Page 1

TM

October 2019

www.bakersfieldlife.com

Love yourself

Overcom(h)er Conference

Promoting positive body image in the digital age

A community of women supporting women

On the Road Genesis G70 blends luxury, performance THE ANNUAL

$3.95

WOMEN’S ISSUE

Dining with Dre

Chef’s Choice Noodle Bar a complete culinary experience Allie Mae Perkins, Lindsay Book and Alexandrea Garzaro use their social media platforms to promote confidence among women.


FALL SHOPPING S TA R T S HERE

Over 50 Stores, Restaurants, Boutiques & Spas Stockdale Hwy. & Calloway Dr. ShopsatRiverWalk.com


:KHWKHULW·VZLQQLQJWKHJDPHRUSXUFKDVLQJDQHZKRPHYLFWRU\LV VZHHW7XUQWKHXOWLPDWHGUHDPRIKRPHRZQHUVKLSLQWRDUHDOLW\'LG\RX NQRZWKDWRZQLQJDKRPHFDQKHOS\RXUFKLOGUHQGREHWWHULQVFKRRO" 7KHDYHUDJHFKLOGRIKRPHRZQHUVLVVLJQLÃ&#x20AC;FDQWO\PRUHOLNHO\WRDFKLHYH DKLJKHUOHYHORIHGXFDWLRQDQGWKHUHE\DKLJKHUOHYHORIHDUQLQJV +(5(·6:+<<285&+,/'5(1%(1(),7 Q5HDGLQJVFRUHVDUHKLJKHUIRUKRPHRZQHUV Q0DWK6FRUHVDUHKLJKHUIRUKRPHRZQHUV Q+LJK6FKRRO*UDGVDUHKLJKHUIRUKRPHRZQHUV Q&ROOHJH*UDGVDUHKLJKHUIRUKRPHRZQHUV 6RZK\UHQWZKHQ\RXFDQEX\"+RPHRZQHUVKLSLVWKHSULPDU\ FRPSRQHQWLQWKHFUHDWLRQRIZHDOWK IRUPDQ\$PHULFDQV'DWDIURP+DUYDUG8QLYHUVLW\·V-RLQW&HQWHU RI+RXVLQJ6WXGLHVLOOXVWUDWHQRWRQO\WKDWWKHPHGLDQQHWZHDOWKRI KRPHRZQHUVLVWLPHVJUHDWHUWKDQWKDWRIUHQWHUVEXWDOVRWKDW RYHUKDOIRIWKDWZHDOWKLVJHQHUDWHGIURPKRPHHTXLW\ 0RVWKRPHVDSSUHFLDWHLQYDOXHRYHUWLPHDQGFDQEHDVRXUFH RILQFRPHIRU\RXDQG\RXUIDPLO\ 5($/7256®FDQVKRZ\RXRSWLRQVWKDWEHVWÃ&#x20AC;W\RXUQHHGV:HKHOS PLOOLRQVRIIDPLOLHVÃ&#x20AC;QGWKHLU$PHULFDQGUHDPHYHU\GD\ 3DUWQHULQJZLWKD5($/725®GHOLYHUVWKHSHDFHRIPLQGWKDWFRPHV IURPZRUNLQJZLWKDUHDOSHUVRQ³DUHDODGYRFDWH$UHDOWUXVWHG SURIHVVLRQDOZKRLVFRPPLWWHGWR\RXDQG\RXUIDPLO\·VIXWXUHMXVW DVPXFKDV\RXDUH´7KDW·V:KR:H5µ:HDUH5($/7256® *RWREDNHUVÃ&#x20AC;HOGUHDOWRUFRPZKHUH\RXFDQÃ&#x20AC;QGRQHRIRXUWUXVWHG 5($/7256®DQGZKHUH\RX·OODOVRÃ&#x20AC;QGKXQGUHGVRIORFDOKRPHVIRUVDOH ,W·VWKHRQO\SODFH\RXFDQWUXVWZLWKDFFXUDWHLQIRUPDWLRQLQUHDOWLPH 'RQ·WZDLWZLQRQDQGRIIWKHÃ&#x20AC;HOGKLUHD5($/725®QRZ

'UHDPVFDQEHFRPHDUHDOLW\ 6285&( California Association of REALTORS® & National Association of REALTORS® ´6RFLDO%HQHÃ&#x20AC;WVRI+RPHRZQHUVKLSDQG6WDEOH+RXVLQJ6WXG\µ

ZZZEDNHUVÃ&#x20AC;HOGUHDOWRUFRP_  635.2300


STAFF Bakersfield’s Premier City Magazine October 2019 / Vol. 14 / Issue 1 Bakersfield Life™ Magazine is published by Sound News Media

Cliff Chandler

Editor Mark Nessia

Specialty Publications Designer

Allie Mae Perkins, Lindsay Book and Alexandrea Garzaro use their social media platforms to promote confidence among women.

Julie Mana-ay Perez

Contributing Copyeditor Maude Campbell

Photo by Mark Nessia Photography April & Co., Nicole Bolinger, Alex

Coming up next … Men and Cars

Horvath, Mark Nessia, Greg Nichols, Carla Rivas, Jocelyn Sandusky, Rod Thornburg

Advertise, contact Cliff

Chandler at cchandler@bakersfield. com or 395-7521.

Contributing writers

Subscribe

Jason Gutierrez, Nina Ha, Sarena Hess,

Maureen Buscher-Dang, Asha Chandy,

to Bakersfield Life Magazine for your home or office, go to www.tbcoffers. com/deal/blifeintro.

Partner with us

Lisa Kimble, Karen King, Elizabeth Lehr-Cardenas, Stephen Lynch, Melissa Peaker-Whitten, Natalia Perez, Julie Plata, Andrea Saavedra, Cheryl Scott,

for your next event. Email Mark Nessia at mnessia@bakersfield.com or call 395-7383 for more information.

Bakersfield Life Magazine

“The most influential woman in my life is my great-grandma. She taught me how important it was to be fully generous with your time and resources. But the most important lesson she taught was to see and accept people as they are.” – Sarena Hess, contributing writer “Greta Thunberg because she doesn’t let her age disqualify her from sitting at and speaking at the table of decision-makers. She understands the power of words and also lives by what she speaks of.” – Asha Chandy, contributing writer “I admire my sister for her free spirit and care-free attitude. She has a pure heart and finds the good in people.” – Mark Nessia, editor “The most influential person in my life is my Auntie Maricel. We’re very close in age and we grew up together. She always inspires me to be better than I can ever be. She’s one of the strongest bonds I have in my life and I can’t dream of ever giving that up.” – Julie Mana-ay Perez, specialty publications designer

Aaron Stonelake, Rudy Valdivia

Connect with us – www.bakersfieldlfe.com facebook.com/BakersfieldLifeMagazine Instagram/bakersfield_life twitter.com/BakersfieldLife

4

Who is the most influential woman in your life other than your mom? “I look up to my sister Sarah, who traveled the world as a model, homeschooled four children, holds a black belt in kung fu, attends acupuncture school and loves the Lord.” – Nina Ha, contributing writer

General Manager

On the Cover

SHARES

October 2019

We want to hear from you – Send comments or letters to the editor to Mark Nessia at mnessia@bakersfield. com. Please include name, city and phone number. We reserve the right to edit letters for clarity and to excerpt them.

Contact us – 3700 Pegasus Dr. Bakersfield, CA 93308 661-395-7500


Rick Sorci, CKD Shawna Sorci Bakersfield’ most experienced certified Kitchen Designer & General contractor #905759

Rick Sorci, CKD

Bakersfield’s most experienced certified Kitchen Designer & General Contractor. #905759

Beautiful Cabinetry Smart Design GAME ROOM:

• Sharp Microwave • Cabinetry Waypoint Color Linen • In counter freezer • Under Counter Sub Zero • Brown Fantasy counter tops

BATHROOM:

• Diamond Cabinetry Color Black • Marble tile color Statuary honed • Picture framed back wall in Shower Chateau Black Jade and White Thassos

LAUNDRY ROOM

BEDROOM ENTERTAINMENT AND STORAGE : • Waypoint Cabinetry Color Silk • Counter top Marble Diana Royal

Who Will Be Next? Call Today!

661-834-3333 • 4500 Shepard Street, Ste. B2

www.stockdalekitchenandbath.com


October 2019

FEATURES

WALL OF

HOPE FIGHTING BREAST CANCER

TOGETHER 50

Elevate your confidence

PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

Positive body image is power. Take back control and create a healthy lifestyle for yourself.

6

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

58


From the Original Creator of Seven Oaks

2005 Brighton Parks changed everyone’s perception of active adult living. Now, Castle & Cooke introduces Highgate Regents at Seven Oaks, our newest and most anticipated gated, master planned active adult community. Highgate Regents takes the active adult lifestyle to an all-new level, combining European sophistication with California style, low maintenance homes and stress-free living. Visit Highgate Regents today and discover why Castle & Cooke is Bakersfield’s number one choice for active adult living.

Ming Avenue

Regents ACTIVE ADULT

Allen Road

In 1998 Castle & Cooke created The Greens in Seven Oaks. In

Highgate Park Boulevard

THE REGENCY CLUB

MODELS

Highgate Heath Avenue

GATED, MASTER PLANNED, ACTIVE ADULT COMMUNITY | THE REGENCY CLUB: PRIVATE CLUBHOUSE, POOL & FITNESS CENTER

661-829-1775 | Ming Ave. and Allen Rd. | Monday - Saturday 10am - 5pm and Sunday 11am - 5pm | HighgateSevenOaks.com BRE#01254164


OCTOBER 2019

DEPARTMENTS Up Front

Barbecues, festivals and fiestas are taking place in October. Find more events starting on Page 12.

Eat & Drink

Andrea “Dre” Saavedra visits a downtown favorite in Chef’s Choice Noodle Bar. Page 13.

Lifestyles

PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

28

Genesis is the newest brand to enter the luxury car market and the G70 is the perfect blend of comfort, practicality and performance. Page 28.

Go & Do

The Overcom(h)er Conference aims to create a community of women supporting women. Find out more on Page 42.

B Well

20 Up Front 10 Editor’s Note 11 The Big Picture 12 Short Takes 14 Happenings Eat & Drink 16 Dining with Dre 20 Bites 24 Dining Guide 26 Best Thing We Ate This Month

8

Bakersfield Life Magazine

27 Where We’re Eating Lifestyles 28 On the Road 30 Money Matters 32 Pastimes 34 Love & Life Go & Do 36 Entertainment 38 Trip Planner 40 Arts & Culture

October 2019

64 42 Out & About B Well 46 Sarenaty 48 Feature – Fiber Is the Superhero Your Body Needs, Deserves People & Community 60 Business Profiles 64 Bakersfield Matters 66 Be in Bakersfield 68 Study Hall

PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

Confidence coach Sarena Hess says now is the time for women to rise and shine. Page 46.

People & Community

Read about the leaders behind Women’s March Kern County on Page 72.

70 Our Town 72 Personality 74 History 76 All-Star Roundup 80 SNAP! 86 Last Word The Marketplace 75 Realtor Profiles 78 Prime Finds


AK

ER

SFIELD CALIF OR

2014

TH

2017

RE

AD

E R S’

CH O IC E

PO

AN NI

2018

EB

Thank you for voting us “Best of ” seven years in a row.

LL

Your Money is Valuable.

Maximize its Potential Wondering how the tax law changes benefit you? The experienced professionals at Brown Armstrong can help you.

Earn, Save, Grow, Protect Every Dollar!

At Brown Armstrong, we maintain more than just “accounts” – we build strong relationships with friends and provide solid advice and strategies to maximize their money! Our business and personal tax specialists can provide answers and guidance for scenarios you may not even know exist.

Brown Armstrong: Strategic, Innovative, Trustworthy, Experienced, Local

Contact Brown Armstrong today for your tax needs – you can’t afford not to! Intelligent money management with professional accounting services. That’s what we do!

45 Years of Serving our Community.

Brown Armstrong Services Include: • • • • • • • • •

Individual Tax Preparation and Planning Corporate Tax Compliance and Consulting Estate and Trust Administration Bookkeeping QuickBooks Pro Advisors Payroll, A/R & A/P Sales Tax Returns Business Consulting Audit and Attest Services

BROWN ARMSTRONG CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

4200 Truxtun Avenue #300 | Bakersfield, CA 93309 | 661.324.4971 | bacpas.com


EDITOR’S

NOTE

HOWDY-DO, MARY SUE Let me introduce you to Mary Sue. She’s beautiful. Physically and mentally strong. Makes the right decisions. Stands up for the little guy. Is exceptionally skilled. She possesses all the characteristics you’d want for yourself. And people hate her for it. Mary Sue is a label attached to an overidealized, near-flawless fictional character. They’re often seen as “badly written” because they are too perfect and audiences find them to be boring. While Mary Sue applies to any character who is, as Urban Dictionary puts it, “so perfect as to be annoying,” an overwhelming majority affixed with the label are female. People are up in arms over characters like Rey from the “Star Wars” sequel trilogy, Captain Marvel from the Marvel Cinematic Universe and Arya Stark for her deeds in the final season of “Game of Thrones,” saying they are untested, overpowered and/or don’t deserve of the honor of killing the big baddie. So let’s turn things around for a second. Superman is arguably the biggest Mary Sue (aka Marty Stu, Gary Sue or Larry Stu when referring to male characters) nobody talks about. There’s no denying that Superman is overpowered. When he entered the fight against Steppenwolf in “Justice League,” the fight was essentially over. How can someone so powerful and seemingly invincible be in any real danger? The answer: He can’t. Storytellers often try to introduce weaknesses to take him down a notch but the results are always the same – Superman wins. Yet the character is beloved by millions, the franchise spawning countless comic books, movies, TV shows, video games, fan fiction and more. But if you Google “Is Superman a Mary Sue,” the majority of the results will state that he isn’t. One argument claims that Superman has defined powers and limitations and doesn’t simply develop a brandnew superpower or ability to save the day, yet when he spontaneously gained time-traveling capabilities, people just accepted it. Perhaps the reason is tied to the second half of

10

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

Superman’s name. The sad truth may be that society doesn’t know how to handle strong women. They have to be flawed. They have to stay within their predetermined roles of underwritten supporting characters rather than main protagonist and heroine. Imagine if James Bond was the “damsel in distress” and was rescued by a woman rather than the typical formula of him bedding her before defeating the villain and escaping death while keeping his suits in pristine condition. What if John Wick decided to stop mowing down hordes of faceless henchmen because he realized that no amount of vengeance will bring his wife back and that her memory will live on so long as he keeps her in his heart? Audiences would probably walk out of the theater. Those are acceptable scenarios for female characters but not men. And that is unacceptable. We should embrace and celebrate female characters who exhibit strong, positive traits and break the mold of being merely the love interest and/or eye candy because they are so much more than that. It’s hard to believe that people can be so hesitant to accept strong female characters when, in truth, we are surrounded by strong women all the time – women who possess traits and characteristics shared by Rey, Captain Marvel and Arya Stark. But unlike the fictional characters labeled Mary Sues, these women are real.

Mark Nessia Editor 395-7383 mnessia@bakersfield.com


UPFRONT

Find out what’s happening in October on Page 14.

T h e B i g P i c t u re / Sh o r t Ta ke s / Ha p p e n i n g s

DOUGHNUT WORRY, BE HAPPY Kern County Sheriff Luciano Escaleva was on roof of the Dunkin’ Donuts with other law enforcement folks on Allen Road to raise awareness and funds for Special Olympics Southern California and Law Enforcement Torch Run. – Photo by Alex Horvath

www.BakersfieldLife.com

11


UP FRONT

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL HOMELESS CENTER GRILLS FOR A CAUSE As the local homeless population explodes, organizations like the St. Vincent de Paul Homeless Center in east Bakersfield, which receives no federal funding, have been straining to keep up with the need. Thursday, Oct. 3, it will host its annual Fall Barbecue, where monies raised in the past have helped improve fencing and security and make updates to the facility. Upward of 200 homeless men, women and children rely on the center for two hot meals a day and access to restrooms, showers, and basic social and mail services. Doors to the event at 316 Baker St. open at 5 p.m. Harris Ranch New York steaks, teriyaki chicken and all the trimmings will be served beginning at 5:30 p.m. Takeout, drive-thru and complimentary valet parking will be available. Tickets are $35 and can be purchased at the door.

Lamb chops, feta fries and more will be available at the annual Greek Food Festival.

GREEK FOOD ON DISPLAY AT ANNUAL FESTIVAL St. George Greek Orthodox Church hosts its annual Greek Food Festival Oct. 4-6 at 401 Truxtun Ave. The family friendly event features authentic Greek barbecue, gyro sandwiches, chicken wings, lamb shanks, vegetarian fare, Greek coffee and pastries in addition to dance performances and live music provided by The Olympians. Shopping opportunities, church tours and bounce houses are available as well. Admission is $5 and children under 12 are free. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Kern Coalition Against Human Trafficking. For more information and discount coupons, go to www.bakersfieldgreekfoodfestival. org.

BASQUE, MEXICAN CULTURES COME TOGETHER DURING 14TH ANNUAL PYRENEES FESTIVAL A “magical” evening awaits during the 14th annual Pyrenees Fiesta Oct. 12, from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. at The Station, 7900 Downing Ave., Suite D. The annual event benefiting the Mendiburu Magic Foundation blends Basque and Mexican cultures with dinner, drinks, live music and dancing. The Mendiburu Magic Foundation is a nonprofit organization that responds to the unmet needs of local children and their families during the battle against cancer and other catastrophic or life-threatening illnesses. Dr. Paula Green Tickets are $75. For more information, call Valerie at 661-319-0355.

12

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

PHOTO BY ROD THORNBURG

Harris Ranch steak is on the menu for the annual St. Vincent de Paul Homeless Center Fall Barbecue.

CALIFORNIAN FILE PHOTO

Short Takes


UP FRONT

Short Takes

PHOTO COURTESY OF BAKERSFIELD COLLEGE

‘PEACEBUILDING IN DIVIDED COMMUNITIES’: PAULA GREEN TO VISIT BAKERSFIELD COLLEGE Dr. Paula Green, founder and senior fellow of the Karuna Center for Peacebuilding, will visit Bakersfield College as part of its Distinguished Speaker series Oct. 23 at 5:30 p.m. in Forum 101. Green has extensive international experience in peacebuilding and conflict transformation and also serves as professor of conflict transformation at the School for International Training. The Karuna Center combines psychology, sociology and politics in a holistic fashion. Her book “Peacebuilding in Divided Communities” discusses the philosophy behind peacebuilding efforts and useful materials for teaching and learning. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, go to www.bakersfieldcollege.edu.

SIP AND SAVOR AT THE BAKERSFIELD COUNTRY CLUB On Oct. 5, the Henrietta Child Guidance Foundation invites you to join them at Sip and Savor, a festival of Kern County wines at Bakersfield Country Club, 4200 Country Club Drive. The evening will begin at 7 p.m. and will feature live music by the Peoples Project, a wine pull, appetizer stations, silent auction, raffle prizes, valet parking and more. Sip on wines with Kern County connections, which will be hand selected by Mike and Claudia Stephanovich of Step On Wine. Tickets start at $100 per person and include unlimited tastings. To learn more, visit www.weillguidancefoundation. org/sipandsavor.


UP FRONT

Happenings

EVENTS IN

Find more community events at www.bakersfield.com/events. Post your event there or submit via email to bakersfieldlife@bakersfield.com.

OCTOBER

CALIFORNIAN FILE PHOTO

DEPOSITPHOTOS.COM

Powered by

Oct. 5 Sip and Savor, 7 p.m. What: A festival of Kern County wines featuring live music, silent auction, raffle prizes and more. Where: Bakersfield Country Club, 4200 Country Club Drive Admission: $100 More Info: www.weillguidancefoundation.org/sipandsavor

14

Safe Halloween at the Kern County Museum

Oct. 12

Oct. 11

Bakersfield Brunch Fest, 11 a.m. What: A day to sample food and beverage brunch items from locations in town. Where: Kern County Museum, 3801 Chester Ave. Admission: $55-$110; 21 and over only More Info: www.eventbrite. com

BYP Downtown Street Party, 7 p.m. What: Fifth annual Downtown Street Party benefiting the Bakersfield Young Professionals program. Where: The Park at The Mark + Wall Street Alley, 1623 19th St. Admission: $20-$30 More Info: 661-327-4421

Oktoberfest, 5 p.m. What: Second annual Oktoberfest benefiting Junior League of Bakersfield. Where: Junior League of Bakersfield Community Center, 1928 19th St. Admission: $55-$85 More Info: www.juniorleagueofbakersfield.org

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

Pyrenees Fiesta, 6:30 p.m. What: Annual event benefiting the Mendiburu Magic Foundation Where: The Station, 7900 Downing Ave., Suite D Admission: $75 More Info: Contact Valerie at 661-319-0355

Oct. 14 Dot x Ott Presents: A Frightful Fete + Magic Show, 6 p.m. What: A spooky take on dinner and a show, featuring award-winning magician Ron Saylor. Where: Dot x Ott, 930 18th St. Admission: $80; 21 and over only

More Info: Email Christine at christine@dotandott.com

Oct. 18 Party in the Park – Halloween Nights, 6 p.m. What: CSUB Alumni Association’s annual fundraiser raising money for scholarships and mentoring. Where: CSUB Alumni Park, 9001 Stockdale Highway Admission: $25-$50 More Info: www.csub.edu/ alumni

Oct. 19 Bakersfield Walk to End Alzheimer’s, 8 a.m. What: Two-mile walk to raise funds and awareness for Alzheimer’s care.


PHOTO BY APRIL & CO.

BYP Downtown Street Party

Where: The Park at River Walk, 11298 Stockdale Highway Admission: Free to walk but donations are appreciated. More Info: Email Amanda at avalenzuela@alz.org

programs. Where: Buena Vista Edible Schoolyard, 6520 Buena Vista Road Admission: $75 More Info: www.eventbrite. com

Oct. 20

Night at the Museum, runs through Oct. 26 What: Flashlight tours of the museum. Where: Buena Vista Museum of Natural History & Science, 2018 Chester Ave. Admission: Adults: $8; children and students: $6 More Info: 661-324-6350

Bakersfield Salsa & Music Festival, 11â&#x20AC;Ża.m. What: A competition to crown Kern Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best salsa. Where: Stramler Park, 3805 Chester Ave. Admission: $15-$60; 21 and over only More Info: www.eventbrite. com

Oct. 25 Toast and Taste the Season, 6 p.m. What: A night of live music, drinks, local bites and cooking demonstrations at the Buena Vista Edible Schoolyard, featuring purveyors like Redhouse Beef and Cafe Smitten. Proceeds benefit Edible Schoolyard Kern County

Oct. 30 Safe Halloween at the Kern County Museum, runs through Oct. 31 What: Family entertainment at the Kern County Museum, featuring 50 candy stations. Where: Kern County Museum, 3801 Chester Ave. Admission: Kids 5-13: $10; adults: $5; children 4 and under: free More Info: www.kerncountymuseum.org www.BakersfieldLife.com

15


EAT & DRINK

Dining with Dre

Surf and turf with pineapple fried rice

CHEF’S CHOICE NOODLE BAR

A CULINARY EXPERIENCE FROM START TO FINISH By Andrea Saavedra

Throughout my food journey in Bakersfield, I’ve noticed that the variety and diversity of the food scene here is growing, especially in Asian fusion cuisine. Though I love seeing this growth with a spike in poke spots and pho shops, still being somewhat new in town, I still hadn’t tried some of the Asian fusion classics that Bakersfield has to offer. Enter Chef’s Choice Noodle Bar. Found in the heart of downtown Bakersfield, Chef’s Choice Noodle Bar has called Westchester home for the

16

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

last eight years. The restaurant boasts a 200-seat dining room along with an experienced Angeleno chef (originally from Thailand) who has created and executes its Thai fusion menu on the daily. Being a lover of Asian cuisine, I have tried almost every Korean barbecue, poke, pho and ramen spot Bakersfield has to offer. With all of these places, I always left with a full tummy and yet a disappointed palate. So when I decided to join friends for dinner at Chef’s Choice Noodle Bar, I didn’t think much of it. Just another Asian spot, right? Wrong! Upon walking into Chef’s Choice, I crossed the thresh-


PHOTOS BY MARK NESSIA

Pork shumai

old and was met with the incredible aromas of Thailand. As I followed the hostess to our table, waiters whizzed by into the bustling dining room with dishes that filled the air with the essence of Thai basil, coriander and toasted peanuts. Looking over the menu was a little daunting as there were so many choices. They have a large menu with something for everyone. Appetizers, soups, salads, WEB EXCLUSIVE noodles, fried rice, entrees, pho, desserts – the menu Watch Dre’s visit to Chef’s went on and on. Choice Noodle Bar at www.bakersfieldlife.com. Everything sounded amazing, but I couldn’t decide on just one thing. So, in regular “Dre” fashion, I ordered a handful of items with a master plan to have a to-go-box party with a leftover feast. I ordered the pork dumplings, the noodle tom yum soup, spicy eggplant stir-fry, their signature surf and turf with a side of pineapple fried rice and, finally for dessert, a Thai classic, sticky rice with mango. All of the dishes exceeded my expectations. The com-

bination of traditional flavors with a dash of creative flair took this meal to infinity and beyond. This was especially evident in the pineapple fried rice, the tom yum soup and the mango sticky rice. All of these dishes are traditional Thai cuisine that I have tried elsewhere, yet Chef’s Choice is the place that got them right. Let me just say, I will never have mango sticky rice dessert anywhere else but Chef’s Choice ever again. Yes, seriously. Each dish exploded with unique flavors and textures, yet one never overpowered the other. Thai cuisine

When I decided to join friends for dinner at Chef’s Choice Noodle Bar, I didn’t think much of it. Just another Asian spot, right? Wrong!

Continued on Page 19

www.BakersfieldLife.com

17


EAT & DRINK

Dining with Dre

Spicy eggplant stir-fry with white rice

banquet & catering g WWW W WW W.SK SKINRNAESTHETICS KIN NRN RNAE NAE AEST STHE STHE HET TIIICS CS.C CS COM OM OM

• PRIVATE DINING ROOMS • OFF-SITE FULL CATERING SERVICES (food, service, bar) • HOLIDAY PARTIES • BRIDAL & BABY SHOWERS • REHEARSAL DINNERS

THINK NOODLE BAR! Botox, Juvederm, Volbella, Vollure & Voluma Radiesse & Xeomin 18

Office of Edmund Fisher M.D. FACS 661-323-6200 5301 Truxtun Ave., Ste. 200, Bakersfield, CA Appointments now available.

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

Call 325.1234 and ask for Nick Panici.

Voted Best Chef Preeda Piamfa

Follow Our Facebook Page

Voted Best Thai Restaurant

1534 19TH STREET • DOWNTOWN • 661-325-1234


Continued from Page 17

is all about the balance of earthy flavors with a touch of brightness from fruits, herbs and spices. Chef’s Choice is a place that gets fusion right by combining these traditional flavors with a modern twist. My dining experience at Chef’s Choice was a culinary symphony from start to finish, complete with impecChef’s Choice Noodle Bar cable service, knowledgeable 1534 19th St., Suite 100 staff and even 661-325-1234 a greeting from www.ccnoodlebar.com the owner. A five-star dinner! Though Chef’s Choice isn’t the new kid on the block, it is not one to be ignored. In my opinion, it is the Asian fusion spot to go to here in Bakersfield. So whether you’re heading out for a date night, dinner with friends or are in need of a spot for your next banquet, Chef’s Choice Noodle Bar has you covered to Andrea make your experience one to rememSaavedra ber. I know I’ll remember mine!

Light Up A Life At The Marketplace

Bangkok cosmo

Beautiful Skin is

Timeless So Love The Skin You’re In!

• Facials • Microdermabrasion • Botox and Juvaderm • Facial Laser Rejuvenation • 2 Spa Rooms Schedule Your Appointment Now or Call for Pricing

ALL INJECTIONS PERFORMED BY DR. STAINER!

Presented by GREGORY A STAINER, M.D., F.A.C.S is recognized as an expert in non-surgical injections.

call 833-4040 or visit

www.bakersfieldlasik.com 4649 Planz Road, Bakersfield CA www.BakersfieldLife.com

19


EAT & DRINK

Bites

Thai cuisine Thai Kitchen

PANANG CURRY Thick, salty, sweet, creamy and nutty with a spicy kick at the end. Those are the flavors and textures you experience with each bite of Thai Kitchen’s panang curry. A thick red curry made with coconut milk, potatoes, peas, carrots, peanuts and your choice of protein, panang, like a lot of curries, is complex and each bite differs from the

20

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

one before as different ingredients take center stage – it’s anything but predictable. Thai Kitchen’s lunch special includes soup, spring roll, pad thai and steamed rice all for $10.99, Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the entree, which is served with steamed rice, is $12.95. – Thai Kitchen, 9901 Hageman Road, #200


Siam Iyara

PAD THAI Siam Iyara is a newly opened local restaurant in town that serves a variety of Asian fusion food. The pad thai dish is plated with green onions, carrots, bean sprouts, peanuts and your choice of meat. The chicken pad thai is the perfect sweet, sour and savory dish combination. From the crunch of peanuts and vegetables to the savoriness of the noodles, the sauce in this dish truly pops and makes you taste a range of different flavors. Siam Iyara is the new Thai spot in town that will keep customers coming back for more. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Siam Iyara, 6401 White Lane

www.BakersfieldLife.com

21


EAT & DRINK

Bites

Singha Thai

SINGHA SPICY When the owners of Singha Thai opened for business, they were advised to refrain from selling anything spicy because spicy food does not sell. It turns out spice is what has kept people coming back for over 16 years. One of their most popular dishes is the Singha spicy, a stir-fry that contains your choice of chicken, beef or pork; white and green onion; bamboo; ground jalapeno chili; and a collection of herbs. The meat and vegetables sit at the top of the plate, while the juices sink to the bot22

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

tom of the bowl to form a soup that can be enjoyed with the other ingredients or on its own. Customers have the option of customizing their meals to reach their desired level of spice. Every entree also comes with a side of rice that could combat the level of spice if it gets to be too much. You might end up needing it because dishes like the Singha spicy live up to their name and are, in fact, very spicy. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Singha Thai, 5432 California Ave.


Thai House

TRIP TO THAILAND Take a “trip to Thailand” without having to pack your bags with Thai House’s stacked lunch special. Featuring pad thai, red curry, charbroiled chicken, white rice, fried wontons and a bowl of vegetable broth, it’s a meal that includes many Thai staples and favorites. You’ll find yourself hopping from “destination to

destination” trying out all the items and mixing them with other elements on the plate to form new flavor combinations. It’s a great introduction to Thai cuisine and a wonderful option for diners who can’t decide what to get. – Thai House, 5143 Ming Ave.


EAT & DRINK

Dining Guide

The BLVD!

Nachos

1500 Haggin Oaks Blvd. Bakersfield, CA 93311

661-617-6101

The BLVD! 3200 Buck Owens Blvd. • 661-873-4477 www.BLVDBakersfield.com

The BLVD! has a thoughtfully crafted menu featuring gastropub-style farm-to-table cuisine. Shared plates include items ranging from nachos, sliders, mozzarella steaks and bacon jalapeno wontons. Guests who are interested in larger meals can choose from dishes such as our hearth-oven pizzas, beer-battered fish and chips, artisan burgers or craft their own pizza, calzone, pasta or burger! Available Monday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. is the Lunch Lane menu featuring eats starting at $8 or create a combo for $12.

www.skinsationmedispa.com

LIVE MUSIC • FOOD VENDORS • CRAFT BEER • COCKTAILS • GAMES • & MORE!

Friday, Oct. 11 7-11 p.m.

The Park at The Mark & Wall Street Alley $20 (Now - Sept. 30) $30 (Oct. 1 - Oct. 10) $35 at the door

KDA & BYP will produce Ten Tiny Dances® during the street party.

Presented by: Gold Sponsor

Jim Burke Lincoln

Silver Sponsors

Carney’s Business Technology Center Comprehensive Blood & Cancer Center The Mark Restaurant

Bronze Sponsor

Coca-Cola Bottling For sponsorship opportunities, contact Hillary Haenes

at hhaenes@bakochamber.com

LIMITED TICKETS AVAILABLE. PURCHASE TICKETS ON EVENTBRITE! 24

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October2019

Promotional Content


LAND OF FOUR SEASONS! This serene, peaceful seven-acre estate serves well as a family compound or vacation home getaway! Lovely grounds with magnificent huge trees, interspersed with daffodils and lilac, and enhanced with extensive use of brick (over 100,000 bricks!). The two-story main level of the home is 4,208 s.f. Upstairs room-finished storage areas are 1,135 s.f. A separate 1,092 s.f. guest house is just a few steps away. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also find a big high-ceiling 1404 s.f. RV barn, huge 1660 s.f. shop. Soaring ceilings, crown moldings, wainscoting, hardwood and brick floors, lots of French doors are throughout both homes. Etched glass entry doors open to a grand central living area with spacious seating areas for entertaining. The show-stopping massive brick fireplace columns reach to the ceiling! Huge family room/game room w/built in window seats, bookcases--room for pool table. Bear Valley Springs guard gated: call me in advance for gate pass (301-6279).

Promotional Content

www.BakersfieldLife.com

25


EAT & DRINK

Best Thing We Ate This Month

THE BARNYARD AT MATCH POINT GRILL’S

SMOKED PORK SANDWICH

The Barnyard at Match Point Grill is unlike any barbecue restaurant in town. The smoked pork sandwich hits the trifecta of flavors – smoky, yet subtle, sweet and crunchy. This barbecue pork sandwich was topped with tangy and crispy coleslaw between two slices of toasted telera bread. It’s easy to say that this pop-up restaurant did not disappoint. Don’t forget to order your sweet potato fries Barnyard style. They are served with drizzled chipotle aioli that drives you nuts!

26

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019


EAT & DRINK

Where We’re Eating NEW VINTAGE GRILL There’s something about New Vintage Grill that makes ordinary food feel like it’s hitting jabs in your mouth with sensational flavors. The establishment serves choices of soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers and pizzas. The black bean chipotle veggie burger is anything but ordinary. The veggie burger comes with lettuce, tomato, onions, alfalfa sprouts, chipotle aioli and is topped with a toasted brioche bun. Customers have the option to choose between a soup, salad or waffle-battered sweet potato fries. Chipotle mayo and the jalapeno cilantro ranch is also a must-have on the side. Burgers usually make you feel full but at New Vintage Grill, the black bean burger is considered a light dish on the menu. This vegetarian-friendly dish allows you to taste different spices and it becomes impossible to not eat everything on your plate. – Julie Mana-ay Perez, specialty publications designer New Vintage Grill 9901 Hageman Road, Suite 100 661-829-6814

PANINI KABOB GRILL LOS AGUACATES MEXICAN BAR & GRILL The food at Los Aguacates Mexican Bar & Grill does not rely on a long list of fancy ingredients to impress customers. The food is incredibly simple and you can see every ingredient that hits your tongue. I ordered the chicken diablo burrito and it was drenched in a spicy diablo sauce and generously topped with delicious Monterey cheese. It was filled with plenty of large seasoned chicken strips, beans and onions. Do not be intimidated by the name of the dish because the level of spice is grounded by a great tomato base. The food portions are also quite large and have no problem filling you up. If you are craving Mexican food in a genuine atmosphere and setting, Los Aguacates is a great option.

Ever since I saw the sign for Panini Kabob Grill along Ming Avenue, adjacent to the Valley Plaza Mall, I knew I had to eat there. The name alone was intriguing. Panini Kabob? Is this some sort of delicious hybrid that combines elements of a toasted sandwich with marinated meats and grilled veggies? The short answer: No. Turns out Panini Kabob Grill is an eatery that’s full of surprises. Not only is it a full-service sit-down restaurant, rather than the fast-casual atmosphere I was expecting, the menu boasts a wide selection of paninis and kabobs, separately, as well as wraps, salads, desserts and even breakfast with noticeable Mediterranean and Italian influences. Everything is prepared fresh in-house, resulting in healthy, high-quality food. It may not be the Frankenstein hybrid I thought it would be, but it’s still tasty!

– Jocelyn Sandusky, specialty publications intern

– Mark Nessia, editor

Los Aguacates Mexican Bar & Grill 727 S. H St. 661-836-6634

Panini Kabob Grill 3111 Ming Ave., Suite 470 661-396-9010 www.BakersfieldLife.com

27


LIFESTYLES

PHOTOS BY MARK NESSIA

On the Road

Genesis is the newest brand to enter the luxury car market, challenging the likes of BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Lexus. The G70 contains more amenities than its competitors at a much lower price point.

THE START OF SOMETHING BIG Genesis G70 a perfect blend of luxury, practicality and performance By Mark Nessia

When it comes to luxury vehicles, there’s comfort and there’s performance. Many vehicles incorporate bits and pieces from both categories but rarely are they one in the same. That’s because, at some point, one will overtake the other. Comfort can come at the cost of performance and high performance may not be the most cozy. And if the two worlds do collide, the price tag is usually sky-high. Enter Genesis. The newest brand to enter the luxury car market aims to challenge the likes of BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Lexus by building vehicles that satisfy driving aficionados and luxury enthusiasts at values that are almost too good to be true. With the G70, Genesis did just that. Not only does the luxury sports sedan contain more amenities than its BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Lexus counterparts, its starting price is nearly $4,000 less than

28

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October2019

the Lexus IS, $6,000 less than the BMW 3 Series and $6,500 less than the Mercedes-Benz C-Class. But don’t think a lesser price means a lesser car. On the outside, the Genesis G70 is sexy, with an aggressive grille and sweeping lines typically found in coupes that get lost with sedans as the vehicle’s size increases. Under the hood, a turbocharged four-cylinder comes standard. But the 3.3T Dynamic Edition I tested features a beefy twin-turbo V-6 that puts out 365 horsepower and 376 pound-feet of torque, propelling you from zero to 60 in 4.7 seconds. This car has performance in mind as indicated by the support bars around the engine that result in less twist in the vehicle when cornering. The G70 supports five drive modes – eco, smart, comfort, sport and custom. Eco prioritizes fuel economy, smart changes accordingly based on driver style, comfort balances fuel efficiency and performance, and sport optimizes acceleration and tightens steering. Trust me when I say you’ll want to keep it in sport. Acceleration is punchy and pins you back into the soft

Promotional Content


The dash and center console are clean and modern with all the latest technology, like Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and wireless Qi charging.

The 3.3T Dynamic Edition boasts a twin-turbo V-6 that puts out 365 horsepower and 376 pound-feet of torque. .

leather seats, the steering is responsive and the Brembo brakes provide superior stopping performance, taking on winding canyon roads with ease. The sports sedan also boasts blind-spot monitoring, lane-departure warning and lane-keeping assist, adaptive cruise control and a bevy of cameras to keep you aware of your surroundings. However, we can’t forget that this is a luxury car. Leather is plentiful and fine details like decorative red stitching on the seats and doors are a clear indication that a lot of thought was put into the design of this vehicle. The dashboard is clean, modern and highlighted by the protruding touchscreen infotainment system. This may be an unpopular opinion, but I like that Genesis decided against putting an analog clock in the center console – an anachronistic feature that I think provides little to no value amid the technology found inside most luxury vehicles. Valet service is also available, with car pickup and return for service and maintenance while dropping off a courtesy replacement vehicle to keep you moving. Controls are easy to find and even easier to operate with navigation, heated and ventilated seats, and climate and stereo controls all within easy reach. Speaking of stereo, the Lexicon 15-speaker system with Quantum Logic and Clari-Fi Music Restoration paired with Apple CarPlay (Android Auto is also available) is easily my second-favor-

Promotional Content

ite feature – beLeather is plentiful and fine details hind the driving like decorative red stitching elevate experience, of an already attractive interior. course. I like my music loud and the system provides with punchy bass, strong mids and clear highs with no distortion at excessive volumes. With its impressive performance, premium interior and low price tag, the G70 delivers more bang for your buck. Its perfect blend of comfort, practicality and sportiness could very well be the genesis of a new standard for luxury vehicles.

It’s all in the details Genesis G70 Price tag: Starts at $34,900 As tested: $51,370 Fuel efficiency: 22 city, 30 highway Name your five favorite features on the 2019 G70 3.3T Dynamic Edition: Smart cruise control with adaptive cruise, drive mode selection, head-up display, all the warranties, price point versus competitors. The G70 is ideal for: The car is designed for the driver enthusiast who enjoys a vehicle with a sport stance and luxury accents at a reasonable price point. What makes the G70 stand out from other luxury sport sedans? At any trim level, our vehicle is equipped with more standard safety features and technology at a price point that can fit any budget. Describe the Genesis G70 in three words: Fantasy meets reality. – Source: Eric McKelvey, Genesis of Bakersfield sales consultant

www.BakersfieldLife.com

29


LIFESTYLES

WHEN IS A HOBBY

NO LONGER A HOBBY? By Rudy Valdivia

One of the “seasoned” CPAs in our office loves to tell the story of the ugly statues. This story is dredged up whenever someone asks her a question about hobby-loss rules. Here is the short version of the story: “My boss, a CPA who did not do taxes, came into my office, leaned over my desk and loudly deposited a ceramic figure. Although the figure resembled a confused baby walrus, it turned out to be a representation of a human child who, as my grandmother would say, ‘Only a mother could love.’ He loudly proclaimed that this was his artist-wife’s creation and that she was planning to spend thousands of dollars on the equipment to produce these statues. In exchange for the lovely sample, he demanded I figure out how he could deduct the inevitable losses of this venture.” Since 1954, the tax has restricted hobby losses. Over the years, the tax law has evolved in a constant effort to objectively separate hobbies from profit-motive businesses. There are nine objective factors when considering hobby status. In 1972, Judge Sterrett of the Tax Court wrote, “A business will not be turned into a hobby merely because the owner finds it pleasurable; suffering has never been made a prerequisite to deductibility.” Before the most recent tax overhaul, hobby revenue could be offset by hobby expenses. In other words, a hobby that lost money wouldn’t decrease your taxes, but it couldn’t increase your taxes, either. The 2018 change in the rules for itemizing deductions has closed off that option. Now, hobby revenue is taxable, but most hobby expenses are nondeductible. So classification as a hobby is a tax trap. To avoid this trap, follow every step: • Obtain a reasonable level of expertise in the field or regularly consult experts. 30

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

DEPOSITPHOTOS.COM

Money Matters

• Prepare a detailed written business plan, including the project goals, startup costs, projected results and exit plan for an unsuccessful venture. • Maintain a separate bank account and books and records. Obtain a business license and file required tax returns. • Document your time and tasks. Your activity should be significant, both in terms of time and importance to the activity. • If the activity is not successful, make changes. • Minimize the obviously personal or recreational aspects. Early in the venture, it may be hard to see future results. In these early stages, one option to consider is treating the initial expenses as startup costs. Startup costs are not deductible immediately but are identified and then deducted over time once the business is up and running. So what happened with the ugly statues? “My boss and his wife combined their expertise and adopted a detailed business plan, following all the steps to document their intent. In the first year, not a single statue was sold so there was no revenue. Startup costs were reported on the return without a deduction. “In year two, a few statues were sold and they began to deduct the startup costs but still reported a loss. Sales took off during year three and the artist was approached by a marketer who not only mass produced the statues, but licensed a (much more attractive) version of the walrus-child on note cards. She sold her rights to the marketer and headed back to her studio, proclaiming her business to be ‘over.’ Her paintings were beautiful; I wish I’d worked up the nerve to ask to swap that statue for a painting.” Rudy Valdivia is a senior accountant with Brown Armstrong Accountancy Corp. He can be reached at 661-324Rudy Valdivia 4971. The views expressed are his own.


Together, unstoppable. Let’s beat cancer. You bring the determination. The courage. And the spirit to fight. We’ll bring the very latest technology and a caring team of breast cancer experts. The Adventist Health Breast Center is here to lead you through every step. We’re a fully accredited breast center offering all the services you need, conveniently located on one medical campus.

When it’s time to beat cancer, together we’re unstoppable. Learn more at AHBakersfield.org/CancerCare


LIFESTYLES

The Bunco Babes gather once a month to play the social dice game, a tradition going on 40 years. Back row, from left: Diane Villanueva, Marie Gonzales, Rachel Mazza, Frances Mendez, Liz Wood and Rosemary Garcia Lomas. Front row, from left: original members Lupe Mesa, Arlou Perez, Lucy Gallardo, Janet Martin and Maryann Martinez. Not pictured: Maria Frausto.

PHOTOS BY MARK NESSIA

Pastimes

DEDICATION AND CAMARADERIE Local bunco group celebrates 40 years of sisterhood By Mark Nessia

When friends Lucy Gallardo, Maryann Martinez, Lupe Mesa, Arlou Reyes, Janet Martin and Susie Mesa Flores got together to form a bunco group, they had a feeling it was the start of something that would stand the test of time. In fact, Arlou said they should invest in a rest home so by the time they retire, they can own it, move in and keep playing bunco. That was 40 years ago. Since 1979, the “Bunco Babes,” a nickname given to Lucy by attorney David Torres while she worked for the Superior Court of Kern County Criminal Division that was adopted by the group, gather once a month to play the social dice game, rotating hosts each time. Each of the 12 members pay a $5 fee that contributes toward various prizes for accomplishments like most wins, most buncos, 32

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

even most losses. But the game takes a back seat to the real reason the group has been going strong – lifelong sisterhood. “We’ve gone through deaths, births, anniversaries, weddings with our children – we’ve gone through it all. It’s just like one big family,” Lucy said. “We play together, we drink together, we argue together, we do whatever.”

Susie Mesa Flores was one of the six original members of the Bunco Babes. Susie passed away from cancer on Jan. 16, 2014.


Top left: Bunco games are played across three tables where players are split into teams of two. Players rotate tables based on whether they win or lose a given round. Top right: Chef Cesar Perez prepares a special meal for the September Bunco Babes gathering. The theme for the evening was fiesta. Left: The Bunco Babes gather every month to play bunco, a tradition going on 40 years.

Bunco basics

“It was a good way to get away from the husbands,” Janet added. The group has always stayed at 12 members, with subs filling for those who cannot make a gathering. There hasn’t been an opening since 2014 when the group lost Susie to cancer. Diagnosed in 2012, one year after Arlou was diagnosed with breast cancer, the group rallied in support of one another. “We really are a good support system when something happens,” Arlou said. “Everybody lets everybody know what’s going on so we can be a support to that person.” “(Susie) was a trooper,” Lucy said. “I remember the last bunco she went to. It was December 2013 and she was so happy because she had gone into remission.” But a fall later in the month led to a recurrence and Susie passed away on Jan. 16, 2014. Her last request was that the group bring in Rosemary Garcia Lomas to replace her, which they did with no questions asked. “We feel her presence a lot,” Lucy said. “Certain little things we think, ‘Oh my God, look at this – this is Susie.’ Her favorite colors were purple and lavender and one day we all dressed in purple and lavender.” Today, the group consists of original members Lucy, Maryann, Lupe, Arlou, Janet, Rosemary, Diane Villanueva, Marie Gonzales, Rachel Mazza, Frances Mendez, Liz Wood and Maria Frausto. Outside of the original mem-

Each round begins with the ringing of a bell, which is followed by the scorekeeper at each table picking up and rolling three dice simultaneously. Points are earned for each roll that matches the round number, e.g., each 2 rolled during round two is worth a point. Each player keeps rolling until they score no points. Rolling three-of-a-kind of a number not matching the current round is worth five points. Rolling three-of-a-kind matching the round number results in a bunco, which is worth 21 points. The player must call out “Bunco!” and keep rolling, unless they are sitting at the head table in which they must ring the bell to signal the end of the round. Otherwise, the round ends when the head table accumulates at least 21 points, in which the player who accumulated the points would ring the bell to signal the end of the round.

bers, the others have been with the group for at least 30 years. While they’ve transitioned from adult beverages and late nights during their younger days to water and soda in more recent years, the tradition shows no signs of slowing down. “I never thought it would end,” Janet said, when looking back on the group’s beginnings. “We even talked about us retiring and having the GET bus take us to the different retirement homes so we can keep playing.” “Then our conversations wouldn’t be about husbands – they’ll be about Depends and false teeth, our canes and our walkers,” Lucy added as the others laughed in agreement. www.BakersfieldLife.com

33


LIFESTYLE

PHOTO COURTESY OF NINA HA

Love & Life

Nina Ha with Michelle Quiogue Sperber in December 2014.

BREAST HEALTH

FOR YOUR BEST HEALTH By Nina Ha

Five years ago, one of my dearest friends suggested that we get mammograms since we had both recently celebrated our milestone 40th birthdays. Michelle Quiogue Sperber and I scheduled our appointments together and we challenged our friends to get mammograms, too. We took silly preexam selfies and I jokingly thought of my hospital wrap as an elegant gown. We never expected that one of us would be diagnosed with breast cancer. It was a difficult road to recovery, but my beautiful, strong friend faced surgery, chemotherapy and radiation with tremendous grace, gratitude and grit supported by her family and friends. Fortunately, the cancer was detected in its early stages. Dr. Quiogue Sperber is now cancer-free and back to caring for others as a family physician. Inspired by Michelle and other survivors who exemplify the warrior spirit, I get screened annually. About three years ago, my routine mammogram required a biopsy to further examine a small area that appeared concerning. Oftentimes, illness, or the possibility of it, forces us to pause, reevaluate priorities and charter a different path. While waiting for the pathology results, I focused on eating healthier, writing in my journal and having conversations with God. I prayed that I would be at peace with any outcome the Lord had planned for me. After what felt like an eternity, I learned that my results were clear. No cancer. However, I would need frequent appointments to monitor any 34

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

changes for the next Just the Facts two years. The experience Women between 40 and 44 have strengthened my the option to start screening with faith, gave clarity to a mammogram every year. my life and helped Women 45 to 54 should get me to pray harder for those facing, fighting mammograms every year. and surviving cancer. Women 55 and older can continue It also motivates yearly mammograms or switch to me to help alleviate every other year. the fear for anyone For more information on how to apprehensive about getting screened. The schedule a mammogram, visit mammography prowww.linksforlife.org or call 661cess only takes about 322-5601. 20 minutes, with the compression of each breast lasting only a few seconds per image. Chief radiologist Dr. Steven Wang from Kaiser Permanente Kern County says, “Technologists can work with you to minimize discomfort while obtaining the best images possible for an accurate diagnosis.” Physicians recommend scheduling mammograms when breasts are not tender or swollen, so avoid the week before your period. This Breast Cancer Awareness Month and throughout the year, let’s make breast health a priority so we can all live long and healthy lives for ourselves and those who love us. Opinions expressed in this column Nina Ha are those of Nina Ha.


IT REALLY CHANGED MY LIFE.

Getting a Heart Health Checkup at the Bakersfield Heart Hospital Women’s Heart Center was the best decision I’ve ever made. It was quick, easy and told me things about heart disease I never knew. Like how your heart age can be older than your actual age and how living a heart-healthy lifestyle can help avoid a devastating heart attack. Now I’m enjoying my life like never before. So can you, with a Heart Health Checkup at the Bakersfield Heart Hospital Women’s Heart Center.

25

Heart Health $ Checkup

only

Not covered by most insurance plans.

Includes:

- Screenings - Evaluation - Personalized Report

3001 SILLECT AVE, BAKERSFIELD, CA 93308 - 852-6200 - BAKERSFIELDHEARTHOSPITAL.COM


GO & DO

Entertainment

DONUT FEST COMES TO BAKERSFIELD Social Power Hour comes to Bakersfield to bring first event of its kind By Julie Mana-ay Perez

If you’re looking for a sweet escape in October, Donut Fest is the place to be. Donut Fest is the first event of its kind in Bakersfield and Temblor Brewing Company is the first to host it on Oct. 13, from 1 to 5 p.m. “Most people love doughnuts and we wanted to come up with an opportunity for locals to try doughnuts from different doughnut shops from around the area,” said Matt Hensler, founder of Social Hour Power. Social Power Hour will be working with local doughnut shops in Bakersfield to provide a marketing opportunity for those businesses to reach new customers. Eight to 10 local doughnut vendors will be present at this year’s event, like Prodonuts. Temblor Brewing Company’s Event Manager Katie Brownell said Donut Fest will take place inside of the building. Along with sampling the best local doughnuts in the city, guests will also receive a Temblor Brewing Company beer ticket for those 21 years old and above. In addition to doughnuts, Hensler said there will be samples to complement doughnuts, like coffee, milk and tea. Alongside being in doughnut galore, merchandise like T-shirts will be available for purchase at the event. People are able to purchase early bird tickets starting at $12.50. VIP tickets are $25 and kids are also able to get in on the action for $8. Some of the event’s proceeds will also go to a good cause. Social Power Hour is donating a portion of its proceeds to Golden Rule Charity and Hospitality Fund. “Since our events are in the food and beverage space, we want to help the hospitality industry, so 10 percent of our proceeds go to our charity partners,” said Hensler. Donut Fest is organized by Social Power Hour, a full-service event marketing company that produces food and 36

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019


“Most people love doughnuts and we wanted to come up with an opportunity for locals to try doughnuts from different doughnut shops in the area.”

nut Fest in 12 other cities, like San Diego, Las Vegas and Chicago. Hensler adds that he wants to do more events like Donut Fest in Bakersfield, like bringing the All American Chef Battle to find Bakersfield’s local top chef. “Chef Battle is one of my favorite events, because we find local chefs and give them a platform to compete and advance to a national battle. ... So next year we’d love to come to Bakersfield for a local competition to find the city’s top chef,” said Hensler. For more information, go to www.eventbrite.com.

– Matt Hensler drink events around the country. Along with Donut Fest, Social Power Hour has put on events like Chef Battle, Bartender Battle, Say Cheese Fest, and Drink Local and Wine Bash in other cities. The organization has put on Do-

Donut Fest Oct. 13, 1 to 5 p.m. Temblor Brewing Company, 3200 Buck Owens Blvd., Suite 200 www.eventbrite.com

www.BakersfieldLife.com

37


GO & DO

Hundreds of cyclists, walkers and joggers explore Hollywood Boulevard during CicLAvia – Meet the Hollywoods on Aug. 18. CicLAvia transforms streets in the Los Angeles area into public recreational spaces for a day free of vehicular traffic.

PHOTOS BY MARK NESSIA

Trip Planner

NO CARS ALLOWED CicLAvia hosts biggest open-streets events in the country By Mark Nessia

If Los Angeles is the entertainment capital of the world, then Hollywood is its heart and Hollywood Boulevard is the main artery pumping life into it. Millions roam the area annually to witness cultural landmarks, museums and other attractions showcasing the area’s rich film and entertainment heritage, resulting in congested streets and sidewalks. But what if, for one day, the roads were closed off to vehicles, making them accessible only by foot and human-powered transportation like bikes, skateboards and scooters? 38

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

You’d end up with CicLAvia – Meet the Hollywoods. CicLAvia is an LA-based nonprofit that advocates for vibrant public spaces, active transportation and good health through car-free streets and hosts events that turn stretches of road across Los Angeles County into public recreational spaces void of motorized vehicles. On Aug. 18, CicLAvia took over Hollywood, from Santa Monica and San Vincente boulevards in the west to Hollywood Boulevard and Vermont Avenue in the east, closing off 6.5 miles of some of LA’s most iconic streets. This unique way to explore California’s largest city is family friendly and attracts crowds of all types, from locals to out-of-towners, serious and casual cyclists, even joggers looking to take advantage of the open spaces. And


CicLAvia features all sorts of bikes, like custom wooden cruisers made by artist Jerry Knight.

Cyclists and pedestrians gather in front of the TCL Chinese Theatre for a special morning tour during CicLAvia – Meet the Hollywoods.

Kid-friendly activities, like storytime, provide entertainment for younger participants at CicLAvia.

it’s free. CicLAvia is not a race and visitors are free to start and end wherever they like. Bike, board or walk stretches of road while exploring the scenery between designated “dismount zones,” where foot traffic is greeted with vendor booths, games, food, drinks and more. The most popular stretch, unsurprisingly, was Hollywood Boulevard, between La Brea and Highland avenues, which contains the TCL Chinese Theatre, the El Capitan Theatre, Madame Tussauds Hollywood and, of course, a good portion of the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The Hollywood-and-Highland area hosts more than 70 retailers and 25 dining options that, without any car traffic, were extremely easy to access and navigate. Bike and scooter rentals are plentiful throughout the event, so there’s no need to bring your own. Bike taxis are even available for those looking to explore in comfort and style and bike mechanics are stationed at every mandatory-dismount area should mechanical problems arise. While the streets are open and congestion-free due

Cyclists ride past the Hollywood Pantages Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard.

to the absence of vehicles, finding parking so you can get there can be a hassle. Paid parking lots can be found in the surrounding areas but we recommend parking at a nearby neighborhood and riding to the event. It’s easier and you can get some extra exercise in while you’re at it! CicLAvia is what you make of it. You check in and check out inside an hour or spend the whole day there (it typically lasts from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.). It’s urban sightseeing done in a manner that’s not so common nowadays – slow, free of hurry and worry, and out in the open.

CicLAvia – Heart of LA Oct. 6, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. CicLAvia’s next event celebrates UCLA’s centennial, featuring Downtown Los Angeles, where UCLA originally began as a teachers college; Westlake; Chinatown; Little Tokyo; and Boyle Heights. For more information, go to www.ciclavia.org. www.BakersfieldLife.com

39


GO & DO

Bubble Pop Gallery founder and curator Ashleymarie Sey Lively stands in front of the “Sidekicks & Henchmen” exhibit before its opening during First Friday on Sept. 6.

COMMUNITY OVER COMPETITION Bubble Pop Gallery brings fun, unique art experience by making it accessible to all By Jocelyn Sandusky

Ashleymarie Sey Lively, the curator and founder of Bubble Pop Gallery, wants you to know that the Bakersfield art scene is not just alive and well, but thriving. According to Lively, Bakersfield’s flourishing art community is nothing new. Bakersfield has always had a vibrant art scene that is just as big and popular as larger cities like Los Angeles. She said the audience for art has always existed here, 40

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

but it was just a matter of letting them know where to find it. Since the inception of ArtWalk presented by the Arts Council of Kern during First Friday, finding a large variety of art in one place has never been easier. On the first Friday of every month, people can visit downtown Bakersfield to find a collection of art from different artists and vendors. Bubble Pop Gallery has participated in the event since Lively opened the gallery in December 2017. The gallery has proved that viewing art is not a niche activity and can

PHOTO BY JOCELYN SANDUSKY

Arts & Culture


be enjoyed by everyone. On previous occasions, in the four hours that it is open, the gallery has hosted thousands of people in a single night. According to Lively, art flourishes here because it is abundant. Gallery space in Bakersfield is plentiful when compared to other cities and has the space to showcase a wide range of artists and their art. She says that cities like Pomona, which has a great art scene, only open up a small section of a wall to display art pieces. Bubble Pop Gallery, on the contrary, has displayed more than 80 pieces of art at one time. Bakersfield gives artists opportunities that they may not find anywhere else. Artists featured in Bubble Pop are handpicked by Lively and vary in age and experience. Since she hopes to give people with a passion for art a chance to showcase their work, there is no fee to apply to be featured in the gallery. She wants to set herself apart from other galleries and emphasize community over competition. Lively’s goal in opening the gallery was to bring a fun and unique experience to her hometown. Each month, she creates a new exhibition centered around a pop culture

theme, free of charge. The themes make the event fun, but it also makes art more accessible and relatable. Anyone can walk in and find a piece they like and understand. The gallery features all types of art including oil, ink, digital and colored-pencil paintings. Sculptures have also been included in the past. In addition to the art pieces displayed along the walls of the gallery, there are also live artist shows. This allows spectators to witness an artists’ creative process from start to finish, something Lively describes as “magic in front of your eyes.” While many believe the arts are diminishing in the age of technology, Lively believes that there is a rise in interest and knowledge about art and hopes that the stereotype of the starving artist doesn’t discourage people from going after their dreams. She says there is always going to be a need in the community, and if artists can use their skillset to meet that need, then they can continue to do what they love and bring happiness to people. “Utilize your skills, no matter what they are, and adjust yourself as an artist,” she said.

There is always going to be a need in the community, and if artists can use their skillset to meet that need, then they can continue to do what they love and bring happiness to people.

www.BakersfieldLife.com

41


GO & DO

The Overcom(h)er Conference seeks to empower women in all facets of their lives, helping women gain the skills, confidence and the realistic expectations to be successful leaders in their community, in their families and in their businesses.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THERESA WOONER PHOTOGRAPHY

Out & About

FEMALE EMPOWERMENT Overcom(h)er Conference aims to create community of women supporting women By Asha Chandy

Women are at no loss of accomplishments throughout history. At the same time, each influential woman required a spark of inspiration and support to begin the process of becoming a positive force for good. For example, Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing, led a staff of volunteers to treat wounded soldiers while also changing the entire field of clinical medicine by proving that more were dying from poor sanitation than traumatic injuries. The mother-daughter team of Katharine Cook Briggs and Isabel Briggs Meyers created the Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator that Fortune 500 companies still use today for management and human resources. For the women of Bakersfield, the spark of inspiration can be found at the Overcom(h)er Conference Nov. 3 at

42

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

the Stockdale Country Club. A nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering women in all facets of their lives, founders Rainee Browder and Jade Thomasy are helping women gain the skills, confidence and the realistic expectations to be successful leaders in their community, in their families and in their businesses. “Women are amazing, and if they are given the right tools and support, they can do absolutely anything they set their minds to,” said Browder. “We want to see more women pursuing their dreams, living in their confidence, showing their resiliency and changing the world – just because they can.” Speakers and breakout sessions are lined up with the specific purpose of teaching women how to harness their confidence, run businesses and more, all while learning in a group setting that is supportive and real. “We pretty much Instagram-stalked every (speaker)


Y O U ’ R E A LWA Y S W E L C O M E A T

Gables Residential Care Homes

The Meadows • 10702 Four Bears Dr. RCFE No. 157204176

“Women are amazing, and if they are given the right tools and support, they can do absolutely anything they set their minds to.”

for months before asking them to get involved in the conference,” said Browder. “Even the ones that were our friends. We had to make sure every person we brought in shared our philosophy and understood the message we wanted to convey.” Browder and Thomasy both agree that no one journey is – Rainee Browder perfect and free from self-doubt and the duo actively works to build a support network of empowered women who empower others. “We’ve both failed many times and, unfortunately, the culture surrounding failure isn’t very supportive,” said Browder. “We want women to embrace who they are and what value they bring to the table along with all of their failures. … We want to build women up, give them the tools they need to go after their dreams and create a community of women truly supporting other women because there isn’t enough of that.”

Overcom(h)er Conference Nov. 3, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Stockdale Country Club, 7001 Stockdale Highway General admission, $125; VIP, $175. General admission table for eight, $875; VIP table for four, $700. www.overcomher.com

Spruce Gardens • 13303 Nantucket RCFE No. 157206898

The Gables • 903 Spirit Lake RCFE No. 155801279

When living at home is no longer the best option for your loved one, visit the private homes of Gables Residential Care.

In these elegant, family homes, you will find: • Comforts of home in a beautiful surrounding • Caring and competent staff on duty 24 hours a day • Only six residents in each home – companionship with others • Personal assistance with activities of daily living – bathing, dressing, grooming, meals, medication supervision, transportation – whatever is needed. • Delicious, home-cooked meals and snacks • Lovely patios and secure walking paths • Alzheimer’s/Hospice Waivers

661.631.2036 www.BakersfieldLife.com

43


GO & DO

Entering its sixth year, the Valley of Hope gala is a night of entertainment, auctions and philanthropy, honoring the lives taken and survivors of cancer.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

Out & About

A NIGHT OF PHILANTHROPY Valley of Hope unites community in search for cure to cancer By Asha Chandy

Entering its sixth year, the Valley of Hope gala is a night of entertainment, auctions and philanthropy, honoring the lives taken and survivors of the disease that knows no gender, race or socioeconomic background – cancer. The American Cancer Society’s Bakersfield branch hosts this gala each year to raise funds for research, but also to unite the community to rally behind the scientific search for a cure. Hobnob with public officials and local celebrities dressed to the nines hoping to raise money and find a cure. This year’s event will take place Oct. 19 at the ranch of Julie and Matt Fisher, who have generously opened their home and ranch to the gala for the past four years. “It’s a really neat atmosphere, outdoors, under a canopy of oak trees with beautiful lighting and music. It’s a 44

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

magical evening,” said Lara Weberling, ACS development manager for distinguished events. “It’s got a bohemian feel; it’s going to be fun, airy and fantastic.” This year’s honoree is Rick Kreiser, owner of Carney’s Business Technology Center, who will be speaking about the loss of many of his family members and how the American Cancer Society of Bakersfield supports victims and their families in their most dire time of need. Each year, the gala wows attendees with vast silent and live auction opportunities, from spa packages to vacations, and this year is no exception. Galagoers can also slip into their dancing shoes to groove to live entertainment and music, cocktails in hand, and then relax under the oak trees to enjoy a farm-to-table-style catered dinner. To date, locals attending the Valley of Hope galas have been able to raise over $1 million in the past five years. This year’s goal is to raise of $300,000 in one night. Funds raised at the Valley of Hope benefit the American Can-


cer Society’s general fund, which has made huge strides in finding a “cure,” which does not look the same from patient to patient. “The way cancer works is that there is no one Band-Aid for each type of cancer. There isn’t just one cure – there are cures and treatments,” said Weberling. “It’s a very specialized process, including identifying and diagnosing and then customizing treatment programs.” ACS Bakersfield provides important services and advocacy for patients and their families, from support groups, wigs for chemotherapy patients, even rides to treatment and discounted or free hotel rooms for patients and families seeking treatment outside of town. “We bridge that gap through our volunteer driver program,” said Weberling, “We also more broadly advocate for patients’ rights on the state and local level. Some of our representatives work with local hospitals and clinics where we provide research and recommendations for clinical training.” These simple and often overlooked acts of kindness are coordinated and staffed by volunteers, and the same volunteers also coordinate, host and fundraise for the gala each year. This year’s volunteer co-chairs are Katie Corrigan and Jenifer Pitcher and the chair emeritus is Christy Hornbuckle. The honorary chair this year is Olympic Bronze medalist Gabe Woodward, a Bakersfield native and cancer survivor who swam in the 4x100 relay in Athens. “(The volunteers) give of themselves throughout the entire year, not just during the gala season,” said Weberling. “They roll up their sleeves to make this huge commitment and make this event successful.” www.BakersfieldLife.com

45


B WELL

Sarenaty

THE TIME IS NOW FOR WOMEN TO RISE AND SHINE By Sarena Hess

It was a normal day. I was messing around on Instagram stories, like usual, when something unexpected happened. I got a DM from a male business owner in town and he was mad about me and what I was doing. I’m the creator of a podcast with the strong focus on women empowerment and I’m a confidence coach for women – and women only. With that being said, a lot of my content on social media, and a lot of the work I do, is for and with women. His message basically said: “What you’re doing is cool, but I don’t like how you only help women. Men struggle with these things, too. You need to be more considerate of the men in your life.” That message felt like a knife twisting in my gut. It felt like everything I had worked so hard to produce to uplift women was wrong. Every day crafting a blog post, every hour editing a podcast episode, every minute writing the perfect Instagram caption. Was I doing it all wrong? In the past, equality for women was really messed up. In the mid1800s, women were expected to get married and have kids – and that’s it. In the 1950s, women got an option to work. They could now get a job. But when they had kids (not if), they were expected to quit to raise their family. In my perspective, women empowerment is not an aggressive and dominating thing. I am not coming from a place that says, “I am woman, hear me roar.” The intention is not to squash the fingers of men in my life. I am not here to compete with men or elbow my way to fame or notoriety. Yet, I want to see women rise. 46

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

The 2019 Fortune 500 List was published but only 33 of those 500 companies had female CEOs. While that is more than ever before in history, to me, it’s a little disappointing. I’m grateful that I have a place at the table. I’m grateful that I can vote, work, open a bank account, own property. I am grateful for the women before who have paved the way to create an equal playing field for me and for you. But I will not stop fighting to see women rise. I refuse to settle, refuse to quiet down and refuse to give up until women are equally represented in all aspects of life. I also want to say this to my male readers: The women WEB EXCLUSIVE around you need strong men. I need Go to www.bakersfieldlife.com for a men in my life who preview of Sarena’s upcoming video are not threatened series, “The Better Life Project.” by my ambition. I need men who are supportive of me. Men who feel secure in who they are and what they are doing. Men who encourage women to chase their dreams. So fathers, support your daughter when she says she wants to be the next president. Brothers, listen to your sister when she wants to work for Apple, Google or Facebook. Husbands, support your wife if she wants to step out and start her own business. Men, you will not be stepped on if you allow a woman in your life to shine. There is enough room for both men and women to shine in this world. Sarena Hess is a confidence coach for women and motivational speaker. The views expressed Sarena Hess are her own.

UNSPLASH.COM

There is plenty of room in the spotlight for women, men


Great lawyers close to home. A top California legal team is right in your own backyard. Whether you are operating a business or need personal legal counseling, you can rely on local attorneys who have an unrivaled track record, depth of knowledge and experience unique to the San Joaquin Valley. From business litigation, transactions and counseling, to bankruptcy, intellectual property, estate planning and employment law issues, KDG works with you to meet your legal needs and achieve successful, cost-effective results.

B A KE R S F I E LD • F R E S N O • S A N D I E G O • K L E IN L AW.COM

2017

2019

www.BakersfieldLife.com

47


B WELL

Feature

Trust your

gut By Aaron Stonelake

Why should I eat fiber? I’m glad you asked! Fiber is a superhero for our digestive system. Fiber’s superpowers include: lowering risk of diabetes and heart disease, regulating blood sugar levels, lowering cholesterol levels, maintaining weight loss, promoting healthy gut bacteria, promoting regular bowel movements, lowering risk of colorectal cancer and strengthening the immune system. So why should you eat fiber? Because eating a high-fiber diet makes for a healthy heart and a happy digestive system. Fiber helps keep your digestion regular, while also reducing your risk for heart disease. The superhero we all need! Where does fiber get its superpowers? Fiber’s claim to superhero status is this: Unlike other carbs, fiber does not break down into sugar as it moves through your digestive system. Because it does not break down into sugar, fiber makes you feel full longer.

48

Bakersfield Life Magazine

September 2019

Fiber is the superhero your body needs, deserves Fiber has the power to lower cholesterol and lower blood sugar levels. Eating a high-fiber diet promotes healthy blood sugar levels and protects against heart disease. Fibrous diets can even lower your risk for diabetes and can decrease your chance of having a stroke! Fiber protects your heart like Batman protects Gotham City – fiber is the superhero that your body needs. Fiber is not afraid to do the dirty work. As fiber passes through your digestive system, it pushes other food and liquid through your intestines and out as waste. By eating fiber, you are giving your body the superpowers it needs to move food waste through your intestines and colon. If I want to eat more fiber, do I need to start eating cardboard boxes? No! Please do not eat cardboard; that is not advisable. There are plenty of fun and tasty ways to add more fiber to your diet! Here are some great places to start, if you want to up your fiber intake: • Avocados: See what the millennials are raving about with


• Brown rice. If you want your digestive system to be fully superpowered, women should be eating 25 grams and men should be eating 38 grams of fiber per day. Most Americans fall short of this goal and only consume about 16 grams of fiber a day. Do your body a favor and give it the superhero it deserves: fiber! Aaron Stonelake is the nutritionist for the Kern County Public Health Services Department. For more on health resources and programs, go to www.kernpublichealth.com.

Recipe for Success: Avocado Toast Start of your day with a healthy dose of fiber – 16 grams to be exact. • 2 slices of whole-grain bread, toasted (4 grams) • 2 tablespoons of hummus (2 grams) • 1 cup of avocado (10 grams) • ½ teaspoon of lemon juice • Salt and pepper to taste Toast both slices of bread until crisp. Mash the avocado until smooth, then add lemon juice. Spread hummus on toast, then top with avocado and salt and pepper. Enjoy!

DEPOSITPHOTOS.COM

DEPOSITPHOTOS.COM

the avocado toast. • Salads: Bonus points if you add chickpeas or kidney beans. • Hummus: Great on sandwiches, as a dip or topping. • Whole fruits: Not juice! • Nuts and seeds. • Whole vegetables: Leave on the peels for an instant fiber boost! • Leafy green vegetables. • Whole grains: In bread, pasta, oatmeal or cereal.

www.BakersfieldLife.com

49


Paint the Town Pink

EVENTS SEPTEMBER 9/28/19 I Pink I Can Women's Health Screening Bessie Owens School, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 9/29/19 I Pink I Can Women's Health Screening North Meadow Park, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. OCTOBER 10/1/19 Breast Cancer Support Group Links for Life Office, 6:30 p.m. 10/3/19 EmpowerHer Mercy Southwest Hospital, 5:30 p.m.

Fighting Breast Cancer

TOGETHER

10/5/19 Lace'n It Up Run/Walk The Park at Riverwalk, 8:30 a.m. Register at www.linksforlife.org/events 10/8/19 Men's Strong Links Hang Out Imbibe Wine & Spirits, 6:30 p.m. 10/8/19 Slices of Hope Rusty's Pizza (all day) Locations: Ming/Ashe, Rosedale Hwy, Olive Dr., and Lamont 10/15/19 Grupo de Esperanza Links for Life Office RSVP required: staff@linksforlife.org 10/17/19 Rosé & Whiskey Tasting Imbible Wine & Spirits, 5 p.m. www.linksforlife.org/events to register 10/17/19 VIPink AIS Cancer Center, 5:30 p.m. 10/19/19 Links Survivor Lunch Too Fat on 18th Street, 11:30 a.m. 10/19/19 Paint Your Plank PINK On the Vine, 2 p.m. www.planksanddranks.com to register 10/22/19 Fashion, Firemen and Friends Victoria's in the Marketplace, 5 p.m. 661-665-8300 10/23/19 Pink Passion Picnic Hanford Civic Center, 11 a.m. 10/24/19 Breast Screening AIS Cancer Center 661-637-8321 to make appointment 10/30/19 All About Pink Color Me Mine, 6-9 p.m. RSVP required: 661-664-7366 NOVEMBER 11/2/19 Health & Resource Fair 661-326-5692 to make appointment for free mammogram Haven Drive Middle School, Arvin, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 50

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

ByJason Gutierrez

S

ometimes you find the strongest support in people whom you never would have thought you’d ever meet. That’s part of the magic behind Links for Life’s local services. The organization delicately knits a beautiful tapestry of support services for breast cancer survivors from all walks of life. The common thread – hope and a simple-but-true message of we are in this together. Since Links for Life started its support programs in 1992 with only 10 women, its services have grown tremendously to reach women and men fighting breast cancer across the county. And the support doesn’t stop with the survivor; the organization also takes in the family and loved ones of those walking toward better health. Bob Meadows became closely involved with Links for Life as his wife, Vicki, was tasked with battling breast cancer. That was six years ago. But for Bob and Vicki, their connection to the organization continues to stay strong. “Vicki’s first call when she got the diagnosis was to our friend Rosie Azevedo, also a survivor, to ask for the date of the next survivors meeting. I don’t know where she would be without Links, without her sisters who are all part of the club nobody ever wanted to join but are now forever grateful they did,” Bob said. “The support they give each other is so important and hard to measure. Many of these ladies would never have met if not for having breast cancer – and finding Links for Life.” In April 2018, Bob gave a keynote address at Links for Life’s annual gala in honor of Vicki, their faith and Links. “Vicki and I will be forever blessed

by the people and services Links for Life has brought to our life,” he said. Shortly after, Bob helped the organization implement a new service – a men’s “nonsupport group” support group. “A lot of guys expressed the same feelings I had. It is a helpless feeling for us men, who by nature are drawn to fixing things,” he said. Strong Links is more of a hangout for the guys, a chance to meet new people dealing with similar situations and talk as much or as little as they would like. Gabriela Vasquez, a cancer survivor, also felt inspired to stay linked to the organization, help it grow and assist wherever her help may be needed. Now as a member of the board of directors, she says it’s a privilege to be able to support the organization that selflessly helped her. “Links for Life provided a great deal of support to me through one of the most difficult times of my life,” she said. Vasquez has helped the organization offer new services as the facilitator for the organization’s young survivors support group and her volunteer work with special events. There’s a great deal of spirit put into these groups. It’s no wonder Stana Bright, a three-time breast cancer survivor, board member and trusted volunteer continues to be a beacon of light for the organization. “It has been wonderful and fulfilling to watch the organization grow over the years and to see the difference we are making in the lives of Kern County women and men and their families,” she says. “My heart and passion is with the survivors in serving as the facilitator of the Links for Life support group. We are here to help everyone along their breast cancer journey.”


LINKS FOR LIFE

WALL OF HOPE

Maria del S. Aguilar

Irene Aguirre

Estrella Anaya

Lisa L. Anderson

Michelle Andrews

Eloise Arias

1-year survivor

4-year survivor

12-year survivor

6-year survivor

3-year survivor

4-year survivor

1-year survivor

6-year survivor

Rosie Azevedo

Brenda Bailey

Stephanie Baker

Mary Barron

Jamie Barta

Rhonda Bassler

Beverly Baxley

Leann Bayne

12-year survivor

9-year survivor

23-year survivor

11-year survivor

2-year survivor

7-year survivor

19-year survivor

1-year survivor

Kelly Bendert Sanchez

Julie Bensusen

Sarah Bentley

Cherryl Biggar

Kelly Bishop

Diane Biswanger

Carolyn Bradford

Jacquelyn Bradley-Sanders

9-year survivor

2-year survivor

13-year survivor

18-year survivor

12-year survivor

18-year survivor

16-year survivor

10-year survivor

Christine Bradshaw

Nancy Brady

Charlotte Brandt

Stana Bright

Maureen Buckey

Holly Bunde

Teresa Burns

Kara Cagle

19-year survivor

33-year survivor

13-year survivor

28-year survivor

2-year survivor

3-year survivor

17-year survivor

7-year survivor

Julia Calvillo

Mercedes Camarillo

Valorie Candelaria

Rachelle Carlos

Monique Carte

Mayevern Casey

Lois Caswell

17-year survivor

9-year survivor

3-year survivor

1-year survivor

3-year survivor

Darlene Casey 21-year survivor

24-year survivor

25-year survivor

Arlene Chuman

Karen Churchwell

Bonnie Coats

Lee Cole

Betty Cotton

Juli Coulthurst

17-year survivor

14-year survivor

12-year survivor

27-year survivor

20-year survivor

Linda Crawford

Jacare Davis

Carol Aguilar

34-year survivor

2-year survivor

Mary Aslett

18-year survivor

www.BakersfieldLife.com

51


LINKS FOR LIFE

WALL OF HOPE

Cheryle DeMarco

Kathy Dickey

Joy Dixon

Joy Doepel

Joy Dolman

Marilyn Dorer

Marjorie Driscoll

Betty Eaves

5-year survivor

19-year survivor

28-year survivor

9-year survivor

1-year survivor

23-year survivor

5-year survivor

32-year survivor

Hala El-Ansary

Marlene Elbert

Barbara Ellis

Ginger Empey

Susan Ewens

Peggy Fleming

Julie Followwill

Joan Frank

9-year survivor

17-year survivor

41-year survivor

24-year survivor

14-year survivor

12-year survivor

14-year survivor

7-year survivor

Rebecca Gaede

Debbie Gallington

Margarita Garza

Donna Gibb

Lupe Gomez

Lupe Gonzales

Sandra Gonzalez

Sheri Gonzales

4-year survivor

18-year survivor

34-year survivor

21-year survivor

2-year survivor

6-year survivor

10-year survivor

9-year survivor

Suzanne Gonzalez

Natalie Grumet

Connie Guerra

27-year survivor

12-year survivor

3-year survivor

Coleen Gundzik 12-year survivor

Jennie Harberlander 19-year survivor

Margaret Hadley

Bobbie Hake

Paige Halterman

12-year survivor

9-year survivor

16-year survivor

Brigette Hamblet

Koral Hancharick

Nancy Harbin

Kristi Harrer

Sherry Harrison

Linda Hartt

Victoria Harvey

Louise Henderson

14-year survivor

2-year survivor

1-year survivor

1-year survivor

13-year survivor

24-year survivor

2-year survivor

10-year survivor

Donna Hermann

Diana Hernandez

Jeanette Hernandez

11-year survivor

9-year survivor

Jessica Hernandez

Michelle Hines

Vivia Hobbs

Valerie Hodges

Dorothy Hoffman

10-year survivor

52

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

5-year survivor

1-year survivor

6-year survivor

26-year survivor

13-year survivor


LINKS FOR LIFE

WALL OF HOPE

Marguerite Hughey

Joyce Hulen

Sheri Hunter

Dona Hurt

Dolores Holder

Dorothy Hollingsworth

LaNell Howell

Mary Hughes

10-year survivor

13-year survivor

13-year survivor

2-year survivor

35-year survivor

2-year survivor

1-year survivor

18-year survivor

Gail Istre

Olga Jacobs

Karla Jadwin

Carrie Johnson

Debra Kemp

29-year survivor

47-year survivor

10-year survivor

Rebekah Khan

46-year survivor

21-year survivor

Linda Jordan

5-year survivor

4-year survivor

Linda Jones

12-year survivor

Cheryle Kileen

Germaine Kimm

Debbie Kiser

Berna Koski

Armida Laddaga

Cynthia Lake

Ginger Lane

Codie Larsen

20-year survivor

17-year survivor

13-year survivor

8-year survivor

20-year survivor

12-year survivor

8-year survivor

4-year survivor

Jessica Latta

Kimberly Lee

Marie Lehmann

Asuncion Leung

Peggy Limi

Rita Linkswiler

Pearl Lovell

Esther Lozano

4-year survivor

8-year survivor

19-year survivor

1-year survivor

5-year survivor

13-year survivor

17-year survivor

26-year survivor

Phyllis Luckey

Luz Luna

Stephanie Lynch

11-year survivor

1-year survivor

17-year survivor

Carrie Maglieri

Judith Malerich

6-year survivor

19-year survivor

Jan Maltone

Kay Marquez

16-year survivor

Suzanne Manning 1-year survivor

8-year survivor

Gwenetta Marshall

Norma Martin

Elizabeth Martinez

Janice Maxwell

Pam McCalla

10-year survivor

4-year survivor

2-year survivor

6-year survivor

Carolyn McCloud

Ann McCright

Naomi McCutcheon

1-year survivor

24-year survivor

23-year survivor

17-year survivor

www.BakersfieldLife.com

53


LINKS FOR LIFE

WALL OF HOPE

Vicki Meadows

Liz Menchaca

Sandy Menendez

6-year survivor

5-year survivor

3-year survivor

Ethel Miksits

Carolyn â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scottieâ&#x20AC;? Miller

14-year survivor

17-year survivor

Alice Mills

Antoinette Mitchell

Sharon Moore

34-year survivor

1-year survivor

15-year survivor

Pat Napier

Nicole Nelson

Susan Newman

Linda Morales

Barb Moser

Ines Mota

Jill Mushaney

Mandy Muth

18-year survivor

1-year survivor

2-year survivor

9-year survivor

14-year survivor

8-year survivor

4-year survivor

5-year survivor

Terri Nixon

Joann Nunn

Haley Osborne

Linda Oswald

Amy Padilla Villalobos

Terry Page

Maria Paine

Mary Jo Pasek

16-year survivor

20-year survivor

1-year survivor

11-year survivor

JoAnn Payne

Nancy Pelton

Eldean Phillips

25-year survivor

21-year survivor

Arlinda Perez-Reyes 8-year survivor

Jane Pratt

Cherie Puckett

20-year survivor

5-year survivor

Joan Reedy

Natalie Robles

Patsy Romero

3-year survivor

54

9-year survivor

Bakersfield Life Magazine

10-year survivor

11-year survivor

4-year survivor

22-year survivor

Nancy Phillips

Priscilla Darling Phillips

Tammi Pierce

Janet Polte

4-year survivor

10-year survivor

6-year survivor

7-year survivor

Kay Restad

Lisa Rey

24-year survivor

12-year survivor

Billie Reynolds

Deanna Rhoades

21-year survivor

14-year survivor

Gerry Richardson

Angela Ruffino

Mary Ruth

Laura Salamanca

13-year survivor

9-year survivor

2-year survivor

23-year survivor

October 2019

5-year survivor

Kelly Sanders

Vickie Sanford

5-year survivor

21-year survivor

10-year survivor

Vickie Sarceda 1-year survivor


LINKS FOR LIFE

WALL OF HOPE

Myna Sarzotti

Diane Schuetz

Lavonne Schuetz

23-year survivor

9-year survivor

19-year survivor

Suzanne Shelbourne 3-year survivor

Shelly Sheldon

Lynne Sill

9-year survivor

17-year survivor

Mary Ann Stieber

Kala Stuebbe

8-year survivor

39-year survivor

Georgia Twist

Malise Unruh

23-year survivor

16-year survivor

Laura Volpini

Lora Warfield

10-year survivor

12-year survivor

Catherine Wemhoff 17-year survivor

Fran Thompson 16-year survivor

Katie Valentich

Barbara Scott 29-year survivor

Connie Simpson 13-year survivor

Kathy Torres 16-year survivor

Brandy Scott

Joyce Shankle

1-year survivor

65-year survivor

Aimee Shaw

Chris Sheehan

16-year survivor

15-year survivor

Nancy Skellenger

Rita Smith

Melody Spalinger

35-year survivor

14-year survivor

Pam Smoot

Kristen Torres 4-year survivor

4-year survivor

2-year survivor

5-year survivor

Alissa Turner

Linda Turner

11-year survivor

13-year survivor

Tricia Velasquez

Dorothy Vokolek

Marisela Trujillo

6-year survivor

Mary Van Blake

Shirley Vance

Gabriela Vasquez

11-year survivor

31-year survivor

2-year survivor

12-year survivor

47-year survivor

Carol Warkentin

Dianna Warner

Deloris Waters

10-year survivor

9-year survivor

Marilyn Watson

Mary Weaver

Jean Wedeking

8-year survivor

Donna Wheeler

Amy White

Collece Wilcox

23-year survivor

1-year survivor

9-year survivor

Debbie Williams 22-year survivor

13-year survivor

19-year survivor

27-year survivor

Theresa Wilson

Susan Wirth

Kelli Woods

1-year survivor

6-year survivor

2-year survivor

www.BakersfieldLife.com

55


LINKS FOR LIFE

WALL OF HOPE

Janet Yacopetti

Kelly Yoon 6-year survivor

Jeff Hayward

10-year survivor

23-year survivor

Renee Johnson & Stephne Bishop Daughter/Mother

Casey McBride and Sandie Smith Sister/Sister

6-year survivor/9-year survivor

Nick Marantos

1-year survivor

6-year survivor

Henrietta Camarillo and Henrietta Galaviz Mother/Daughter

30-year survivor/9-year survivor

7-year survivor/13-year survivor

Diane Nelson and Marsha Chatfield Daughter/Mother

Linda Garza and Francis Gollinger Daughter/Mother

2-year survivor/17-year survivor

3-year survivor/2-year survivor

Tammy Shipley and Thelma Reed Daughter/Mother

Cherie Shomake and Marilyn Thomas Daughter/Mother

Ede Pacaldo and Priscilla Bacus Cousin/Cousin

25-year survivor/33-year survivor

18-year survivor/18-year survivor

Judy Buechler and Laurie Geissel Aunt/Niece 25-year survivor/6-year survivor

56

Rob Lieske

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

15-year survivor/33-year survivor

Jeanine Wanlass and Yevette Peterson Mother/Daughter 12-year survivor/12-year survivor

Loretta Nevarez and Pemma Garcia Daughter/Mother 6-year survivor/27-year survivor


LINKS FOR LIFE

WALL OF HOPE

Ruth Adams and Brandi Moore Grandmother/Granddaughter 13-year survivor/4-year survivor

Vivian Chianello & Karen Chianello Mother/Daughter 12-year survivor/9-year survivor

14-year survivor/2-year survivor

Find us at: www.linksforlife.org staff@linksforlife.org 661-322-5601 5301 Office Park Drive Suite 370, 93309

Raine Bumbaca & Rebecca Lynn Mother/Daughter

Office Hours: Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

To be included in next year's Wall of Hope, contact staff@linksforlife.org

Thank you to Karla Jadwin and Stana Bright from Links for Life for their help with the Wall of Hope Service Partners

Support Partners

Sustaining Partners Survivor Partners


PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

Allie Mae Perkins (left), Lindsay Book (middle), and Alexandrea Garzaro (right).

CREATING A BETTER

YOU

Positive body image starts in the mind, not the mirror

Garzaro runs her own business as Grind Body Shop and Grind Babe. She is a weight loss specialist for women Throughout time, people in Bakersfield looking to better their jump from diet to diet, on lifestyles with fitness regimes. to the next trend. Because With social media being the social media is at the fingertips of prevalent influencer among people, society, the issue with body image it creates an unhealthy image of who becomes more present every day. people need to be. But what about the role people and “It has the biggest effect on how we social media play in the way we see perceive ourselves. It projects one-sidourselves? Body image and self-esed images. There’s not many people teem start in the mind and not in showing the grind of where they are,” the mirror. she said. “A lot of people take it out of Because social media is one-sided, context and has a negative connopeople don’t see the entire picture and tation, but if we break down body begin to create unrealistic expecimage, what it does is cause an tations of what we can really in the – Allie Mae Perkins emotion inside of us. It’s a feeling lifestyle we currently have. created within ourselves, like past Bakersfield YouTuber and Instaexperiences and what society says gram blogger Lindsay Book is an advocate for positive we should look like and if we fit into that mold,” said body image and living a healthy lifestyle through Grind Body Shop owner Alexandrea Garzaro. Julie Mana-ay Perez

"When you start believing that you are beautiful, you can do anything. Start believing in yourself first before any impact can happen.”

58

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019


her social media platform. Amid the digital age, image is everything. “I think we can see from social media, all of (these) ads include humans. We look to these people and see what they have and see that we can’t live without that product. ... Body image is such a big deal because not everyone is that one image like Barbie,” Book said. “Not everyone is Barbie.” Because there seems to be a standard for what the perfect body is, people begin to transition into these diets like keto, paleo and vegan diets. “We have a cookie cutter view of what people should look like. That is something our culture can do, push (diversity) out to the media,” said Book. Beautiful Life Nation owner Allie Mae Perkins is another advocate for positive body image. Perkins’ business allows her to elevate the confidence of extraordinary women through confidence camps and women’s workshops and transforming the way women look at themselves. “We have social media and TV stuffing down our throats what a beautiful woman is. We compare ourselves to that image,” said Perkins. “We go from diet to diet because we strive to (become) what society wants us to be. We are not concerned about being our healthiest self.” Yani Valdes, a yoga instructor at Cal State Bakersfield shared her experience with her own body image growing up. I was always bigger my entire life and I think that I wanted to be a certain way, not because it made me feel good, but because others looked a certain way and I wanted to have that,” she said. Valdes also admits she wanted things for herself that were stemmed from other people’s opinions. The issue with body image is often linked with women, but it also affects men too. Anthony Jauregui expresses how his relationship with his own body image has affected his life. “I was in a relationship with someone who was a lot more attractive than me and a lot of that put internal pain in me to want to look better. A lot of that influenced me to want to take care of myself,” he said. To create positive body image, one must identify what beauty means to them. “Positivity is a feeling. It’s an emotion we create. Continue to tell yourself you’re pretty. When you can feel something, you start to believe it. And when you believe it, it becomes our reality. If you think you’re not beautiful, that projects onto the world. And the world only reacts to what we give them,” said Garzaro.

Books, Perkins and Garzaro all share thoughts on how to create positive body image for people, like focusing on your health, learning to love yourself, accepting that there are different body types and believing in change. “Start embracing yourself and it transforms you. When you start believing that you are beautiful, you can do anything. Start believing in yourself first before any impact can happen,” Perkins said. Book longs for a change in the way people perceive their bodies. And if people don’t, the cycle repeats itself. “My generation has been broken by this, my mom’s and grandma’s generation has been broken by this. I do not want the next generation to be broken by this. I don’t want these girls to think they have to be measured by these unrealistic standards thinking that they are not beautiful because they are in their own way,” said Books. Both Garzaro and Perkins said if someone has low confidence in their body image, they need to break it down as to why they feel that way. “It’s interesting how deep body image goes beyond weight. If you still see yourself as the big girl, you will always see yourself as the big girl in the mirror,” said Perkins. “Break down the layers of insecurities, the root cause of the issue and that’s how you start feeling confident.” Garzaro expresses that moving forward from a negative body image can be an issue. “It also stems down to a deeper issue than body image itself. Because if we’re trying to please somebody else then there’s something that was rooted in our lives that caused us to be this ‘people pleaser’ instead of actually facing the problem, we’re changing our body,” Garzaro said. Perkins also mentions that until that person learns to love themselves, how do they expect anyone else to love them? “Until you identify the insecurity you have, you have to identify the mask to cover it up and why you did it in the first place,” she said. Garzaro suggests for those who are struggling with their body image to start working out to begin creating a positive image for themselves. “What fitness does is it’s the foundation of taking control of your body and life. If you could find control in one aspect of your life, no matter how small, they start to propel you into believing in yourself,” she said. “When you feel empowered, there’s nothing that could stand in your way.” A healthy image and self-esteem are a big part of a person’s well-being and it starts with you. www.BakersfieldLife.com

59


PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

Business Profile

REMODELING TRENDS Master bath and pool

By Maureen Buscher-Dang

Kristin and Chris Hagan enjoy the charm of living in historic downtown Bakersfield. They lived in their first home on 19th Street for more than 10 years. When a home on 20th Street came on the market in 2016, they were smitten. “We absolutely fell in love with the house the moment we stepped foot inside,” explained Kristin. “But the master bathroom was not as functional as we would have liked. We really wanted a double vanity and needed to increase our storage space.” Beyond that, the couple didn’t have any other preconceived ideas or plans when they met with Tim and Michelle Hardt. “Tim and Michelle did a great job of bringing ideas to the table that provided functionality, as well as looked beautiful from a design standpoint,” noted Kristin. “They also did a great job ensuring that every design decision fit the look and feel of the house. We really didn’t want to take away from the old charm of the house and they did a great job of integrating the new with the old.” “It was really important to Kristin and Chris to retain the character and integrity of the home’s time period, while creatively updating the master bath,” said Michelle, who heads up design services for Hardt Construction Services. In addition to the master bath remodel, they decided to add a pool in the backyard. “The house didn’t have a pool when we bought it,” said Chris. “We decided to build one because our kids are at 60

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

the ages where they can really enjoy it with friends. We figured if we were going to do it at all, now was the time.” They liked seeing the new changes in a three-dimensional rendering the Hardts created and showed them before any construction began. “It entirely takes the guesswork out of it. It also alleviates the stress of committing substantial money toward a project because you know exactly what it will look like when it is complete,” said Kristin. “In the master bathroom, we took down the wall that separated the dressing area from the bathroom,” said Tim, who heads up the construction side of Hardt Construction Services. “Two windows were removed so we could accommodate a double vanity.” New cabinetry was also installed, along with flooring and tile in the shower and finish work on the closet and outer shower casing. Outside, the entire backyard was demolished and the new pool, hardscaping and fencing were installed. An added feature was new French doors that lead from the den to the backyard. Asked what they like best, Chris especially enjoys the new pool. “We have already had so much fun with the kids and the backyard has become a new space for entertaining,” he said. Kristin likes all of the drawer space available in the new cabinetry. “And I’m most excited about the ability to have my own sink and vanity space that I don’t have to share with Chris!” she added.

Promotional Content


How to Celebrate your Remodel? Fun, food, family & friends!

"We absolutely loved seeing the design in 3D before starting the remodel of our master bathroom. You have an idea in your head, but actually seeing it put into our space on the 3D program allows the opportunity to change something before they start." Shelly and Don Banks

"Our new kitchen is amazing! I'm most excited about the new island. It's where my family likes to gather together when we cook. Not only was Hardt Construction on budget, but everything was done on schedule. And they helped bring my ideas to fruition." Paige Etcheverry

"I love to cook for our family and friends. But after 23 years, our kitchen was dated and most appliances didn't work properly. Tim and Michelle made my little 1970's kitchen into a gorgeous showcase! Their team is awesome and I will always be thankful!!" Tessa and Dave Williams

Call today for a free consultation

661-333-7541

Follow us on Facebook and see our latest remodel â&#x20AC;&#x153;reveal!â&#x20AC;?

HCS

Cert. #14030078

HARDT CONSTRUCTION SERVICES, INC. WE DO IT ALL Home Remodel . Kitchens . Bathrooms . New Home Design & Build Lic.#972659


PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

Business Profile

NEW BRAND FOR BAKERSFIELD Kern County presents community's ‘best’ By Cheryl Scott

More and more, people are talking about being their “best self,” a term that means something different for everyone, but generally means identifying what you want in life, recognizing your natural strengths and then leaning into those strengths in order to, indeed, be your very best. Over the past two years, a coalition of community members representing Bakersfield and Kern County has been working on a similar process, but the focus was on how our community can take a good look at itself and then how we can present our best image (or “brand”) to the outside world.

A Positive Image Attracts Positive Attention

Branding is not just about feeling good about ourselves as a community. A positive and honest image for Bakersfield and Kern County helps us recruit new businesses and also attract new talent (and, hopefully, retain our young talent as well). When a person or business considers moving here, they typically use the internet and other resources to learn more about our community. It’s up to us to change the narrative and tell our story. Five partner organizations, together with 15 private-sector funders, set forth in 2017 with an ambitious goal of developing a cohesive approach for presenting our region. North Star Destination Strategies (renowned for working with states, counties and cities throughout the U.S.) conducted extensive research within our community and also with people in other Central Valley communities, the Bay Area and Los Angeles. The data helped develop a clear understanding of our region and how it was perceived by the outside world. Next came the 62

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

creative development phase. The result is a collection of new brands for the city of Bakersfield, Kern County, the Greater Bakersfield Chamber, Visit Bakersfield and the Kern Economic Development Corporation. Each brand stands alone, yet they are connected in color and style. Other local organizations and businesses are encouraged to adopt the look, logos and taglines as they exist or by putting their own “spin” to them.

Signs of the New Brand Already Appearing

Even before the official unveiling of the brands in early September, local creative partners have been busy developing websites, magazines, signage, advertisements and other items that utilize the new theme. The new look is already appearing all over the community!

Bakersfield: The Sound of Something Better

The key takeaways from the research are that Bakersfield is a generous community that provides residents and visitors with something better, whether it’s a warm welcome, a home of your own, friends you can count on who share your values or the chance to rise up generationally and personally.

Kern County: Grounded & Boundless

Kern County, the research showed, is “grounded,” with an appreciation for natural beauty, hard work and affordability (where young people can buy a home and can even own a business). On the other hand, Kern County is “boundless” in its innovation, opportunities and economic growth (on earth and even in space, thanks to our opportunities in east Kern). Now it’s time to put the research and creative work into action. By joining together and showing off our new brands, we can present our boundless opportunities and best self to the world. Promotional Content


PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

PHOTOS BY MARK NESSIA

Bakersfield Matters

Jenny Vaughan has been a costumer for 40 years, starting at the age of 18.

DESIGNING WOMAN Former costume designer lends her talents to art museum By Lisa Kimble

Last spring, as guests at the Bakersfield Museum of Art’s annual fundraiser ArtMix walked through the dramatic and colorful entrance, little did they know it was the work of the event’s chairwoman, a former renowned costume designer. “We used over 2,000 feet of cellophane, which was backlit,” said its creator, Jenny Vaughan. “We have done some pretty fun things for the ArtMix hallway, but this three-dimensional Mondrian-inspired one was a new level.” A year ago, after much coaxing, Vaughan agreed to give a First Wednesday presentation at the museum about her former life as a sought-after costumer. Those in attendance were nothing short of amazed by the ornate

64

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

“Not many people here know about what I used to do and the scope of the work.”

costumes and detailed sketches she’d brought with her. “Not many people here know about what I used to do and the scope of the work,” she added. The “work” was a – Jenny Vaughan 25-year career designing for film, variety, theater and video productions that began when Vaughan was a senior in high school in Northern California. “Peanuts” creator Charles Schulz had built an ice arena across from his Santa Rosa studio where she and her sister took lessons. When Schulz decided to produce a show marking his Redwood Empire


Costume sketches for the “Carnival Sur Glace” number for the “Tis the Season” show, left, and the “Snoopy Finale” show in 2000.

The cover of the Feb. 29, 1988, issue of Sports Illustrated features gold-medal winner Brian Boitano and one of Jenny Vaughan’s costume designs.

Ice Arena’s 10th anniversary featuring legendary skater Peggy Fleming, he enlisted Vaughan’s mother, a seamstress, to help with costumes, who, in turn, asked her daughter to put ideas to paper. The show was a resounding success, and Sparky, as the cartoonist was affectionately called, wanted to continue collaborating on future shows. Vaughan had started college at UC Davis, intent on following in her architect father’s footsteps, but the costume jobs kept coming. She graduated with a degree in design, picked up a graduate degree at UCLA in theater, specializing in costume design, and continued creating outfits for ice skaters. She established herself in Los Angeles and soon was creating numbers for SeaWorld’s acrobatic show “Cirque De La Mer,” Princess cruise line’s productions and ESPN’s “Stars on Ice.” “These were big productions, sometimes 200 costumes for each show,” she said of the elaborate clothing. She outfitted skating legends Dorothy Hamill and Scott Hamilton and traveled the globe designing ensembles for shows in places like Asia and South Africa. There were cowboys, Dutch girls, showgirls, animals, aliens, fish – there was nothing Vaughan couldn’t imagine and fashion. The more complex, the better. “I remember we once used kite material to help en-

gineer giant butterfly wings that moved as the skaters glided across the ice,” she said. But it was the iconic Napoleonic-ensemble, a navy-style costume featuring gold ornamental epaulets, Brian Boitano wore when he captured the 1988 Olympic Men’s Figure Skating Gold Medal that cemented her reputation in the industry and landed her work on the cover of Sports Illustrated. Tasked with designing the opening ceremony apparel for the United States team at the 1996 Summer Olympics, she again found herself with a frontrow seat to a major sporting event. “That was a thrill. I remember being in the tunnel watching,” she said proudly. That moment, too, was captured on the cover of the magazine. Considered one of the top costumers in the country at the time, she said she relished that no two projects were alike. “I loved that it changed all the time, there was always something new,” she said. But in 2005, after the birth of her second child, juggling work and a growing family became a challenge, despite the flexibility Schulz afforded her. “The cruise lines and some television shows weren’t as flexible,” she remembered, walking away from a storied career and lucrative work. But she hasn’t stepped away altogether. She still designs costumes for The Wooden Floor, a creative youth development nonprofit in Orange County that works with young people in low-income communities through the power of dance. “It is my fun thing to do to keep my hand in it,” she said. And she still lends her talents to the art museum. “I love volunteering.” Opinions expressed in this column Lisa Kimble are those of Lisa Kimble.

www.BakersfieldLife.com

65


PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

Be In Bakersfield

With a strong team behind her, Elizabeth Lehr-Cardenas, right, was able to raise over $62,000 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, benefiting local patients like Evelyn Verdejo, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Girl of the Year.

66

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

PHOTOS BY NICOLE BOLINGER

THE POWER OF RALLYING A TEAM AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT


By Elizabeth Lehr-Cardenas

Last year, thanks to the incredible generosity of the Bakersfield community, I won the Woman of the Year fundraising contest put on by the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. I was thrilled to be chosen as a participant, and for 16 weeks, my fellow nominees and I pulled out all the stops to raise both awareness about and money to cure blood cancer. By the time it was over, I’d raised over $62,000 – a feat that never would have happened without an outpouring of community support. If I listed every person and local business that gave so generously to my campaign, I would fill pages and pages. Because the fundraising window was so short, we knew we’d need to start with a solid strategy and put in a lot of work. Fifteen amazing women joined my team, attending weekly meetings, helping plan fundraisers and receiving community support from local businesses like Action Sports and SC Anderson Construction. It was truly a team win. As far as strategy goes, we decided to put most of our effort toward one big fundraising event – the Pajama Party – and host a few smaller gatherings along the way. With team member Sarah Watkins leading the way, the Pajama Party was a big hit. Who wouldn’t want to come out in their pajamas for amazing auction items, a band, plenty of drinks and food, a beauty bar and an opportunity to support a good cause? That event alone raised about $10,000. Our smaller events covered all kinds of interests. Uniquely Chic Florist & Boutique held a fundraiser for us where all attendees got to make beautiful succulent arrangements and my team member Bri Moncier put on a volleyball tournament. Bellissima Medical Aesthetics even had a “Babes + Botox” party, offering free services in exchange for donations. We weren’t just focused on collecting the most money, though. We really wanted to make sure people understood why they were donating. Our local Leukemia and Lymphoma Society helps Kern County patients and their families and we wanted to find creative ways to let people know that. Just the Facts Each year, alongBe in Bakersfield is a grassroots side the Man and movement aimed at changing Woman of the Year contests, the Leukethe conversation around Bamia and Lymphoma kersfield and activating positive Society selects a Boy change within our community. and Girl of the Year. Visit us online at www.beinbaThese children don’t kersfield.com or on Facebook + fundraise. They and their families received Instagram at @beinbakersfield. assistance from the

charity and they help the community see the value of their donations. This year’s girl, Evelyn Verdejo, and her mom, Katelyn, attended some of our events to tie a local story to our mission. I think people connected with that the most. I’m still in awe of how much local businesses and individuals gave. Our community loves being part of something big and I think that’s why so many people showed up at events or gave donations. My hope is that we continue to support charities that support our community directly. All of these charities need volunteers, so I hope you’ll find one that speaks to your heart and donate your time to. Be generous in Bakersfield. Elizabeth Lehr-Cardenas, a local State Farm agent and mother, was named Woman of the Year by the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society after raising over $62,000. The views Elizabeth Lehr-Cardenas expressed are her own.

www.BakersfieldLife.com

67


PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CSUB ATHLETICS

Study Hall

PLAYING TODAY, LEADING TOMORROW WINGS mentor program prepares female student-athletes to lead their communities By Julie Mana-ay Perez

An idea hatched by one of CSU Bakersfield’s very own, the WINGS program is designed to advocate and improve the education of female scholar-athletes while preparing them for the shift from college to workplace through the mentorship they receive. The idea of the program was to not only provide real-life examples of what work-life looked like after sports, but help these young women network as it benefits them during and after their time at CSUB. Women Influencing the Next Generation through Sports was established in 2014 through a mentoring event and, soon enough, female leaders within the athletics department felt that their athletes should connect in formal settings that could lead to beneficial relationships beyond graduation. The program hosts approximately five events per year and its mentor database has grown to over 100 female leaders since WINGS began at CSUB. Meghan Thomason, CSUB’s director of golf, said the program has benefited many of the athletes by getting them to interact with other female 68

Bakersfield Life Magazine

professionals and has been an inspiring opportunity for them. Mentors of the program are local women who represent a variety of professional backgrounds, from education to business to law enforcement and health care. “I have discovered through conversations with our scholar-athletes that they love hearing about the journey each mentor has taken to this point in her career,” said Thomason. In addition to the mentorship events, WINGS puts on an annual event that is celebrated throughout the country. National Girls & Women in Sports Day is distinguished within the program as CSUB’s women’s teams host small clinics for the participants, who are younger girls. “This is an opportunity for our scholar-athletes to pay it forward and become the mentors to young girls from the Bakersfield community for the day,” said Thomason. Kate Tokuhara, who is a redshirt junior on the women’s basketball team, expressed that the program has helped her tremendously on and off the court for the past three years. “You gain a lot of connections and meet new people through the program,” she said.

October 2019

Younger girls in the community take part in the WINGS program.

Women athletes gather for an annual event at CSUB.


CSUB female student-athletes are joined by some of the younger girls who take part in the WINGS program.

The program brings younger girls and CSUB athletes together.

Because there are many mentors involved, these young female athletes learn that there are different paths to success and one does not need to have their next step figured out on graduation day. Not only does the program gives an opportunity for female athletes to be inspired by others but these young women are also inspiring younger girls. “Our scholar-athletes know the girls who come to their games look up to them as role models, so the ability to have so much time to interact with them and hopefully inspire them to achieve their dreams is really important and an impactful aspect of the WINGS program,” said Thomason.

Younger girls participate in the programs annual event.

“Every young girl should pursue anything and chase their dreams. (The program) helps us learn how to be professional and grow as (women).” – Kate Tokuhara

Tokuhara also encourages younger girls to get involved in sports and join the program. “Every young girl should pursue anything and chase their dreams. (The program) helps us learn how to be professional and grow as (women),” she said. Thompson hopes that these female scholar-athletes will go on to become leaders in their communities, wherever life after graduation takes them. She also adds that because a large number of graduates stay in Kern County after graduation, the WINGS program is a great way to bring current and future leaders of Bakersfield together for the betterment of the community. www.BakersfieldLife.com

69


PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

Honor Flight Kern County was founded in 2012 and works in conjunction with Wounded Heroes to sponsor one or two wounded heroes on almost every flight.

PHOTO BY RICHARD FORRESTER

Our Town

BAKERSFIELD WOMEN

LEAD THE WAY IN PROVIDING SUPPORT SERVICES FOR LOCAL VETERANS By Melissa Peaker-Whitten

Kern County has a reputation for supporting its veterans, so it’s not surprising there are so many organizations that have been created to serve them. What you may not know is that many of them were started by and are run by women. While traditionally the military has been seen as a man’s world, it’s the women in their lives who have led the way in providing support services for them. California Pinups and Patriots, founded by Ramona Dolan and Shelley Coffey, strives to bring awareness to those struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder, holding a candlelight vigil each June. They also help veterans suffering with PTSD find resources and treatment. Their eye-catching retro style brings positive attention to the causes they champion, and many of the ladies dress that way every day, said Coffey of the ’40s- and ’50s-style clothing the members wear. “It brings to mind an era when patriotism was alive 70

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

and well and our military and veterans were respected,” she said. One of their biggest events is their annual Wings and Wheels fundraiser, which will take place on Nov. 2, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Minter Field Air Museum. Another local organization is The Wounded Heroes Fund, started 10 years ago by Wendy Porter. In the beginning, the main focus was on helping post-9/11 veterans who had a service-related injury. However, over the past five years, the program has expanded to offer a variety of services to veterans and their families, including financial workshops and couples retreats. Their goal is to create opportunities for veterans to build relationships with others like them, who understand what they’ve been through. “When they come home, a lot of them will isolate themselves because they feel like no one understands them,” said Porter. “When they are able to spend time with other veterans, it helps them reconnect because they speak the same language.” Their upcoming fundraiser, the Soaring with Heroes


PHOTO BY RICHARD FORRESTER

Honor Flight Kern County has taken between 1,600 and 1,700 veterans to the WWII and Vietnam memorials to date.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CALIFORNIA PINUPS AND PATRIOTS PHOTO COURTESY OF BAKERSFIELD VET CENTER

California Pinups and Patriots wear retro-style outfits to bring positive attention to the military.

Motorcycles staged after completing a 9/11 ride.

Hangar Party, will take place on the evening of Nov. 2 at Minter Field. Wounded Heroes also works in conjunction with Honor Flight Kern County, sponsoring one or two wounded heroes on almost every flight, said LiLi Marsh, who founded the local chapter in 2012. They have taken between 1,600 and 1,700 veterans to the WWII and Vietnam memorials to date. When she first heard about Honor Flight, which originated in Ohio, she thought: “We can do that here! Let’s do it!” “I feel like there are so many people that work so hard at making this happen; they’re all responsible for changing lives. Nobody comes back without being changed,” said Marsh. “This town is really unique in the way we treat our veterans. I feel like since we’ve been flying, (the) town has really rallied around (our veterans), because of (these) organizations.” Although each organization provides different ser-

vices, they all work together to meet the needs of our local veterans. The Armed Services Support Fund focuses on providing for the immediate needs of veterans while they’re waiting for other services to come through. Founded by Jenny Patton and her husband, Ben, in 2013, both veterans themselves, they have provided wheelchairs, clothes and shoes for veterans starting new jobs, bus passes to get them to college, help with utility bills, even a stove for a veteran whose unit had quit working two days before Thanksgiving. “A lot of people want to get involved in helping vets and want to see where it’s going,” said Jenny. “When we involve people, they get the same satisfaction we do because they’re involved in the donation. That’s the beauty of this community – it’s amazing when you look at it – I don’t think that’s typical for most places and most nonprofits, it’s pretty empowering. We’ve worked together for years, which says a lot about (the) women (in) this community.” www.BakersfieldLife.com

71


PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

Kimberly Kirchmer (red) is applauded by a group of supporters. One of the supporters standing behind her is Robin Walters (blue). Kirchmer and Walters are the co-executive directors for Women’s March Kern County.

WOMEN, TAKE THE LEAD Women behind Women’s March Kern County look to unite the community By Melissa Peaker-Whitten

With a heart toward serving their community and a mind toward activism, both Kimberly Kirchmer and Robin Walters walk the walk, not only in their day jobs, but even after they’re off the clock. Walters, a public defender for Kern County youth, and Kirchmer, a high school teacher, both commit countless hours to helping bring about positive change in our community. In January 2017, just a few months after the 2016 presidential election, Kirchmer chartered four busses and took 140 women to the inaugural Women’s March in 72

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

Los Angeles, an extension of the national movement. The following year, she was challenged to bring the march to Kern County. However, with only 10 weeks to make it happen, many were skeptical, including Walters, her right-hand woman. But with the help of Women’s March Los Angeles and many local volunteers, they not only pulled it off, but they exceeded their expectations. Originally anticipating around 1,000 participants, drone footage shows that the crowd numbered more than 5,000 at that first march. Last year’s march drew even larger numbers and the plans for the third annual Women’s March Kern County on Jan. 18, 2020, are well underway. Although it started as a march, it has become a move-

CALIFORNIAN FILE PHOTO

Personality


ment and it isn’t just “It was truly specfor women. There are tacular (to see) thousands of male allies who work alongside people from our them. The movement own community isn’t meant to divide, but rather to unite us loving and supall in the common goal porting each other, of making our community a better place lifting up and emfor everyone who lives powering women, here, regardless of their and truly loving race, religion, gender, sexual orientation or their neighbor. party affiliation. This is what keeps With a focus on the Unity Principles, the me going.” group strives to ensure – Robin Walters civil rights, as well as the rights of those with disabilities, workers’ rights, reproductive rights, immigrant rights and LGBTQIA rights, while also promoting environmental justice and an end to violence. The march in 2018 featured 50 speakers from all walks of life, each answering the question “I march because.” When asked why they march, Kirchmer and Walters both had very personal responses. “As a victim of sexual assault, I was shocked, traumatized and outraged our country elected a sexual predator. The first march in Los Angeles was an opportunity to do something to express it and doing so with 750,000 other people empowered me to not wallow but do something,” said Kirchmer. “The next year, when I had the opportunity to organize a march in Kern County, I was honored to be

CALIFORNIAN FILE PHOTO

From left to right: Jessica Nix, Kimberly Kirchmer, Denise Norris and Robin Walters represent the Women’s March at the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Awards Breakfast Celebration on Jan. 15, 2018.

part of a team to provide a platform to empower women to speak up and tell their stories and march alongside one another in unity. I’m also energized by my children and their future children, (as well as) my students (whom) I grow to love and want the best future for.” For Walters, it was her then-high-school-age daughter who inspired her to become more actively involved after the 2016 election. Walters was also integral in organizing the first local march. “After over 5,000 people showed up, I was energized and empowered. It was truly spectacular (to see) people from our own community loving and supporting each other, lifting up and empowering women, and truly loving their neighbor. That is what keeps me going,” said Walters. “When young girls come up and say, ‘I went to the march and it was so powerful,’ or, ‘I never felt so much positive energy.’ Hope and a core belief in the goodness of people, while sometimes hard to find, is what keeps me going. And I want to make the world a better place for my daughter.” WMKC is currently in the process of putting together an advisory board made up of local female leaders in an effort to expand their reach and further unite various community organizations that share the same vision. “This isn’t a partisan movement, this is a group of people committed to upholding the Unity Principles,” said Walters. “We want people to know how to get involved.” On Oct. 19, they will be hosting a Resistance Boot Camp, along with other community-minded organizations. The camp will offer training in organization, phone and text banking, as well as other tools for becoming involved in our community. For more information or to register, go to their Facebook page www.facebook.com/ resistancebootcamp or visit www.womensmarchkerncounty.com. www.BakersfieldLife.com

73


PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

History

‘AN EDUCATIONAL FORCE FOR INCALCULABLE GOOD’ Bakersfield College’s first president set the bar for leadership in higher education

Upon her retirement from Bakersfield College in 1977, Dr. Ruth Maguire reflected upon the reason she accepted a position there in the first place. That reason was Grace Van Dyke Bird, Bakersfield College’s first president. Maguire described Bird as an amazing woman who was ahead of her time. She stated to the May 15, 1977, Bakersfield Californian: “Everybody said, if you want to learn about junior colleges, see Grace Bird. She’s the DEAN of junior colleges.” Such praise of Bird was not uncommon. In fact, over the course of her 29-year tenure at Bakersfield College, it was the norm – and not just locally. Bird had established a distinguished reputation as an innovator in higher education throughout the state and the nation. Grace V. Bird’s notable career began shortly after she graduated from Berkeley. In 1917, she accepted a teaching position as a Bakersfield High School and Bakersfield College faculty member, where she taught French at both schools. She was appointed vice principal of the high school and head of the college during the 1921-22 school year. She remained with the high school until 1940, when she began working full time as the head of Bakersfield College. She was extremely successful at increasing enrollment at the college as the student population grew from just 80 in 1921 to over 1,200 in 1949. In 1928, she was unanimously elected president of the Central Association of Junior Colleges. The position of president of the Junior College Federation of California was also bestowed upon her in 1934 and 1935. The April 18, 1935, Californian reported she easily earned the position as she was a leader “prominently identified with the junior college movement in California since its inception and who has directed development of the local junior college into one of the most outstanding institutions of this nature in the state.” It was no surprise that Bird’s success earned her a job offer from Berkeley that she accepted in 1949. Upon her resignation from Bakersfield College, the editor of The Californian lamented over her leaving as she was a “friend to thousands and an educational force for incalculable good since she came here 32 years ago.” Bird felt the same about leaving Bakersfield and the students she cared deeply about. As a parting gift, the board of trustees of the Kern

74

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

Grace Bird walks across the Bakersfield College campus in 1949.

CALIFORNIAN FILE PHOTO

By Julie Plata

County Union High School District named the Bakersfield College library in her honor. The Californian reported on Dec. 31, 1949, that the decision would not doubt “give her a nice ‘warm’ feeling when she is slogging away at her desk on the Berkeley campus to know that there is a Grace Van Dyke Bird Library down in Bakersfield.” Grace V. Bird helped establish female leadership in higher education in Bakersfield. She set the foundation for the women who followed in her footsteps, including Presidents Sandra Serrano and Sonya Christian. And at last, CSUB can be added to that list with the recent addition of the university’s first female president, Lynnette Zelezny.


Joanie Haenelt Coldwell Banker

PROFILES

REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS

Joanie has enjoyed being a Realtor for 14 years. A lifelong resident of Bakersfield, Joanie has a comprehensive understanding of our local market. She has a passion for helping her clients reach their real estate goals. She has received numerous production and customer service recognitions. Joanie is active in the community and a proud Rotarian of Bakersfield West Rotary. “Wishing courage and strength to all the women of our community.”

Laurie McCarty

Ronda Newport

The McCarty Group

Watson Realty

With 10,000-plus sales in her career, Laurie McCarty always puts you first. She loves what she does and genuinely cares about the results she achieves for each and every client. As an industry trailblazer, she researches trends, invests in innovative marketing and partners with key professionals to achieve the best possible outcomes for buyers and sellers. Let Laurie and The McCarty Group help you with all your real estate needs!

Ronda Newport epitomizes integrity, hard work and creative service in every detail of the real estate transaction. Her clients receive the utmost care and service with accurate knowledge of the ins and outs of the both the homebuying and selling process. Ronda is a member of the Circle of Excellence with Watson Realty, ERA. She also serves on the BAOR board of directors and is the incoming 2020 president.

Locally Owned and Serving Kern County for more than 26 years!

When you or someone you love requires assistance in the home due to illness, surgery, or age, you can trust Alternative Care to provide the helping hands you need with carefully screened, qualified, compassionate caregivers. Free In-home Care Assessment • 24 Hour Service

661.631.2036 • 2029 21st Street KERN ALTERNATIVE CARE dba Alternative Care, Ca State License No. 154700004.

Promotional Content

www.BakersfieldLife.com

75


PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

Bethany Fitzsimmons

Elise Ferreira

OSE STAT E AT SAN J URTE SY O F PHOT O CO

URTE SY O F PHOT O CO

PHOT O CO

URTE SY O F

GOD

CSUN

ATHL E

UCKS .COM

TICS

HLET

ICS

All-Star Roundup

Kristen Amarikwa

LOCAL FEMALE ATHLETES EXCELLING AT COLLEGIATE LEVEL By Stephen Lynch

The new school year has recently started and there are numerous local athletes currently competing collegiately in fall sports. A big chunk of them are women, who are excelling on volleyball courts and soccer fields throughout the country. Here are a few of them.

Volleyball Breana Runnels, the 2015 BVarsity All-Area Player of the Year, is a dominating force for Colorado State. A redshirt junior, Runnels led the Rams and entire Mountain West Conference in kills last year with 454. That total, which ranked No. 55 in the country, set a CSU single-season, modern scoring record. For her efforts, the 5-foot-10 Independence High School grad was named to the Mountain West All-Conference team. 76

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

Elise Ferreira, the 2018 BVarsity All-Area Player of the Year, is a key contributor for nationally ranked Oregon. The Liberty High School product had 2 assists in her college debut, a Ducks sweep of UC Irvine. Ferreira, one of the top recruits in the country coming out of high school, should see plenty of action this year for Oregon. Lauryn Burt, the 2017 BVarsity All-Area Player of the Year and high school teammate of Ferreira’s, is also making her mark on the college level. Burt, a sophomore at UNLV, is one of the Rebels’ top players. The 5-foot-8 setter was first on the Rebels in aces (nine), second in assists (58) and tied for third in digs (19) through UNLV’s first three matches of 2019 season. A pair of Kern County products, Lexi McLeod and Hannah Merjil, are both playing at Cal State Northridge. As a true freshman last year, McLeod (Centennial High) appeared in all 28 of CSUN’s matches and ranked second on the team in kills (206) and third in digs (216) and aces


O PHOT OF TESY COUR O CO PHOT F SY O URTE

Sadie Armijo

TICS

E ATHL

Former Frontier High standout Kristen Amarkiwa continues to serve as a stellar defender for San Jose State. Anchoring the Spartans’ back line, Amarkiwa, the 2015 and 2016 BVarsity All-Area Player of the Year, helped SJSU tally a school record 11 shutouts last year. The two-time All-Mountain West selection and two-time All-Pacific Region selection was named to the 2018 Mountain West

CSUN

Soccer

Lexi McLeod

TICS

(23). Merjil (Garces) played in 17 matches, starting eight for the Matadors last year. The then-redshirt freshman tallied the third most assists (281) of anyone on her team. Maci Haddad (Stockdale High School) hopes to build off a spectacular debut last year at Cal Lutheran University. As a freshman in 2018, Haddad was named AVCA Freshman of the Year, while also garnering AVCA Honorable Mention All-America, AVCA All-Region First Team and All-SCIAC First Team honors. The 5-foot-11 sophomore middle blocker was second on the Regals in kills (281). Brooklynn Cheney, the 2016 BVarsity All-Area Player of the Year, is one of Westmont College’s top players. Last year the 5-foot-10 outside hitter/defensive specialist was named Golden State Athletic Conference Defensive Player of the Week on three separate occasions. Cheney (Liberty High School) ranked second on the Warriors and sixth in the GSAC in digs with 459.

E ATHL

S

TION NICA

MMU

CSUN

O ICS C

F SY O URTE

HLET

E AT STAT

O CO PHOT

RADO COLO

Breana Runnels

All-Tournament Team. Amarikwa’s outstanding play was a key reason the Spartans won the Mountain West Championship and qualified for the NCAA Tournament. Three former Kern County high school athletes – Bethany Fitzsimmons (Taft Union High School), Peyton Jo Armijo (Highland High School) and Sadie Armijo (Highland High School) – are currently playing on the Cal State Northridge women’s soccer team. Fitzsimmons, a redshirt junior forward, ranked second on the Matadors in goals (four), points (nine), shots (21) and shots on goal (11) last year. Payton Jo Armijo, a redshirt junior forward/midfielder scored two goals and earned Big West All-Academic Team honors a year ago. Her younger sister Sadie played in 11 games, starting two of them. Erica Torres (Bakersfield High School) leads a group of five women’s soccer players from Bakersfield currently competing at Metropolitan State University of Denver. The others are Mackayla Duerksen (Liberty High School), Jordan Lewis (Frontier High School), Luna Garcia (East High School) and Mariah Rex (Highland High School). Torres, the Roadrunners’ starting goalkeeper, notched eight shutouts in 18 games last year. She finished the year with a 0.97 goals against average and was accorded 2018 All-RMAC honorable mention status. Duerksen, Lewis and Garcia all started eight or more games and scored at least one goal. www.BakersfieldLife.com

77


THE MARKETPLACE

Prime Finds

Unique, custom-designed jewelry by Raul Zavala Large inventory of fine jewelry; most repairs in one day. No job too big or too small. Cash for gold coins, silver large diamonds or broken jewelry. 5009 Stockdale Highway inside Lucky's Boutique & More 661-633-2278

Local artist at three locations through October

Now at Sugardaddy's

The artist, Charlotte White, has 14 watercolor paintings of iconic Oildale at Covenant Coffee, 1700 N. Chester Ave., eight oil paintings featuring Bakersfield at the Chamber of Commerce, 1725 Eye St. and watercolor paintings at The Art Center, 1607 19th St.

This stylish retro-look bag has a structured top handle design with smooth and shiny metallic vegan leather, triple-wall dividers, adjustable and removable shoulder straps, gold-toned hardware and custom color leather for handle and trim. Seven colors to choose from.

To contact the artist, call 661-330-2676.

5512 Stockdale Highway 661-325-8300

2019

www.agapemtgco.com

78

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

Promotional Content


Snap! Bike Bakersfield Full Moon Ride Date: Aug. 15 Held at: Beach Park Photos by: Greg Nichols Clay Collup and Asha Chandy

Reyna Sambrano, Morgan Smart, and Ashley and Sean Drennan

Alyce and Michael Passaglia

Bakersfield Life Magazine

Eddie and Mayra Tello and Arleen Trejo

Aaron Gonzalez, Kevin Talley and Max Taylor

Adam Kähler and Glenn Hammett

80

Virginia Delao and Joe Morones

October 2019

Corduroy and Dash Baltazar and Jesse Flores

Jeremy and Roy Allard

Chris, Ethan and Erin Reichelt


Snap! Inaugural Kern Margarita Championship Date: Aug. 24 Held at: IBEW Hall Photos by: Carla Rivas Ruth and Valentin Medina

Jose and Adriana Salas

Cristobal Ramirez and Brenda Orozco

Nick James and Michelle Avila

Stephanie Elrod, Zach Aakhus, and Chanda and Jim Elrod

Berkay Unal, Andrea Saavedra, and Kelley and Thomas Beauchamp

William and Alicia Estes

Del Depoian, Toni Mitchell and Paula Williams

Steve Flores, Aaron Flores and Rosie Schweer

www.BakersfieldLife.com

81


Snap! CALMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ice Cream Zoofari Date: Aug. 24 Held at: CALM Photos by: Carla Rivas

Wendy, Michael and Michael Gutierrez

Taylor and Kathyren Arellano

Ashley Minnie, Makenna Minnie Busby, Kassie Busby, Luke Busby, Evan Busby, Maddox Minnie, Megan Reed and Michael Reed

Addison Escalante, Naomi Muriel, Kristen Muriel and Natalie Muriel

Josh, Amber and Alyvia Vogel

Katie Bryant, Sandra Parker, Nia Fenwich, Theoron Bryant, Cayle Bryant and Daphne Bryant

Socorro Huerta, Mykaylah Huerta, Abriana Nuno and Tamara Delong

Aunt Mae's Sweet Tooth will be opening at 830 18th Street SOON!!!

Our Gourmet English Toffee, Chocolate Pecan Fudge, and Gourmet Nuts are available at Home Bakery & Boutique, Luigi's, CafĂŠ Med, Sweet Surrender, Brookside Market and Deli, Caesar's Deli, Sully's Chevron, select Countryside Markets, Cosaree's Deli.

For orders please call 725-5200 or visit auntmaessweets.com

82

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

Arianna Carmona, Hollie Rossiter, Melissa Rossiter, Aubriana and Aneliese Arredondo and Patrick Rossiter


Snap! Stomp Out Suicide Walk Date: Sept. 7 Held at: Beach Park Photos by: Carla Rivas

Mike Overall, Tammy Overall, Robin Arvizu, Kylee Foley and Denise Nieto

Zachary Powell, Kamdyn Powell and Katie Womack

Sophia Goodell, Brooklyn Grahek, Tracy Merickel, Robin Taylor, Henry Goodell, T.R. Merickel, Paige Merickel and Bill Walker

Joe Watkins, Landon Watkins Michelle Watkins, Terry Bullock, Doylene Bullock, Dustin Bullock, Travis Bullock, Terri Jackson and Alice Ybarra

Team Foods Co.

Elizabeth Machado, Serena Trebizo, Marisa Trebizo, Brian Harris, Robyn Garcia, Trini Lopez, Saul Gutierrez, Stephanie Guzman and Jose Medina

Amanda Grombly, Caitlin Livingston, Candice Livingston, Tina Livingston, Chris Livingston, Curt Asher, Aida Asher, Kim Kartinen and Donato Cruz

Team Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Angels

www.BakersfieldLife.com

83


Snap! Tunes and Tacos Date: Aug. 17 Held at: Stramler Park Photos by: Greg Nichols

Shanita Ford and Myetta Beavers

Nancy Olmos, Mayra Sanchez and Sabrina Bautista

Roxanne Salinas and Miguel Martinez

Patty Perez and Rita Tovar

Langley Andrews, Mondo Jones, John Genis and Daphane Martin

Juan and Jessica Aceves

Kait Hill, Azucena Garcia, Francisco Garcia and Danny Hill

2019

19th & N Street, Downtown Bakersfield www.emporiumwesternstore.com

84

Bakersfield Life Magazine

(661) 325-8476

October 2019

Paul Barron, Debbie Barron, Connie Andrade and Ed Andrade


Snap! Chamber Mixer Date: Aug. 23 Held at: Bakersfield Museum of Art Photos by: Greg Nichols

Kaelyn Peterson and Tera Ortiz

Jennifer and David Rous

Kathy Ray, Sylvie Ray and John Purcell

Louis Medina, Karen Goh, Cathy Butler, Pablo Lopez, Enone Evans, Ed Flickinger, Sergio Aguilar and Jacqueline Fernandez

Ken Keller, Sally Meeks, Nicole Panero, Jacob Panero and Amanda Frank

Daniel Anaya, Amanda Anaya, Rachel Glauser and Eric Glauser

A N N I V E R S A RY C E L E B R AT I O N

POWERFUL TESTIMONIES & LIVE MUSIC BY THE TEEN CHALLENGE INCREDIBLE WORSHIP EXPERIENCE & PARRISH

Rick Kreiser, Lorie Kreiser, Jeff Kreiser and Mark Sudenga

HONORING KERN COUNTY AND OUR FAITHFUL SUPPORTERS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18TH, 2019 OLIVE KNOLLS CHURCH 6201 FRUITVALE AVE. BAKERSFTELD, CA 93308

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 661-399-CARE (2273)

REFRESHMENTS & HORS Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OEUVRES: 6:00PM DINNER & PROGRAM: 6:45 PM

www.BakersfieldLife.com

85


PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

PHOTOS COURTESY OF BAKERSFIELD MUSEUM OF ART

Last Word

CREATING ART, MAKING MEMORIES Community support shines strong at Via Arte By Natalia Perez

Do you remember drawing with chalk on the pavement when you were a little kid? You may have covered yourself in dust and felt so excited that you had so much space to work with. Bakersfield Museum of Art’s Via Arte Italian Street Painting Festival on Oct. 19 and 20 takes that wonderful feeling to the next level with a weekend-long event! Artists of any age can participate! The Marketplace kindly lends the Bakersfield Museum of Art a large section of its parking lot and provides a fresh, smooth surface. Then BMoA organizes the space into working “squares,” ready to be transformed by artists. There’s something about the use of professional-grade chalk pastel on the pavement that makes each work come to life. Adults have the opportunity to submit a work of art that they can recreate on squares as large as 12 feet by 12 feet. Many choose to work in teams but there are many solo artists as well. High schools and other organizations have the same opportunity to create with squares as large as 7 feet by 7 feet. Each square is sponsored by local businesses, families and museum supporters so this incredible experience is of no cost to these participants. For our young artists and those who may not want to create such a large work, there are 2-by-2-feet squares available to purchase, which come with a box of professional-grade chalk. Many children and teens grow up anticipating the day they can have their own square. Since this will be the 21st annual event, many children have grown up and are now making one of their childhood dreams come true. A spectacular thing about Via Arte is that the community and artists can interact with one another. For many artists, this is their favorite thing about the event. They love sharing their work, answering questions, telling stories and seeing reactions 86

Bakersfield Life Magazine

October 2019

from others. Personally, 21st Annual Via Arte Italian this is my favorite Street Painting Festival event that occurs Oct. 19-20, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. in Bakersfield. The Marketplace, 9000 Ming Ave. The brightly lit Free colors, the comwww.viaartebakersfield.com munity of artists that participates yearly and the thousands of faces that come out is a sight to see. Best of all, it’s free for all to attend. I’ve completed two squares by myself and I plan to do another one this year. It is so much fun but definitely requires hard work and a commitment. The reward is priceless. You are among one of the artists who are part of a one-of-a-kind public exhibition. Monday night after Via Arte, the work of hundreds of artists is washed away but the memories from BMoA’s street painting festival will last a lifetime. It is truly a Bakersfield tradition. The love of this community shines so strong at this annual event. I can’t wait for the 21st Annual Via Arte Italian Street Painting Festival to begin. Natalia Perez is the social media and volunteer coordinator at the Bakersfield Museum of Art. This will be her fifth year working at the festival. She will graduate from Bakersfield College this year with an AA in art, liberal studies and American sign language. Next year, she hopes to return to BC’s Interpreter Training Program for ASL. You can find her at Via Arte with an umbrella hat. The views expressed are Natalia Perez her own.


AK

ER

SFIELD CALIF OR

2014

TH

2017

RE

AD

E R S’

CH O IC E

PO

AN NI

2018

EB

Thank you for voting us “Best of ” seven years in a row.

LL

Your Money is Valuable.

Maximize its Potential Wondering how the tax law changes benefit you? The experienced professionals at Brown Armstrong can help you.

Earn, Save, Grow, Protect Every Dollar!

At Brown Armstrong, we maintain more than just “accounts” – we build strong relationships with friends and provide solid advice and strategies to maximize their money! Our business and personal tax specialists can provide answers and guidance for scenarios you may not even know exist.

Brown Armstrong: Strategic, Innovative, Trustworthy, Experienced, Local

Contact Brown Armstrong today for your tax needs – you can’t afford not to! Intelligent money management with professional accounting services. That’s what we do!

45 Years of Serving our Community.

Brown Armstrong Services Include: • • • • • • • • •

Individual Tax Preparation and Planning Corporate Tax Compliance and Consulting Estate and Trust Administration Bookkeeping QuickBooks Pro Advisors Payroll, A/R & A/P Sales Tax Returns Business Consulting Audit and Attest Services

BROWN ARMSTRONG CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

4200 Truxtun Avenue #300 | Bakersfield, CA 93309 | 661.324.4971 | bacpas.com


SPOOKTACULAR SAVINGS! ˜ Ó䣙čVVœÀ`-i`>˜

i i

œ˜Ìˆ˜ÕœÕÏÞ6>Àˆ>Li Transmission LX

Ãi i>ÌÕÀi`-«iVˆ>i>Ãi

249

$

per month 36 mos. $1499 due at signing Closed-end lease for 2019 Accord Sedan Continuously Variable Transmission smissioon LX available through 10/31/2019, to approved lessees by Honda Financial Services. vices.s. MSRP vice MSRP RPP $24,650.00 (includes destination; excludes tax, title, license, registration, on,, op on options, ptionns,s, insurance). Actual net capitalized cost $22,045.02. Total monthly paymentss $8,96 $$8,964.00. 8,9 44.00 8,96 00. Option to purchase at lease end $13,804.00. Lessee responsible for m maintenance, aint ntenan enan enance nance ce, excessive wear/tear and up to 20¢/mi. over 12,000 miles/year. Dealer participation may affect actual payment. Dealer sets actual prices. See participating dealers for details.

2019 Civic Sedan n

œ˜Ìˆ˜ÕœÕÏÞ6>Àˆ>Li >L Li L Transmission LX X i>ÌÕÀi`-«iVˆ>i>Ãi i>Ãi i>à i

Ó䣙 ,‡6 œ˜Ìˆ˜ÕœÕÏÞ ՜ÕÃÞ 6>Àˆ>Li/À>˜Ã“ˆÃȜ˜ Ȝ˜ 2WD EX i>ÌÕÀi`-«iVˆ>i>Ãi i>Ãi i

189

259

$

$

per month 36 mos. oss. $2199 due at signing ning ni ing

per month 36 mos. mo oss. $2799 due at signing gniing g

Closed-end lease for 2019 Civic Sedan Continuously Variable Transmission LX available through 10/31/2019, to approved lessees by Honda Financial Services. MSRP $21,280.00 (includes destination; excludes tax, title, license, registration, options, insurance). Actual net capitalized cost $17,969.08. Total monthly payments $6,804.00. Option to purchase at lease end $12,129.60. Lessee responsible for maintenance, excessive wear/tear and up to 20¢/mi. over 12,000 miles/year. Dealer participation may affect actual payment. Dealer sets actual prices. See participating dealers for details.

Closed-end lease for 2019 CR-V Continuously Variable Transmission 2WD EX available through 10/31/2019, to approved lessees by Honda Financial Services. MSRP $28,445.00 (includes destination; excludes tax, title, license, registration, options, insurance). Actual net capitalized cost $25,115.45. Total monthly payments $9,324.00. Option to purchase at lease end $17,067.00. Lessee responsible for maintenance, excessive wear/tear and up to 20¢/mi. over 12,000 miles/year. Dealer participation may affect actual payment. Dealer sets actual prices. See participating dealers for details.

Get Your Best Deal on a New Honda - Trust the Locally Owned Dealer who’s been Serving Kern County for over 60 Years!

Barber Honda Home of the

20 Year

250,000 Mile POWERTRAIN WARRANTY! *

NEW & USED VEHICLES

*

*See dealer for details

Barber Honda

4500 Wible Road at the Entrance to the >ŽiÀÃwi`čÕ̜>

1955

1-888-503-8891 Se Habla Español

2019

Profile for The Bakersfield Californian Specialty Publications

Bakersfield Life Magazine October 2019 Issue  

The theme of Bakersfield Life's October issue is "Women." Through our issue, you'll see the Wall of Hope, features on the inspirational wome...

Bakersfield Life Magazine October 2019 Issue  

The theme of Bakersfield Life's October issue is "Women." Through our issue, you'll see the Wall of Hope, features on the inspirational wome...