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when having stepped over the chasm of Torda, water sprang up from the rocks as an answer to his prayers. The giant bronze−man that suggests personality, the horse striding devoutly with its noble burden, the just sufficient attributes, the detailed attire all build up the image of St. László in our collective memory. Györfi also modelled the state and church founding king of the Hungarian nation in front of the castle church of Szolnok with similar sensitivity. The figure of Chieftain Szabolcs wearing battle garment leads us back to the age of the Hungarian conquest, while the palatial array of Ferenc Rákóczi II invokes the spirit of his war of independence. The Jász Monument, which is also one−figured, hints at chief Lehel with his legendary horn, and the coats of arms of the Jász settlements hint at the settlements that took part in the redemption of their rights after the Turkish thraldom. While the statue of Kossuth is associated with the revolution and war of independence of 1848−49, the figure of Archbishop Mindszenty placed in a built−up area shows the recent past. Györfi’s first equestrian monument is the War Memorial of the Hungarian Hussars in World War II, which was erected in 1997 in Nyíregyháza. The artist placed the mounted soldier with his battle pack leaving for the war on a cornice decorated with white columns, with embossments on both sides showing the battle of the Hadik Hussars against Napoleon. Responding to the demands of the 90s, he made an increasing number of monuments to the memory of those who were wasted in the Second World War. The most soul−stirring of these is probably the Pieta of Karcag. White rows of stone columns forming a semi−circle border the large−sized Pieta placed on a stone foundation. The mourning mother is holding the nude body of her dead son covered with a military coat. The symbol of the distinctive cloak thrown over the body is unequivocal: the Mother’s pain belongs to all victims. As Györfi writes about this piece: “The Kun Pieta tells about the tragedy of a community, the horrors of World War II. The community shared this pain with me when they consigned the creation of this statue to me. The only way to make it authentically was with fellow−feeling. I wanted to create something in Karcag that cannot be found anywhere else: a Protestant Pieta. This statue has become a place of memory.” In Györfi’s work it is the thought that appears first, it is embodied under his hands and gains expression in the forms by his hands. Perhaps the most succinct example to this is the plastic representation of the Kun bearings of his homeland. Looking over the pieces that belong here, one can register an outstanding achievement. It is not just the wittiness and execution of these statues that make them impressive, but also their weight and importance. Few creators can claim to have created a world on its own. The Kun population, which used to have their own language once, settled among the Hungarians in areas allocated to them, and not only enriched the country that accommodated them, but gradually giving up their own language, they shared the fate of their chosen masters. In return, they were able to live free from serfdom for a good four centuries. And when this independence was lost, they bought it back using their own resources, collecting money among themselves together with the Jász, who shared a similar fate. This redemption is perhaps unparalleled in world history. The biggest settlement of the Jász, Jászberény became the administrative centre of the Threefold District, while Karcag had a leading role in managing the Nagykun District. Along with the middle−class development that followed the Redemption in both centres of the area, the search for identity of newly settled peoples began, the search for the origin of the Jász and Kun. Enthusiastic scientists started to collect the Kun relics, the archaeological, historical, and ethnographical details that made up the history of the Kun in the Carpathian Basin. However, there are no visible, perceptible traces. There are no architectural objects or articles of everyday life and we are short of archaeological findings of the nomadic Hungarians from the age of the migration of nations, neither are there any of the Kun population of similar culture who arrived some centuries later.

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