Madrid, Suede Mora, Mitchell Ballis, Logan Zipkes and Connor Brooks take offon forRNN.â€? the district race.“I’m Theone of the fastest drivers in my family. I have especially good driving “I volunteer for Special Olympics.â€? “My family animal is a cow because they look “I embarrass people -Meagan Anderson, 10 cute and taste great.â€? -Shey Covington, 11 -Dillon Garza, 12team won the 13-6A title. “District skills and I’m good at drag racing.â€? -Moose Jenkins, 11 was good,â€? Ballis said. “We obviously won and everybody did their best. Suede had a bit of an injury, but Danny pulled for the team and did really well. Everybody else worked great as a team. â€? TOUCHDOWN TIME LIGHT IT UP Freshman Helen Roddy LONE RUNNER In the end zone, freshman Jack Junior varsity maroon players Andrew made a signiďŹ cant impact Sarah Warrenburg heads Glenn catches a pass during the Swenson, TJ Wolski, Zach Smith,Sophomore on varsity girls, winning to the ďŹ nish at district. Warrenburg the Cowboy Jamboree and and the varsity girls won the district freshman gold game against Leander. Brandon Planchard and Brady KalousďŹ nishing in the top three at title. “I’m really proud of how we did witnessed how everyone decks out in blue and white at The team scored two touchdowns in tian take the ďŹ eldI’veevery during Leander game and assembly, the how the crowds scream loud in ďŹ ve races. She was third at and I fell like all the hard work has resupport of our school, and have seen how friendships blossom. I have chanted “I believe that we will winâ€? and “we are GP,â€? district and eighth at reand I’ve noticed they echo through I can picture the non-district win over the Lions game. “Even though wehowlost wemy mind.had ally paid off this year which has helped the moments, every smile, and every laugh. This is what I’ll gionals. “It was really cool remember. This is how I’ll see it for the rest of my life. better our team,â€? Warrenburg said. by BaileyVassalli for their ďŹ rst win of the season. “I felt fun growing as a team,â€? Planchardus said. to be able to go to state as a freshman.â€? fantastic,â€? Glenn said. “I just did what “We weren’t too happy about the loss,

READY TO RUN

“I am obsessed with ’90s sitcoms.� -Paisley Baxa, 9

Stratified sampling of 100 students

23%

FRESHMAN & JUNIOR VARSITY FOOTBALL

ns

“I prefer books rather than dealing with people.� -Deanna Alpert, 9

page by m. crawford

37%

Autumn

never

ctures.� hapman, 9

“I play varsity golf.� -Devon Peterson, 10

page by e. thurman

017

k. brinkmeyer

Mary Claire Paddock said. “Sometimes, when Laressa Harris a restaurant is closed on the Texas side, like McDonald’s for example, you can go over to the Arkansas side where it’s still open.�

How WE SEE Side

“I sleep at the front edge of my bed.� -Matt Ramirez, 9

the state line

016

104

CROSS COUNTRY

FLOATING

State Line

Autumn

Sum


hello FALL g o o D b y e

fall

“It’s

21

good to just

scream and

wave towels,

because everyone feeds off of others’

energy.” Page 32

“I was

laughing crying,

& and I felt like I was

S u m m e r

in my starring own

We managed to get back in the habit of homework, organize our ACE binder and

movie.” Page 36

t T

“I like knowing the players are fighting that

district champs, and school spirit was at an all-time high. Remember the time we

just as It all comes

hard

painted the town red? Literally.

for the

same goal.

down to who

JUNE 12-

football team dominated, earning a spot as

O 2 th th J o

DID

fightsharder.” Page 41

FIFA YES 65%

“I would always mess up the

fight scene

F

JULY 13

stake out a spot in the cafeteria. The varsity

because I was

afraid that I would hurt the wolf.” Page 56

“I’ve

come to realize

what’s really

important in life —

Vista Ridge High School

finding what you really like todo, as opposed to what the

Cedar Park, Texas Jamie Ray, adviser

January

1

st

19 Day Fit For a

14 fall 2015

GO

M

“I feel like it’s an important holiday to look back on the history of our country. Also, it is important to respect Martin Luther King Jr. and civil rights. The nation is reminded of the struggles of the past,” Madi Moore (9) said. “We need to consider those struggles when looking at the present day situations with racial tension. I don’t think that people realize the importance of the changes he made. Our country would look totally different today without his actions. However, people do not respect him.”

Chronological Coverage Photography by Jeff Heathman, Scott Shaffer, Chloe Chism, Roni Scavacini & Ben Nebesky

58

P

N

A

ic of th

b

NEW YEARS

DON’T

“My New Years resolution was to be as fit as possible because it helps me feel better about myself and it helps me deal with the stresses of life. It’s still a work in progress, but I’m happy that I was able to stay committed and continue to stay committed,” Tatum Higginbotham (11) said.

B

7% 21% academic

35%

Q: Ho

20%

 Nan had a  Chr nece

11%

social personal mental 27%

ingto the Beat

Students were given a day-off to celebrate the civil rights leader, Martin Luther King Jr.

“It’s a very magnificent day because it’s a very important day in black history,” Jamal Tolbert (10) said. “It’s the birth of a wonderful man who fought for black rights and equality.”

HU SO

NUMBERS

“I went [to Snowglobe] because it’s so much fun and my friends and I always have a blast. I went with Chloe Chism (12) and we met up with our big group of friends there. I was there for three days. It costs about $300 for your ticket and your food. The music was amazing. I loved seeing Odesza and Zedd. I loved seeing Odesza and Zedd because I love their music so much and I’ve always wanted to see them live. I was able to afford the music festival because I have a job. “It was not difficult convincing my parents because this is my second time going. The only issues I faced was the freezing snow. I got through the freezing temperatures by wearing tons and tons of layers and about three layers of socks. It was beyond worth it. I am going again this year. I’ve already bought my ticket. My New Year’s experience was amazing. I got to spend it with all my friends and listen to great music and it was just a blast. It was the best three days of my life.” -Haley Edgington (12)

elements

CH

other

or sno

On the cover, the theme phrase “Tell it Like it is” uses angled type to create a tightly constructed logo. One font package, Radikal, with 14 treatments creates meaningful headline variations on every spread.

FO

KN

lobee g w Sno w hom

Reno, Nevada Lizabeth Walsh, adviser

“I W

Spirit in the Air Seconds into the third quarter, the student section cheers after throwing red powder at the last district game against Cedar Park on Nov. 7. The following week, the visitor’s side of Gupton stadium was power washed three times. “It got everybody really hyped and it was a moment that I’ll never forget,” senior Kolton O’Riley said. “Just being with all my friends in that rush was so exciting.” Photo by Jamie Ray

The word “hello” is a faint transparency woven into the orange haze. The primary type repeats fonts on the divider are introduced on the cover for continuity. The colorful sidebar quotes direct readers to coverage within the section.

Reno High School

is.” norm Page 115

“I think it’s wonderful that we give someone who did so much this day of recognition. It’s important to remember the hardships people went through, and appreciate all of King’s work and success,” Kat Clark (11) said.

“It’s a great opportunity to remember him and what he was fighting for, but at the same time it is taken for granted. Do people actually celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day? Not usually, it’s just a day off,” Dylan Arnold (12) said.

29

“RL Grime is heavy trap of ‘grimey’ trap, hence the name. I just enjoy the rhythm and the bass. [It] vibrates through your whole body and gives you something to move to. He’s just an artist, whose music I had listened to before and wanted to see live. The best part was hearing music live I’ve heard before just listening to on my phone or something. Grime dropped the Flume remix of ‘Slasher’ by Rustie, which was a night maker. The worst part was how crowded it was around me: people didn’t know what personal space was.” Jeff Heathman (11) said.

personal physical

Q: Ho

 Nan wron made  Chr dolla

Q: Wh

 Nan betw  Chr befor

no resolution

165/1693 students surveyed

First, Let Me 30 But Take a SELFIE

Q: We

 Nan I was alway  Chr would

Q: Wh

 Nan danc  Chr Cartli begin

As Winterfest week came to an end, the dance was held on the Saturday to celebrate the week. To commemorate the annual Winterfest semi-formal dance, many girls took pictures with their friends throughout the evening. “My friends were all going. I had a lot of fun at Homecoming so I was looking forward to another dance, “Chloe Hayes (9) said with Mya Haney (9). “It was fun to hang out with my schoolmates outside of class. [I] definitely wanted to take pictures so the

 for t

e Mater H

an

 gir Now

dan C includ wh A raise Lat

memories will last.”

January: Student Life Reporting & Design by Roni Scavacini & Mika Alvarez

59

12


Miami Palmetto Senior High School

Pinecrest, Florida Kurt Panton, adviser All cap headlines and secondary headlines in varying sizes, weights, colors and configurations are expertly designed for maximum content and impact. The type treatment invites the reader to explore every word on the spread.

10

KATALINA DIAZ (11)

0

DID YOU DO THE ALS ICE BUCKET

22%

CHALLENGE AND I

KNEW IT WAS A

GOOD CAUSE.

MY TEACHER'S

79% YESWERE NOMINATED

PERSONAL."

NATALIE ALS ICE BUCKET AGULAR (10)

CHALLENGE

Willingly pouring ice-cold water over your head? It may seem outrageous but nearly 100 million dollars was raised toward Lou Gherig’s disease as millions of people challenged their friends and families to dump a bucket of ice and water on themselves. Following the announcement of their victims, the participants would donate 10 dollars to the cause, and would give only 24 hours to the nominees to do the challenge.

back in

%

36

SO

DO U

BT FIR E

23CIET MS % Y 26% .

'S

SALLY NGUYEN (11)

THE SUMMER

FEELING."

JAHELIA

ARNOLD (10)

On July 4th at 11 p.m. a few Palmetto alumni were involved in a deadly boat crash. Sadly, the boat crash resulted in four fatalities, two of which were former students of Palmetto. Kelsie Karpiak, daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Karpiak, who are both respected teachers at our school, was one of the deaths resulting from the collision. Another loss the community suffered as a result of the boat crash was Victoria Dempsey. Both girls were out celebrating Independence Day out on a boat that ended up involving substantial drinking. This crash was one of three that occurred the night of July 4th.

JULY 4TH

BOAT CRASH

HEAT WILL SURVIVE

WITHOUT LEBRON

BECAUSE THEY ARE A STRONG

“I NEVER REALLY

TEAM. THEY

TEACHERS OR

GREAT PLAYERS

KNEW THE THEIR DAUGHTER, BUT MY PARENTS

WERE GOOD

FRIENDS WITH

THEM AND THEY

ANGELO SCIABARASSI (10)

“I THINK THE

WERE PRETTY YOU TO ENJOY

SHAKEN. IT REMINDS

WHAT YOU HAVE."

PHOTO BY: Kelly Rostran -out of 92 students surveyed

HAVE REALLY LIKE DWAYNE WADE

AND CHRIS BOSH."

MATTHEW

MACHADO (12)

JULY 7

35% 65%

HUSBAND HAS ALS, SO IT WAS PRETTY

YET NOBODY NOTICED HIS

DEPRESSION."

YES

THE MIAMI HEAT WILL

15% 15% 11%

9%

8% 5%

1%

ISRAEL

SURVIVE WITHOUT LEBRON LEAVES LEBRON JAMES?

GAZA

NO

&

"BEING IN ISRAEL

WHEN THE WAR WAS GOING ON

LEBRON LEAVES THE MIAMI HEAT

WAS CRAZY.

EVERYONE

TRIED TO

REMAIN CALM.

On July 11, Lebron James, star Miami Heat forward and two time NBA finals MVP winner, announced his surprising decision to leave the Miami Heat and return to the Cleveland Cavaliers. Despite their infamous outrage when Lebron left his hometown to join the Miami Heat in 2010, the Cavaliers have rejoiced his return. Lebron's decision to leave the Heat, the team that brought him back to back NBA Championship titles in 2012 and 2013, surprised many.

JULY 11

NO

FOR THE ALS

17%

FOR EVERYONE ELSE

type your

DO YOU THINK

CHALLENGE?

“I WAS NOMINATED

JUMANJI.

IT'S SAD TO

CARED SO MUCH

Summer- Calvin Harris All Of Me John Legend Turn Down For What- DJ Am I WrongNico & Vinz WiggleJason Derulo HappyPharrell

GAME."

19%

Rude- Magic!

MY FAVORITE

WAS THE FINAL

LOOK, THEY ADD TO

THE SUMMER?

MOVIE IS KNOW THAT HE

49% 51%

20

GO PRO

THEY LOVE.

w o h s f of

WHAT WAS YOUR

Problem- Ariana Grande Feat. Iggy Azalea Fancy - Iggy Azalea feat. Charli XCX

37% CHUBBIES

UNITE TO

PLAY A SPORT

“I LIKE THE WAY

FLASH TATS

I THINK OF IT, I AUTOMATICALLY

AND FEEL RELAXED."

FAVORITE SONG OF

ET

41%

30

I LOVE THE SINGER AND WHENEVER

THINK OF SUMMER

ROBIN WILLIAMS

IN

D

D

LA

A

PO

THE WORLD CUP. I LOVE HOW ALL THE COUNTRIES

"ALL OF ME."

"MY FAVORITE

D

40

"I DID WATCH

FLASH TATS

NO 35%

YES 65%

BIGGEST SUMMER TREND?

JUM ANJ

15% I

WHICH WAS THE

“I REALLY LIKE THE SONG

WHICH IS YOUR FAVORITE ROBIN WILLIAMS MOVIE?

EA

DID YOU WATCH THE

FIFA WORLD CUP?

It was not just the tragic death of just Robin Williams, but it was the death of the Genie from Aladdin, Mrs. Doubtfire and Popeye. Williams, through these characters, touched the hearts of millions. When he took his life on August 11th, 2014 at the age of 63, millions more were devastated. Known for his enthusiasm and excitement in every role he played in movies, Robin Williams was known as a true Hollywood legend amongst his coworkers and his viewers, featuring in more than 50 films.

D

One of the largest sporting events in the world, the 2014 FIFA World Cup took place in 12 different stadiums throughout Brazil. A total of three million fans attended the 64 matches spanning from June 12 to the final game on July 13. In the final match, Germany defeated Argentina in overtime by merely one goal.

SONGS OF THE SUMMER

AUGUST 11

Five-inch seams, head-mounted cameras and unique silver and gold designs. The latest in men’s fashion returns to the 1980’s short-shorts with the widespread use of the Chubbies shorts. Found in multiple colors and patterns, these thigh-liberating shorts have made their mark. Whether it is diving beneath the ocean or mountain biking, the GoPro camera is known for its ability to capture high-action moments in high quality. These cameras are easily adaptable to a head mount, a pole and even a chest-strap. With the rising trend of flash tattoos, marking one's body has never seen such urgency amongst teenage girls. Lasting more than a week, these silver and gold tattoos are distinct from typical temporary tattoos.

JULY 13

JUNE 12-

ROBIN WILLIAMS DIES

SUMMER TRENDS

FLASH TATS, CHUBBIES AND GO PRO

FIFA WORLD CUP

june - august PEREDA (10)

of

NICHOLAS

the THE

PEOPLE TRIED TO

KEEP IT OFF

MINDS BY GREGORY THEIR GOING ABOUT THEIR WOLF (12) DAILY LIVES."

After months of rocket fire from militants in Gaza and Israeli air strikes, the two sides have agreed to an Egyptian sponsored ceasefire. Fighting increased after the abduction and killing of three Israeli teenagers in June, which Israel blamed on Hamas and led to Israel’s suppression of the group in the West Bank. Tensions increased after a supposed revenge killing of a Palestinian teenager in Jerusalem on July 2. Since the events, there have been thousands of air strikes and rockets fired.

SUMMER

recap

SMALL DETAILS

Mr. and Miss Suncoast, Christian Hernandez (12) and Nandi Eastmond (12), give an insider’s view of planning the blackout pep rally

BIG PLAYS

BLACK

Receiving

Passing

Completions: 19 Yards: 133 Yards/Completion: 7 Long Pass: 25 yds.

Completions: 19 Yards: 133 Completion %: 57.6 Long Pass: 25 yds.

.

Q: How long did you spend planning for this pep rally?  Nandi:

It takes a few weeks to plan a really good pep rally; however, we only had a week to get everything together for this one.  Christian: It took forever to plan for this event, but all-nighters weren’t necessary. I have a habit of sleeping by eleven at night anyways.

A look at the first football game against Jupiter Christian in statistics

Punts

Defense

Number: 4 Yards: 166 Average: 41.5 Long Punt: 58 yds.

Interceptions: 1 Solo Tackles: 32 Assists: 14 Tackles for Loss: 6

Q: How did you gather all of the supplies and decorations?

 Nandi: I bought some balloons and streamers, even though they were the wrong colors. A few people from Student Government Association (SGA) also made posters.  Christian: I got the kiddie pool for the Ice Bucket Challenge. It was only ten dollars, so I just bought it to use in future events.

Matt Dame (11)

Q: What was the biggest obstacle during the planning process?

 Nandi: The biggest obstacle is the music. There’s always miscommunication between us and who’s actually getting the music.  Christian: Since we had some difficulties, we just picked the music right before the pep rally.

Q: Were you nervous or excited right before the pep rally?

 Nandi: I was so nervous until two minutes before the event. Once it started, I was excited and ready to go. I expected this to happen though because I’m always like this before important events.  Christian: I was nervous because I didn’t want to mess up. This pep rally would set the tone for the rest of the year in regards to our school spirit.

Q: What was one activity that you wish you could have participated in?

 Nandi: I really wish that I did the dance-off challenge. I’m not the best dancer, but I’m very hyper whenever there’s music.  Christian: I wish that I was the one to dump the ice [on principal Dr. Linda Cartlidge] during the Ice Bucket Challenge because it was my idea in the beginning; however, things can’t always go your way.

shake it off

In their own style, Ethan Curling (12) and Farhan Ahmed (12) entertain the crowd during a dance contest. They both increased the school spirit. "Being in front of everybody and messing around were the best parts of the pep rally," Ethan said. photo by Alec Deker

Suncoast High School

the life of the party

12

BLACKOUT STARS Some take school spirit to a whole new level and stand out, even in a crowd

first pep rally

Deker and Emory Gawlik

 Determined to increase school spirit, Nineh Irving (11) and Rebecca Weissman (11) hold signs and cheer for the Class of 2016.  At the start of the pep rally, Justin Hancock (10) busts out his best moves.  Oliver Perry (12) and Cameron Cooper (12) are on their feet to support principal Dr. Linda Cartlidge during the Ice Bucket Challenge.  As the band blares its trumpets, David Leconte (12) and Brian Wilkins (12) dance along. photos by Alec Deker

summer

 Christening the microphone for the first pep rally of the year, Nandi Eastmond (12) leads everyone in reciting the Alma Mater before the pep rally begins.  Hyping up the crowd, mascot Charlie the Charger makes another grand entrance for the second year.  As a representative for the girls’ varsity volleyball, Kirsten Nowak (12) showcases her best moves during the pep rally’s dance off.  Principal Dr. Linda Cartlidge surprises everyone, including Mr. and Miss Suncoast, when she accepts the popular ALS Ice Bucket Challenge to raise awareness for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. photos by Alec

13

Riviera Beach, Florida Stephanie Russo, adviser The contrast between the casual Londrina font family, the sans serif Helvetica Neue and serif Kreon help reinforce the theme “little BIG things.” To effectively use three very different fonts, the staff used them consistently throughout the book. This was essential. elements

15 fall 2015


shofw of finalists the NSPA picture of the year

National Scholastic Press Association’s Picture of the Year competition honors student photographers in six categories, including News, Feature, Sports Action, Sports Reaction, Environmental Portrait and Junior High/Middle School.​

1 Kelsie Sneegas

10 Katie Shanahand

2 Amanda Offor

11 Dolly Moon

Shawnee Mission North HS Overland Park, Kansas Becky Tate, adviser Harvard-Westlake School Studio City, California Jen Bladen, adviser

1

Rocky Heights MS Highlands Ranch, Colorado Tim Ryckman, adviser Hendrickson High School Pflugerville, Texas Cari Reimer, adviser

5

3 Will Nicolas

McNeil High School Austin, Texas Theresa Proctor, adviser

4 Abbie Howell

Harvard-Westlake School Studio City, California Jen Bladen, adviser

5 Claire Hessenflow

Shawnee Mission East HS Prairie Village, Kansas Dow Tate, adviser

6 Emily Yi

Rocky Heights MS Highlands Ranch, Colorado Tim Ryckman, adviser

7 Emily Hermann

Claudia Taylor Johnson HS San Antonio, Texas Velissa Jewett, adviser

8 Alex Gers

American School in London MS London, England Shannon Miller, adviser

9 Emily Hermann

Claudia Taylor Johnson HS San Antonio, Texas Velissa Jewett, adviser elements

16 fall 2015

9

6


2

3

4

8

7

10

11 elements

17 fall 2015


GREAT SHOT PHOTO CONTEST Great photography, crucial to a fantastic yearbook No matter where you are in the production process, photo skills need to be introduced, reinforced and mastered. For interesting photo opportunities, school events provide the actions and reactions of students and staff. If you are looking for ways to showcase, reinforce and reward photo skills, enter Balfour’s Great Shot Photo Contest. It is easy to participate. As an incentive to enter, have students submit their best shots for a grade. Besides getting them thinking about photography and taking great photos for your publication, they can win up to $500. (Photos taken by advisers can be entered, too.)

photo by Mollie Graham Maple Lake HS – Maple Lake, Minnesota

elements

18 fall 2015

photo by Kelsi Brinkmeyer Texas High School – Texarkana, Texas

Great Shot

spring contest winners

photo by Rebecca Moreno Jefferson-Silva HS –  El Paso, Texas


photo by Becky Calhoun – Texas City High School – Texas City, Texas

Great Shot Photo Contest ends november 20 #balfourgreatshot Now you can share your best action photos and win money in the process! The top prize is $500. This is a great way to recognize staff work and promote your yearbook.

photo by Ryan Long – Hill County Christian School – Austin, Texas

Here’s how the contest works: • Visit facebook.com/balfouryearbooks to enter. • Share your best yearbook action pics. • You can enter one or more photos.

IT’S AS EASY AS THAT!

Check the gallery daily for contest entries and like your favorite. photo by Caressa Cook – St. Petersburg, Florida Dixie Hollins High School

photo by Isabel Wilson – North Davidson High School –  Lexington, North Carolina

w o h s ff o

s o t o h p n o i act your best yearbook

elements

19 fall 2015


w o sh f f o r u o f l a b studio  one location for all your yearbook needs

StudioBalfour is where your yearbook experience comes to life. It’s an online resource just for you and your staff. You’ll find everything you need to design, create and manage a great yearbook at studio.balfour.com.

BOOK STATUS

BUILD A BOOK

Besides including your account information and payment history, Book Status tracks production details such as yearbook specifications, deadlines, page/signature status and outstanding proofs. You can also add users to your yearbook project here, with individualized access to the site.

Using one of three platforms, StudioWorks®, BalfourTools® or myYear®, Build a Book is your yearbook construction site. Customize your book by exploring clipart and cover galleries. In addition, expand coverage with BAL4.tv or re-imagine your book with eYearbook.

• • • • • • • •

elements

Project Information School Information Project Administration Outstanding Proofs Page & Printing Signature Statistics Yearbook Deadlines Yearbook Specifications Add Users

20 fall 2015

• • • • • • • • • •

Yearbook Supplies Software Learning Resources Image Share Community Photo App Balfour Clipart Collection NetChek BAL4.tv eYearbook Properties BalfourTools Download Cover Decorations Files to Balfour


SALES & ORDERS

EDUCATION

Make sure everyone has a book, the product of your staff’s hard work. Sales management is kept simple with just a few steps. The Sales & Order tools allow you to easily set up an online store, add on-campus orders, maintain student lists, track orders and handle personalization.

“Modeling” is a buzz word in Education. Here you’ll find ideas & resources, themes & layouts, and tip & tricks to inspire your staff to create a comprehensive chronicle of the year.

• • • • • • •

Marketing Resources Catalog Store Setup Sales Dashboard Download Sales Reports On-Campus Orders Manage Smart-Pay Say It! Custom Signage

• • • • • • • • • •

Theme Ideas Yearbook Yearbook Small Book Design Inspirations Yearbook Curriculum Resources Workshops & Events Workshop Shows & Resources Advising Resources, by topic Yearbook Magazine | Elements Blog | The Colophon Helpful Links

You can do it all at studio.balfour.com! elements

21 fall 2015


w o h s f of your

social media

Facebook http://www.therideronline.com

Called a Digital Dale Carnegie, Erik Qualman, the author of “Socialnomics” said, ““We don’t have a choice on whether we do social media, the question is how well we do it?”

Leland Mallett

Legacy High School Mansfield, Texas

As journalism teachers in 2015, we must be promoting our programs, stories, books, students, successes and events in social media. To bring real-life experiences to the classroom, we owe it to our students to model how to use social media in a professional manner. It’s a communication and marketing tool today’s journalists must have. Here’s how we got started and what we’re doing at Legacy High School. But my administration won’t allow it. explain why students need knowledge of social media • They may get hired based on their social media skills. • They could get fired for their inability to use social media responsibly or effectively. • They could make a significant impact on the world faster than nearly anything else. Whether they love it or hate it, social media is here to stay and ignoring it won’t change the impact it has on students’ daily lives. Create a package for your administration to show why social media should be included in your curriculum. Model the professionals, @dallasnews, @todayshow, @usatoday, to show professional, journalistic approach to social media.

elements

22 fall 2015


Twitter https://twitter.com/therideronline

They’re Out There, Go Find Them

More than 90 percent of teens are on social media. It’s all they know of each other. It’s how they communicate. That’s how we should be communicating with them – daily. Poll your students to determine what social media site is commonly used. We found Facebook is not used much by students, but it has a huge following with parents. For the most part, students are on Twitter; however, you can reach them on Instagram as well. If you’re willing to give up some control, jump to SnapChat.

Create Policies and Rules

We have a student social media director who is the watchdog for Facebook and Twitter while our photo editor oversees Instagram and SnapChat. (Editors-in-chief have the passwords as well.) Twitter is our professional account. We use up style headlines and always include a link and photo. Instagram is more playful. We post our

newspaper’s photo of the day and other fun things. Finally, SnapChat is used to show students where we are and what we are covering, such as games and events. Only staff members have access to the account (two at a time), and we change the password constantly. We don’t typically like other people’s posts, but will occasionally retweet from other school’s accounts.

Build a Community

Create a group of your school’s clubs and sports Twitter accounts and follow them. Retweet things that are newsworthy. Also, create a school fan page on Facebook.

Follow Back, or Not

We do not follow back on Twitter. When we first launched in 2008, we thought it was creepy for a “they” account to follow students. However, we broke our own rule with Instagram where we do follow back. Remember students know their follower number.

Staff Accounts versus Personal Accounts

The yearbook or student media account is a must, but it’s not effective on its own. Staff members must promote the account by liking and retweeting from the staff account. Students must show off what they are doing in your publications class. If their posts are about personal projects and accomplishments, they will elicit responses from their friends. The staff account is professional. The personal account is personal.

When to Update

Update daily, but spread it out. It gets annoying when 5-10 tweets all come from the same account in your feed. You can use apps that schedule your updates. We use the Buffer app that provides quick and flexible scheduling and one-click posting to multiple social accounts. It also provides analytic that help you improve your social media presence. Do not, I repeat, do not “live tweet.” Large numbers of tweets from an

Instagram https://instagram.com/therideronline

event cause you to lose followers. If they care about an event, they will be there. We created a “live events” account for sports and events. We also use the “live events” account for live video feeds using Meercat or Periscope apps.

Create Hashtags

Each year we create a yearbook hashtag to promote the book. To draw attention to our Tweets and encourage students to join the conversation, we make sure to use the dedicated hashtag during an event. We provide updates for academic, extracurricular and sporting events. As a result of the updates, your readers know the journalism squad is working to cover them. We also market the book by showing off the cover and previewing content with screen shots of spreads. This drives both interest and sales. We also do a trendy hashtag for our school, #BroncoNation. Encourage other clubs and organizations to join you with your hashtags. elements

23 fall 2015


SmugMug http://www.therideronline.smugmug.com

SmugMug

Using SmugMug is a great way to display unused photos and make a few dollars. And it’s an easy sell at the end of the year when moms call asking for photos.

Vimeo/YouTube

We use Vimeo because YouTube is blocked at school. Unfortunately, no one goes to Vimeo to search videos. To attain maximum engagement, try to get your videos on both sites. For example, we create a series of commercials for yearbook sales. Typically we use a current commercial and adapt it to yearbook sales. The shorter they are, the more they are watched.

Once they are uploaded to Vimeo or YouTube, promote them on other sites.

Cover It Live

This is a great site that allows you to chat. We call it “Chat Now” on our newspaper site. We’ve done chats with the principal, counselors and other special guests. You have full control over what posts. For marketing purposes, create “buy your yearbook” ads during the chats.

Tumblr

In order to show your student body photos or pages you’re working on, try Tumblr. We use it for our

Key Practices • • • • •

Update daily Create a presence Be first / Be accurate Be the go-to for your school Market yourself weekly (sell yearbooks too) • Team with other school and district social media accounts • Staff members retweet (personalization) • Create and use #hashtags

elements

24 fall 2015

Cover It Live http://www.therideronline.com/chat-now

“Humans of Legacy” coverage. The same stories featured on Tumblr run as personality profiles in the yearbook.

Promote Yourself

Each year I notice that we spend more time marketing our book. Balfour has a new site that allows you to create banners, posters, window clings, yard signs and much more. (Go to https://studio. balfour.com/sales-orders/say-itcustom-signage/)

media sites and tells them (on the back) how to order a yearbook. If your school requires students and teachers to wear an ID, distribute lanyards with your media department’s name. Banners work better than flyers. Magnets work better than banners. Consider buying pens with a stylus on top and your website written on it. Of course, include how to order a yearbook on everything. Be out there all the time. Focus on freshmen.

We print “follow us” cards (business cards) locally. After each interview, we present the respondents with a card that features our social

What to Promote Daily in Social Media (STAFF ACCOUNT) Events – show students you’re covering them for the book or newspaper Announcements – be the source of info for your school Photos – show off what your students are doing Headlines – promote stories

What to Promote Daily in Social Media (PERSONAL ACCOUNTS) Events – show friends they are part of the yearbook or newspaper staff Feelings – communicate the fun they have in journalism class & how they enjoy what they’re doing Previews – reveal parts of the book, newspaper or video they’re creating to generate interest Retweets – share Items from the journalism staff account


& & &

It’s meant to b.

bt eYearbook

Yearbook Curriculum

BAL4.tv

The first truly interactive yearbook viewable on a acomputeror mobile device.

The only comprehensive, integrated curriculum for yearbook.

Extend yearbook coverage and transform the way students remember school with links to multimedia.

BalfourTools The premier yearbook plugin for Adobe™ InDesign that integrates seamlessly on Adobe™ Creative Cloud™

ImageShare Easy-to-use photo upload app that allows the school community to share snapshots for the yearbook

We’re good together. Why? You give your time, enthusiasm and commitment to the yearbook. Pair those with our cutting-edge technology, comprehensive educational resources and attentive customer service, and it’s no coincidence. It’s meant to be. For more information, see your Balfour representative or visit us at balfour.com/yearbooks.


PRSRT.STD U.S.Postage PAID PERMIT No. 3193 Dallas, TX

1550 W. Mockingbird Lane Dallas, TX 75235

GREAT SHOT PHOTO CONTEST YOU COULD WIN $500!

Share your best yearbook action pic. Contest ends November 20. Visit facebook.com/balfouryearbooks to enter. #balfourgreatshot

Elements Magazine, Vol 10, Fall 2015  

Yearbook Magazine

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