Bakersfield Life Magazine July 2015

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July 2015

bakersfieldlife.com

Summer Sips

Cool & refreshing cocktails

Best local beer spots Road trip breweries

After 2-year search

Symphony gets its man Buon appetito Food Dudes visit Sorella

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20 Under 40 Young and making an impact



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F E A T U R E S July2015

20 Under 40 Our annual feature seeks out passionate, giving individuals and leaders in the community who will inspire us all. Page 62

Summer Sips Thirsty? Enjoy a few cocktails or local beers while you kick back and enjoy the summer.

PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

Page 85

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July 2015


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Health and Wellness On the Road In My Closet Fit and Fresh Pastimes Home and Garden

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Personality Hometown Hero Why I Live Here All-Star Athlete Talk of the Town

Go & Do 56 Entertainment 58 Trip Planner

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Word on the Street The Big Picture Money Matters Named After Short Takes Letters to the Editor In Season Finding Fame My Pet By the Numbers What I’m Reading On the Web Happenings 12 Random Things

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S TA F F S H A R E S

WHAT’S ONE GOAL YOU PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH THIS SUMMER?

Bakersfield’s Premier City Magazine July 2015 / Vol. 9 / Issue 10 Bakersfield Life™ Magazine is published by TBC Media The magazine is inserted into The Bakersfield Californian on the last Saturday of every month and available with The Californian through its digital subscription. To subscribe, please call 392-5777. To advertise, contact Lisa Whitten at lwhitten@bakersfield.com or 395-7563. Publisher Ginger Moorhouse Associate Publisher Virginia Cowenhoven President/CEO Richard Beene Senior Vice President Chief Operating Officer Logan Molen Senior Vice President Revenue and Marketing John Wells Vice President, Administration and Operations Nancy Chaffin Advertising Sales Manager Lisa Whitten

“I plan to accomplish going to the beach every weekend and eat clam chowder.” – Paul Rivas, contributing writer “Find a new book series to start and finish, since George R. R. Martin is taking his precious time finishing ‘The Winds of Winter.’” – Mark Nessia, assistant managing editor “Pack light, pack right and not wait until the eleventh hour to do so!” – Lisa Kimble, contributing writer “I hope to redo my kitchen and laundry room floors. The ’70s definitely have to go!” – Linda Petree, advertising account representative “My goal is to drink at least 20 ounces of water per day and reduce my intake of carbonated drinks and coffee.” – Maria Machuca, contributing writer "I plan on getting back into the gym and living a more healthy lifestyle. I also want to spend more time with my family." - Tyler Stevens, contributing writer “I am looking forward to my family celebrating my son’s 18th birthday in a special way.” – Olivia Garcia, editor

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Advertising Traffic Manager Shauna Rockwell Market Research Lisa Beason, Jose Granados Editor Olivia Garcia Assistant Managing Editor Mark Nessia Specialty Publications Coordinator Laura Liera Art Director Glenn Hammett Graphic Designer Holly Bikakis Editorial Interns Heather Hoelscher, Gloria Saldivar Photography Felix Adamo, Alex Balfour, Sally Baker, Casey Christie, Omar Cruz, Tanya X. Leonzo, Bruce Lochrie, Michael Lopez, Mark Nessia, Greg Nichols, Carla Rivas, Jan St Pierre, Rodney Thornburg, Dennis VanderWerff Contributing writers Sally Baker, Zachary Esparza, Ellen Ewing, Diana Greenlee, Ken Hooper, Lisa Kimble, Katie Kirschenmann, Stephen Lynch, Maria Machuca, Shelby Parker, Katy Raytis, Monique Rogers, Cheryl Scott, Anna C. Smith, Tyler Stevens, Chris Thornburgh, Lori Wolf

On the cover Barrelhouse IPA, Firestone Stickee Monkee and General Sherman IPA brought to you by Advance Beverage. Photographed at the Prospect Lounge in the Padre Hotel. Photo by Mark Nessia.


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C O N T R I B U TO R S

E D I TO R ’ S N OT E

Andrea Johnston is a California girl, born and raised. She’s lived in Bakersfield for the last 13 years and is the niche publications account executive for The Bakersfield Californian. She loves that Bakersfield is a big enough town to have great restaurants and plenty to do, but is still a very close-knit community with small-town values. Andrea has three terrific teenagers. Her hobbies include yoga, gardening, cooking, hiking, camping and biking. Some of her favorite ways to relax are listening to music and hanging out with friends.

SUMMER TRADITIONS, SIPS

Tyler Stevens is a freelance writer for Bakersfield Life Magazine. He is 27 years old and graduated from Stockdale High School in 2005. After taking a journalism class at Bakersfield College, he discovered an interest for writing. Tyler interned with Bakersfield Life Magazine before he was offered a position as a freelancer. He has a strong passion for the entertainment industry and wants to pursue his dream of working on movie sets as part of the film crew.

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the best brewhouses to visit? We got some answers for you! Also writer Anna Smith talks to local bartenders who use special ingredients to create their amazing concoctions. As an added bonus, we highlight some popular cocktails and seasonal summer menus from local restaurants. Also as part of our summer issue, writer Maria Machuca looks into the trend of artificial grass for your home. With the concerns over conservation and limitations on irrigating your lawns each week, local experts share some information on whether considering artificial grass is the right choice for you. If you are like me and still want to exercise outdoors even in the summer months, then writers Sally Baker and Katie Kirschenmann have some great insight for you on what you can do to protect yourself during Bakersfield’s loving dog days of summer. And for all the pet lovers, please read about Legend, a therapy dog who is used to comfort court witnesses and victims at the courthouse. We all know that our furry friends can make a world of difference in our lives, but discover how important of a role Legend has on the job.

PHOTO BY TANYA X. LEONZO

Contributing writer Anna Smith is a fourth-generation Bakersfield native. After graduating from Bakersfield Christian High School, she received an undergraduate degree in news-editorial journalism from Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas, and a juris doctor degree from U.C. Hastings, College of the Law in San Francisco. Passionate about downtown revitalization, Anna is cochair for Bakersfield Young Professionals’ Urbanist Crew. She also serves as a board member for both Keep Bakersfield Beautiful and the Fox Theater. Anna and Austin live in Westchester with a spirited, black-spotted puppy named Millie.

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ummer has arrived in Bakersfield, and many of us have discovered different avenues to welcome the annual season. For the staff, one of our Bakersfield Life summer traditions has become highlighting 20 local residents ages 40 and under achieving great things in our community. This is the third annual 20 Under 40 People to Watch contest, brought to you by our magazine and readers. Each year, we ask our readers — you — to nominate people who are not only great at what they do in their professions or academic studies but are also committed in making a difference in the community through their nonprofit or community service work. For this year’s competition, we received more than 80 submissions and selection was tough for the judging committee, which included Publisher Ginger Moorhouse, CEO/President Richard Beene and Senior Vice President of Revenue and Marketing John Wells. Those whom we selected will be honored at a small magazine ceremony later this month at The Mark. My thanks to Terry Maxwell of The Mark for providing a spectacular venue for our special ceremony. So who are the honorees? Well, turn to the inside pages to see who made the top 20. Staffers Laura Liera and Mark Nessia had some fun interviewing and photographing these honorees. For those who did not make the selection, please consider nominating them again next year. There are so many good people in our community who are trying their best to give back in various ways, and it was difficult for the committee to choose from all these great selections. Aside from our 20 Under 40 contest, Bakersfield Life also shined the spotlight on summer sips, from breweries to cocktails. Want to know what are some of

Olivia Garcia Editor 395-7487 • ogarcia@bakersfield.com


Up Front

WORD ON THE STREET

Compiled by Heather Hoelscher

Photos by Mark Nessia

WHAT ARE YOUR SUMMER TRAVEL PLANS? Nancy Arcos: I go to the pool with friends and have some drinks with them. I also go on beach trips to Santa Monica.

Estafani Hernandez: I stay inside because it’s so hot. I go swimming a lot. I usually go to In-Shape to swim. I also go to Mexico every summer for two weeks.

Giovanni Quebral: Swim! I go to Delano High School to swim and I work out at In-Shape gym and go to the outside pool. And eat ice cream!

Zachary Wolpe: I go to Ventura Beach. I like to swim and I like to go to the ice rink at the Bakersfield Ice Center.

Jackie Cardenes: I like to stay inside and not get too sunburned. I like to make fun popsicles and I also have a pool.

Nayeli Heredia: In the summer, I mainly work but I plan trips and go around town. I like to hang out with friends that come back from other colleges. And I go to the beach.

Jim Drnek: I swim. I am in my backyard pool most of the summer. It’s a great way to stay cool. Right before bed I go swimming, that way no air conditioning is needed.

Monica Goree: I go to pool parties and barbecues, get together with friends, go to the park, jog, go to the movies and bowling.

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Jordan Bailey: Mainly I stay indoors. To have fun, I go hang out with friends at their house or wherever they are.

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Up Front

THE BIG PICTURE

Photo by Casey Christie

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RED NOSE DAY Seventh-graders at St. John’s Lutheran School got into the red nose spirit in May after student Allyse Naworski and her mother, Julie, bought the two classes noses at Walgreen’s to help with Red Nose Day, a national event of comic relief to help lift children out of poverty.

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Up Front

THE BIG PICTURE

THE SEVEN TEACUPS Photo by Alex Balfour

The Seven Teacups is a series of seven circular pools connected by waterfalls. The Teacups are located on Dry Meadow Creek, a Kern River tributary about 20 miles north of Kernville, and are a popular destination for canyoneering and kayaking.

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Up Front

M O N E Y M AT T E R S

TEENS AND TAXES: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW By Chris Thornburgh

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f your teen has a job this summer, you’re probably thankful. No more begging for money! Uncle Sam is happy, too. While summer jobs have expected tax implications for the working teen, parents may bear a surprise impact on their tax returns. Let’s look at some questions you may run into. Can I claim their income on my tax return? If your teen is working or receiving income other than interest, dividends and capital gains, they must file their own tax return. The taxes on their wages or self-employment income are based on their own low tax rate. What age do you have to start filing a tax return? There is no minimum age to start filing a tax return, but there is a minimum filing requirement. Generally, a dependent child must file a tax return if their unearned income exceeds $1,000 or gross income tops $6,300. However, if your teen earns as little as $400 in self-employment income, they may be required to file an income tax return. Can I still claim my working teen as a dependent? Tax rules for a dependent child are different than any other type of dependent. If your dependent child is under age 19 or is a full-time student under age 24, your child can have any amount of income and still be claimed as your dependent as long as they do not provide more than half their own support. This includes gifts, food, shelter, clothing and school expenses to name a few. Note that if your teen can be claimed as a dependency exemption on your tax return, they cannot claim their own exemption. Additional rules apply for divorced parents. What is the kiddie tax and does it affect me? The “kiddie tax” can wreak havoc on unprepared taxpayers. This tax is designed to prevent parents from shifting investment income to their kids to take advantage of lower tax brackets. The kiddie tax applies to children under 19 years of age and

qualifying dependent children ages 19 to 23 who are full-time students. Under the kiddie tax, children pay tax at their own tax rate on unearned income they receive up to $2,100. Here’s the hitch – all unearned income kids receive above the threshold amount is taxed at their parent’s highest income tax rate. Unearned income comes from investments such as interest, dividends and capital gains. Any salary or wages that a child earns through employment are not subject to the kiddie tax rules – that income is taxed at the child’s tax rate. Can I still claim the child tax credit? Each dependent child under the age of 17 can qualify you for the $1,000 per child tax credit. The credit is available even if your child is working and files a tax return. Your filing status and income may reduce or eliminate the credit. Why would you file if there is no requirement? Sometimes a young earner should file a return to retrieve income taxes withheld, even when there’s no filing requirement. If you don’t expect annual earnings to exceed the filing requirement, note “exempt” on line 7 of form W-4, instead. Can I file on a smartphone? No matter how convenient, do not prepare and file a tax return on a smartphone. Identity theft, lost records and errors are common issues if you cut corners on tax return preparation and filing. Steer clear of using smartphone applications. Bottom line Taxes are complex and even more so when you have a working dependent. Seek the advice of a tax professional to understand which tax implications may affect you.

Chris Thornburgh

Chris Thornburgh is a CPA and partner at Brown Armstrong Accountancy Corp. Contact her at cthornburgh@bacpas.com or 324-4971.

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NAMED AFTER

JASTRO HOUSE By Lisa Kimble

PHOTO BY CASEY CHRISTIE

J

astro House, the two-story Gothic Victorian-cottage-style building on 20th Street between F and G streets downtown that has been the subject of relocation and demolition in recent years, was the former residence of Henry Jastro, longtime Kern County supervisor, head of the Kern County Land Company and one of the earliest Jewish settlers to come to Kern County. The city landmark is the only surviving example of Gothic architecture in central Bakersfield. Henry Alexander Jastrowitz was born in 1857. His birth name was changed when he came to America. Jastro was first elected to the Board of Supervisors at the age of 44 and served 24 years. In 1903, he was named general manager of J.B. Haggin’s Kern County Land Company, overseeing its more than 1 million acres across California, Mexico, Arizona and New Mexico. Jastro was considered a mover and shaker, not only in Kern County but also across the West. An expert on agriculture and trade, his business acumen and advice were sought after. A regent of the University of California, Kern County democrats nominated him for governor. Jastro married Col. Thomas Baker’s 17-year-old daughter, May. The couple had a son and two daughters. In the 1870s, he bought six lots between 19th and 20th streets. At the time, there was no alley between the two streets. He built his family’s house on one of the lots in 1877. The home faced south on 19th Street. According to local historian Gilbert Gia, who interviewed former owner Glenn Burroughs, Henry built the home only a foot or so above the ground, believing that the area was no longer at risk of flooding. His faith was tested with the flood of 1893, which filled 19th Street and Chester Avenue. According to Gia, the house is built of full-dimensional redwood, which was unusual for the time. The stick lumber used in the Jastro House was likely part of the earliest rail deliveries

The historic Jastro House sits on the property on 20th Street in Bakersfield.

after Southern Pacific arrived in 1876. The stairs, banister and newel posts were made in San Francisco. Downstairs, the ceilings are 16 feet. In 1917, in advance of the construction of the Jastro office building, known today as the Standard Oil Building, on the same block, the Jastro House was rotated 180 degrees to face north. Doing so was no easy feat. The Bakersfield Californian, in its July 17, 1917, edition, described how mule power and rollers moved the home to face north. Its new address was 1811 20th St. In 1920, Kern County Land Company moved its offices from Fresno to the office building at 19th and G streets. Mary Jastro died in the house in 1894. Henry lived there until the following year. He died in 1925. In the 1930s,

ownership of the house was held by members of the Burroughs family, including Glenn, who owned the property when it was condemned in 2006. Over the years, it had been a rooming house, a Sunday school and a private residence. There was no visible damage from the quakes of 1952, but years of neglect and some fire damage had taken their toll on the property, which sits on Bakersfield’s Register of Historic Places. A local attorney purchased the property in 2010 and tried unsuccessfully to donate the house to the Kern County Museum. Last fall, local accountant Neil Galyan and his wife, Jill, purchased the property. Earlier this year, the Historic Preservation Commission unanimously approved their restoration plans. bakersfieldlife.com

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Up Front

S H O R T TA K E S

TEHACHAPI BEER AND WINE FEST

THINKSTOCK.COM

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2015 OFFICER OF THE YEAR AWARDS DINNER

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he Kern County Law Enforcement Foundation is set to host the 2015 Officer of the Year Awards Dinner, Friday, July 17, at 7 p.m. at the Stockdale Country Club, 7001 Stockdale Highway. The event was established over 25 years ago to help local law enforcement agencies that didn’t have the funds for equipment, such as handguns and stun guns. The event helped those agencies with purchasing equipment, remodeling and more. Now it seeks to assist students interested in law enforcement. The dinner also will help raise funds for students who aspire to become involved in law enforcement careers, helping provide students with scholarships. Jon Busby, president of KCLEF,

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mentions that is now their biggest focus. KCLEF will still raise funds to assist various police agencies of Kern County in all levels, federal, state or local. The dinner and awards will also be recognizing and honoring the outstanding law enforcement officers and citizens who have taken action and helped our community in any law enforcement emergency. Individual tickets are $100 and $60 for law enforcement members. Sponsorships are also available, ranging from Gold, Bronze, Silver and table sponsors. For more information, contact Angela Barton at 345-8091. — Bakersfield Life

July 2015

he Tehachapi Mountain Beer and Wine Fest is coming to Benz Visco Sports Park on July 18 from 4 to 8 p.m. The festival will offer more than 100 craft wines and beers to sample. Food will be provided by restaurants, such as Red House BBQ, Sandrini’s, Old River Grill, Pacino’s and P-Dubs Grille and Bar. Music from Mento Buru and Therese and the Sweetness will also be featured at the event. Proceeds of the event will go toward helping local charities. Tickets are $45 for general admission and $100 for VIP tickets, which includes exclusive entry to the tented VIP section and much more. For more information or to buy tickets, visit tehachapibrew.com or call 374-0395. – Bakersfield Life

FLUX FUN RUN

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or a new, fun and unique way to be fit and active this summer, just add foam. The first event of its kind in Bakersfield, the Foam Rush 5K is a family-friendly run featuring foam zones, fun slides and squirt guns taking place on July 25 at 10 a.m. at the Kern County Soccer Park, 9400 Alfred Harrell Highway. The run will benefit the CBCC Foundation for Community Wellness. Registration is $40 for adults and includes sunglasses, tattoo bib and squirt gun. Kids 10 and under are free, but for $15, they can get the Kids Fun Pack, which includes a tattoo, bib and squirt gun. Cancer survivors also run for free but must contact the CBCC Foundation at 862-7136 and be registered by July 15. Parking is $5 at the venue. For more information or to register, go to fluxfunrun.com, active.com or call 873-5092. Use promo code CBCCF55 to get 10 percent off registration. — Bakersfield Life


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Up Front

S H O R T TA K E S

FOURTH OF JULY RACE TO KICK OFF HOLIDAY WEEKEND

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he 2nd Annual Fourth of July Warrior 5K Run is going to kick off an entire day’s worth of family fun in Tehachapi. Race registration is at 6 a.m. The Warrior Run kicks off at 7:30 a.m. sharp at the Philip Marx Central Park on Mojave and E streets. Proceeds will benefit the Tehachapi High School Athletics Club and the Warrior Booster Club. Following the race will be a pan-

LATINA LEADERS TO BE HONORED AT ANNUAL FUNDRAISER

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atina Leaders of Kern County will honor the 2015 Latinas Leading the Way Honorees during a semi-formal awards banquet on Saturday, July 11, at the Bakersfield Country Club, 4200 Country Club Drive. Camila Chavez, executive director for the Dolores Huerta Foundation; Sylvia Picazo, office administrator for the Kern County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; and Lisa Robles-Kent, executive secretary of the Bakersfield College Foundation were selected for their exceptional professionalism, achievements and commitment to the community. The Latinas Leading the Way Awards and Dinner Banquet is LLKC’s annual fundraising event that supports youth programs and other activities targeted to professional Latinas in the community. The reception starts at 6 p.m. and dinner is at 7. Tickets are $70. For more information and for event tickets, go to kernlatinas.org.

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— Bakersfield Life

CASA ORIENTATION SEEKS VOLUNTEER ADVOCATES

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ourt Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) is currently holding orientations for individuals interested in working with children in the foster care system. All-day summer training classes are available throughout the month of July. CASA works with children who have been abused, abandoned or neglected and need a responsible, caring adult who will speak up and advocate for their best interests. Volunteers make an 18-month commitment and donate an average of 10 to 15 hours per month as an advocate. All volunteers must be screened and accepted to a 30-hour training program. Orientation dates are: June 29 at 4:30 p.m. and July 9 at 4 p.m. at CASA of Kern County; July 14 at noon at the Southwest Library; July 22 at 4:30 p.m. at the Wilson Branch Library; July 25 at noon at the Rathbun Branch Library; and July 31 at 10 a.m. at CASA of Kern County. To RSVP, call 631-2272 or go to kerncasa.org. – Bakersfield Life

– Bakersfield Life

cake breakfast for all participating runners. The public can also enjoy the breakfast for only $5. There will be live entertainment, food vendors, games for kids and much more throughout the park as the day leads into the night for the grand finale: a fireworks show. Race admission is $40 through July 2 and $45 the day of the race. To register, visit active.com.


L E T T E R S TO T H E E D I TO R

PARENTS, STUDENTS RAVE ABOUT JUNIOR HIGH MUSIC DIRECTOR Editor’s Note: We received a series of letters from parents and students praising Beardsley Junior High Music Director Jim Young. The following are two selections. We plan to get to know him for a future feature once school is back in session.

Dear Editor, I am writing to you on behalf of the parents and students of the Beardsley Junior High drum line team. We would like Bakersfield to know about a very special person we have at Beardsley Junior High. His name is Jim Young, and he is the band, choir, drum line, color guard, beginning band and flutophone director for the Beardsley School District. ... This past spring, the Pep and Pageantry Arts Association of Central California (PPAACC) finals for drum line took place at Frontier High School. Our students and their instructors, Jay Harris, Vee Geniesse, Marisa Ramos and Jim Young, have been working on the program since last year. As they were about to perform, the sound system failed to work. It was heartbreaking for everyone involved with this program. The problem with the sound system was resolved, and the PPAACC graciously allowed Beardsley to perform a few hours later. Our team managed to pull themselves together and performed their best program ever! However, we still had a threepoint time penalty against us and placed second in the competition. We would like to see Mr. Young recognized in the magazine. He is an amazing person and we want Bakersfield to know about the “gem” Beardsley School District has had for the past 30 years! – Gina Rasmussen

Dear Editor, My name is Jency Gates, I am 13 and I have been a student of Mr. Young for four years. I am sadly saying goodbye this year as an eighth grader. Mr. Young has been a great choir, band and indoor percussion director for me. He has taught me how to play the flute, piccolo, keyboard and mallet percussion. In April, the indoor percussion had their final competition. ... We plugged everything in and got set. When the pit captain tapped us off, the keyboards never played. The keyboards start the song, but the song never started. Mr. Young rushed out to the floor, and tried to figure out the problem. ... He finally got it to work, and we went back at the time. When we went back, we performed our hearts out. ... Although we got second place, it taught us just how much Mr. Young cared about us. He was never thinking about himself when he tried to fix the machine. He was thinking about the kids. He didn’t just teach us how to play instruments, he taught us courage, he taught us strength and finally he taught us that winning wasn’t what mattered. It took the greatest amount of courage we had in our little bodies to go back out there and perform as if nothing happened. I am thankful that you have taken the time to publish this letter. The music program at Beardsley has had 76 years of excellence. With only three directors: Mr. Miller, Mr. Reed and finally Mr. Young.

FASHION SHOW CELEBRATES CHRISTMAS IN JULY

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he Second Annual Christmas in July Fashion Show benefiting Kern County Teen Challenge will be held July 25 at Olive Knolls Church, 6201 Fruitvale Ave., from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The fashion show will feature kids’ fashion from Rock Me Baby Clothing, face painting and “Star Wars” characters provided by A Wish Your Heart Makes that will be available for photos. Individual tickets are $20 and a table for eight is $140. Tickets must be purchased by July 15. Lunch for adults and kid-friendly meals will be served and opportunity tickets will be available for purchase to win a decorated Christmas tree complete with gifts. For more information, call Teen Challenge at 399-2273.

– Jency Gates

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Up Front

IN SEASON

North of the River and Greenacres Pools Open to public through Aug. 7 Daily pass: $2 30-day pass: $20 Season pass: $35 North of the River: Open Monday through Thursday, 2 to 4 p.m. Greenacres Pool: Open Tuesday through Friday, 2 to 4 p.m. Swim lessons held at both locations Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.

PHOTO BY FELIX ADAMO

Spray Parks Open from noon to 4 p.m. daily. Madison Grove Park River View Park San Lauren Park Silver Oak Park

McMurtrey waterslide

STAYING COOL ALL SUMMER LONG Local pools and parks provide ways to beat the heat Compiled by Bakersfield Life

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akersfield summers a bit too hot for you? Try staying cool with these fun and entertaining parks, pools and swim activities. North of the River (NOR) Recreation and Park District and Greenacres have just the thing to stay cool and beat the heat this summer. With swim lessons and a public pool, there’s always something fun to do. If you want something different, try heading over to the spray parks located at eight different public parks across Bakersfield. These spray parks, or splash pads, are a series of featured water toys that spray out water and keep you cool. The push button helps control the water use to just when you want it. Open now and free for everyone.

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July 2015

The Bakersfield College pool is open to the public as well. Season passes are available, so you can stay cool all summer long. Programs like summer swim lessons and adult lap swim are going on throughout the summer. Other public pools include: Jefferson Pool, MLK Pool, McMurtrey Aquatic Center and Silver Creek Pool. And throughout July and part of August, the Bakersfield Racquet Club has water fitness sessions to get fit and beat the heat all at the same time. Swimming lessons have already started at CSUB. They offer regular swim lessons for older kids and “mommy and me” swim lessons for little ones. With all these options, you’re sure to stay cool and have fun all summer long.

Open from 3 to 7 p.m. Emerald Cove Park North Meadows Park Polo Community Park Sears Park

College Pools The Bakersfield College pool is open from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday with family swim nights on Fridays from 6 to 8 p.m. Season passes are $60 ($30 for students) and day passes are $3. CSUB swimming lessons are offered in eight one-week sessions, $120 for ages 3 to 15. “Mommy and me” classes for ages 1 to 3 are $80 per session. For more information about the CSUB swimming lessons, call 654-2071.

Public Pools McMurtrey offers group rates starting at $435 for a group of 200 or fewer and $465 for groups up to 300 people. Individual tickets are $4 and a group of four costs $13. Silver Creek Pool group rates range from $190 to $250. MLK, Jefferson and Silver Creek Pool offer individual tickets for $1.


F I N D I N G FA M E

MICHAELA SHARP Young talent reaches for the stars By Shelby Parker

PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAELA SHARP

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lot of little girls dream about the glitz and glamour of Hollywood or making it as a star, but very few want to put in the work that it actually takes to get there. Fourteen-year-old Michaela Sharp is a different story. She knows what she wants and is working hard to get to the goal. Michaela says that she discovered the acting bug after a friend’s mom told her about a local musical group and told Michaela she should give it a try. She did and really loved it. From there, she and her parents researched what would be the best way to find out about upcoming casting calls and auditions. They decided to use the company Actors Access and have been clients for the past couple of years. They submitted her portfolio and the site would match her with auditions, which were then up for her and her parents to review. Recently graduating from junior high and getting ready to start her freshman year at Garces High School, Micahela has a lot on her plate. “It can be a challenge sometimes, because I want to maintain my grades, then I want to do what I want to do at the same time,” she said. Michaela might be young, but she is on the right track. Her resume includes being selected to participate in a modeling competition in Manhattan, New York, in the summer of 2013; auditioning for Disney Channel and getting a callback audition for its show “Kirby Buckets” in 2014; serving as an extra in the independent film in Bakersfield called “Revelation;” and being selected to for a public service announcement in 2013 to promote the importance of voting in Kern County. “I remember when my wife came to me shortly before Michaela spoke to us about wanting to perform and audition. She thought Michaela had a gift to sing,” said Bobby Sharp, Michaela’s father. Michaela has sung the national anthem at various Bakersfield Jam and Bakersfield Condors games this year. Michaela has been working with voice coach Ayrian Gridiron and her company, ExerciSING, for about a year. It was discussed that Michaela needed experience understanding the process of recording music. She had a short practice session, then went into the studio, which belonged to Gridiron’s brother, Tim, and recorded her first demo that included four songs. “She’s a joy to work with,” said Ayrian, also adding that she’s very mature vocally for her age. Ayrian said Michaela aspires to be a Disney or Nickelodeon star, combining her two loves of singing and acting, and that she really is one of those “hidden talents.” Ayrian said that Michaela will go far as long as she continues to do what she’s doing and remains focused.

Michaela Sharp

“She can be anything that she wants to be,” she said. While a lot of parents might not be on board with going down the acting and singing route, Bobby and Jeanine Sharp want to help their daughter and do whatever they can to help her live out her dream. “I want Michaela to chase her dream and live in her calling,” said Bobby. “We believe in our family that God gives each of us special gifts and that He will guide her path and use for glory.” Bobby said they are finishing up Michaela’s website and their goal this year is to secure a management team to help further her career. bakersfieldlife.com

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Up Front

MY PET

KIM NANCE, TINA AND LUCY Compiled by Bakersfield Life

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Kim Nance and her dogs Lucy, left, and Tina What are your pets’ favorite treats? Oh they love their chicken-wrapped rawhide sticks. We call it “doggy crack.” They have to have them every day. They are expensive and hard to find but it’s the only treat they’ll eat. How would you describe their personalities? Tina is hardheaded and wants to go, and Lucy just wants to play.

PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

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ou can catch Tina and Lucy enjoying the view on their personal pet stroller at the beach or even on the streets of Bakersfield. With only their fluffy heads propped up far enough for them to admire the sceneries, the two Chihuahuas can’t help but stick their tongues out in approval. Their owner, Kim Nance, 57, said the stroller was a great investment. With Tina now 14 years old and 3-yearold Lucy, the two can’t walk as many miles as their owners. But the critters still go for walks twice a day. “Tina used to do 5Ks with me, but this last year she had a few health problems and now has congestive heart failure,” Nance said. But no amount of health problems stops Tina from missing out on any family trips. The two Chihuahuas go camping with Nance and her husband, Rod, and enjoy the beach as much as any human does. They even took a 10-day trip to Idaho recently. Although they don’t like playing in the ocean as much, they are currently in the process of learning how to kayak. They already own personalized red life jackets. “Now it’s just a matter of Lucy getting a bit more comfortable with the idea of kayaking, she’s still a little nervous,” Nance said. Both Tina and Lucy are local rescue dogs. Tina was a playful and loveable 2-yearold puppy when Nance spotted her at the Bakersfield Animal Care Center. And Lucy was a sweet but malnourished puppy who luckily regained strength with Nance. When Lucy started getting healthier, Nance said she noticed tan-colored spots appear on her little body. “We kept trying to clean her because we thought someone had spilled coffee on her,” Nance said chuckling. But as it turns out, when a dog is malnourished, it loses pigmentation. As it begins to regain strength, its colors return.

What’s the best memory? I miss running with Tina. We used to run three miles in the morning and three miles at night. Why would you recommend owning a pet? They have changed our lives tremendously. They are great company and they become a part of your life. The joy they bring you when you have them is worth it. It teaches you how to love. It’s unconditional love.


BY THE NUMBERS

BEER STATS U.S. Beer Sales Volume Growth 2014 17.6% Craft 6.9% Import 36% Export Craft Beer Overall 2014 Beer Market $101.5 Billion Craft Beer 2014 Market $19.6 Billion U.S. Operating Breweries 2014 Total: 3,418 Regional Craft: 135 Microbreweries: 1,871 Brewpubs: 1,412 19% increase over 2013

Alcohol consumption in Kern County

Household income beer consumption

51% of men 49% of women

• 42% of households with an income of $75,000 or more drink craft beer

Demographic of beer consumption

• 26% of households with an income between $25,000 and $34,999 drink craft beer

• 38% of people 25 to 34 years old drink craft beer • 22% of people 35 to 44 years old drink any beer • 16% of people 45 to 54 years old drink any beer

Brewing jobs in 2014 115,469 people employed in 2014 4.3% increase over 2013

• 24% of households with an income between $50,000 and $74,999 drink craft beer • 18% of households with an income between $35,000 and $49,999 drinks any beer Source: Scarborough Research 2014

TYPE OF ALCOHOL DRINK MOST OFTEN CONSUMED IN KERN COUNTY

20% BEER

9% LIQUOR

9% WINE

Source: Brewers Association

A star of our own KDG simply has the best and the brightest. Congratulations to KDG partner Dustin Dodgin for being selected by Super Lawyers magazine as a 2015 Southern California Rising Star, the second year running. Dustin practices in the areas of business and employment litigation and business counseling.

kleinlaw.com

BAKERSFIELD · FRESNO · SAN DIEGO

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Up Front

ON THE WEB

W H AT I ’ M R E A D I N G

SUMMER VACATION PHOTOS Summer vacations come and go, but memories last forever. We asked our readers to share their favorite vacation photos they have taken this summer to let us in on their fun, even if it is just through a lens.

JIMMY PHILLIPS Compiled by Bakersfield Life

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riginally from Omaha, Nebraska, Jimmy Phillips grew up going to church with his family and from a young age started reading Christian books. Now with a wife of almost three years, Natalie, and a 10-month-old baby boy, Lincoln, the executive director of marketing for San Joaquin Community Hospital fits in a book whenever he can.

“My husband and I were thrilled to experience a vacation in Belize with our son, daughter-in-law and two of our grandchildren. We climbed to the top of this Mayan ruin where we could see Guatemala off to the west. A trip we will never forget!” – Vicki Utt

Being a new dad is pretty much my whole world right now. I just finished the book “What a Son Needs from His Dad.” Highly recommended!

Jimmy Phillips

PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

What I’m currently reading:

Favorite book growing up:

My favorite series was the Ladd Family Adventure Series. I remember running to the bookstore to get the latest release. Favorite author:

I wouldn’t say I have a favorite author – I more just read books as they appeal to me. Reading a wide range of authors helps me stay well rounded. Favorite book:

This is going to sound like a cop-out, but I read the Bible every day so that group of authors will always be my favorite. Favorite quote:

Abraham Lincoln said, “If I had six hours to chop down a tree, I’d spend the first four sharpening the axe.” 28

Why I love that quote:

I love that quote because it speaks to preparation, which is so critical in the creative marketing work that I do. The book that’s been inspirational in my life:

In addition to the Bible, there is a book called “The Desire of Ages.” The Library of Congress deemed it as the pre-eminent book on the life of Jesus. Everyone should take time to read that book. It will literally change your life and give you a fresh perspective on the life of Christ.

Bakersfield Life Magazine

July 2015

“This is my husband, Daniel, and I celebrating Memorial Day at Yosemite National Park this year.” – Alexis Duarte

Any other thoughts on reading you wish to share with readers?

“This is me and my husband, Don, on our first trans-Atlantic cruise at the Blarney Castle near Cork, Ireland.” – Betsy Slauson

I am just itching for the day when my son will actually hold still enough for me to be able to read to him! My mom read with me every night growing up, and I think it has served me well throughout my life. I can’t wait to pass that on to Lincoln.

SELFIE-SIP All of this Kern County heat has everyone thirsty and what better way to cool down than with a cold beer? Check out all the different places in town where you can grab a beer and take a “selfie-sip.” Send your pictures and what you're drinking to bakersfieldlife@bakersfield.com.


We’re Not Just Building Homes, We’re Building Families.

NEW MODELS NOW OPEN At Village Green we understand what it takes to build a family. Lots of love…and lots of fun! That’s why Castle & Cooke filled Village Green with things like a landscaped park, a resort-style swimming pool, a

children’s water spray park, a convenient picnic area and playground, and beautiful new Castle & Cooke homes. And Village Green is a

quiet, gated community, with streets specifically designed to slow

traffic to a calmer pace. Which will make you feel better when your children go out to play in the park. Discover family-friendly Village Green. It’s everything you’ve been looking for.

New Castle & Cooke homes from the mid $200’s. Stockdale Hwy. & Renfro Rd. 661-387--6427

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Up Front

HAPPENINGS

CAN’T-MISS EVENTS IN JULY

Find more community events at bakersfieldlife.com, or submit yours via email to bakersfieldlife@bakersfield.com or via our Facebook page: Bakersfield Life Magazine

July 3

July 10

July 18

Taft Fireworks Show, food and craft vendors, beer garden, bounce houses, live entertainment, 6 p.m., fireworks show at 9 p.m. Taft Rails to Trails, 6th and Main streets. Free. 765-2165.

Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band, 8 p.m., Fox Theater, 2001 H St. $33.50-$53.50 at the box office.

Tehachapi Mountain Beer and Wine Fest, 4 p.m., Benz Visco Youth Sports & Cultural Park, 20537 Tehachapi Willow Springs Rd. $45 per person; $100 VIP; $75 RV Parking. tehachapibrew.com. “The Book of Life,” 11 a.m., Fox Theater, 2001 H St. $1 at the box office.

July 4 The Fourth at River Walk, games, food, drinks, live entertainment, 5 p.m., fireworks show at 9:15 p.m. Bright House Networks Amphitheatre at The Park at River Walk, 11298 Stockdale Highway. Free.

Twilight at CALM, summer Saturdays, 5 p.m., CALM, 10500 Alfred Harrell Highway. $9 adult, $7 seniors, $5 children age 3 to 12. 872-2256.

July 19 Bowling for OUR Troops, 1:30 p.m., AMF Westchester Lanes, 1819 30th St. $15. eventbrite.com.

July 11 “SpongeBob Squarepants: The Movie,” 11 a.m., Fox Theater, 2001 H St. $1 at the box office. 16th Annual Benz Bad Bulls Bull Riding Tour, food and Western vendors, 6 p.m., Tehachapi Event Center and Rodeo Grounds, 601 S. Dennison Road and Highway 58, followed by fireworks show. $15 adults, $12 seniors, military and children 5 to 12 years old; $5 parking, tickets sold at the gate. tehachapiprorodeo.com. 2nd Annual Fourth of July Warrior 5K Run, pancake breakfast, food, drink, live entertainment, 6 a.m. registration, 7:30 a.m. race start at Philip Marx Central Park, Mojave and E streets in Tehachapi. $40 through July 2, $45 day of race. active.com.

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Intocable, 8 p.m., Rabobank Theater, 1001 Truxtun Ave. $25-$85 at ticketmaster.com.

July 14 Dancing with the Stars: LIVE!, 8 p.m., Rabobank Theater, 1001 Truxtun Ave. $45.80-$87.85 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

July 15 Anjelah Johnson presents Bon Qui Qui Live, 8 p.m., Fox Theater, 2001 H St. $44 at the box office.

July 2015

July 24 WWE Live Summerslam Heatwave Tour, 7:30 p.m., Rabobank Arena, 1001 Truxtun Ave. $15-$95. ticketmaster.com.

2nd Annual Christmas in July Fashion Show, to benefit Kern County Teen Challenge, luncheon, face painting, photos with “Star Wars” characters. 10 a.m., Olive Knolls Church, 6201 Fruitvale Ave. $20 each or $140 for table of eight. 399-2273. Kid’s Design Clay Pot, 10 a.m., Log Cabin Florist, 800 19th St. $40. 327-8646.

July 25 Foam Water Rush 5K, run, skip or walk through foam-bubble extravaganza. Proceeds to benefit The CBCC Foundation. 10 a.m., Kern County Soccer Park, 9400 Alfred Harrell Highway. $40 per person, kids 10 and under enter free. active.com.

July 26 4th Annual Bakersfield Natural Hair Extravaganza, presented by Upside Productions, swag bags, appetizers, live entertainment, hair show, vendors, prizes. 4 p.m., Bakersfield Marriott at the Convention Center, 801 Truxtun Ave. $25. upsideproductions.biz.

July 28 Juanes, 7:30 p.m., Rabobank Theater, 1001 Truxtun Ave. $28-$73.50 at ticketmaster.com.


1 2 R A N D O M T H I N G S YO U D I D N ’ T K N OW A B O U T …

VICTOR HUGO CASAS

PHOTO BY MICHAEL LOPEZ

Restaurant owner, family man, spicy chili enthusiast

Victor Hugo Casas at the bar in Mama Roomba.

Complied by Bakersfield Life

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ictor Hugo Casas, 43, can’t believe it has been 10 years since he took his life savings and invested in opening his own restaurant. Mama Roomba is nestled in the heart of Bakersfield and its vibrant-colored exterior is one you can’t miss. Its cozy environment and signature Latin Caribbeaninfused dishes earned the restaurant an appearance on the Food Network hit TV show “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives” earlier this year. “It was an honor to have Guy Fieri visit my restaurant,” Casas said. For Casas, owning his restaurant was a goal he set at the early age of 15. He spent many afternoons in the kitchen with his mom smelling and tasting delicious food. “I had a love for food at a very young age,” Casas said. “And my dream was to be my own boss one day.” Today, Mama Roomba is cooking up dishes like corn cheese empanadas, steamed mussels and skillet shrimp, among others.

1 I was born in Mexico City and moved to San Francisco when I was 15 years old.

2 I don’t like to eat by myself. Food is meant to be enjoyed with others and seeing people eat makes me happy.

3

Spicy food is everything to me. I usually ask my wife to carry a few chillies in a Ziploc bag in her purse, just in case the restaurant we go to doesn’t have spicy food.

4

Every year, I take my family on vacation to the Caribbean.

5 I love sushi. If I can eat it at least once a week, that makes me very, very happy.

6

I am the youngest of 10 siblings.

7

Besides owning my own restaurant, my

biggest accomplishment has been seeing my two children grow up. Family is extremely important for me. I do this for them.

8 Ever year, I take a trip to Las Vegas to watch Luis Miguel in concert. I buy a new outfit, including new shoes, and just have a great time.

9

My favorite snack is anything and everything seafood.

10 I don’t like sweet cocktails. I’d rather have tequila on the rocks. 11 Whenever I go on vacation, I ask locals where they like to eat. I like to find those one-of-a-kind places that have the best food.

12 My goal is to own three different restaurants with their own unique food style. Mama Roomba is my first, and the two others I want to start up somewhere on the coast.

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Eat & Drink

FOOD DUDES

SORELLA RISTORANTE ITALIANO ‘Buon Appetito’: Old-school Italian cuisine keeps you coming for more

Lobster tail with pesto pasta

Compiled by Bakersfield Life

Photos by Greg Nichols

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et’s get straight to the point. Sorella Ristorante Italiano is a well-kept secret for excellent Italian seafood. Bakersfield is truly privileged to have Annunziata Cristallo and her family share their family recipes through the delicacies served. A true-life story of the American dream, Cristallo and her family’s pursuit of passion and love for preparing quality Italian dishes are embellished in their excellent culinary creations. In a city that is proud of its local flare, Sorella is certainly a place you simply must try.

APPETIZER Adam Alvidrez on the bruschetta pizza: It’s about the

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size of a personal pizza. When you hear “bruschetta,” you automatically assume thick sourdough with chunks of tomato, oil, cheeses. This was different. It was definitely pizza dough, not too thick, though. The foundation was a light-brushed Alfredo sauce with a plethora of cheeses, small diced tomato and basil. I’ll definitely order it again!

ENTREES Richard Collins on the baked halibut special: When it arrived, I marveled first at its visual appeal. The colorful confetti-like blanket of diced shallots, garlic, red pepper flakes and basil almost kept me from digging in and ruining the aesthetic. But once you dig in, magnifico! Imagine just underneath the confetti an inch-thick halibut steak, snow-white,


From left: Laurel Floyd, Guss Gomez, Jason Cater, Justin Cave, Annunziata Cristallo, Lillian Swift Larson, Adam Alvidrez and Michael Lopez

WHITE LN

McNAIR LN GOSFORD RD

flaky and lusciously juicy. This rests on a bed of angel hair pasta, bathed in a spicy broth that rivals a Thai soup for complexity of flavor. All this surrounded by other surprises of taste, texture and visual appeal, such as the accompaniment of mushrooms, tomatoes and artichoke hearts that decorate the perimeter of this first-class dish. Jason Cater on the New York steak with scampi: With enough food to test even the biggest appetites, this dish is composed of a New York steak that is grilled and sauteed to perfection, complemented by a bed of angel hair pasta topped with creamy Alfredo sauce. The tender steak truly rivals any in town. This dish’s delightful blend of texture and tastes truly brings out the zeal for cooking, which has been the foundation

CERNAN WAY

Baked halibut

500 FT

Sorella Ristorante Italiano

Sorella Ristorante Italiano 7900 McNair Lane 661-396-8603 www.sorellarestaurant.com Open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday; 4 to 10 p.m. Saturday; 4 to 9 p.m. Sunday.

7900 McNair Lane

Continued on page 34 bakersfieldlife.com

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Chicken parmigiana

Continued from page 33 for this local establishment for years. One bite will leave you wanting more as the blend of seafood, Italian and a fine cut will captivate and send your taste buds into overdrive.

A photo of Sorella owner Annunziata Cristallo’s family, taken in the 1950s, after they immigrated to the U.S. The smallest girl in the front is Annunziata.

Michael Lopez on the fettuccine Alfredo with shrimp: This dish was superb! The Alfredo

sauce was nice and thick, almost like the consistency of gravy; I love when my Alfredo sauce has some weight and density to it. The fettuccine was cooked to perfection but the added bonus was the shrimp. Oh my! The shrimp took the dish over the top. They were large and full of flavor. By the time I was done eating, I knew I had to loosen my belt. I was stuffed! Justin Cave on the lobster tail paired with pesto pasta: At first glance, when the dish arrived, I

knew I had made the right decision. The huge lobster tail was cooked to perfection with drawn butter to complement this tender, tasty delicacy. The pesto over angel hair was fantastic. Pesto is a sauce inspired in the northern region of Italy and consists of basil, crushed garlic and European pine nuts blended in olive oil, and Sorella’s pesto recipe is sure to please the pickiest of Italians – mainly my mom. Adam on the chicken parmigiana: Lightly breaded and tenderized to perfection, this entree did not disappoint. The tomato-based Neapolitan sauce and melted cheese complemented the chicken. To kids’ taste buds, if mozzarella sticks married Italian chicken strips, this is what you would get.

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Enhancing Lives. Improving Homes. Actual DreamMaker Kitchen Remodel

Lemon cream cake

AK

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SFIELD CALIF OR

TH

2014 14 14

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CH O IC E

PO

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Michael on Lily’s mud pie: OMG! I am not even sure that explains it well enough. This dessert is enough for an entire table. The ice cream with peanut butter, the chocolate, the whipped cream and the cherry on top make this one heck of a dessert! Adam on the lemon cream cake: Put it this way, I literally dreamed about the lemon cake the other night. Light, moist, jampacked with flavor. It was hard for me to share that one, but of course, I’m a team player so I did. If there is one thing we love about Bakersfield, it’s the family-owned, local restaurant whose pride, tradition and passion for great food are evident by the quality of its products. Sorella Ristorante Italiano tops the list of excellent authentic Italian food. So, from our family to yours, mangia! Mangia!

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DESSERTS

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Eat & Drink

FOOD AND WINE

WHAT’S ON THE MENU? Summer sizzles in seasonal items By Zachary Esparza

Photos by Mark Nessia

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Bakersfield summer promises sunny skies, a rise in temperatures and some delicious seasonal cuisine. Many restaurants around town spice up their menus with more options to cater to their guests’ palates. Here are a few summer previews at some of Bakersfield’s beloved restaurants.

Ceviche salad at Steak and Grape

Steak and Grape No matter the season, the most popular items at Steak and Grape are the mouthwatering steaks, said Shai Gordon, co-owner of the restaurant. Prepare for “more salads, beers, white wine and an emphasis on food that goes well with hot temperature.” Salads of all kinds, including chicken and shrimp, are a big hit at Steak and Grape. Gordon’s personal summertime favorite is, surprisingly, a hot dish. “It’s called the oxtail osso buco (stew in a red wine reduction sauce served in a Dutch oven) and I think even in the summer it’s just something I look forward to,” said Gordon. 36

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June July 2015 2015

Bloody mary ceviche at Steak and Grape


The Mark The Mark’s menu is intended to fit in all types of seasons, said Terry Maxwell, general manager of the restaurant. “We try and fashion our specials every night to be more of a seasonal sort of special.” Features may include fish and creative twists on heavier proteins, like beef and pork, by adding lighter sauces. To maximize freshness, The Mark has the ability to order fish from Hawaii and receive it the very next day. Fruits produced in summer bring out unique flavors in some of The Mark’s dishes, including the creme brulee, said Maxwell.

JANE’S JEWELERS Where Bakersfield Gets Engaged

9530 Hageman Road • 587-6242 Corner of Calloway & Hageman Tuesday - Friday 10:00 - 6:00 • Saturday 10:00 - 3:00 Closed Sunday and Monday Visit us on our website: JanesJewelers.com Facebook.com/JanesJewelers Pinterest.com/JanesJewelers

Paradise salad at Camino Real

Ceviche at Camino Real

Camino Real Refreshing fruit drinks and light appetizers are a summertime favorite at Camino Real. “You want to try to go with something light and airy that will open the appetite for your next entree,” said owner Alejandro Ocampo. Cucumber chili margarita, mango ceviche, shrimp cocktail and the mango sorbet are some of the most popular dishes enjoyed after a hot day at Camino Real. There’s even a spicy habanero margarita “for people that like a little bit of sweet and a little bit of heat.”

Continued on page 38

2300 Eye Street (Across f rom Rite Aide)

661.327.9999 www.reddoor-interiors.com HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 10-6 • SATURDAY 10-5 • SUNDAY CLOSED

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Try it before the season changes Camino Real Ceviche, which is fish or shrimp marinated in lime juice with pico de gallo, chopped cucumbers and avocado. The other item is the paradise salad. It’s sliced cucumber sauteed with lime, marinated onions, a mango vinaigrette, chili flakes, grilled chicken and a chopped mango salsa.

Capellini al naturale primavera with grilled chicken breast and vegetables at Sorella Ristorante Italiano.

Continued from page 37

Sorella Ristorante Italiano Seafood, pizzas, calzones and even a new stuffed baked chicken are in abundance at the Italian restaurant for unlimited choices. “We use lighter sauces, olive oil and fresh garlic while staying away

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July 2015

from the heavy butter sauces,” said Laurel Floyd, co-owner and a chef at Sorella. Capellini al natural with grilled chicken is a standard at Sorella in the summertime. “It’s a really light dish and it’s very healthy. You don’t feel weighed down,” said Floyd.

Sorella’s Capellini al naturale primavera with grilled chicken breast. It’s made with extra virgin olive oil, fresh garlic, Roma tomatoes, fresh basil, broccoli, cauliflower, zucchini and carrots. The Mark Charbroiled monchong fish with risotto and chimichurri sauce. Catfish po’boy sandwich on a Pyrenees roll with a choice of coleslaw or fries. Steak and Grape Summer specials change regularly. Call 588-9463 for details.


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Lifestyles

H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

MINDFUL MOVEMENT Moves to reduce stress in the office while at the office

Upward facing desk dog

Chair pigeon pose

By Monique Rogers

Photos by Mark Nessia

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ver had one of those days where the stress begins the minute you open your eyes? Alarm clock fails. Where are my keys? Traffic is horrid. Parking is a mess. Family or school needs are pressing. Emails, assignments and phone messages piling up. If you’re like most Americans, this type of stress has become part of your daily work-life balance battle. In fact, eight out of 10 Americans are stressed out by at least one thing, according to a survey conducted by Nieslen for Everest College. Add completing a college degree to the mix and the level of work-life-study stress is even greater. Besides worrying about careers and an active life, most students also have to face full academic schedules, late night study cram sessions and the stress of really never getting any breaks. Work-life-study stress can be a disaster on the nervous system, mental capabilities and physical tissues. Mindful body movement can help. As the stress in our body rises, tension occurs. It settles in the shoulders, neck, hips or even manifests with headaches and migraines. Here are two suggestions to begin a simple mindful movement practice and regain focus and take back the day with less stress.

UPWARD FACING DESK DOG Your desk or a table at home can be easily used as a prop for mindful movement. In fact, moving in this manner will add to your arm strength while signaling areas of tension 40

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July 2015

around your neck, shoulders and back to relax. From a standing position, place both hands firmly on a secure and sturdy table, desk or counter. Step back one foot at a time while beginning to lean forward, creating an “L” shape with your body. With feet and hands firmly planted and arms extended, drop your head and chest to feel a stretch in your shoulders. Lengthen your spine by pressing your hips away from your hands. Hold this position for three deep breaths. Begin to your shift weight into your hands as you move your hips forward. Gently lift the heels of your feet, curve your back and inhale as you lift your chin. Look up and roll your shoulders back and down. Exhale to move back to the “L” shape position for three more deep breaths. Complete this cycle three to five times.

CHAIR PIGEON POSE Sitting with crossed legs for extended periods can cause imbalances in our hips and lower back, especially when done on one side more frequently. This imbalance can translate to difficulty standing for long periods, low back pain and unwanted tension. Begin from a sitting position in a supported chair with feet flat on the floor. Cross your right ankle over your left knee, creating a 90-degree angle with your right leg. Keep the right foot arch flexed to reduce pressure on the right knee. Sit tall with a long spine in an upright position, breathing slowly and deeply through your nose. A gentle to moderate stretch should be felt on the outside of the right thigh. Complete six to eight deep breaths before switching sides.


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Lifestyles

ON THE ROAD

2016 VOLVO XC90 T6 AWD INSCRIPTION Simple, elegant design, premium materials make luxury SUV blueprint for company’s resurgence By Glenn Hammett

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Photos by Mark Nessia

eturning to the office with Bakersfield Life Assistant Editor and photographer Mark Nessia following our photo shoot for this story, I parked the 2016 Volvo XC90 across the street from the Padre Hotel.

Bakersfield Life Art Director Glenn Hammett with the 2016 Volvo XC90. The redesigned luxury SUV strikes a perfect balance between performance, elegance and utility. 42

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July 2015

As we stepped out of the redesigned seven-seat SUV, I was approached by two well-dressed men who had just crossed 18th Street, one of whom asked me enthusiastically, “What is THAT?” “It is Volvo’s new SUV,” I calmly responded. “It’s beautiful, perfectly proportioned,” the curious professional exclaimed. His superlatives only escalated when I opened the door and showed him the stunning interior with nappa leather seats and natural walnut trim. Earlier that day, I dropped in to get some thoughts on the car from my friend Jeff, who is somewhat of luxury SUV aficionado. Like the exuberant man on the street, Jeff was captivated by the tastefully designed exterior and enamored with the beautiful simplicity of the interior. “So clean inside. Where are all of the buttons and controls?” he asked. The answer is that the customary cluster of buttons on the center stack have been replaced by a 9-inch touchscreen,


Thanks to the well-designed seat configuration, the XC90’s cargo area expands to more than 85 cubic feet.

Volvo’s Sensus system controls most of the XC90’s settings and functions via its 9-inch touch screen, eliminating the need for the customary array buttons and switches.

It’s all in the details

The low-profile front seats make the interior feel more spacious, are infinitely adjustable and have several built-in safety features.

where Volvo’s new Sensus system controls most of the settings and functions of the car. The screen features a home button at the bottom, like that on an iPhone, and works a lot like a tablet. I found Sensus easy to navigate and appreciated the fact that you are not required to go deep into menu hell to find what you are looking for. Volvo’s emphasis on keeping its drivers and passengers safe is legendary. Now it is taking it a step further with its Vision 2020 plan, a promise that “by 2020, nobody shall be seriously

injured or killed in a new Volvo.” The objective is to create cars that will not crash. In addition to the all of safety features you would expect in a luxury SUV, the XC90 has a few new ones that indicate Volvo is serious about achieving its 2020 goal. It will alert you to approaching cars, cyclists and pedestrians and apply the brakes if you start to pull out in front of cross traffic or make a left turn into oncoming traffic. If a collision is imminent, the XC90 warns you with a red light and sound alert and locks up the brakes if you don’t respond. There is a 360-degree camera system that gives a real-time overhead view of the SUV so you can see exactly how close you are to cars, curbs and other obstacles when parking or maneuvering tight spaces. The new XC90 is powered by a 2.0-liter supercharged and turbocharged four-cylinder engine (which generates a surprising 316 horsepower), paired with a silky-smooth eightspeed transmission. Compared to the previous generation of the XC90, the smaller engine reduces the overall weight, improving fuel efficiency, handling and braking. Since being sold by Ford in 2010, Volvo has been on a quest to reinvent itself and become relevant again in the luxury car market. The 2016 XC90 is the first manifestation of that effort and will serve as a blueprint for the rest of its lineup. Judging from the way it turned heads during my test drive, I think Volvo is well on its way.

2016 Volvo XC90 T6 Inscription Gas Mileage: Estimated 20 city, 25 highway and 22 combined miles per gallon Price tag: The 2016 Volvo XC90 T6 Inscription trim model starts at approximately $55,000.

The 360-degree camera system Five best features of the XC90 Inscription: 1. Nappa leather (soft temper) upholstery, dashboard, upper door panels and key fob. 2. Linear walnut wood inlays 3. 12.3-inch digital instrument display 4. LED headlights with Active Bending Lights 5. Ventilated front seats Target customer: The new Volvo XC90 aims to appeal to the customer base looking for a luxury midsize SUV that will hold up to seven passengers comfortably. Three words that define the 2016 Volvo XC90 Inscription: Innovative, luxurious, affordable. What do I like most about the 2016 XC90 Inscription: I love that the new 2016 Volvo XC90 Inscription package is not just luxurious, but extremely stylish. The advances in technology are ahead of the curve, yet still simple to use. Paired with Volvo’s leading advances in safety, the new Volvo XC90 Inscription is a perfect choice. Source: Max Pierce, Sangera Automotive Group Internet sales

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Lifestyles

I N M Y C LO S E T

DUSTIN CONTRERAS Well-suited for the job

Compiled by Bakersfield Life Photos by Mark Nessia

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ou will never catch Dustin Contreras in a T-shirt and sandals running errands around Bakersfield. And by the way he dresses for work, you wouldn’t think otherwise. With close to 200 ties and nearly 30 watches, Contreras is a fashion guru. And a suit man. “I always wear suits,” the human trafficking detective with the Kern County Sheriff’s Office said. And he isn’t afraid of colors or patterns. He usually sticks with grays and purples, lavender being his go-to color. His tie collection includes British-style patterns and an array of colors. “The big rule that most people forget about wearing a tie is that it has to be darker than your shirt, even just by one shade,” he said. “You can always tell who is new to wearing suits when they wear same-colored ties.” What is your favorite clothing item in your closet? My Diesel jeans. Everyone always give me a hard time because they are so expensive, but they are worth $300. They last forever. Favorite place to shop? My suits are from Men’s Wearhouse and for accessories I shop at most local men’s boutiques. Where do you seek fashion inspiration? My dad was a big inspiration to me because he always wore suits to work every day. But I also enjoy exploring style blogs, magazines and Pinterest.

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July 2015

Dustin Contreras always wears suits and isn’t afraid of colors or patterns.


Ted Baker wing-tips with leather bottoms

Dustin Contreras has close to 30 watches.

What makes a suit stand out? Getting it tailored. You can buy the most expensive suit, but if it’s not tailored, it won’t look good. That’s the key. Tips on buying ties? Ties can be really expensive but try to find ones that are affordable and good quality. Once you get good quality ties, they can last forever. What’s your favorite casual look? Just look at a Ralph Lauren advertisement and that’s perfect for me – it’s not over the top. I won’t mimic the outfit exactly because I like to add my own style but that’s more of my casual look. Your favorite accessory? I always wear a watch. And shoes are the biggest thing to any outfit. I always pay attention to what shoes I have on. I stay away from rubber-based shoes and stick to leather dress shoes. Any fashion advice? Fashion comes and goes but styles stay the same, so make a style of your own and don’t let people deter you from how you dress. You can be manly and stylish at the same time.

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Lifestyles

FIT AND FRESH

EARLY BIRD GETS THE RUN

PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK

Running before sun rises best way to avoid summer heat

By Sally Baker and Katie Kirschenmann

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ith temperatures rising, it’s more important than ever to stay cool and avoid the heat whenever possible. But that doesn’t mean staying indoors and running on a treadmill. Take part in the Fourth of July Warrior Run 5K in the cool mountain air of Tehachapi to escape the Bakersfield summer. And be sure to try the super-simple red, white and blue summer salad, which makes a perfect addition to any Fourth of July potluck.

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RUNNING AND WORKING OUT IN BAKERSFIELD’S SUMMER HEAT If you’re a runner or a cyclist, you already know about the challenges our extreme temperatures can pose to getting miles in, especially if you’re training for an event. The answer to this challenge is simple yet comes with challenges of its own. Simply put: The earlier you get out the door, the better off you are. And when we say early, we mean before the sun rises. Here are our five top tips for getting out the door safely and healthy while avoiding the heat.

FOURTH OF JULY WARRIOR RUN 5K

1. Hydrate. Be sure to drinks loads of water and eat clean the night before an ultra-early run. Avoid alcohol and heavy, starchy foods.

For something a little different from the usual 5K in Yokuts Park, head up the hill for this fun way to start off your Fourth of July celebrations. Race starts at 7:30 a.m. in Central Park in Tehachapi, which can be found at Mojave and E streets. Pancake breakfast to follow. For more information, find the link at Bakersfieldtrackclub.com/calendar.

2. Fuel up. It can be hard to make breakfast when you’re half asleep at 3 a.m. Plan ahead by making breakfast the night before or having your smoothie ingredients measured out so that you can get out the door with enough fuel to sustain your activity. Nourish yourself with protein and a complex carb.

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July 2015


PHOTO BY SALLY BAKER

Red, white and blue summer salad This colorful, nutritious and delicious salad could not be easier. In fact, invite your kids to make it; they will be proud of their Fourth of July masterpiece. Take a large platter or shallow bowl and throw on a thin layer of arugula. On top of this, add a layer of fresh, ripe sliced tomatoes and avocados. Next, sprinkle fresh blueberries and, finally, goat cheese crumbles. For the final touch, drizzle Trader Joe’s balsamic glaze over the top. Voila! For a perfect pairing, add a piece of grilled fish and some crusty wholegrain bread.

3. Avoid caffeine. I know, I know, you’re balking at this one. Coffee will dehydrate you and, um, well, may give you the expected need for a pit stop while you’re on your run. That’s no fun. 4. Carry water. Wear your water! Even if you’re starting early, the mercury can rise quickly in the peak of summer. Heatstrokes happen, even to the fittest of people. Listen to your body. If you feel weak or dizzy, slow down, take a breather and drink water. Actions Sports and Sole 2 Soul Sports have a plethora of vests, belts and bottles devoted to comfortably wearing your water. 5. Be visible! This last tip is the most important. You need to see and be seen. Purchase a headlamp for your bike or if you’re a runner, one for your head. There are many long-battery-life lamps out there on the market. They range in price, so shop out the right gear for your needs relative to your activity. Make sure your bike and your person are lit up like fireworks on the Fourth of July. Reflective gear, belts, hats and tape are easily accessible. We recently found batterypowered blinking armbands for a reasonable price at Costco. Be careful, think ahead and listen to your body. Getting up so early in the morning is challenging but you’ll be happy that you’ve gotten your miles in before most of the town is awake.

1500 Haggin Oaks, Suite 100 Dr. Gregory Klis, M.D. April Cooper, R.N. • Debbie Alteparmakian, R.N. Tasha Garcia, R.N. W e accept V isa, M astercard , D iscover an d C areC red it w w w. s k i n s at i o n m e d i s pa . c o m The non-invasive Ultherapy® procedure is FDA-cleared to lift skin on the neck, on the eyebrow and under the chin as well as to improve lines and wrinkles on the décolletage. For full product and safety information, including possible mild side effects, visit www.ultherapy.com/IFU. ©2015 Ulthera, Inc. Ultherapy and See the Beauty of Sound are trademarks of Ulthera, Inc.

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Lifestyles

PA S T I M E S

STUDENT WRITERS RECEIVE LOCAL HONORS Local middle-schoolers showcase skills in writing competition By Lori Wolf

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PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID WOLF

he Writers of Kern is the local branch of the California Writers Club, which was informally started by author Jack London. The club’s motto is “educating writers of all abilities in the craft of writing and in the marketing of their work.” In keeping with this theme, the Writers of Kern (WOK)

Steering Committee members, from left: WOK Vice President Dennis VanderWerff, retired principal John Hefner, WOK President Joan Raymond, Judge Robert Tafoya and prosecutor David Wolf. 50

Bakersfield Life Magazine

held its 2015 Honors Dinner at Hodel’s, which was hosted by Dennis VanderWerff, master of ceremonies and vice president of WOK. At the dinner, pins were awarded to active members of WOK, and various other member awards were given, but the highlight of the dinner was the award presentation for the Young Writers of Kern Competition. For the YWOK Competition, there were more than 70 writing submissions from middle school students throughout Kern County. Those submissions were evaluated by a team of volunteer judges from WOK, and 12 students were chosen to receive the awards, which included $200, student memberships to Writers of Kern and free admission to the awards dinner for the award recipients and their families and teachers. Work on the awards began much earlier than the May awards dinner. Retired Fruitvale Principal John Hefner and Deputy District Attorney David Wolf worked tirelessly to obtain donations to make the awards possible. On the night of the Honors Dinner, both men were delighted to hand out the awards to the talented winners: Elleigh Davis, Downtown

June 2015


PHOTO BY DENNIS VANDERWERFF

Winners of the third annual Young Writers of Kern Writing Competition are Breanna Hodgeman, Gabriella Lara, Ana Rodriquez and Anahi Zavala of Pond School; McKall Henrie, of Cato Middle School; Gustavo Valenzuela, of McFarland Middle School; and David Schwartz, of Fruitvale Junior High; and Elleigh Davis, Maddie Hutson, Leah Truitt, Isabel Iturriria and Charles Rous of Downtown School. Pictured left to right are Elleigh, McKall, Ana, Maddie, Breanna, David, Anahi, Leah, Gustavo, Isabel, Charles and Gabriella.

Elementary School; Breanna Hodgeman, Pond School; Maddie Hutson, Downtown Elementary School; Isabel Iturriria; Downtown Elementary School; Gabriela Lara, Pond School; McKall Henrie, Paul L. Cato Middle School; Ana Rodriquez, Pond School; Charles Rous, Downtown Elementary School; David Schwartz, Fruitvale Junior High School; Leah Truitt, Downtown Elementary School; Gustavo Valenzuela, McFarland Middle School; and Anahi Zavala, Pond School. Local Judge Robert Tafoya has been an advocate for the importance of teaching writing to our youth and has been an integral part of this award program over the past four years. Tafoya spoke to the recipients and told them he had four pieces of advice for them: listen to your parents; listen to your teachers; choose your friends wisely and realize that your parents are your best friends and are always looking out for you and what is best for you; and work hard. As Tafoya so aptly pointed out, the ability to write well is an integral part of being successful in all career fields. Encouraging young writers to keep writing and improving their writing abilities will benefit not only the individual writers, but society as a whole. If you did not have the opportunity to become involved in this worthwhile program this year, plan on participating next year. Donations for the awards are always needed and much appreciated. If you want to have a more hands-on role, contact WOK about joining and becoming a judge for the 2016 competition. Finally, make time to attend the awards dinner. There is nothing more uplifting than seeing the smiles on the faces of the young award winners and their proud parents and teachers. Lori Wolf is the owner of Tantamount Editorial Services, Tantamount Legal Editing, and author of “Bank of Allowance Givers: Raising Financially Savvy Children.”

The Greater Bakersfield Chamber of Commerce congratulates President/CEO Nick Ortiz on being named one of Bakersfield’s ’20 Under 40!’

Nick Ortiz bakersfieldlife.com

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Lifestyles

HOME AND GARDEN

Aiden, left, and Austin Gentry play in the Saunders’ front yard, which contains artificial grass. Aiden is allergic to grass but can now play in the yard with his younger brother.

GREENER OPPORTUNITIES Homeowners test waters with artificial grass By Maria Machuca

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ith public agencies pressing for water restriction and conservation, local residents are now testing the waters of replacing their luscious lawns with artificial grass. “As Californians, we love our grass. We love our pretty, green grass,” said Gerald Ogden, owner of Courts & Greens, an artificial grass and sports construction company that has encountered an increased interest locally. “I travel all over the United States and I just think that California has the nicest, man-made landscaping in the country.” Bakersfield couple Sandra and Gerald Saunders agree. Both retired teachers take pride in their lawn, but with the

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state’s drought, they want to do their part in conserving water. “Even last year, we started watering three times a week to try to conserve,” Gerald said. However, as they used less water, the Saunders noticed their lawn scattered with weeds, unwanted grass and dry spots. That’s when they considered artificial grass. Gerald admits fake turf was initially unappealing, but after checking it out at the house of one of his wife’s friends, he and his wife were amazed with the feel and looks of it. Bakersfield, unlike some California cities, doesn’t have a ban on artificial grass. In fact, the city has installed fake turf in at least eight locations, including City Hall North, as part of a water conservation test program launched last year. “Currently we are only placing synthetic turf in areas that have limited access and/or other maintenance concerns,” said Darin Budak, Bakersfield’s Recreation and Parks assistant director. Budak said they are still in the process of evaluating its use and whether to implement a citywide program. In early May, the California State Water Resources Control Board approved new water use rules designed to meet Gov. Jerry Brown’s executive order requiring a 25 percent reduction


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in water consumption across the state. Cities and local water agencies have to collectively meet their mandatory reduction targets, which range from 4 to 36 percent, or face severe fines. Under the new rules, the city of Bakersfield domestic water system must slash its urban water use by 36 percent. Cal Water must cut its use by 32 percent. Meanwhile, Jason Meadors, city of Bakersfield Water Resources Department director, has noted a heightened interest in artificial turf and drought-tolerant landscaping within the community. Increased demand for fake turf Ogden, who started installing artificial grass in 2001, said he was installing about 20,000 square feet of fake turf per year back then. This year, he is on track to do 200,000 square feet – up 50,000 from last year. The average home backyard is 1,000 square feet. The state’s drought has definitely influenced the shift in people’s perceptions about artificial grass, but what has really helped the turf industry is that its quality and aesthetics have

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PHOTO COURTESY OF GERALD SAUNDERS

The Saunders’ front yard prior to installing artificial grass.

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improved, Ogden said. Tim Hardt, owner of Hardt Construction Services, said his company has started to see the demand for fake turf triple. He went from doing two installations per month to three or four per week. “With the cutback on water usage, people are starting to see their front yards not as green as they used to be and grass dying out,” he said, adding that he’s doing mostly front yard installations. According to Hardt, the average home’s front yard uses up to 30 percent of its total irrigation water. In addition to water conservation, fake turf saves on chemicals, fertilizers, gardening and winter rye. The cost of fake turf installation depends on several variables and square footage, but it can run from $10,000 to $15,000 – approximately $7 or $8 per square foot. Several water districts have begun offering incentive programs to help residents conserve water and eliminate live grass. Nowadays, buying artificial grass is like buying carpet with hundreds of different grass varieties to choose from and can last up to 20 years. About two months ago, the Saunders family hired Courts & Greens to install 1,500 square feet of fake turf in their front yard. “We love it!” Sandra said. “We walk outside and it’s done," she said. “It’s not tacky. It’s not plastic. It looks real.” “The whole neighborhood stopped when we were putting it in,’” Gerald said.

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Go & Do

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

AN EXPLOSION OF LATIN FLAIR Colombian singer Juanes hits the stage in Bakersfield

By Laura Liera

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July 2015

PHOTO BY OMAR CRUZ

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rowing up in a household where the sound of folk music bounced off the walls was where it all began for Juanes. “I remember my brothers and father singing at home in a big room, and I always envisioned myself playing the guitar and singing,” the Colombian rock star remembered. At the age of 15, Juanes was the voice behind the rock band Ekhymosis but after 12 years, the band fell apart. The singer-songwriter rose to fame as a solo artist in 2000 with the release of his first album, “Fijate Bien.” “Many times, I didn’t think I was going to make it on my own,” Juanes said. “But my passion for music was much stronger than my fear.” Today, Juanes is a two-time Grammy and 20-time Latin Grammy winner. As he gets ready to take on the second half of his “Loco de Amor” tour in the U.S., Juanes is bringing his unmistakable Latin flair to Bakersfield later this month. When asked what his favorite song off the latest album was, Juanes said that it was hard to choose.


“Each song comes from a special place in my heart, and each has a different angle of how I see love,” he said. Love from pain. Love from happiness. Love from experiences. All 11 tracks will give fans a glimpse into the songwriter’s inner thoughts.

July 28, 7:30 p.m., Rabobank Theater, 1001 Truxtun Ave. Tickets range from $28-$73.50, available at ticketmaster.com

His inspiration: “My life, my family, my kids, my wife, my country.” This year, Juanes also took on one of the biggest projects in his career, a collaboration with The Walt Disney Co. The song “Juntos ” is an original song he co-wrote for Disney’s “McFarland USA” starring

Kevin Costner. “It was an amazing experience because it was the first time I had written a song for a movie, and I absolutely loved the movie,” Juanes said. The lead single of the movie talks about working together as a team. “When you work together with someone else, and you envision the win as a team, you can do anything you want in life,” he added. Juanes also made a quick stop in McFarland last year at their annual Christmas Parade. The Latin music idol filmed the music video for “Juntos” at McFarland High School. For fans awaiting his arrival July 28 at the Rabobank Theater, Juanes said he is ready to entertain and deliver the best Latin music to ever hit Bakersfield. “The focus is 100 percent on the music and we are ready,” he said.

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Go & Do

TRIP PLANNER

AN ARTISTIC GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES 4 must-see art museums By Tyler Stevens

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hile Los Angeles is known for its exciting nightlife and artistic ambiences, museums play a role in the history and modern-day culture of the city. Museums provide an educational experience to individuals pursuing an understanding of their artistic interests. Ranging from pop culture to music, architecture and contemporary art, Los Angeles has the museum to fit your lifestyle. Embrace the culture of Los Angeles and explore what the city has to offer.

MADAME TUSSAUDS HOLLYWOOD WAX MUSEUM If pop culture and the celebrity lifestyle interest you, Madame Tussauds Hollywood Wax Museum is the place to visit. Located on Hollywood Boulevard, Madame Tussauds is next to the world-famous Chinese Theatre and the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The museum features more than 125 lifelike celebrity wax figures from movies, television, music, sports and politics. Once you step foot inside, you will be immersed in a world of entertainment and Hollywood fame. “Madame Tussauds gives you the opportunity to step in to Hollywood,” General Manager Colin Thomas said. “We’re more than a museum and there are no ropes or barriers. We encourage you to get up-close to the figures and really feel fame! “Our guests generally find their favorite scenes or sets amongst the figures in the attraction, whether it’s having breakfast at Tiffany’s surrounded by the golden age of Hollywood, joining Forrest Gump on the park bench in modern classics, directing a scene on the ‘Kill Bill’ set with the help of Tarantino or, of course, the Marvel action heroes with 4-D experience – they’re guaranteed to leave with amazing photos!”

Wolverine

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Taylor Swift

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July 2015

Selena Gomez


J. Paul Getty Museum The Getty is a well-known museum settled above the city with views of the Pacific Ocean and the surrounding Santa Monica Mountains. The Getty features works of art in the form of European paintings, modern sculptures, manuscripts from the Renaissance era and historical photographs. After you take in the sights of the museum, step outside to the Central Garden where you will be surrounded by more than 500 varieties of plant materials that make up the beautiful landscape. The Getty Center prides itself on the research, interpretation and education of the arts. Experience the Getty on your next trip to Los Angeles. “We want to contribute to the mobility of people intellectually, personally, and professionally. I hope the Getty will provide opportunities for others to have the experience that I had as a young 19-year-old student wandering around a great museum,” said James Cuno, Getty Trust president and CEO, in a video shared on Getty.edu.

The Central Garden at the Getty Center

GRAMMY MUSEUM In the heart of downtown Los Angeles lies the Grammy Museum at L.A. Live. The museum features more than 30,000 square feet of exhibits and interactive programs that showcase the history and pioneers of the Grammy Awards. You will begin your tour with the Songwriters Hall of Fame gallery, which showcases digital videos and interactive touch screens to browse through. As you make your way through the exhibit, you will gain knowledge of the recording process, the technology used to create music and sit in a replica theater to get the full experience of the award show. “The Grammy Museum is a place to come and witness the history and the future of music,” said Ken Ehrlich, Grammy Museum board member, in a video shared on Grammy Museum website. In the same video, Colleen McCray, a member since 2009, said the Grammy Museum captures the essence of the artists.

Giant replica of the famous trophy

Madame Tussauds Hollywood Wax Museum 6933 Hollywood Blvd. Tickets start at $29.95 for adults ages 13 and over; $22.95 for children ages 4 to 12. Open 10 a.m. daily, except on Oscars day. Check website for early closure notices for the summer. www.madametussauds.com 866-841-3315 Getty Center Museum 1200 N. Sepulveda Blvd. Admission: Free Open Tuesday through Friday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Closed Mondays. Open Fridays until 9 p.m. through Aug. 28. www.getty.edu 310-440-7300 Grammy Museum 800 W. Olympic Blvd., Suite A245 Admission: Adults, $12.95; college students, $11.95 (18 years and older, valid ID required); seniors, $11.95 (65 years and older); youth, $10.95 (6-17 years); and military, $10.95 (valid ID required). Hours: Monday through Friday 11:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. www.grammymuseum.org 213-765-6800 Los Angeles County Museum of Art 5905 Wilshire Blvd. Admission: Adults, $15; seniors (ages 62 and older), $10; students with valid ID and children (17 and under), free. Also free to active duty military personnel, National Guard and Reserve, and their families. Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Closed Wednesdays, Thanksgivng Day, and Christmas Day. www.lacma.org 323-857-6000

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LACMA Resnick Exhibit Pavilion turing exhibits from local artists Noah Purifoy and Ed Moses, as well as the 50 for 50 exhibit, showcasing gifts donated to the museum in celebration of its

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Experience the West Coast’s largest museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Beginning in 1965, the museum has been providing art enthusiasts with more than 120,000 artistic objects spanning from antique-style works to modern-day pieces. The LA County Museum appreciates both historical and geographical art forms. These forms include Latin American art, Asian art, pre-Columbian art and Islamic art. One of the museum’s well-known pieces is Chris Burden’s “Urban Light” sculpture. Over 202 restored street lamps are uniformly placed together at the entrance to the museum. This museum is a must-see on your next trip down to Southern California. The museum is currently fea-

PHOTO COURTESY OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART

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50th anniversary. “We’re the largest encyclopedic museum on the West Coast,” LACMA Director of Communications Miranda Carroll said.

“That means we have something for everyone. We cover the gamut of art, crafts, artifacts from all cultures, from ancient mummies to contemporary art.”


Urban Light

Lamp, Egypt or Syria, mid-14th century PHOTO COURTESY OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART

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Making an

Impact

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By Bakersfield Life Magazine

These individuals are changing the face of Bakersfield. The young professionals highlighted in Bakersfield Life’s third annual 20 Under 40 People to Watch entered into a competitive nomination process in March and were selected as this year’s most promising

Photos by Mark Nessia

rising stars in our community. Whether it’s owning their own business, providing the latest care in optometry, making an impact in the educational system or practicing law, these compassionate men and women are improving the quality of life in our community.

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SAL ARIAS • 38, Prevention Specialist with the Kern County Superintendent of Schools • Community involvement: Various gang intervention programs, serves on the board of Youth Connection, volunteer at Christ the King Catholic Church

When it comes to getting youth in check, Sal Arias is the man that parents, teachers, principals and counselors call. As a prevention specialist with the Kern County Superintendent of Schools, he spends his time working with at-risk students and their families. Arias said he can get between 10 to 15 phone calls a day from concerned parents who need help getting their child to stay in school, or keeping them away from gangs or feel threatened by their child at home. Once a situation is assessed, Arias puts together a plan that will benefit not only a student but parents as well. Arias is currently the only fulltime prevention specialist in Kern County. He has trained 13 future school social interns and hopes that number will grow to 20 by next year. His dream would be to have a school social worker at every elementary, junior high and high school in Kern County. “There is nothing like having a caring adult at each school,” Arias said. “If a student feels connected to an adult, someone that will support them, they’ll think twice before skipping school or hanging out with the wrong crowd.” And for Arias, the success stories are what makes his job fulfilling. “When you get to see students that are not going to add on to the prison population and are going to be contributors to society instead, that’s golden,” he said.

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JORGE BARRIENTOS • 31, Director of Marketing and Public Relations, Chain | Cohn | Stiles • Community involvement: Vice president of the Kern County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s Business and Education Foundation, board director for Mothers Against Drunk Driving Kern County, board member of the Bakersfield Museum of Art and Bakersfield Active 20-30 Club

Like most people from Bakersfield who leave and say they’ll never make it back, Jorge Barrientos found himself back in the city that stores all of his childhood memories. After moving away for college in Chico, then to Southern California to work at the Orange County Register right out of college, Barrientos returned to Bakersfield in 2008 and has called it home ever since. Barrientos sits on the board of many local nonprofit organizations, including those whose focus is education. Growing up in a poor neighborhood surrounded by lots of gang activity and drug use, Barrientos chose to learn instead – learn from those doing things wrong and learn from those doing things right. “I learned – from family, friends and mentors – that hard work overcomes a whole lot,” he said. When he speaks with youth growing up in similar situations like he did as a teenager, he can relate. “I say it’s not the end of the road,” Barrientos added. “There are resources always available and good people who are always willing to help.” For young professionals in Bakersfield, Barrientos had one piece of advice: Care for your job and everything that’s a part of it, care how you do it and care how others see you do it. But also care about your wellbeing. It’s important to live your life.

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RAJI BRAR • 39, Chief Operations Officer at Countryside Market & Restaurants • Community involvement: Director of the Bakersfield Sikh Women’s Association, a director of the Kern County Fair Board

Raji Brar is a true example of someone living the American Dream. Born to immigrant parents who started off as farm workers in the Central Valley, she is now a successful businesswoman. Brar has owned and operated different franchises throughout Kern County for the past 25 years. These include, Subways, Taco Bells, Pizza Huts, Brookside Deli and Shell gas stations. All together, there are more than 250 Kern County residents employed. “Being able to own different businesses in the community I call home is a blessing,” Brar said. Brar said her worth ethic comes from watching her dad become a successful businessman himself, after coming to the U.S. with only a few dollars in his pockets. As busy as one can get from running different businesses, Brar still finds the time to sit on numerous private and community boards and is actively involved in giving back. In 2015, she was appointed by Gov. Jerry Brown as a director of the Kern County Fair Board, a first for anyone of Indian descent. “My appointment not only meant a lot to me but also to the entire Indian community,” she said. “To be a part of the Kern County Fair Board is a privilege and the best part of all, my boys finally think mommy has a cool job.” Recently, she co-founded the Bakersfield Sikh Women’s Foundation, a first for the city. The mission of the foundation is to give back to the community and is comprised of women who are teachers, lawyers, doctors, nurses, therapists, business owners and politicians who help newly arrived parents from India cope with the American way of life. The foundation will soon establish a mentoring program at local high schools so that Indian children, especially young girls, have role models to help them succeed in life. 66

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DON BYNUM • 35, Vice President of Gregory D. Bynum & Associates • Community involvement: President of Temblor Brewery, CSUB Roadrunner Scholarship Fund, CAPK, co-owner of The Gentleman

As a former student-athlete at UC Davis, Don Bynum knows exactly how the experience molds athletes into future leaders. Bynum has been involved with the Cal State Bakersfield Roadrunner Scholarship Fund for more than 10 years. Last year, his group raised $550,000 for Division I scholarships. “Many of the talented athletes who receive scholarships here at CSUB could not otherwise afford to attend a university of this quality,” Bynum said. When he’s not busy coming up with different fundraisers for CSUB or working in the family business, he is focused on another passion: beer. Since 2010, Bynum has been a student of beer. He has traveled across the U.S. and Europe visiting hundreds of breweries and beer bars for inspiration. “I became a home brewer and learned the science with lots of reading and experimentation and some course work,” he said. In 2011, Patrick Wade, Thomas Maxwell, Coby Vance and Bynum founded The Gentleman, a private membership-only club that focuses on foreign and domestic craft beer. “We wanted to bring something to Bakersfield that didn’t already exist,” he said. And that same motto was the push for Temblor, a new brewery that is slated to open in September. “We were very fortunate to be able to gather an incredible group of team members and investors to begin this exciting new brewery in town,” Bynum added.

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TAMI CALDERWOOD • 38, Owner of Apricot Lane Boutique • Community involvement: Donates 20 percent of proceeds earned from flier events or shopping parties to local nonprofits, schools, clubs and religious organizations

Tami Calderwood believes in the power of self-will and is constantly encouraging others struggling with life’s hurdles to never give up. The local businesswoman was born and raised in Bakersfield and runs a successful clothing store at The Marketplace: Apricot Lane Boutique. “Opening a business in the town that I grew up in, I naturally started with a strong support group,” Calderwood said. “Friends and family are like my own live Twitter feed.” Before the start of her business, Calderwood knew she wanted to have flexible hours to be involved with her two daughters’ extracurricular activities. And the only way to do that was to be her own boss. As she interacts with staff and customers on a daily basis, Calderwood said she hopes her outlook and attitude on life sets a good example for those she encounters. “I hope that being vulnerable and sharing some hard topics allows others to see that hard work, dedication and doing the right thing, even when it’s the last thing you want to do, always pays off,” she said. When she’s not at one of her daughters’ schools helping out as a volunteer, Calderwood is coming up with new fundraisers to raise money for local charities. She has donated private shopping events at the boutique to be auctioned off for Stockdale Christian School, Junior League and First Presbyterian Church Camp scholarship fundraiser, among others. “It’s an honor knowing that organizations seek out Apricot Lane to help with their fundraising needs,” she said. “My business survives with the support of the entire city of Bakersfield and that requires me to get out into the community in addition to just opening my door at The Marketplace.”

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JUSTIN L. CAVE • 36, Executive Director for the Center for the Blind & Visually Impaired and Advanced Center for Eyecare • Community involvement: Provides free glasses and exams to visually impaired children in Kern County

Justin L. Cave is the force behind two nonprofit organizations that focus on serving the blind, visually impaired and medical eye needs of Kern County. The Advanced Center for Eyecare (ACE) and the Center for the Blind & Visually Impaired (CBVI) complement each other and share common values and goals. “Providing the gift of eyesight, in my opinion, is one of the greatest gifts a child or any individual can ever receive because it allows us to see the beauty of this world,” Cave said. ACE spearheads a yearly vision clinic through a partnership with OneSight International to provide children with free eye exams and free glasses. To date, 1,760 children and counting have received these vital services, increasing their ability to do classroom work and manage school assignments, Cave said. Through CBVI, people are provided the necessary training in assistive technology, Braille and using a white cane to increase independent living skills. One of the highlights of his job, Cave explained, is sharing stories about individuals he is blessed to help each day. “With the generous help of our community and volunteer partners, ACE funded a prosthetic eye for a 12year-old girl,” he said. “We gave her back the confidence she deserves.”

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VIN T. DANG • 33, Primary Care Optometrist with Empire Eye and Laser Center • Community involvement: OneSight missions, provides internships for students at Western University of Health Sciences, Allergy and Dry Eye Clinic

Our eyes are the most crucial sensory organ. They are the window to the world. With just a glance, we instantly register and interpret shapes, colors, sizes and textures. And they are also a little more. “By looking at or into your eyes, I can diagnose systemic health issues like high blood pressure or diabetes, as well as early risk factors for multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s and dementia, among nearly 200 other diseases that are present in the eyes,” said Vin T. Dang. As a primary care optometrist, Dang provides patients with solutions and not one day is the same. He also takes the time every year to volunteer his time and expertise and give free eye exams to children in Bakersfield and others in developing countries like India and Thailand. “I love what I do,” he said. “I don’t feel like what I do is a ‘job;’ instead, I get to be a problem solver.” Dang has also been the driving force behind Empire Eye and Laser Center’s Allergy and Dry Eye Clinic, helping provide detection, treatment and prevention for eye allergy sufferers in Kern County. From the day he began practicing in Bakersfield nearly eight years ago, Dang said he was amazed by the number of patients with symptoms of red, watery and itchy eyes. It was so common that the staff began to give it the title of “Bakersfield Eye Syndrome.” “With my allergic clinic, I am able to minimize or eliminate your exposure to the allergens you are allergic to and develop a customized treatment plan to fight the allergies affecting your eyes,” Dang said.

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JOSE GARZA • 36, Counselor with the Kern High School District • Community involvement: Hector Ibarra Jr. Memorial Scholarship Fund, Bakersfield Ivy League Project, College Dream Fund Board, Kern High School Counselors’ Association, Relay for Life

Jose Garza remembers growing up in east Bakersfield in a neighborhood where no one had ever gone to college nor was that the norm. “People looked out of windows dreaming of what could have been,” Garza said. “I knew that by setting my sights to Berkeley and later Harvard, that I could help break those windows for my family, my brothers and my community.” As a counselor at Foothill High School, Garza goes the extra mile for students because he can relate to the stories they share with him. In 2010, Garza started the Hector Ibarra Jr. Memorial Scholarship in memory of a Mira Monte High School student who died a month after being diagnosed with a rare liver cancer at the age of 14. Since then, $16,000 has been awarded in scholarships — each recipient receives a $1,000 scholarship — thanks to community donations and an anonymous donor. Next year, the scholarship will be made available to the entire community instead of just Mira Monte students. When it came to finding ways to inspire students to pursue a college education, Garza and a colleague brought the Ivy League Project to Bakersfield a few years back. Last year, 25 Kern County students traveled to the East Coast to visit Ivy League schools. “These students returned from this experience with a strengthened sense of possibility and a renewed hope for their futures,” Garza said. Although he doesn’t know what the future holds, the high school counselor is hopeful for those who have gone away to become professionals. “Those of us who leave have a responsibility to the places and people who built us,” he said. “I took my books, my pencils and my dreams to the universities I attended so that I could come back and help the children of this community see beyond the windows in their lives.” bakersfieldlife.com

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NEIL GEHLAWAT • 27, Associate Attorney Chain | Cohn | Stiles • Community involvement: Education Committee chairman on the New Lawyers Division Board, founder of Cal Alumni Chapter Bakersfield, Mothers Against Drunk Driving

When the time came for Neil Gehlawat to decide what career he was going to pursue, his inspiration was at home. Growing up, he saw the difference his dad made and continues to make in the lives of his patients as a pediatrician in Delano. “He inspired me to pursue a career in a field where I could make a positive impact on people’s lives,” Gehlawat said. During his time in college, Gehlawat was involved in an organization that provided free representation to students who had disputes with the university. It was then that he knew he wanted to study law. “I went to law school because I wanted to help real people, and I’m happy to say that I’m at a place where I’m doing that every day,” he noted. The same inspiration he grew up with is one that Gehlawat now conveys to North High School students as part of a mentorship program. He mentors one student throughout the year and is able to provide advice and guidance for the unique needs of that one student. But as Gehlawat puts it, you can accomplish more with showing than telling. “I’ve brought my students downtown to my office so that they can see what I do, so that they can see the courthouse,” he said. “It’s much more powerful to bring them downtown and show them what I do, and let them visualize their future.”

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JACQUELYN KITCHEN • 31, Planning Director for the City of Bakersfield • Community involvement: Motivational speaker at schools and youth groups, one-on-one counseling with students bound for college

Jacquelyn Kitchen has one focus: Create development in Bakersfield that is sustainable, enduring and facilitating the big picture of a community that is modern and an enjoyable place to be. The Bakersfield native and recently selected planning director for the city of Bakersfield works with out-of-town developers who want to bring the next big thing to Bakersfield. She also meets with locals business owners who want to expand their business. Kitchen was pleased to learn that Bloomberg Business recently ranked Bakersfield as the No. 2 fastest-growing city for millennials, ages 20 to 34. “I want to work toward making our city appealing for more reasons than just affordability,” she said. “One of my goals is to build upon this and truly brand Bakersfield as the top destination for young families to lay down roots, for baby boomers to retire and for everyone in between.” When she was elected as one of the youngest planning directors in the state in 2014, Kitchen said she was humbled to be selected among a nationwide recruitment. “I think in the end, my passion for the city of Bakersfield shined through and I am so excited to be in a position where I can help to really make a difference in our community,” she said.

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ANDREA L. MEDINA • 37, Cal State Bakersfield Director of Grants and Outreach for the School of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Engineering • Community involvement: Vice chair of the Housing and Opportunity Foundation of Kern, treasurer for the California Maternal Mental Health Collaborative, wrote legislation passed into law

Andrea L. Medina is not one to back away from a challenge. On any given day, she can be juggling up to 15 grants that will benefit STEM teachers and students at Cal State Bakersfield if approved. As much as she enjoys writing grant proposals for special projects, she said the outreach portion of her job is her favorite. Medina organizes STEM-related events designed to inspire kids to pursue careers in math and science. “It always warms my heart when a past participant comes by to tell me they decided to follow math or science as a career because of a particular program they were a part of,” Medina said. When she’s not at CSUB, Medina keeps busy serving as a board member on local committees like the Housing and Opportunity Foundation of Kern or the Junior League of Bakersfield. “I care very deeply about the people around me and the community we live in,” she said. “I’ve been a habitual volunteer for as long as I can remember and I honestly feel that we can make a difference when we stick together.”

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NICK ORTIZ • 33, Greater Bakersfield Chamber of Commerce CEO • Community involvement: Board member of the Bakersfield Homeless Center and past board member of the Kern County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

When Nick Ortiz got the call in March that he had been selected as the new president and CEO of the Greater Bakersfield Chamber of Commerce, he was honored and humbled. “I really owe a great deal of my success to this organization,” Ortiz said. “As a chamber staff member from 2007 to 2010, I was able to raise my profile and as a volunteer; I’ve had amazing opportunities.” His focus on improving the business climate and quality of life in Bakersfield has led him to connect with statewide leaders like Gov. Jerry Brown, attorney General Kamala Harris, among others. Through the chamber’s different social events, local business owners have an opportunity to network and share ideas that will ultimately benefit Bakersfield. “I truly believe that when you harness the power of the business community, you can accomplish great things,” he said. He thanks the chamber volunteers and talented staff that make everything possible. “I have the privilege of leading this incredible group of professionals in promoting our community, providing tools for business owners, and advocating for a healthy economy and business environment,” Ortiz said.

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TIMOTHY M. OSBORN • 35, Law Office of Timothy M. Osborn — Owner/Personal Injury Attorney • Community involvement: JJ’s Legacy board of directors, CSUB Foundation, St. Baldrick’s Pediatric Cancer Foundation, Active 20-30 Club of Bakersfield, The Kern County Bar Association

Timothy M. Osborn is a fourth-generation local whose ancestors’ names are etched in Bakersfield history. He is the great, great nephew of Marion Osborn Cunningham, whose family established the first Bakersfield Museum of Art – known as the Cunningham Memorial Art Gallery in her honor. But he has made a name for himself in the legal community as a solo practitioner. At the age of 28, he opened his own practice, just shy of completing his third year as a lawyer. He had one client and no staff. “I remember having an endless number of concerns but the main one was whether I would be able to generate enough business to survive,” Osborn said. To date, Osborn is the only attorney in the office and clients deal with him directly. There isn’t a single document that goes through without Osborn looking at it and making a decision on every case. This past year, Osborn was named a Rising Star by the Southern California Super Lawyers – a prestigious rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. “Of course, I probably would not be allowed back in the office if I didn’t mention my secretaries, Tiffany Gomez and Perla Lizarraga,” he said. For those thinking about taking a leap of faith, Osborn says charge forward. “Don’t be afraid to take some calculated risks once in a while. If it doesn’t work out, at least you had the courage to give it a try, which is more than a lot of people can say,” he said. 76

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MITCHALL PATEL • 27, Outreach and Public Relations Coordinator for Community Action Partnership of Kern, WIC • Community involvement: Founder of Bakersfield Young Democrats, director on the board of Children First, vice chair of the Kern County Democratic Central Committee

It’s a known fact that promoting healthy eating among families is the best way to combat obesity. Mitchall Patel is doing just that. As an overseer of the WIC programs through the Community Action Partnership of Kern, Patel has direct contact with communities that need nutrition resources to fight childhood obesity. “Through my job I’m able to fight childhood obesity and provide families with the basics for them and our communities to grow healthy,” Patel said. Besides his involvement with CAPK, Patel has a passion for politics. In 2011 he founded the Bakersfield Young Democrats after the 2010 election. “I wanted to develop an organization to add to the dialogue in local politics and provide a resource to other young Democrats to get involved and help them add their voice to the conversation,” he said. There are currently about 216 members.

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GLEN PIERCE • 40, Owner of Code 3 Uniforms, B&B Graphics and Gotta Go Bail Bonds • Community involvement: Kern County Sheriff’s Activities League, Bakersfield Police Activities League, homeless fundraiser events, donates uniforms to schools

Sometimes you don’t have to move away from your hometown to open successful businesses. For Glen Pierce, staying local was the only option he saw 11 years ago. He is the owner of Gotta Go Bail Bonds, Code 3 Uniforms and B&B Graphics. “It’s all about giving my kids as well as others a great inspiration, seeing that you don’t have to leave the place you grew up in,” Pierce said. “It’s all about determination and hard work and I couldn’t think of doing this any other way.” The local businessman grew up in Bakersfield and said he witnessed many families who had their lives torn apart by drug abuse or gang involvement. “I believe it is my duty to do what I can to help our community, and I have focused my efforts on prevention programs for children at risk of getting involved with drugs or gangs,” Pierce said. Pierce has donated more than $100,000 to local charities, including countless donations of uniforms to help dress kids. “I am proud to be able to improve the quality of life for children in Bakersfield and Kern County, and I intend to keep doing so my entire life,” he said.

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KATIE SALCIDO • 35, Dean of Students at the Regional Occupational Center and Bakersfield Adult School for the Kern High School District • Community involvement: Jim Burke Education Foundation – Ford Dimensions and Dream Builders

Education is important but the most important aspect of education comes in participating in educational activities outside of the regular classroom. That is Katie Salcido’s motto and why she splits her time between the Jim Burke Foundation and the Regional Occupational Center. “There are so many programs that develop children in multiple ways and it’s important to realize that it takes more than just class work to develop a more successful young adult,” Salcido said. During their year in Ford Dimension and Dream Builders, students are charged with the task of creating, developing and implementing a significant community service project. They also get to experience real life scenarios – something they wouldn’t get in a classroom. “Watching how they develop throughout their senior year and begin to truly understand the importance of service over self reminds me how important it is to continue to positively impact your community,” she said. With ROC, Salcido said she has learned more from her students than she would have ever imagined. Salcido now has welding, automotive and animal care skills. “I have been able to see roughly 600 seniors each year graduate from high school more well-rounded and ready for life than the rest of their peers by experiencing the junior college atmosphere at ROC,” Salcido said.

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RAINEE SEIBERT • 23, Founder and CEO of The Nanny Network • Community Involvement: Relay for Life, American Kids Sports Center’s Safer Kids

Rainee Seibert became a CEO at the age of 22. Although it’s still surreal that she owns her own business, The Nanny Network, Seibert couldn’t imagine doing anything else in life. “I’ve been working with children for more than 10 years and as a nanny, I constantly had people asking me if I was taking on new clients,” she said. When she realized she had people on a waiting list, she knew it was time to bring in more nannies. She brought in a few of her friends to fill in spots that she couldn’t take care of and it was then that she knew she had to open her own nanny service. Seibert is currently a nanny for three families. As a part-time “parent,” she has to deal with decisions, attitudes and stress on bad days. But she also deals with the good days. “The kisses, the first steps and first words at the end of the day make it all worth it,” she said. Although Seibert doesn’t know what the future holds, she knows the key is to keep moving forward. “We’re moving forward and sometimes we need to readjust, re-strategize and recoup but our goals and our dreams are BIG,” Seibert said.

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KEVIN TRUELSON • 34, Kaiser Permanente Project Manager III • Community involvement: Sports coach for youth, Special Olympics World Games, Comprehensive Wellness Program

For Kevin Truelson, sports are the ultimate equalizer. He is the man behind the group of athletes who will be competing in the upcoming Special Olympics World Summer Games in Los Angeles, July 25 to Aug. 2. “Sports is a great teacher of many things but most importantly it helps build discipline, determination and work ethic,” Truelson said. With support from Kaiser Permanente physicians, the local team has raised $10,000 to help support the trip. Bakersfield was also selected as a World Games Host Town. Special Olympic athletes and coaches from Jordan and Kenya will spend time in Bakersfield in July prior to the event. “The Special Olympics, in general, strives to create a better world by fostering the acceptance and inclusion of all people, and through sports, people with intellectual disabilities discover new strengths and abilities, skills and success,” he said. As an athlete himself, Truelson knows the importance of having coaches who ultimately become mentors. Truelson went to the University of New Hampshire on a full athletic scholarship. He thanks his parents, coaches and sports for the man he is today. “Hockey taught me discipline, determination, persistence and confidence,” he said. “But most importantly, it taught me to become a leader, sacrifice for an ultimate goal and be a team player – all skills that are transferable to the working world.” Truelson played three seasons with the Bakersfield Condors and is the team’s all-time leading scorer among defensemen, recording 148 points in 204 games. He notes that the Bakersfield community is one that gives generously and appreciates those who work through adversity. “Our Special Olympic athletes strive to be their best, defying the odds again and again, showcasing the triumphs of people with intellectual disabilities,” Truelson said.

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JULIA K. VLAHOS • 30, Attorney at Klein DeNatale Goldner Cooper Rosenlieb & Kimball LLP • Community involvement: Pro bono work for local nonprofit organizations

Born in East Berlin, Germany, prior to the wall falling, Julia K. Vlahos now calls Bakersfield home. The Highland High School graduate attended Cal State Bakersfield and then journeyed out of town for three years to McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento. “The transition was tough because my husband remained in Bakersfield for three years working while I stayed in Sacramento,” Vlahos said. Although leaving to law school was tough, she managed to excel academically. Vlahos was a staff writer for the McGeorge Law Review – an honor given only to the top students. She was also a member of the honors mock trial team and graduated with honors in the top of her class. Her husband, Athanasios, applauds her dedication and courage, especially when he became very ill and had to undergo two brain surgeries shortly after his wife graduated from law school. “Even with all that was going on in her personal life, my wife immediately passed the toughest bar exam in the country,” Athanasios said. Today, Julia practices personal injury law and has taken on pro bono work for local nonprofit organizations. “It is such a wonderful learning experience, and I relish the opportunity to work with some of the greatest legal minds in our community,” she said. “I get to do work that I love for organizations I am passionate about with people who are incredible at their jobs and successful in their careers.”

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PATRICK WADE • 35, Owner of Precision Pharmacy • Community involvement: Founder of Kern Citizens for Sustainable Government, Bakersfield City Planning Commission, co-owner of The Gentleman, past tutor for the GED program at the Bakersfield Homeless Center, board of directors for the Roadrunner Scholarship Fund, Advisory Board member of Grimm Academy, Bakersfield College Helmet Club board member

At the early age of 26, Patrick Wade had one goal in mind: find an opportunity to become an entrepreneur. “Starting my own company was a calculated risk and I was determined to do whatever it took to make a success out of it,” Wade said. Precision Pharmacy has now grown into the largest compounder of large animal pharmaceuticals in the nation. Wade currently employs about 60 people in wide ranging industries, such as making complicated sterile pharmaceuticals for multi-million dollar race horses, running a hotel he recently purchased in Ireland, co-producing a movie currently being filmed by Warner Bros. and several others. As the co-owner of The Gentleman – a social club downtown – Wade has raised nearly $20,000 annually since 2012 to give away to local nonprofits. “I’m fifth-generation Bakersfield and I truly feel like a product of the unique culture here,” Wade said. “Not only is giving back to the community a good thing from a human perspective, but I also feel that I owe a debt to the community that helped shape who I am today.”

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A guide for hot summer days and nights bakersfieldlife.com

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PHOTO BY MICHAEL LOPEZ

EUREKA BURGER

SURPRISING INGREDIENTS

Serve ice cold.

At the Padre Hotel,

the bartender who is mixing with Corbin sweet potato vodka is Zachary Heidrich. The following orange creamsicle and fruity pebble-tini recipes are from Heidrich.

Watermelon Mojito

FRUITY PEBBLE-TINI

If you think bartenders have it easy, think again. By Anna C. Smith

A

flirty smile and heavy hand aren’t all that is required to keep customers coming back. Creative genius is what’s setting the bar for bars nowadays and everyone is stepping up their game. Local bartenders are no exception. Homemade ingredients and unique concoctions are popping up in restaurants and bars all over Bakersfield. The bar at Eureka is known for an inventive cocktail menu filled with drinks containing house-made, fresh ingredients. Popular at Eureka is the signature whiskey sour, made with one hard-to-find ingredient – real egg whites. Real eggs create the best foam and fizz for the drink, explains manager Alex Teran. Also commonly requested is Eureka’s Moscow mule made with house-made ginger-lime syrup, instead of ginger beer, and served in a crisp copper mug. Every week, a bartender or manager at Eureka concocts a unique “fresh market” cocktail, made with seasonal produce. It has become quite a competition among the staff to see who can invent the best beverage. Weekly cocktail specials are only around for a few days each. However, Eureka patrons are invited to order past weeks’ fresh market cocktail favorites, and bartenders will try their best to accommodate. Upcoming options will include the cheekily titled “Kentucky breakfast,” a comforting summer cocktail made with velvety apricot jam. Cocktail connoisseurs can also look forward to a refreshing watermelon mojito, created with seasonally fresh pureed watermelon. If you would like to try your hand at making a Eureka-inspired summer cocktail, follow the recipe below.

WATERMELON MOJITO Ingredients: • 30 large fresh mint leaves, coarsely torn by hand • 3 to 4 thick slices fresh watermelon with the rind and seeds discarded, pureed in a food processor fitted with the steel blade • 12 ounces light rum, such as Bacardi • ½ cup simple syrup • 6 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice (3 limes) • sprigs of mint and spears of watermelon for serving

Use a mortar and pestle to mash the mint leaves. Put the mashed mint into a large pitcher with two cups of pureed watermelon, the rum, simple syrup, and lime juice and stir to combine. Pour the mixture into a pitcher for serving. Place ice cubes in six glasses and pour the mojito mixture into the glasses. Garnish with sprigs of fresh mint and spears of watermelon.

Bakersfield Life Magazine

Directions: Add all ingredients to tin shaker except the Sprite and Blue Curacao. Shake and strain this mixture into a martini glass and add a splash of Sprite. Sugar the rim of the glass. Sink the final quarter ounce of Blue Curacao into the drink. BARTENDER QUOTE

Heidrick on the fruity pebble-tini: "This cocktail is fruity and colorful. The Sprite adds a bit of bubble to the drink and keeps you wanting more."

ORANGE CREAMSICLE Ingredients: • • • • • •

1 3⁄4 ounces Corbin sweet potato vodka 1 ounce orange juice 1 bar spoon of vanilla 1 1⁄2 ounces simple syrup 2 count of whipped cream splash of sparkling water

Directions: Add all ingredients except sparkling water to tin shaker. Shake and strain into a martini glass. Add splash of sparkling water. BARTENDER QUOTE

Directions:

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Ingredients: • 2 ounces Corbin sweet potato vodka • 1⁄2 ounce Amaretto Disaronno • 1⁄2 ounce Chambord • splash of pineapple • splash of sweet and sour • splash of Sprite • 1 lemon (squeezed and dropped into tin) • 1⁄4 ounce Blue Curacao

July 2015

Heidrich said: “The orange creamsicle cocktail is a perfect comparison to any orange cream soda that we have all had. It isn’t too thick or thin but leaves hints of vanilla and orange on the breath.”


PHOTO BY MICHAEL LOPEZ

Over at the Lone Oak Lounge, Janice Medford has been tending bar for 13 years. She mixes up a “Nolet’s Passion” cocktail with unusual trimmings like pomegranate rimming sugar and edible flower garnish. To make this passion-infused cocktail yourself, follow the recipe below. Medford said of her creation: “It is a very refreshing, innovative-flavored and low-calorie cocktail that can be appealing to both men and women.”

LONE OAK LOUNGE Nolet’s Passion

THE PADRE HOTEL

For brunch,

adventurous cocktail sippers should head to 24th Street Cafe to try its signature bloody mary made with locally crafted Bowen’s whiskey instead of the traditional vodka. If you’re still craving vodka, you may want to try the newest trend in this eastern European liquor, which some say dates back to the 11th century. Inventive mixologists are integrating a new vodka into cocktails that is distilled from an unusual source – California sweet potatoes. To try a drink with this surprising ingredient, one should visit Cafe Med, Bakersfield Country Club, Sandrini’s, The Petroleum Club or the VIP Lounge.

PHOTO BY MICHAEL LOPEZ

Fruity Pebble-tini and Orange Creamsicle cocktails

NOLET’S PASSION Ingredients: • 1 ounce Nolet’s Silver gin • ½ teaspoon agave sweetener • Tazo passion iced tea • pomegranate rimming sugar • ice

Directions: Chill Nolet’s Silver in a mixing glass. Pour the chilled liquor into large cocktail glass rimmed with pomegranate sugar. Add agave sweetener, passion iced tea and ice to fill the glass. Garnish with an edible flower.

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CHEERS!

LOCAL COCKTAILS

Pump up your summer with this new wave of local cocktails

Compiled by Bakersfield Life / Photos by Mark Nessia

WIKI’S WINE DIVE & GRILL 11350 MING AVE.

Paulie’s Bacon Bloody Mary Stoli Vodka, bloody mary mix, bacon, pickled jalapeno, olives, onion, celery, lemon and lime Price: $11

French Kiss Martini Stoli Raspberry Vodka, vanilla vodka, Chambord, pineapple juice, strawberry puree Price: $14

Jalapeno Cucumber Margarita Cucumber, jalapeno, Sauza tequila, triple sec, lime juice Price: $10

THE PADRE HOTEL 1702 18TH ST. BARTENDER QUOTE

The Sazerac Sazerac Rye, Pernod Absinthe, dash of bitters Price: $11

“These are cool, refreshing drinks that are perfect for hot summer Bakersfield days,” night bartender Paulie Lupercio said.

CHEF’S CHOICE NOODLE BAR 1534 19TH ST.

Tom Yum

Hangar 1 Vodka, Malibu rum, lime juice, sugar, jalapeno, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaf, rambutan fruit Price: $11

“Heid” The Sour

Cool Cucumber Martini

Bulleit Rye, lemon and lime juice, egg white Price: $11

Lemon juice, cucumber, cilantro, sugar, Tito’s Vodka Price: $9

MANAGER QUOTE

MANAGER QUOTE

“You can’t beat the fresh ingredients in these drinks,” General Manager Nick Panicim said. “You can make the cool cucumber martini at home and just relax.”

“Both of these drinks have been on the menu for less than a month, and we wanted to provide our customers with old-school summer drinks,” Food and Beverage Manager Nick Serda said. 88

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IMBIBE WINE AND SPIRITS MERCHANT 4140 TRUXTUN AVE.

aperol Spritz 3 parts of Prosecco, 2 parts of Aperol, 1 splash of soda (Purchase ingredients at Imbibe)

VALENTIEN RESTAURANT WINE AND BAR 3310 TRUXTUN AVE.

OWNER QUOTE

“I’ve made this spritz at family gatherings, and it’s always a hit, especially in the summer,” owner David Dobbs said.

Champagne Cocktail with Blueberry Mint Sorbet Champagne or French sparkling wine, housemade mint and blueberry sorbet, frozen blueberries, garnish with mint leaves and blueberries Price: $10

CO-OWNER QUOTE

“There are three different stages of blueberry — the sorbet, frozen and room temperature — and it all creates the perfect sparking chain reaction that is great for summers in Bakersfield,” co-owner Jeramy Brown said.

KC STEAKHOUSE

loCal COCKTAILS

2515 F ST.

lavender lemon Drop Vodka, lavender simple syrup, lemon juice, rimmed with sugar Price: $9.50

Hibiscus Sangria Rosenblum wine, lemon juice, orange, peach, brandy, Sprite, orange juice, triple sec Price: $8

BARTENDER QUOTE

“Our spring-summer menu includes fruity and refreshing drinks that complement the season,” bartender Mary Crane said.

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WHAT’S ON TAP

SIP ON THIS UNloCKINg THe BeST BeeR SPoTS IN BaKeRSFIelD aND BeYoND

Compiled by Bakersfield Life / Photos by Mark Nessia

HONEY WAGON BREWERY

wHaT’S ON TAP

365 ENTERPRISE WAY TEHACHAPI HONEYWAGONBREWING.COM WHAT’S ON TAP:

Ruthless Red ale This caramel, toffee beer is on the lighter side and makes for a perfect beer.

No. 2 Brown ale

It’s a coffee and chocolate flavor that will keep you coming back for more.

IMBIBE WINE AND SPIRITS MERCHANT 4140 TRUXTUN AVE. IMBIBEWINE.COM FEATURED BEER:

Just outstanding IPa The name says it all. This pale ale has a large malt character and a huge hop profile.

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LENGTHWISE BREWING COMPANY

wHaT’S

6720 SCHIRRA COURT 2900 CALLOWAY DRIVE 9000 MING AVE. LENGTHWISE.COM

ON TAP

WHAT’S ON TAP:

Zeus Imperial ale Aromas are balanced and the hops are earthy and citrusy. It has a low bitterness and is one of the best sellers.

Cyber Beer Bully ale Double IPA with just enough hop bitterness to balance the massive dry hop additions of Amarillo and Citra hops. Notes of stone and tropical fruits will overtake your taste buds.

THE PADRE HOTEL 1702 18TH ST. THEPADREHOTEL.COM FEATURED BEER:

great white

Perfect summertime beer. Crisp with light hops. WHAT’S ON TAP:

grapefruit Sculpin IPa Latest signature IPA. It showcases bright flavors and aromas of apricot, peach, mango and lemon. The lighter body also brings out the crispness of the hops.

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ROAD TRIP BEERS

TAKE A DRIvE

and head to these nearby breweries this summer!

PHOTO BY CASEY CHRISITE

Compiled by Bakersfield Life

Brandon Armstrong tends the bar area of the Kern River Brewing Company in Kernville.

KERN RIVER BREWING 13415 SIERRA HIGHWAY KERNVILLE 53 MILES KERNRIVERBREWING.COM 760-376-2337

WOLF CREEK RESTAURANT AND BREWERY 27746 MCBEAN PARKWAY VALENCIA 79.2 MILES WOLFCREEKBREWINGCO.COM 661-263-9653

WHAT’S ON TAP:

WHAT’S ON TAP:

Isabella Blonde

This has an easy malt body and a mild hop aroma produced by traditional English hops. It’s an easy drinking beer for hot summer days.

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PAC CITY BREWERY 12780 PIERCE ST., #5 PACOIMA 94 MILES PACCITYBREWERY.COM 213-219-1921

WHAT’S ON TAP:

Howlin’ Hefeweizen

This Bavarian-style wheat beer with flavors of banana, clove and apricot is a multi-award winning beer at the California State Fair and the LA County Fair. Recently took the “Best in Show” award at the California Beer Festival in Ventura.

July 2015

Ml1871 Mexican ale

This Mexican brew flavored with smoked Anaheim peppers, a hint of pineapple, makes the perfect fizzy refreshment for hot days.


INDIAN WELLS BREWING COMPANY 2565 CA-14 INYOKERN 102 MILES MOJAVERED.COM 760-377-5989 WHAT’S ON TAP:

Raspberry ale This Mojave Gold recipe is made with fresh raspberries and extracts for a light pink-colored beer. This light beer is a fun drink and is a favorite with lady visitors.

FIRESTONE WALKER BREWING COMPANY 1400 RAMADA DRIVE PASO ROBLES 112 MILES FIRESTONEBEER.COM 805-225-5911 WHAT’S ON TAP:

Stickee Monkee

A beer formulated to sit on the sweet and malty side, making it ideal for blending. It has a full body and lust texture with barrel expression: toasted oak, coconut, leather and cigar tobacco.

BARRELHOUSE BREWING CO. 3055 LIMESTONE WAY PASO ROBLES 113 MILES BARRELHOUSEBREWING.COM 805-296-1128 WHAT’S ON TAP:

Barrelhouse IPa

The harmony of malts and hops is what makes this IPA stand out from the crowd. This unfiltered IPA is built around hops to bring the dank, mango hop goodness that only Mosaic, Simcoe and Cascade hops can deliver.

TIOGA-SEQUOIA BREWING COMPANY 745 FULTON ST. FRESNO 108 MILES TIOGASEQUOIA.COM 559-456-2337 WHAT’S ON TAP:

general Sherman IPa

This IPA is a hop lover’s delight! The perfect blend of pale and caramel malts gives General Sherman a copper color and a citrus-like aroma and flavor.

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People & Community

B A K E R S F I E L D M AT T E R S

By Lisa Kimble

A ‘NOVEL’ APPROACH TO ANIMAL CONTROL Author uses writing, friends to make a difference

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ackling Kern’s pet overpopulation isn’t exactly how romance novelist and Tehachapi resident Chelley Kitzmiller envisioned her retirement years. Nor is her latest project quite the summer beach read fans might expect from the well-known Western and Native American author. But as Kitzmiller, author of five novels, finds herself introducing her work to a new, digital audience, she is also taking a page from her latest playbook through digital publication and her labyrinth of connections. “Touched by a Furry Angel: True Stories of Rescued Pets Who Touched Our Hearts” is a collection of essays written by Tehachapi pet owners, including several by Kitzmiller, who also edited the paperback. The brainchild of New York Times bestselling author and publisher Deb Smith, who because of her longstanding friendship with Kitzmiller, volunteered her time and expertise to create the heartwarming book, the recollections celebrate the special bond between pets and their owners. All the proceeds go to Have a Heart Humane Society, the Tehachapi nonprofit Kitzmiller started in 2010, which offers low-cost spay/neuter programs with a secondary focus on rescue and adoption. There is nothing romantic about Kern’s animal control problem. But Kitzmiller, a lifelong animal lover who casts them 96

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in her books, now recognizes that leading the effort to make a dent in Tehachapi’s pet problem may well be her finest work. “I just want to get Tehachapi under control and be the first ‘no-kill’ community in Kern County,” she said. “There’s a point in time you just know this is what you are meant to do.” In the 1980s when she organized the Orange County chapter of Romance Writers of America, before relocating to Tehachapi with husband Ted, writing romance novels was what Kitzmiller aspired to do. She’d read “Sweet Savage Love” by Rosemary Rogers on a family camping trip and was instantly smitten with the genre. Kitzmiller failed high school history, but it is now the framework for her novels. She sold her first novel in 1986, and a year later, was the centerpiece of a 1987 documentary by George Paul Csicsery. “Where the Heart Roams” explored the women who consume the books, and the women, like Kitzmiller, who write and edit them. It was Oscar winner and Tehachapi resident and friend Jack Palance’s character in the film “Arrowhead” who inspired Kitzmiller to focus on Native American and Western historical writing. In the 1990s came “Heartbreak Ranch,” a collaboration with bestselling author and romance queen Fern Michaels and two other novelists, loosely based on time immersed at the Rankin Ranch. In all, Kitzmiller has written nine books with Michaels, who resides in South Carolina, and who, like Kitzmiller, is an animal lover. Inspired by her friend, Michaels donated $30,000 to Have a Heart, and has financially supported Wings of Rescue. Kitzmiller’s advocacy of spay/neuter programs began to get serious around 2000. “People would dump pets in the parking lot of our Radio Shack store,” she recalled. Today the store remains the hub of Have a Heart’s rescue efforts. Thanks to a $14,000 grant from The Bakersfield Californian Foundation, soon Have a Heart will have a 16-foot cargo trailer with windows, like a concession stand, where adoptive families can view rescues. “We are going to make a difference in our community,” Kitzmiller said. Have a Heart promises to do so “one paw at a time.” “I could do a lot more if I had more energy, stamina and staff,” the 68-year-old Kitzmiller said. “But I’m happy to be able to use what I know in writing and my friends to make a difference.” To get your paws on “Touched by a Furry Angel,” visit ebooks.com or amazon.com. For more information on Have a Heart Humane Society, go to haveahearthumanesociety.org. Lisa Kimble


FA M I LY V E R D I C T

By Katy Raytis

LESSONS FROM THE LEMONADE STAND Just add vodka

I

f you think kids do all their learning in the classroom, think again. We have a whole list of valuable life lessons gleaned at none other than the front-yard lemonade stand during the dog days of summer. 1. If life gives you a snow cone machine and a broken extension cord, make lemonade. About eight minutes after setting up our snow cone stand, we discovered that the extra-long extension cord didn’t work. Melted snow cones didn’t sound like they would sell very well, so we regrouped and opted for a lemonade stand instead. 2. People in Bakersfield will buy anything if it comes with an ice cube. When its 102 outside, cold sells. In fact, people in Bakersfield will buy just about anything if it comes with an ice cube. When we ran out of lemonade, we sold water with lemon slices and sales didn’t slip in the least. Evy had the bright idea of selling rocks at our stand. Rock sales were somewhat lacking. Next time, we are going to sell rocks encased in ice. 3. Vodka improves mom’s lemonade. No explanation needed. 4. Summer rules are different. At one point, a man we didn’t know stopped to buy lemonade. The kids scampered joyfully to his window and it struck me how different the rules are in the summer. After years of instructing my kids never to talk to strangers, the mantra had suddenly changed to, “OK kids, flag down any person who happens to drive by, felon or not.” That’s the beauty of summer. The normal rules go away. Bedtime is midnight; bathtime is, “Go get in the pool;” and happy hour starts as soon as you can improve your lemonade. 5. Ditch Common Core math at the lemonade stand. Old-fashioned math works better at the lemonade stand. With old math, when someone orders three lemonades at 50 cents each, you can just tell them they owe you $1.50. That’s a lot easier than “new math,” which requires that you round the three lemonades up to five, subtract the difference using an estimated price and then write a paragraph about why the cost is reasonable. When you use Common Core at the lemonade stand, the ice melts halfway through your calculation and then the customer doesn’t want to buy it anymore. 6. Sitting on the corner can be fun. In between sales, the kids made chalk drawings on the sidewalk and did cartwheels on the lawn. It was like going back to the summertime activities of my childhood. I’m not sure when summer turned into an endless parade of volleyball camp, tennis drills, cooking class and soccer practice. Turns out all that running around is unnecessary. You can build a great day around a card table and some improved lemonade. 7. Life can be a lot like a lemonade stand. I am an attorney. I spend a lot of my time taking sour lemons and trying to make sweet lemonade. Sometimes that takes a little splash of vodka, too. 8. Tricking kids into eating raw lemons is highly entertaining. If you happen to have a child who is incredibly trusting (or not so bright), you can entertain yourself by tricking them into eating raw lemons. It’s like watching a live version of “America’s Funniest Videos” without having to listen to the annoying host.

9. Having your kids apply their own sunblock might be a bad idea. After about five hours on the corner, I realized that the kids missed a few spots when they were applying sunblock. Lily looked like she was wearing pink camouflage on the left side of her body. Evy didn’t miss spots as much as she forgot to rub the lotion in, so she ended up covered in white handprints. 10. Money isn’t everything. At the end of a full day, we grossed about $19. After the cost of the extra-long extension cord and the 15 bags of ice, we actually lost $10 on the day. However, it’s hard to put a value on an afternoon watching my sunburned kids cavort on the lawn and wince from eating lemons, all while enjoying a cold glass of improved lemonade. Actually, that might be the best $10 I have ever spent. So next time life gives you three kids and a summer day (and perhaps a pint of vodka), make lemonade. You just might learn a thing or two about how to have a better summer in your own front yard. Katy Raytis

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People & Community

PERSONALITY

SHARING IS CARING President, CEO eager to expand support for local charities By Diana Greenlee

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Kristen Barnes July 2015

PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

I

f you’ve ever doubted the proverb, “It’s better to give than to receive,” then Kristen Barnes might make you a believer. The dynamic blonde took over as president and CEO of Kern Community Foundation (KCF) in April, and she’s eager to expand opportunities for individuals to support local charities. She’s passionate about her mission. “People are allowed to donate to multiple charities (through KCF),” she said. “But we recognize something broader.” Through individual donations, KCF assists nonprofits in establishing endowments, accounts accruing interest that can be used to cover their operational expenses, so the dollars it fundraises can finance its cause or beneficiaries. Before the foundation was established 15 years ago, the president said many local nonprofits operated “paycheck to paycheck.” “The power of an endowment is that you only use the earnings,” she said. Barnes, 53, was born in Glendale; she earned a degree in accounting from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and worked for five years as a controller with California Republic Bank before moving to Bakersfield in 1983, taking a CPA position. With school-aged children, she decided to shift gears and work as an independent business consultant after two years. As her children grew, so did her desire to switch up her career, and she started teaching math in 2006 at Fruitvale Junior High and then Bakersfield High School. Three years later, with a blend of business and educational experi-


ence under her belt, she was be able to do it,” she said. named executive director with “Her enthusiasm and love for the the Grimm Family Education community make her perfect for Foundation, governing charter her job.” school Grimmway Academy. She A lifelong learner, Barnes is took on the chief financial officer pursuing a doctorate in educaand director of operations roles tional leadership through UCLA; with charter school Paramount she also spends time with her Academy after two years, moving daughter Taylor, 26, and son concurrently into the Paramount Morgan, 23. At home, she enjoys Agricultural Career Academy gourmet cooking and gardening director post for a year before with respect to water conservation. landing her current position with “My whole backyard is KCF. Barnes said charter schools summer vegetables, perennials make sense for many students. and roses,” she said. “A charter school is able to Now that she’s in the driver’s be more responsive and flexible seat at KCF, Barnes said she is to really meet looking ahead student needs,” with a focus on she said. nonprofit susAlthough tainability and Barnes is new at college access. the helm, her hisThe foundation tory with KCF has created a began in 2004, catalog of prewhen she was screened local invited by thencharities with board member information also Judi McCarthy, available online. whom she KCF also offers befriended reloadable “giv— Kristen Barnes through Junior ing cards,” in League, to be various denomipart of the nations. The Women’s and cards can be Girls’ Fund under the auspices of used like gift cards, allowing the the foundation. McCarthy, now recipient to give monetary relocated to Austin, Texas, said donations to his or her charity Barnes was the first person she of choice. thought of when they began “You don’t have to be wealthy forming their crew. to do this,” Barnes assured, “She’s an analytical and displaying the directory. strategic thinker,” she said. As part of their commitment “I knew she’d be a good brain to support education, the presito have.” dent has been gathering the Since its inception, the troops, including local educaWomen’s and Girls’ Fund has tional leaders, to create a think awarded multiple grants to tank targeting barriers to higher organizations serving female res- education. She said their goal is idents of Kern County, including to provide a seamless transition the Kern Adult Literacy Counsel, for Kern County students to obtain Garden Pathways and the CSUB grant scholarships for college. Foundation. “I look at us as being a McCarthy said Barnes’ catalyst to strengthen our expertise in philanthropy and nonprofit partners,” she said. familiarity with Kern County “If we can build a stronger made her a stand out. community, Bakersfield is a “Not just anyone is going to better place to live.”

If we can build a stronger community, Bakersfield is a better place to live.

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People & Community

H O M E TOW N H E R O

DAVID A. LEWIS World War II veteran part of Navy’s ‘finest hour’ Compiled by Bakersfield Life Photos courtesy of David A. Lewis

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t only takes one person, one moment, to change your life forever. That is how David A. Lewis describes the past 93 years of his life. “On July 7, 1944, American forces secured Saipan as the last Japanese defenses fell and my ship, the USS Fanshaw Bay, CVE 70, was there,” he said. Lewis was a 21-year-old sailor/aircraft mechanic onboard the ship that carried about 24 airplanes. On that day, it was unexpectedly attacked by a group of Japanese planes. “A Japanese plane came flying low and I dove into David A. Lewis the shack and crouched down against a metal wall and BOOM! A Japanese bomb went through the aft elevator, exploding on the hangar deck,” Lewis said. The bomb blew holes in nine torpedoes stored on the deck but thankfully they didn’t explode. “My best friend, Leonard Sorem, was killed by shrapnel from the bomb,” Lewis remembered. Sorem had been teaching Lewis how to weld. The memories of that day, written in history as the U.S. Navy’s finest hour, now live in the pages of “The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors” written by James D. Hornfischer. 100

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David A. Lewis, back row center, takes a photo with sailors in front of a Japanese bomber that never flew to the U.S.

Biggest accomplishment in the military: Our ship had more medals than any other ship for being in a battle. A service memory that you remember clearly: We would sleep on the deck of the ship to get some fresh air because it was too hot to sleep inside. It was better on the deck because you could see the stars and feel the wind.

How was your Honor Flight experience in 2012? I was the first one to sign up, and it was great. Dick Taylor (of Kern County Veterans Service Department) was my guardian and at one point on the trip he got on the wheelchair that was supposed to be for me. But I didn’t need it, so I pushed him around in the wheelchair.

What did you do as an aircraft mechanic? I had my own airplane that I was in charge of every morning. There were two ways to start it up and we relied on the wind for that extra thrust. We needed at least a 15 mph wind to get the airplane off the deck. Once the planes would go off and they would get near the end of the ship, we would cross our fingers that they would come up and fly because sometimes planes didn’t make it up. What did you do after leaving the Navy in 1945? I ended up getting a job through an employment agency as an insurance auditor. I had no bookkeeping experience when I started. But I ended up working more than 50 years in the insurance industry before retiring.

David A. Lewis at a Fourth of July neighborhood event.


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People & Community

WHY I LIVE HERE

DEBORAH HERNANDEZ Establishing roots in Bakersfield for generations to come By Zachary Esparza

O

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PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

riginally from Pasadena, California, Deborah Hernandez moved to Bakersfield in 1991 with her mother and three siblings. Being a single mother made Bakersfield a more affordable option than Southern California. By day, Deborah works as a warranty manager at Castle & Cooke, but by night, she’s “Debi Deb,” an old-school-loving deejay, cranking tunes for events, such as parties and weddings. When she needs a break, you can catch her at a Dodger game where you’ll never see her without a Dodger dog in hand. With no plans of leaving Bakersfield anytime soon, she may have another reason to continue her legacy here in Bakersfield. “My son started working with his dad for Key Energy, so he’s already starting his Bakersfield roots,” said Hernandez. What’s your favorite thing to do in Bakersfield? I would say taking advantage of River Walk that’s up the street because Castle and Cooke just opened up some new stores. It’s nice to walk and take a hike. Finish Line is there with [bike rentals] that you can take. We rode our bikes all the way to Golden State Highway one time.

Kern County.

What surprised you most about Bakersfield when you first came here? Being stuck in traffic is not being stuck in traffic; it’s just part of a daily commute. It takes seven minutes for me to get from my work to home, and that’s me complaining about how congested Bakersfield is, but it’s not. It’s an adjustment because you don’t realize how stressed you were living and how expensive it was living outside of

What are the biggest secrets of Bakersfield? Everybody is so nice, and they say hello. Everybody seems to be genuinely considerate of other peoples’ space, and it’s a caring community. The secret is also that you can afford real estate in California. If I tell people that I’m from California, they think, “Wow, that’s so expensive,” and they immediately think of living in a mansion, but Kern County is still very small and affordable.

Bakersfield Life Magazine

July 2015

Deborah Hernandez

What’s your favorite Bakersfield restaurant? I love anything Asian. One of my favorite restaurants is Love Sushi. What’s your proudest Bakersfield moment? When I bought my own house by myself. I have family my age, and they don’t live in Bakersfield. Owning their own home is something they want to eventually do, but the cost of living is much higher (in Pasadena).


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People & Community

A L L- S TA R AT H L E T E

THE RIGHT FIT Centennial standout, Rocky Mountain College a perfect match By Stephen Lynch

Photos courtesy of Lindy Smith

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or recent Centennial High graduate Savannah Smith, finding the right fit for college hinged on two things. It needed to be a school that desired Smith’s skill as a volleyball player and one that also offered a degree in therapeutic riding instruction. Fortunately for the talented outside hitter/ middle blocker, things fell into perfect place this past school year and she was offered a scholarship to play volleyball at Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Montana, a school that offers a degree in her chosen major. Smith reached out to RMC because it was one of the few schools where she could study therapeutic riding instruction. But the perfect match wasn’t made until Smith impressed the school’s volleyball coach during a practice session in October. “She was like, ‘Oh my gosh will you sign right now with me?’” Smith said. Smith, who led the Golden Hawks with 346 in blocks this past season, wants to learn to help special education and disabled kids and wounded veterans through her field of study. Part of Smith’s education process will include her earning PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) certification. “I’ve been obsessed with horses since I was a little kid,” Smith said. “In high school, seeing the special education kids around and seeing how happy they were all the time made me happy. The horse has kind of the same gait as a human so when the kids (who can’t walk) get on a horse, it’s like walking again. They love it.” Smith made Centennial fans happy with the way she played throughout her stellar prep career. As a freshman, she helped the Golden Hawks reach the Central Section Division I semifinals and earn a berth in the state playoffs. For her efforts Smith was named Centennial’s rookie of the year and was All-Area honorable mention. A year later Smith once again helped carry the Golden Hawks deep into the section playoffs and was chosen second team All-Area. She sat out her junior season due to personal reasons but came back better than ever this past year and was voted team MVP and was named first 104

Bakersfield Life Magazine

July 2015

Savannah Smith with Rocky Mountain College volleyball coach Laurie Kelly


Savannah Smith Born Aug. 11, 1997, in Bakersfield. Family includes parents Ken and Lindy and two older sisters, Ashley and Tori. Competed in swimming from ages 7-13 and made the Junior Olympics in the sport. Three-year varsity volleyball player at Centennial. Enjoys hanging out at home. Works out almost every day, mainly lifting weights. Is still growing.

team All-Area. “It wasn’t until this year that I felt like the dominant force,” Smith said. “We didn’t have height this year at all so me and another girl really had to step up and take reigns. Especially when things got bad, I knew it was all on me. It was nerve-wracking but at the same time your team is looking up to you to get it done and you have to.” Smith has only been playing volleyball competitively since seventh grade. She began playing on a club team at age 14.

At 6 feet tall, Smith is an imposing force at the net, but she considers her biggest strength as a player to be her on-court vocal leadership skills. “There’s not a lot of people as loud as I am and straightforward,” Smith said. “That’s one of the reasons the (RMC) coach asked me to play with them because they don’t have girls that tell the others when they need to get it together and stuff like that.” Smith hopes to start right away for the Battlin’ Bears.

Moving to Montana, far from Bakersfield doesn’t concern Smith. “I think everything will be fine because I already have a family there,” Smith said. “Like I have my team so I’ll have people that will help get me through.” If everything goes according to plan, in a few years it will be Smith aiding others to get through their struggles. “I really want to help special education kids and veterans who have done so much for our country,” Smith said.

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People & Community

TA L K O F T H E T O W N

THE PEOPLE’S CONDUCTOR BSO selects new conductor with community help

By Mark Nessia

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Stilian Kirov, Bakersfield Symphony Orchestra music director and conductor

Kirov not only made a connection with the audience, he made a connection with the musicians as well – one that was almost instantaneous. “He not only showed it with his hands and his conducting, but his eyes, his spirit and his heart,” said Paulette Shires, BSO principal viola. “We could feel that and the audience could as well. The pieces that he conducted had a new life. We’ve played them before, but there was a difference in the way they were conducted that put a new

spirit into it and put a new spirit in us. We needed that shot in the arm.” Shires made history as the youngest member to play in the orchestra at 16 years old. Now she’s one of the longest-tenured performers, playing with BSO for nearly 50 years. Shires has played for three conductors during her time with the orchestra – Edouard Hurlimann, Alberto Bolet and Farrer – and thinks Kirov will take them to new heights. “We’ve grown considerably and

PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

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rowth can only come from new experiences and an orchestra can only grow through something fresh and different. After 38 years with the same conductor, the Bakersfield Symphony Orchestra has found new life in Stilian Kirov, who was named the sixth music director and conductor on June 9. The 31-year-old Bulgarian native succeeds John Farrer after a two-year search that attracted 160 applicants from all over the world. He will officially assume his role on July 1. “I feel truly privileged,” said Kirov, who is the youngest conductor in the orchestra’s 83-year history. “This is never an easy decision for any committee. You like to think of your orchestra as your child and you’re choosing a parent for your kid. I see the Bakersfield Symphony as my child, as well, and together we can learn, explore and grow.” An 11-member selection committee, consisting of five musicians, four board members and two community members, narrowed the list of applicants to six finalists who were given an opportunity to conduct one concert during the 2014-2015 season. The community provided feedback after each concert that was factored into the selection process. “The community input was extremely important,” said Ira Cohen, chairman of the BSO board. “If you talked to any of the people who are not board members or musicians, he was their choice.”


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Stilian Kirov performs with the Bakersfield Symphony Orchestra during the 2014-2015 season.

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that’s what we want to do – grow and become a better group,” she said. “I think (Kirov) is the man that can take us there.” Kirov wants to build a community that revolves around music and hopes the concert hall will be a temple of music where people come for one purpose: to embrace the music, have a good time and get inspired. “I really want (the community) to think of the Bakersfield Symphony as our orchestra,” Kirov said. BSO President and CEO Bryan Burrow said Kirov’s

relationship-oriented approach will not only connect well with audiences at the concerts, it will also have an impact on the Bakersfield community outside the music hall. “He will be very involved with our community,” Burrow said. “He’s very insightful, musically talented and is going to fit well with Bakersfield.” Kirov sees Bakersfield as a community with plenty of potential and a fantastic base for growth. “We needed that final piece in our puzzle,” Burrow said. “To find somebody who not only fits with who we are as a board and a staff but also fits as a Bakersfield person – somebody who is good about developing relationships. We believe Stilian is that final piece for us.” And Bakersfield chose him.

Bakersfield Symphony Orchestra President and CEO Bryan Burrow, left, introduces Stilian Kirov as the new music director and conductor during a press conference June 9 at the Bakersfield Petroleum Club. bakersfieldlife.com

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People & Community

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CANINE IN THE COURTROOM Local deputy district attorney brings exceptional pup to provide healing comfort for distressed children By Anna C. Smith Photos by Michael Lopez

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egend is an average-looking Labrador retriever with an extraordinary job. He is a therapy dog used to comfort court witnesses and victims, including devastated children, as they recall traumatic events. On a recent assignment, Legend sat in the witness box of a Bakersfield courtroom, his nose in the lap of a child as she explained how her stepfather shot her mother in the head. The child was understandably nervous; she had not seen her stepfather since the night of the shooting. Legend spent over an hour with the child on the stand as she described details surrounding that horrific event. Overwhelmed with gratefulness for Legend’s tender comfort, the child colored a picture of Legend and Deputy District Attorney Kenneth Green, a criminal prosecutor and Legend’s owner. Legend was drawn with great detail. The sketch of Green was much less meticulous – a faceless stick figure without any color. This drawing hangs outside Green’s office, a daily reminder that Legend can bring relief and healing for vulnerable children who have undergone experiences so appalling they should never have lived through them, let alone be asked to explain again to a jury. Green works as a prosecutor to make our neighborhoods safer by keeping criminals off the street. Sometimes this requires the testimony of children. Child witnesses are glad to have a gentle, intuitive pooch stay near during a difficult time. For these children, 108

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July 2015

Attorney Ken Green takes a moment to pose with his dog Legend outside of the Kern County Superior Court.

Legend is the hero, and Green is happy to see Legend steal the spotlight. Green admits that his job can be heartbreakingly difficult, but he stays motivated by the many tearful displays of gratitude from victims and their families. Legend’s comfort for children comes at a critical time. This calm creature

soothes children in the witness box as they recount memories of rape, shootings and assault. To prevent swaying jurors’ opinions of the witness or their testimony, Legend is trained to stay hidden, and he usually does. However, in one long, five-hour string of testimony for which Legend remained on the


stand to comfort three girls, Legend poked his head over the top of the witness stand to ensure Green was still there. The jury noticed, but the judge allowed Legend to stay and explained to jurors that the presence of a comfort dog should not affect a decision in that case. The new role for dogs as testimony enablers raises tricky legal questions. Defense attorneys have argued that comfort dogs sway jurors with the natural empathy they attract, whether a witness is telling the truth or not. However, Green trains Legend to stay out of sight for this reason and argues that Legend serves an important purpose to ease the stress and trauma so a child is able to testify. The anxiety children feel as they testify against attackers is compounded for many reasons, Green explains. Child witnesses often experience public shame, undergo exhaustive direct and cross-examination about each detail, speak while an ominous figure (the judge) looks down at them in a black robe, 12 strangers (the jury) stare and hang on every word, and, on top of all of this, the child must face the perpetrator, seated

long periods of time and respond to witnesses’ across the courtroom. Legend takes stressful situations and provides steady, quiet comfort. emotional needs. Legend has a knack for these things. Legend has always had a tender soul. Legend’s popularity has earned him his Green initially took Legend as a puppy to own Facebook page. Green and his wife are train him as a guide dog. But when Legend, preparing to add another trainer and more raised by Green’s family in a rural setting, dogs to the witness comfort program. Once failed a stressful performance examination the training is formalized, Green plans to on a busy Los Angeles street, a new purpose expand the program to provide nuzzling at court emerged. Legend was already a solace for more child witnesses. beloved court visitor when he was rejected as a guide dog – he spent days lying around Green’s office. Legend had already been present for most of Green’s time working with child molestation victims and was a natural fit because his calm nature had a soothing effect on children. Months later, after many tests and a performance exam, Legend was certified as a comfort dog. Now, Green brings Legend to work with him almost every day. For his courthouse job, Legend was taught to take commands from far away Legend relaxes in the shade outside of the without making eye contact with Kern County Superior Court. the handler, maintain positions for

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People & Community

FOR A CAUSE

HELPING FURRY FRIENDS Pet food pantry keeps cats, dogs fed when owners can’t By Maria Machuca Photos by Mark Nessia

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t was a sunny Saturday morning at the Bakersfield Pet Food Pantry. The doors were not open yet, but several men and women – some accompanied by their pets – were already lining up outside the pet food bank’s new location on 4500 Shepard St., Suite B1, near Stine Road and District Boulevard. Alex Herrera was one of those waiting to pick up pet food for his three dogs. “This is a very good thing. It helps you and saves you a lot of money,” said Herrera, who also got collars and ID tags for his dogs at the pantry, which opens every second and fourth Saturday of the month from 10 a.m. to noon. According to Cindy Frye, the pantry’s founder and president, most of the people receiving emergency pet food assistance are low-income seniors, but they also help disabled and homeless individuals. Recipients must meet eligibility requirements to receive assistance. The pantry provides free pet food for up to three dogs per household once a month for a limit of six times in a 12-month period. The pantry serves nearly 200 families and distributes about 4,000 pounds in pet food per month. Since it was founded in 2009, it has collected and distributed 200,000 pounds of emergency dog and cat food to thousands of families and individuals struggling to feed their pets. Despite its success, Frye says the demand sometimes is bigger than the pet food supply and the pantry has turned families away. Recently, the pantry received a grant from The Bakersfield Californian Foundation for its pet ID tags, collars and leashes program. A total of 1,400 dogs and cats have gotten ID tags since last August. 110

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July 2015

Great Dane Arti can't contain his excitement over the bag of dog food he and his owners received from Bakersfield Pet Food Pantry volunteer Vicki Eick, who has been with the pantry since 2009.

Accepting: • Dog and cat food (dry or canned, any brand) • Flea medication

Approximately 15 volunteers help regularly to bag and distribute food. One of those volunteers is Christina Amoroso, who started as a volunteer and now also serves as the organization’s vice president. “I love animals, but I can’t work with animals directly because I would want to bring all of them home, so I thought, ‘I can bag food and help in that way,’” she said. The main goal, however, is to bring awareness. “It’s not that we just want the food or the money, we want the community to be aware that there is such a need for these animals,” said Amoroso, adding that without the pantry’s help, some pet owners wouldn’t be able to feed their pets and may end up abandoning them.

Pet food donations: May be dropped off at the pantry, 4500 Shepard St., the second and fourth Saturday of each month between 10 a.m. and noon and at the red barrel drop-off locations: Self Serve Pet Spa, Scruffy To Fluffy Pet Spa, Biscuit Boutique & Doggy Spa, Fur And Feathers Luxury Pet Resort, Coffee Road Animal Hospital and Petco on Rosedale Highway.

For more details about eligibility requirements, programs, how to volunteer or make monetary donations, contact us: • Online – www.bakersfield petfoodpantry.org • Email – info@bakersfield petfoodpantry.org • Call – 661-369-1222


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People & Community

I N S I D E STO RY

Taryn Deoilers adds fresh strawberries to her yogurt.

SUMMER TREATS TO BEAT THE HEAT Tutti Frutti keeps customers cool and satisfied By Heather Hoelscher Photos by Mark Nessia

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July 2015

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n the hot summers, going to Tutti Frutti frozen yogurt is the best way to cool down. With the great variety and selections, anyone can get exactly what they’re craving. The first Tutti Frutti location in Bakersfield opened in 2011, by Medhat Habashy, in the Town & Country Shopping Center on Stockdale Highway, providing customers the sweet treat they want with high-quality ingredients and flavors. “I maintain a high standard of quality here, good value from a price standpoint and great customer service. We use name brand toppings and fresh fruit when in season,” Habashy said. This Tutti Frutti location has more than 40 toppings including, almonds, chocolate, yogurt-covered pretzels, fresh fruit, and many other toppings and sauces. Some of the favorite

toppings are the frosted animal crackers, chopped Reese’s, hot fudge and hot caramel. Customers can choose from a variety of different frozen yogurts. Mint, pistachio, chocolate, hazelnut and mango are among the many popular flavors offered. Tutti Frutti also has dairy-free and sugar-free options. Tutti Frutti mixes flavors on-site whenever possible to keep them fresh. The Town & Country location makes its own pistachio, mango, peach, raspberry, banana, taro, hazelnut, pomegranate flavors and many others, depending on season and availability of ingredients. For frequent frozen yogurt goers, there is a rewards program that provides customers the opportunity to get discounts and money back on their next trip. To learn more about Tutti Frutti visit tfyogurt.com.


Medhat Habashy pours a freshly made 2-gallon batch of mango.

Sierra Jue, who's been working at Tutti Frutti since it opened in 2011, cuts fresh strawberries for the toppings bar. Fresh fruit is cut daily to ensure the best possible quality.

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People & Community

H I STO RY

BUFFALO BILL’S WILD WEST SHOW ‘Stirring scenes and exciting episodes’ reproduce the Wild West for Bakersfield in 1902

By Ken Hooper Photos courtesy of the Kern County Museum used by permission

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n Sept. 20, 1902, the day Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show was set to perform, the Daily Californian newspaper stated that: “Not so many years ago on such occasion like today would have brought to town a lot of men from the cattle ranges who would have made things decidedly lively. … This fact goes to prove that the character of the average cowboy has improved vastly in the last few years, and that the ‘shooting up’ of a town is a thing of the past. Besides, Bakersfield is no longer a frontier town, but a city of order and police regulation.” Col. William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody opened his first Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show on May 19, 1883, at Omaha, Nebraska, launching a variety of outdoor entertainment that lasted for nearly 60 years. Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show would visit Bakersfield on three separate occasions, Sept. 20, 1902; Oct. 14, 1910; and April 26, 1915. The May 2, 1902, issue of the Daily Californian newspaper carried the announcement of Cody’s plans with the 114

Bakersfield Life Magazine

July 2015

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show played across the country for nearly 60 years. headline “Buffalo Bill Is Coming.” The lengthy article stated: “The announcement is made that Buffalo Bill’s Wild West, led by Col. W.F. Cody himself, will this season, and for the first time in its history, make a complete tour of the American continent, from ocean to ocean, east to west; from the Zenith city in the north to the Gulf of Mexico on the south.” A show as large as the Wild West show required enormous logistical support. The Aug. 4, 1902, issue of the Daily Californian newspaper carried a onesentence statement that “The advance agent of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show is in town arranging for an exhibition here for Sept. 30.” The shows date would

later be changed to Sept. 20, 1902, and a vacant lot was secured on the corner of 19th Street and Union Avenue. This was an ideal location for the time period because it was centered between the two population centers of Bakersfield and Kern City, the former being known as “old town Kern” today. After performing a show in Fresno the night before, a special 10-car train pulled into the Southern Pacific railroad station off of Baker Street in Kern City early on the morning of Sept. 20, 1902. By 10 a.m., a parade left the corner of Union and 19th Street and headed west on 19th Street to Chester Avenue, south to Railroad Avenue [now Truxtun Avenue], west to H Street, north to


19th Street and then back to its encampment. The parade was headed by the 12 members of Cody’s drum corps as the Sept. 20, 1902, Daily Californian newspaper reported: “Then came the central figure of the show, riding in a carriage with a footman, Col. William F. Cody himself. The noted scout was dressed in a black suit with broad white hat, and his long hair and striking appearance served to rivet the attention of every one in the crowd.” Following the colonel came Native American riders, cavalrymen, Bedouin tribesmen, a bright-red gondola filled

with a band, followed by more Native Americans and a contingent of the famed Rough Riders of the Spanish American War. The addition to the 1902 show included a boat from the United States Life Saving Service – the forerunner to the United States Coast Guard – being pulled on wheels. After the parade wound through Bakersfield neighborhoods, the Wild West show held two performances, one at 2 p.m. and another at 8 p.m. Tickets were priced at 50 cents for general admission and children under the age of 6 were 25 cents. Reserve seating could be purchased for $1 at the Hughes Drug Store that

was also located at the corner of 19th Street and Union Avenue. There were numerous smallerscale Wild West shows that traveled through the United States until the early 1900s. Cole Younger and Frank James’ Wild West show attempted to trade off their infamous past as bank robbers while many of the shows included famous Native American chiefs, such as the Nez Pierce’s Chief Joseph or the Sioux Chief Red Cloud. But none could match the pageantry of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show.

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Rosewood in Bakersfield, California, is owned and managed by ABHOW, a California nonprofit public benefit corporation. ABHOW is a nonsectarian corporation, serving seniors through quality retirement housing since 1949. State of California License #150400536, DHS License #120000165, Certificate of Authority #203.

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POWER COUPLE

PHOTO BY MICHAEL LOPEZ

People & Community

Doug and Danielle Wade in the backyard of their Bakersfield home

NEW IN TOWN Get-together to meet friends leads to ‘the one’

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Compiled by Bakersfield Life

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hen you’re new in town and don’t know anyone, sometimes you just have to put yourself out there. After moving to Indianapolis, Danielle Wade hosted a barbecue at the recommendation of a couple she met. She provided the food and wine, and the couple provided the people. One of those people was Doug. “My friend Ken Gregory invited me to a party that Danielle was hosting,” Doug said. “She was new to town in Indianapolis and, in retrospect, I think he was playing matchmaker.” The couple has now been married for 12 years and have two children, a 9-year-old daughter and an 11-year-old son.


Work brought the couple to Bakersfield where they have lived for 15 years. Doug is the assistant vice president of fiscal services for CSUB, and Danielle is vice president/general manager of Bright House Networks. “We love our neighborhood, and we particularly like the fact that people give back to our community,” Danielle said. “The sense of community pride is palpable! Indy was a great place to live, but Bakersfield is our home.” Who made the first move? Danielle: Doug made the first move. He was looking me up and down from across the room. When I asked him, “Can I help you?” he replied, “Interesting.” It was very reminiscent of the “Most Interesting Man in the World.” Where did you go on your first date? How did it go? Danielle: Our first official date was the movies and dinner. I would say 12 years later, it was a hit! Doug: We went to dinner, and it was good. I found out she was Catholic, too, when she said grace and made the sign of the cross. Immediate bonus points. How long did you date before you knew she/he was “the one?” Danielle: I knew pretty early – probably six months in. It took him a little longer, but he is very deliberate, which is one of my favorite qualities about him. Doug: I had zeroed in on her after a couple of months. I watched her make a presentation at an HBO event, and I was hooked. What is his/her best quality? Danielle: His best quality is what a wonderful father and husband he is. Doug is committed to his family in the most unselfish way and I love that about him. Doug: I like her whole presentation! What is the key to a happy marriage? Danielle: Patience and faith. We both have very different personalities, which keep it interesting, but we are patient with each other and give one another the space to be authentic. And our marriage is rooted in God, so our faith plays a big part in the success of our happiness. Doug: Happy wife, happy life. What is your favorite thing to do together? Danielle: I would say go to the mountains and hang out with our kids. Our time with them always feels fleeting, and we both love hanging out with them. Doug: Wine tasting. And more wine tasting. How would you describe your marriage? Danielle: Better than I could have ever imagined. I feel like I won the lottery with Doug. We married late in life, and he was totally worth the wait! Doug: Danielle and I are different, yet we’re cut from the same cloth. We have the same family values. Describe him/her in three words. Danielle: Kind, intelligent and funny! Doug: Generous, bold and empathetic.

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People & Community

REAL PEOPLE

BORN TO HELP OTHERS Nurse immunizes, educates Kern County By Ellen Ewing

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Trellis Johnson Green

certain tests. “We focus on awareness for things like Pap smears and hypertension screenings and more. My focus is on preventative care. It’s one of the best medicines,” she said.

PHOTO BY MARK NESSIA

T

rellis Johnson Green didn’t become a nurse; she was born a nurse. She has a tremendous talent for helping people. This flu season, Green helped Kaiser Permanente administer more than a million flu immunizations in its Southern California region (which includes Kern County). Green, an assistant administrator of primary care at Kaiser PermanenteBakersfield, has always known what she wanted to do. “I never wanted to be anything else,” she said. “My grandma was a nurse, and I saw her come home every day in her uniform. When we were sick, she always had the remedy. I’ve always wanted to help people, not just as a nurse but on an everyday basis.” For the past four years, Green has been an immunization champion at Kaiser Permanente. She starts a typical day by looking at immunization reads in the medical center and working on coming up with ways to maintain current rates and meet targets. That includes setting up programs to get members to come in. “I meet with staff, and we do flu consultations with physicians,” Green said. Kaiser Permanente also works with the Department of Public Health Services to get immunizations to the community. “We have a flu program,” explained Green. “Kaiser Permanente sends out postcards when the season starts. We had a drivethru flu clinic last year at CSUB. We partnered with the public health department to give free flu shots to the public. We did marketing all around town and made calls to our members. With that outreach, we let the community know of an easy, accessible way to get in (and) get your flu shot. You didn’t even have to get out of your car; you just stuck your arm out. No appointment, no waiting, no cost.” That outreach has proved a powerful weapon against diseases besides the flu. Green uses it to reach preventative care goals. She’s very proactive about calling members to let them know it’s time to start thinking about

As part of that preventative care outreach, Green has also improved well-baby visit rates. “We reach out to parents not familiar with the immunization schedule. If it’s your first baby, you’re green to all of that,” she said. “A


staffer calls and talks to you about the schedule and what to expect at a well-baby visit. Things like developmental milestones are discussed. They tell you what to expect in the future, and then we call to remind you about your baby’s next visit. We call in the evenings to reach all mothers, working and stay-at-home moms, so they can all be successful with their babies the first year of life.” One of the challenges Green faces is educating parents reluctant to immunize their children. “Parents want to know of side effects, but they’re minimal and rare. I send them to CDC.gov. There are so many vaccination sites out there with so much information. The CDC is the resource that has factual, real information,” Green said. “We have to come from a parent’s point of view. We tell them that we have taken this, we’ve given it to our own kids.” Green’s passion for helping people has carried her through a 13-year nursing career. Her husband’s job led the couple to Bakersfield from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. “Our home was extensively damaged, but out of the disaster came triumph, because we came here and I found my job that became my passion. I love the people I work with, and I love that I feel like I’m making a difference. If I get patients an immunization they didn’t already have, I’ve done my job protecting them and keeping our society healthy.”

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People & Community

PRIME FINDS

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Join California’s largest group of state retirees working to protect our pensions California State Retirees is dedicated to protecting the pension and benefits you earned during your state career. You are eligible to become a member of California State Retirees if you: ✓ retired from any state department ✓ you receive a CalPERS retirement warrant Whether you retired from Corrections, Food and Agriculture, EDD, DMV or any other state department, you need to join CSR so that you can keep apprised of news affecting state retirees and support the fight against consistent attacks on our defined benefit retirement system. Members of California State Retirees will: ✓ Be eligible to attend meetings with interesting speakers and good food at 26 different CSR chapter meetings statewide

Retirees from various facilities within the Department of Corrections recently posed for a group photo at a meeting of the California State Retirees (CSR) in Sacramento. They are helping to spread the word that anybody who has retired from a state department and receives a CalPERS retirement check is eligible to join CSR’s ranks of 34,000 retirees. ✓ Receive a monthly 16-page newspaper – California State Retiree – which reports on the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS), the Legislature and the latest news about political campaigns aimed at destroying our public pension system ✓ Take advantage of member discounts for various benefits, including insurance policies, emergency travel coverage and theme park admissions

Learn more about the many reasons for joining California State Retirees by attending Chapter 26 meetings in Kern County. The chapter usually meets on the third Thursday of every month at Lorene’s Ranch House, 6401 Ming Ave. in Bakersfield. Lunch for new attendees is free. For more information, call Chapter 26 President Gary Ivey at (881) 831-3990.

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Ask your friends if they are members yet – Use this application to sign them up!

Membership Application • California State Retirees Chapter # (please print) Last Name,

First Name

Number and Street

City

Retirement Date

Home Phone

Recruiter’s Name

M.I.

Social Security #

State

Zip Code E-mail

How did you hear about us?

State Agency you Retired From

DUES TABLE FOR RETIRED MEMBERS Type of membership (check one) RETIRED MEMBERSHIP.....................• Available to state retirees only. See Dues Table. BENEFICIARY MEMBERSHIP ............• Available only to beneficiaries of deceased CSE A employed or retired members. Dues are $1.00 per month. Decedent Social Security No. __________________________________ ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP ................ • Available only to persons not eligible for Retired or Beneficiar y membership. Dues are $12.00 per year (payable annually). I hereby apply for membership in California State Retirees, an affiliate of the California State Employees Association, and I authorize CSR to withhold dues from my monthly PERS allowance. I understand my membership rights are set forth in the CSR and CSEA bylaws, policies and procedures. As a member of CSR, I agree to abide by the CSR bylaws, policies and procedures.

Signature BAKERSFIELD (Rev. 06/15)

Date

Monthly Basic PERS Monthly a llowance ( check one) Dues $ 0 - $ 399 ............$1.00 $ 400 - $ 799 ........... $2.25 $ 8 0 0 - $1,19 9 .......... $3.25 $1,2 0 0 - $1,59 9 ......... $5.00 $1,6 0 0 - $1,8 9 9.......... $6.50 $1,9 0 0 - $2,2 9 9 ......... $8.00 $2,3 0 0 - $2,6 9 9 ......... $8.50 $2,70 0 - $3,0 9 9.......... $9.00 $3,10 0 - $3,49 9 ......... $9.50 $3,5 0 0 - $3,999 ....... $10.00 $4,0 0 0 + ................... $12.00

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877.314.7511 BakersfieldHyundai.com

Fit For Business 5K/10K Date: May 30 Held at The Park at River Walk Photos by Jan St Pierre View these photos and more at bakersfieldlife.com.

Ria Bunch, Donna Berry, Tommy Bunch and Allie Jordan

Mark, Tracey and Jillian Napier

Jose and Delfina Renteria Daphne and John Bohan

Maria and Ken Perkins

Peter Wonderly

AJ, Mark and Angela Torres

Anastasia Lester and Shyann Nelson


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Beautiful Bakersfield Awards Date: May 30 Held at DoubleTree Hotel Photos by Mark Nessia View these photos and more at bakersfieldlife.com.

David and Linda Milazzo

Thelma Au, Kathleen Bruce, Breann and Adam Patten

Karen Goh, John Hefner and Sandra Serrano

Elizabeth Privett and Quinn Thurley

Brian and Jacey Cooper

Harvey Hall, Milt Younger, Betty Younger, Brian Burrow and Nicole Barnett

Susanne Campbell, Jean Scheiber and Lauren Skidmore


877.314.7511 BakersfieldHyundai.com

Murder Mystery Dinner to benefit Fairy Godmother Foundation Date: June 4 Held at NV Cafe Photos by Carla Rivas View these photos and more at bakersfieldlife.com.

Jed Silos and Arian Miller

Pam Ames and Paige Boyer

Colleen Bauer, Deanna and Kenny Blaise Michaela and LaDonna McLaughlin, Linda Proctor and Diane Martinez

Christina and Mike Springstead

Kristina Stratton and Alexander Williams 124

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Hema Patel and Tomeka Grider

Todd Schultz and Kindra Hill

Ami and Don Cherry, Patricia Holcomb and Angela Jourdan


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First Friday Date: June 5 Held at Downtown Arts District Photos by Carla Rivas View these photos and more at bakersfieldlife.com.

Sandy Rudnick and Sue Bickford

Susie Harris, Carlee Braun, Terry Twombly, MJ Knowles and Lisa Ross

Judy Neukirchner, Ann Beman, Lori Finstad, Roberta Piazza, Dawn Jordan and Petty Smith

Anna and Dennis Mullins

Dolores and Rob Martens

Ana Chiles, Greg and Debbie Iger, Geovana Karr and Indiana Schenkman

Amy Loken Hudson, Ashley, Amanda and Nancy Polk

Monica Diaz, Jose, EJ and JP Zepeda

Stephanie and Isaac Rocha bakersfieldlife.com

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HALT 5K/10K Run Date: June 6 Held at Yokuts Park Photos by Carla Rivas View these photos and more at bakersfieldlife.com.

Hanna, Ashlee Formhals, Mia, Buddy, Aurora Bullard-Reilly, Clowie and Brittney Bullard-Reilly

Joe Delatorre, Annette and Aubree Placencia and Shorty

Josh Burns, Lori Ruiz, Chloe Johnson and Carly Roberts

Mark Riehle and Gus 126

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July 2015

Kerry Savee and Virgie Rabanal

Joe Fike, Ruby, Willa and Trisha Fike

Brian Reese, Splash, Teeny, Kim Reese and Hoss

Don David, Wi Fi, Mylene Farmer

AJ Robinson, Jim and Jessica Beck

Donna Tirp, Rodney Lewis and Maggie


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Applause for Paws

Tammy Davis and Steve Wenn

Date: June 13 Held at Elks Lodge Photos by Jan St Pierre View these photos and more at bakersfieldlife.com.

Deborah Olson, Rick Berry and Hannah Manning

Jonathan Gernes, Sara Wolf, Liz Keogh and David and Lori Wolf

Marlene and Fred Ray

Kristin Lelewer, Andy Son, Julie Mayer, Sandra Quigley and Jackie Cameron

Charles Hudek, Adrienne Smoot and Marilyn Thompson

NOW AT THE KERN COUNTY MUSEUM A unique exhibit featuring a look at Kern’s WWII heroes, both abroad and on the home front!

Take an in-depth look at Kern County’s heroes abroad and here on the home front in this World War II exhibit featuring artifacts from the war effort, uniforms, photos and more. Also, take a “riveting” look at “Rosie the Homefront Hero”. Meet women who took part in the program here in Kern County and see how they changed the war without going into combat.

Jessica Mojarro and Alice and Catherine Gonzalez

.

Exhibit open during museum hours beginning June 22 (admission to exhibit included in museum admission) Kern County Museum (3801 Chester Avenue)

www.KCmuseum.org

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877.314.7511 BakersfieldHyundai.com

Tigerfight Casino Night Date: June 6 Held at The Padre Hotel Photos by Bruce Lochrie View these photos and more at bakersfieldlife.com.

Chris and Melissa Branson

Dawn and Wayde Kirschenman

Craig and Shawna Hamilton and Elizabeth and Kevin Henry Joe, Lisa and Joey Cooper

Thomas Barter, Katie Doll, Alison McCarthy, Katye and Danny Kinder and Dawni Fauke Marissa Campbell, Katie Peart, Denise Ferdinand, Liliana Chapman and Kristin Bullard

vin g r e s Now

Because it’s 5 o’clock somewhere!

Kevin Fitzgerald, Megan Delaney, Matt Allen and Scott Stanley 128

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People & Community

LAST WORD

TAKING BACK THE GREAT AMERICAN SUMMER VACATION The more vacations you take, the happier you are

THINKSTOCK.COM

By Cheryl Scott

T

he phrase “summer vacation” conjures up a crazy collection of memories for me, including national parks, long drives, skyscrapers and lots of adventures. Just hearing the words fill me – and other summer sojourners – with anticipation. Work demands are changing, though, and they are cutting into Americans’ plans for time off, threatening to decimate the tradition that has brought so many of us joy. If we don’t step in to reverse this trend, the entire summer vacation institution may slip away silently into the hot July night. As a little girl in the 1970s, family vacation was a regular part of my summer. Usually, it was a week, maybe a little longer, but I could count on summer bringing some kind of family trip. From the back seat of our tiny Datsun sedan, I’d watch mile after mile of the Southwestern landscape pass outside my window. So many miles were packed into so few days, I sometimes remember them as “drive-by” vacations rather than “driving” vacations. The recent recession likely triggered the shift in vacation trends. Workers felt the need to stay visible and productive in order to stay employed. Experts agree, though, taking time off improves all aspects of our lives, including personal well-being, family relationships and even work performance. In fact, vacationing can actually be an important tool for keeping us sharp at work. Bakersfield marriage and family therapist Rosie Witt recommends making family vacations a priority, and she says it’s a good idea to try something new during your time away. 130

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“When families take time off together, they need to relax and rest, but they should also try new experiences together,” she said. “Doing something together for the first time helps the family ‘rebond’ as they create new memories.” Those adventures don’t have to be expensive or extravagant. For example, camping, fishing and spending time in the outdoors are great ways to explore new places, all on a budget. Vacations aren’t just about families, either. Everyone should build them into their calendar, Witt said. Whether your time away is solo, as a couple, or with friends or family, the No. 1 goal should be to get away from the day-to-day pressures of life and work. “It’s well known that stress affects everything relating to our health; stress has been linked to minor physical ailments like tooth decay and even serious conditions like cancer,” Witt warned. In the interest of time, many people limit their “vacations” to a long weekend here and there. But Witt cautions they shouldn’t take the place of a fiveto seven- day getaway or “staycation.” It’s best to take a full week, if you can, to be “totally away from work, school, stress and irritations.” Witt also says not to be overly ambitious, scheduling activities for every moment. How can we do all that in today’s world? Bonding, relaxing and destressing sound great but seems nearly impossible when we’re surrounded by

smartphones, tablets and laptops, creating a never-ending link to work. Letting go of our electronic tethers might be the hardest part of really getting away. Human resources expert Robin Paggi said our problem isn’t just work schedules, it’s hyper-connectivity. “We are addicted to technology,” she said. “That, in effect, changes our brain and promotes an addiction to the workplace. Leave the work behind!” Susan Hopkins, a busy working mom with two active boys and a husband, has known for many years the importance of a work-life balance. For her, it’s important to have different kinds of vacations, including family trips; time away with her husband, Rob; plus running trips with girlfriends. “Different types of trips allow me, and the people I care about, to step out of our day-to-day lives and reconnect,” she said. Since their boys are still young, Hopkins said they try to keep family trips to three to five days. Taking a little vacation here and there gives Hopkins something to look forward to throughout the year, she said. She just might be onto something since, according to Witt, “The more vacations you take, the happier you are.” Who can argue with that? For all our sakes, the time seems right for bringing back the summer vacation. I know I’m committed to doing my part. Who’s with me?



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