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2015: Case Study


Perris Union High School District A collection of small learning communities focused on integrated learning in a collaborative environment.



“We are at a most interesting and challenging time in public education.� Dr. Jonathan L. Greenberg, Superintendent, PUHSD


Client: Perris Union High School District Location: Menifee, CA Project Data Construction Dates: Construction Costs: Building Area: Site Area: Enrollment Capacity:

TBD $106,000,000 268,000 SF 54 Acres 2600 Students

Copyright © 2015 BakerNowicki Design Studio, LLP All rights reserved

Design Team

“This is an exciting design for an exciting concept. The design creates a place where students will want to be as one of the major goals for the project. The design is open to enable flexibility for the students to move freely between different learning environments, which helps to personalize their individual learning experience. The design creates many centers to encourage a strong student culture. This is a large campus, yet very human and non-institutional in scale. The strong linear design works well to tie the various learning centers together. The design includes technology-rich features allowing use of multiple shaded and protected outdoor learning environments, a learning commons, a multi-use student union, and the integration of team-teacher professional centers that support a student centered emphasis. Unique sustainable design features, and the building materials used, take advantage of the local climate temperature swings, making this a very comfortable yet energy efficient project.” Jury Comments 2015 CASH/AIACC Design Awards Award of Honor

Architecture: BakerNowicki Design Studio, LLP Structural: KNA Consulting Engineers Mechanical: MA Engineers, Inc. Electrical: Johnson Consulting Engineers, Inc. Civil: Epic Engineering Landscape Nowell & Associates Food Service: Orness Design Group, Inc. Acoustics: Idibri District Executive Committee: Dr. Jonathan Greenberg PUHSD Superintendent Dr. Steve Kennedy MUSD Superintendent Candace Reines Asst Supt Business Services Marcy Savage Asst Supt Educational Services Joseph Williams Director of Technology Grant Bennett Director Learning Support Services Art Fritz Director Director Facilities Services Hector Gonzalez Director, Facilities Chris Rabing Director, Business Services Judy Miller Director Risk Management & Environmental Safety Julie Zierold HHS Principal Don Williamnson PVHS Principal Nick Hilton PHS Principal Fred Good Fred Good and Associates


Site & History

menifee union school district boundary

paloma valley high school high school #4

The Proposed School site consists of two parcels of property totaling approximately 52 acres located on the northwest corner of Leon Road and Wickerd Road extending north to Meadowgate Lane and west to Brandon Lane in an unincorporated area of Riverside County known as Winchester. The Proposed School site is vacant land that has never been developed but has been used primarily for agricultural purposes. The city of Menifee lies roughly 32 miles from the ocean.

GARBANI

MEADOWGATE

Physical Features: • • • •

Soils conditions include subsurface bedrock and exposed granite outcroppings. Topography include rolling hills with significant slope across site from North to South with a grade change of 27 ft. There is the potential for site access from all sides of the property. Potential to use the grade change to enhance sight-lines for supervision and for multi-level access of athletic facilities.

Perris High School #4 | 2015 © BakerNowicki Design Studio

LEON

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS


Community Connection: • • •

The main entry to the campus is most ideal from Leon. Leon will be a four lane road and will require signalization for ingress and egress. Current zoning around the campus is low density residential. There is a potential for residential density to be increased pending County review. Stadium should be located to reduce noise and light spill to the adjacent parcels.

Environmental Conditions: • • •

Cooler coastal breezes from the Southwest should be preserved. Solar orientation and exposure will be critical to address to provide shade and to optimize building energy usage. Traffic noise from surrounding roadways should be addressed.

HISTORY OF MENIFEE

Source: Menifee Valley Historical Association

The area was originally inhabited by the Luiseño Indians, primarily the Pechanga and Soboba bands. In the 18th century, the area fell under Spanish rule and was ceded by Mexico to the United States in 1850 as a result of the Mexican-American War. Farming, which began in the mid-19th century, was concentrated in the Menifee area. Mining began in the early 1880s with the discovery of a significant quartz lode by miner Luther Menifee Wilson, from which Menifee derived its name. Early development of the Menifee area began with Sun City in the early 1960s as the concept of an active retirement community envisioned by Del Webb, a building contractor from Phoenix, Arizona. Webb also developed Sun City, Arizona under the same concept.

Sun City is a centrally located neighborhood within Menifee with a mix of residential and commercial activity. The Menifee area later grew during the late 1980s and into the early 1990s as a master-planned community. However, lack of resources such as industry-oriented occupations and high-density retail and commercial businesses has made many residents drive longer distances to nearby cities such as Temecula or Murrieta, to shop, dine, and work. There has been substantial growth in Menifee with new home construction with large lakes, and fine amenities have attracted many residents from the Inland Empire and Los Angeles to live. On June 3, 2008, the residents of the communities encompassing the Menifee area voted to incorporate together to form Riverside County’s 26th city. The new City of Menifee was officially established on October 1, 2008 BakerNowicki Design Studio | 7


Process Summary: Working in conjunction with leader from local business and the community college allowed for the District to develop relevant Centers for Applied Learning (CAL’s) that support both college and career readiness. This facility will begin to define the center of the community and develop community connections through strong and effective communication and partnerships with business, industry and higher education, as well as opportunities for shared use.

ENGAGE

LISTEN

The design solution is a result of a four-day Design Symposium that brought together teachers, administrators, businesses leaders, colleges and the community.

To verify and emphasize the educational specifications, individual sessions with each focus group, including science, athletics, arts and many others, further defined the needs and programmatic requirements of their programs.

ED SPEC GOALS

SYMPOSIUM

Play Movie:

BakerNowicki’s Symposium Process

DESIGN

CONFIRM

The symposium participants visited the site to fully understand the surroundings and planning issues, in person, including topography, traffic patterns, adjoining neighbors and drainage patterns. After understanding the site and defining the educational goals the group worked together to come up with site zoning schemes that respond directly to the site and campus educational goals and needs.

The design team further developed the resulting scheme and program and reviewed with the group and each individual group of Subject Matter Experts to ensure that the vision had properly been translated into the design. The design was completely influenced by the stakeholder group and incorporated all of the goals, facts and needs into the final concept for HS#4.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

SUBJECT MATTER EXPERTS (SME)


Symposium: Reviewing ‘Facts’

Executive Committee: Site Planning

Snow Cards: Goals, Facts, Needs

Symposium: Group Discussions

SME’s: Sketches at SME Meeting

SME’s: Feedback through a Web Forum

Symposium: Snow Cards on the walls

Executive Committee: Site Planning

Ed Specs: Confirming Ed Spec Goals

BakerNowicki Design Studio | 9 Symposium: Staff Visiting the Project Site

SME’s: Reviewing Education Objectives

Executive Committee: Site Adjacencies


Site Planning After a site visit, members of the executive committee engaged in brainstorming potential site zoning strategies and campus layouts based on the observations from the site visit.. Using these observations along with practical site planning strategies, the members of the group developed numerous site planning concepts for evaluation and consideration. (See right)

Perris High School #4 | 2015 Š BakerNowicki Design Studio


THE FINAL SOLUTION

GARBANI ROAD

After a site visit, members of the Executive Committee engaged in brainstorming potential site zoning strategies and campus layouts based on the observations from the site visit. BakerNowicki provided scaled program pieces on a site plan for the exercise. Using these observations along with practical site planning strategies, the members of the group developed numerous site planning concepts for evaluation and consideration. The best approach was agreed upon after discussion and became the basis of BakerNowicki’s final Site Design Approach.

CAMPUS

PARKING aquatics

stadium

basketball softball

softball

FIELDS pe / soccer

baseball

STORMWATER

baseball

LEON ROAD

OPTIONS

WICKERD ROAD

BakerNowicki Design Studio | 11


Site Analysis HOME HOME

VISITOR HOME HOME

VISITOR

PARKING

STADIUM

SERVICE ACCESS

PARKING

STADIUM

SERVICE ACCESS

QUAD ADMIN

QUAD GYM ADMIN

GYM

SUPERVISION

STADIUM

STADIUM

NOISE

Perris High School #4 | 2015 © BakerNowicki Design Studio

VEHICULAR ENTRY

G


L

SUPERVISION

NOISE

V

How the Proposed Solution Works QUAD ACADEMIC

PAR PUB

ACADEMIC PUBLIC STADIUM

PUBLIC

PUBLIC NOISE & ACADEMIC

VEHICULAR ENTRY

GYM/LOCKER ACCESS

PUBLIC & ACADEMIC

BASEBALL/SOFTBALL

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PARK/ PUBLIC

GYM/LOCKER ACCESS PHYSICAL EDUCATION

AQUATICS

DRAINAGE BakerNowicki Design Studio | 13


Site Planning Being in a arid climate, the design of HS4’s physical environment needs to provide ample shade and protection from the wind. The resulting outdoor learning environments can be used comfortably year round.

Objective

Result

Student safety and site security

A campus perimeter was created for campus security, with the campus zoned into Public/ Private zones from east to west, and social to academic from south to north.

Avoid site drainage impacts on buildings.

The campus is located at the high ground, with the athletic fields located on the low. Water flows downhill - away from the buildings.

Provide safe separation of vehicles, pedestrians, buses, services/deliveries.

Student parking, parent drop off, visitor parking, and bus drop offs are each carefully separated from one another, with safe student pathways to campus. Both public and student points of entry are directly supervised by the administration building staff.

Provide for access to joint use of selected facilities and events after school hours.

The student union multi-purpose space has been carefully located adjacent to the stadium, gymnasium, and Theater to support both pre- and post-function events. A series of unobtrusive sliding architectural gates provides controlled access in a variety of configurations to student union depending on the location of the event. The Theater and Gymnasium are located along the exterior of the campus to to provide direct public access and use.

Perris High School #4 | 2015 © BakerNowicki Design Studio

WICKERD ROAD

The District’s stated goals for Site Planning are summarized in the following Objectives and Results:


TERRACE PROMENADE

BUS

STUDENT PARKING

OUTDOOR LEARNING

PLAZA

COMMONS

ENT COURRTY

ARTS YARD

Quad Zoning Diagram

SLC

International Business

Professional Center

SLC

SCIENCE

Applied Technology

(CASE)

SLC

Hea Scien lth ces

STUDENT UNION

Profes sio Cente nal r

ADMIN PARENT DR O

P OFF

VISITOR PARKING

LEON ROAD

VISUAL ARTS

SLC

THEATER

Public S & Serv afety ice

GYM

SPEC ED BU

S

BakerNowicki Design Studio | 15


Designing Learning Enviroments

Socialization

PERRIS HIGH SCHOOL #4 The self-initiated reflections that have occurred within the PUHSD have created an excitement about the future of educational experiences for students throughout the District. These have created thought-provoking discussions about “where we have been” and “where we need to go.” We appear to be leaving an era within public education in which the concept of “achievement compliance” has been the fundamental norm. The concepts and regulations contained within “No Child Left Behind” have created, in some cases, expectations that appeared to be unattainable. New directions and strategies associated with Common Core are causing meaningful assessments of instructional strategies and the best approaches for delivery of instruction and programs. There is a renewed dedication to an emphasis upon student

learning and preparing students to be productive members of society – whether their future includes matriculation to college, advancement to a career or technical school, or placement into an increasingly global workforce. There is an emerging desire in the PUHSD to provide learning environments that better equip students to develop communication and problem solving skills – all in spaces that facilitate, accommodate and embrace collaboration; there is an equally strong desire to provide the same for staff. The continual and exponential emergence of technology in our schools and private lives has profound implications for where and how we should be headed with the business of educating our students.

Perris High School #4 | 2015 © BakerNowicki Design Studio

SLC

Small Learning Communities


CAL

Play Movie:

Perris High School Design & Animation

Centers for Applied Learning

Collaboration

Flexibility

CASE

Centers for Advanced Science Exploration BakerNowicki Design Studio | 17


Small Learning Communities Classroom

Classroom

Applied Learning Lab (CAL)

COLLABORATION

OUTDOOR LEARNING

OUTDOOR LEARNING

Applied Learning Lab (CAL)

Classroom

CONCEPT SKETCH Perris High School #4 | 2015 Š BakerNowicki Design Studio

SLC Entry

OUTDOOR LEARNING

Professional Center

DIAGRAM

: Outdoor Learning and Collaboration Spaces


) ASE C ( CE

SLC

N

SCIE

SLC

Hea Scien lth ces

Public S & Serv afety ice

SCIENCE (CASE)

CAL

SLC

Professional Center

SLC

VISUAL ARTS

Applied Technology

AP Cousn’s & eling

SLC

Professional Center

SLC

VISUAL ARTS

Professional Center

CAL

THEATER

SLC

International Business

THEATER

STUDENT UNION ADMIN

SLC

Public Safety & Service

Applied Technology

CAL International Business

STUDENT UNION

CAL

Applied Technology

ADMIN

GYM

Indoor/ Outdoor Collaboration Spaces

GYM

FLOOR PLAN

CAMPUS ZONING BakerNowicki Design Studio | 19


2 3 1

4

1 2

1

3

4

1. Small Learning Community 2. Professional Center 3. Science Classrooms

SMALL LEARNING COMMUNITIES:

Small Learning Communities (SLC’s) address some of the biggest challenges on a large comprehensive high school campus by personalizing the learning experience and creating a place students want to be. This design forms four small unique learning communities (SLC). Each

community is equipped with a decentralized administration, a teacher professional center and a Center of Applied Learning (CAL). It is the District’s goal that each of these elements will empower personalized instruction for each student.

CENTERS FOR APPLIED LEARNING: Centers for Applied Learning (CAL’s) were defined from student interests, community input, local labor trends, and integration and articulation with local community college programs. The resulting CAL’s support career paths in Global Business, Health Sciences, Applied Technologies, Public


Small Learning Communities 2 5

1

The Quad

4. Cafe: Shaded Outdoor Dining 5. The Grove: Shaded Outdoor Study Safety & Service. Common core is integrated into each CAL to make the curriculum cohesive and ultimately more relevant for the students. Each CAL is integrated into one of the four SLC’s. Different CAL’s are paired adjacent to one another to allow for cross pollenation of ideas and to provide flexibilityand the ability to share equipment and spaces.

CENTERS FOR ADVANCED SCIENCE EXPLORATION:

Center for Advanced Science Exploration (CASE) provides specialized lab environments for the application and exploration of the sciences and their integration into the academic environment of each SLC. The CASE is located

between the two primary academic wings of campus, and adjacent to the Heath Sciences and Applied Technologies SLC’s.


Small Learning Communities

4

3

1. Small Learning Community 2. Professional Center 3. Cafe: Shaded Outdoor Dining 4. The Grove: Shaded Outdoor Study


2

1

1

The Quad


Collaboration 4

2

Perris High School #4 | 2015 Š BakerNowicki Student Collaboration AreasDesign Studio

1. Collaborative Area, Soft Seating 2. Mobile White Boards 3. Counseling/A.P. Entrance


5

3

1

WHERE EVERYONE GETS TOGETHER Each SLC has one: a large Student Collaboration Area. It’s the heart of each community, providing the nexus of group learning, collaboration, applied learning (flex labs), teach and administrative presence (professional center), and student social life. The space is a double height room at the main entrance to each SLC. It’s comfortable, active, easily supervised from both above and below, and is easy to find. It’s the answer to the goal: “make a pace where BakerNowicki students will want to Studio stay.” | 25 Design

4. Interactive Display 5. Professional Center


3

1

2

Perris High School #4 | 2015 Š BakerNowicki Design Studio


Collaboration Where professional educators can collaborate

4

It’s a bit of a paradigm shift. Teacher’s don’t own their classes at this school. Instead, teachers have been provided a prominant, collraborative workspace that gives them the importance they deserve. Resourced with lounge-styled furniture, shared work stations, white boards, conference rooms, and a kitchenette, Teachers will more easily adapt to the project based learning and collaborative teaching goals that the District has established this campus.

Teacher’s Professional Center 1. Collaborative Area, Soft Seating 2. Mobile White Boards 3. Supervision of Quad 4. Workstations BakerNowicki Design Studio | 27


2

The PerrisLearning High School #4Commons | 2015 Š BakerNowicki Design Studio 1. Collaborative Learning in Soft Seating 2. Project rooms


Collaboration

4

3

1

THIS IS THE ‘LIBARY?’ WHERE ARE THE BOOKS? Perris Union High School District is a “one to one” district, providing chrome-books (or laptops) to each of their students. The result is a hyper-focus on technology rich

environments and learning. The District has re-visioned the Library as a Learning Commons, shown here, as a collaborative learning environment hosting small and medium sized groups. It’s intended

to be a loud a lively space. For students and small groups that still want that library-styled quiet, project rooms (shown above as element (2) can be reserved. BakerNowicki Design Studio | 29

3. Wall-Talker White Boards and Interactive Technology 4. View to Student Union Below


Socialization 1

4

The Lunch Shelter

2

1. Lunch Shelter 2. Outdoor Dining 3. Administration 4. Student Union & Learning Commons

STUDENT CENTERED CULTURE:

COLLEGIATE ENVIRONMENTS:

A series of outdoor and indoor spaces have been created in key locations on campus to collect students for socialization and group learning. The goal is to provide spaces that students want to be in. The prominance of these spaces, and their focus on students will amplify the District’s goal of creating a student centered culture.

While much of the campus is crafted around applied learning and technologies, the District is also very interested in creating a campus culture that encourages students to pursue higher education. The design assists this goal by simulating, through the architecture, a collegiate experience and atmosphere.

STUDENT UNION & LEARNING COMMONS: At Perris High School #4, learning can be integrated into socialization through collaboration. The planning and architecture support this by locating collaborative learning spaces adjacent to social spaces. For Example, the student union is a multi-use space that is


3

the center of the social hub of the campus. The Learning Commons is located inside the Student Union, above the Multi-Purpose Space. Additionally, Flex Labs in the Academic Buildings are adjacent to the Collaboration spaces. These learning-rich and collaborative environments provide flexible use of the campus for both group learning as well as social events and activities.


Socialization Socialization

1

The Terraces 1. Stadium 2. Weight Room 3. Gymnasium 4. Administration


3

4 2

SUSTAINABILITY: Being a Desert Climate, Materials and Building System selection are important to the success of the project. Phase changing materials

will be used in conjunction with night time ventilation to take advantage of the diurnal temperature swings. Naturally flushing the heat from the building significantly reduces energy use during the day. The entire project

will utilize LED lighting and high efficiency HVAC units resulting in a design target that exceeds California’s Title-24 energy requirements by 30%.


3

4

1

2

1. Food Service 2. Dining 3. Interactive Display 4. Learning Common 5. Project Rooms


Collaboration & Flexibility The best expression of flexibility in the design of High School #4 can be seen in how easily and comfortably comfortably students can move between group instruction, individual research, project team activities and centers of applied learning labs. In addition, great pains have been made to allow immediate access to the exterior for outdoor learning from most interior collaboration spaces. Each SLC is designed around open collaboration rooms on each floor, and multiple protected outdoor areas providing an extension of the teaching environment throughout the campus. Giving students options that they are most comfortable in to complete their work.

5

7

Each pair of small learning communities are designed with professional centers for teacher collaboration and exploration of programs, teaching strategies and preparation. Teachers being together, as a team, in one space support the planning and development of inter-discipline assignments. The design accommodates and embraces collaboration among both student and staff. The campus is a linear plan that allows for the shifting of teaching stations to and between adjacent small learning communities while retaining proximity during enrollment fluctuations. Transparency in the design allows for ease of supervision as students use all portions of the site as a learning environment. An example of this can be seen to the left, in the Student Union Space. This space, a vibrant social environment, is easily supervised both indoor and out by staff through the expansive glass walls.

6

The Student Union 6. Soft Seating, Socialization 7. Transparency for Supervision.


Socialization

Gymnasium



Socialization

Theater



ABOUT BAKERNOWICKI DESIGN STUDIO The Baker Nowicki Design Studio team offers over 25 years of specialized services in the design of educational and municipal facilities. Headquartered in San Diego, California, the firm was formed by in 2011 by Jon Baker, FAIA, Richard Nowicki, AIA and Buddy Gessel, AIA. The firm’s principals have worked in partnership for over 15 years and have successfully completed over 100 projects for dozens of public and private educational clients. BakerNowicki Design Studio is dedicated to innovative designs based on conceptual approaches that integrate context, form and experience. Each project is a synergy of the idealized (desire) and the circumstantial (need). Each project presents an opportunity to integrate environments and people. Services are tailored to respond to the specific needs of clients and circumstances. The ability to identify unique solutions to complex project challenges has led to many innovative concepts that address programmatic needs, solve challenging project delivery issues and meet tough budget limitations. Essential to our creative process is the design of spaces that meet the needs of those for whom they are intended. Our desire is to design facilities that will provide memorable and positive experiences to all .

Perris High School #4 | 2015 Š BakerNowicki Design Studio


SERVICES Architecture Design & Engineering Interior Design Construction Administration Cost Estimating Planning Feasibility & Site Selection Project Financial Analysis Master Planning Education Funding OPSC Eligibility & Application Processing IPP & FPP development Regulatory Processing State and Local Agency Approvals Integrated Processes Building Information Modeling Energy Modeling: BIM Sustainable Design

C O L L A B O R AT I V E INTEGRATED INNOVATIVE SUSTAINABLE

Lifecycle Cost Analysis

BakerNowicki Design Studio | 41



NOTES


C O L L A B O R AT I V E INTEGRATED I N N O VAT I V E SUSTAINABLE


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