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students who are the true leaders of the classroom • Staff runs recruitment, interviews and selection of next year’s staff. • Each editor teaches lessons the first three weeks of school. The lessons cover Sports Photography, Photoshop® and Cutouts, InDesign® , Conducting Interviews, Copy and Captions. • Editors ran Back-to-School Night this year. I was filled with pride as I stood in the back of the classroom and watched my Editors-in-Chief run a workshop for parents. To start, they showed the first video that our Videographers created. Next, they explained what was expected of their sons and daughters. Their professional presentation established the editors’ leadership roles. • In 2010 and 2011, I was out for the first eight weeks of the school year on maternity leave. I learned an important lesson from that time. It isn’t my job to produce the book; my students do it. I provide support. I love writing on the sub plans, “Ask my Editors. They run the class.” “We are given a lot of leeway managing the staff. This creates a cohesive environment. Because we are students, we have a better sense of what is going on. We keep our fingers on the pulse of the school. It is easier to direct from the middle of the action than outside of it. Having an incredible staff really helps.” -Maya Sweedler, editor-in-chief

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students that show appreciation and give respect • Students give out monthly work appreciation awards with $5 Starbucks’ cards. • I always give a special gift to my Editorial Staff. Last year I got them mugs with their pictures on them. Our theme was Icons, so I wrote, “You are our ICONS” at the top of the mug. • I love seeing high-fives about great articles and completed work. • Teachers and students request photographers to cover events on campus, and they have started to hire our staff for “photo booths” in lieu of a professional company. • Seniors love watching the yearbook DVD during senior yearbook distribution. They cheer, laugh and cry. The videographers take pride in sharing their work with the school. “I got the Appreciation Award after I finished my first four spreads. It felt good to be recognized for all the work I had done. I knew I was appreciated, but it was nice to actually get an award.” -Christina Briones, writer “People became emotional when they saw a video of everything they had done during the year. The video recorded them with all the friends, who like them, would be leaving. It made us proud to give that to them.” -Emily Kessler, video editor

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students with a passion for writing, design, photography & videography that leads to college/ career choices • At the end of the year, I give every graduating senior the cartoon book, “I Went to College, and It Was Okay.” When I was in high school, I had a teacher who gave this to me. At a pizza lunch on the last day of class, I tell the students about my experience and thank each one for his or her contribution to the staff. • Oh, So Proud: Last year, for the first time, I saw how a passion for journalism as a career possibility could change the dynamic of the class and the quality of the book. They see yearbook as a place to help build their portfolio and because of that, they are eager to learn. • One student is doing Graphic Design at USC. • Two students are pursuing video and video editing. • One student is working as a photographer. • Two students are journalism majors. “I will be majoring in English in college because it is something I know I can do well. I would like to become a screenwriter. By working on the yearbook, I discovered I love telling people’s stories; I am a storyteller. I am looking for a publication to work on at my college.” -Heather Matley, editor-in-chief

elements 5 spring 2014

Elements Magazine, Vol 7, Spring 2014  

Yearbook Magazine

Elements Magazine, Vol 7, Spring 2014  

Yearbook Magazine