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roatan health center

Veronika Adamova, Garric Baker, Joy Ding, Tracy Ford, Andre Pei, Kelsey Vusich


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roatan health center Veronika Adamova, Garric Baker, Joy Ding, Tracy Ford, Andre Pei, Kelsey Vusich

introduction

This comprehensive publication narrates the efforts of six graduate students at Kansas State University’s College of Architecture, Planning, and Design. It combines a yearlong collaboration between island officials, the medical community, and residents of Roatan, Honduras with design solutions provided by these students. This project would not have been possible without the help of several people, in the instance of omission those names are not listed here but the students will forever be in debt to those who have assisted in our endeavors. The work found in this publication has been compiled through teams led by Veronika Adamova, Garric Baker, Joy Ding, Tracy Ford, Andre Pei, and Kelsey Vusich during the fall semester of 2012 and their continued work into the spring 2013 semester. The studio was overseen by Professors Jim Jones and Dragoslav Simic.


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roatan health center Veronika Adamova, Garric Baker, Joy Ding, Tracy Ford, Andre Pei, Kelsey Vusich

I.

project background

project overview // individual designs // group designs

II. the island

the island of roatan // trips // presentations

III. roatan trauma center spring 2013 semester

IV. project bamboo


I. project background r

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roatan health center Veronika Adamova, Garric Baker, Joy Ding, Tracy Ford, Andre Pei, Kelsey Vusich

A. project overview process // program

B. individual designs

adamova // baker // ding // ford // pei // vusich

C. group designs

high 5 // incredibles // lionfish


1

A

2

project overview

The Roatan Health Center began with research conducted by the students of Studio 73, a vertical studio combined of third year students as a part of Architecture Design Studio 3 and fifth year students in the Architecture Design Studio 7.

3

1 // Case studies, site analysis, learning the culture and heritage of the island, common practices in health care based on struggling economies, the necessities found in medical facilities, as well as much more was combined into a skill set the students used in developing the program and requirements for the Roatan Health Facility. 2 // Each student of the studio created conceptual designs. From this exercise the necessities of the facility emerged as common themes found in several solutions. 3 // Principles found in the research and case studies were utilized to push these designs further.

4

4 // From these individual schematic designs five solutions were chosen based on their ability to progress and move forward in a successful attempt at providing health care to the island residents.


Communal Kitchen

2 Bedrooms & Bathroom

Proximity to Outdoor Space Overnight Stay Conversion

40 patient capacity

Kitchenette

Close Proximity to Reception

Bathroom

Covered Waiting Space

Guest Apartments

Covered Drop-Off

Waiting Area

Phone Capabilities

General Maintenance

Multi-Purpose Space

Generator Space

Ambulance Bay Storage of Records

Noise, Air, Exhaust Buffer Adjacent Preproom

Operating Room Overlap with Reception

Admitting & Nurse Station

adjacent restroom

Mechanical & Equipment

Community Space

Support Spaces

Emergency Unit

Site

Counter Space

Staff & Patient Parking

Six Beds

Adjacent Break Room

Intensive Care Units

Emergency Ward

Janitorial Closet

Cleaning Supplies

Adjacent Restroom Small Desk

Drug Storage

Haxardous Material Disposal

Nurse Station

Adjacent Shower

Visibility into Rooms

Neonatal Care Room Close Proximity to Nurse Station

Intensive Care Overnight & Guest Stay Centrally Located

Recovery Room Complicated Labor Equipment

Overnight Stay

Guest Stay

Possibly adjacent to operation room

Centrally Located

Crash Cart Alcove


5

The five schemes were taken on by five groups created within the studio. The teams pushed the designs even further by addressing feedback each individual designer had received during reviews.

6

After changes had been made the designs were reviewed again. Each group was given valuable feedback that needed to be readdressed. This provided a more cohessive concept.

7

Reinforced designs were classified as two courtyard schemes, two bar schemes, and one hybrid of the two. These five designs traveled to Roatan, Honduras and were presented in front of Mayor Galindo of the West End, Mayor Wally of the East End, and the hospital community in Coxen Hole.


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roatan health center


Veronika Adamova

B

individual designs

Garric Baker


Joy Ding

Tracy Ford

Kelsey Vusich

Andre Pei


Courtyard | The building is situated on the platform over the water. Two buildings are situated around the courtyard, which is the main idea of the building. In the Lshaped part is situated health care center and shelter and the rectangular shaped building houses apartments for the doctors. The bamboo cross bracing on the facade is another specific characteristic of the building - their function is structural and also esthetical.

Veronika Adamova

Courtyard perspective


Ground plan

Detail sketching

Courtyard plan

Building model


Process model

Perspective

Zoning | This idea is the main focus of this project. The building of the Roatan Trauma Center is divided into three forms according to their function (health care, community, and accommodation). Smaller (support) spaces are needed between the zones of bigger open (use) spaces (laundry, rest rooms, storages, etc.). Roof planes are shaped to collect rainwater and direct it to these support zones. The health care area has three entrances. The main entrance is the most visible to the public and incoming patients arriving from either the parking lot or by foot. The second entrance is for ambulances which access the hospital area from the other side of the building. Having another entrance separates circulation of fast ambulance access and pedestrian access. The last entrance is for visitors and families who want to visit their inpatient relatives. The remarkable sign of the design is also the datum line, which is a unifying element between these masses and also creates shading around the building.


Groundplan

Sections


Sustainability | In defining sustainability for the Trauma Center of Roatan, Honduras, it

differs from that of using environmentally friendly design and construction methods; for this particular project sustainability refers to the ability of the center to be an independent entity that does not rely on outside funding.

Garric Baker

For this reason, this concept looks at ways of reducing costs finding the main avenue would be to reduce the amount of staff on hand; thus, resulting in a design that focuses around a central nursing station that offers many services. Admissions, record keeping, pharmacy control, supervision of intensive care patients, as well as many other functions are performed at this central location. From the central core there are other functions including the emergency ward, support spaces, the community center, intensive care units, and the doctor’s residence. In doing so this allows for the staff to be readily available within a short distance of all spaces needing their assistance.

Perspective of the building


3D section

B

Birds perspective

3D section


Two forms overlapping on each other create a central core for nurse station to separate pedestrians into waiting room, community space, etc; while keeping the health care unit secure and quiet. The two forms are reinforced by applying different materials and structure language.

Joy Ding

Perspective of the building


Diagrams


Groundplan

2nd floor


Building model


Trauma in Paradise | The underlying goal of this design was to make it a functional and inviting design. The thatched entry is used to make the islanders feel comfortable as they enter into the trauma center. This design is focused largely on daylight with the use of skylights, clerestory windows and large amounts of northern glazing.

Tracy Ford

Perspective of the building


Site plan

Toilet 47 SF Storage 147 SF

Community 1067 SF Waiting 1165 SF

Nurse 298 SF

Pharmacy 105 SF

Restroom 77 SF

ICU 204 SF

ICU 204 SF

Breakroom 183 SF

Laundry 100 SF

Storage 137 SF

Restroom 58 SF

Restroom 59 SF

Consultation 67 SF

ICU 154 SF

ICU 154 SF

Mechanical 178 SF

ER 132 SF

Operating Room 403 SF

Groundplan


Elevations


3D section


Beautiful | The new trauma center creates spaces to foster human connections and collaboration. This building embodies the idea of a hand with its’ fingers spread wide reaching out to touch nature. The three fingers have varying degrees of privacy based on the spaces provided in the building; ER, ICU, and community. The trauma center is orientated on a cliff side with the patient viewing out the window towards the ocean. In between the fingers is an outdoor healing pavilion. Thus, engaging the patient with mother nature who aides in the recovery process.

Kelsey Vusich

Axonometry


Building rendering

Groundplan


Rendered elevation

Roof planes

Rendered elevation


Renewed groundplan


The initial design concept designates the most valuable programmatic space to be at the heart of the trauma center’s plan. The operating room and ICU recovery rooms are completely secure within the premises of the building where they are most insulated for conditioning purposes, and most secure from the public. Utilizing a series of clearstories, all passageways are illuminated by natural daylight and double as ventilation escape point.

Andre Pei

Perspective of the building


-

apt

break

apt

garden

NICU

mech. maint.

stor. mech.

comm.

ICU

nurse

stor.

laundry

RR. RR.

ER

prep.

OR

waiting admit.

nurse

Groundplan

pharm.

RR.

stor.

stable.

ER


Building overview

Interior rendering


Interior rendering

3D section


Veronika Adamova

C

Joy Ding

group designs


high 5


phases 1


2

3


main entrance

circulation

1

random motion patients organized motion patients doctors/ nurses

ambulance drop off

CIRCULATION

Circulation diagram - site

SITE CIRCULATION

1

Section A - Apartments 1/8" = 1'-0"

Apartment Community

HIERARCHY

VENTILATION

Healthcare

2

Section B - Community center 1/8" = 1'-0" GROUND PLAN SCALE: 1/8”=1’-0”

Groundplan

STRUCTURE

SECTION

Section C - Healthcare 3 1/8" = 1'-0"

Siteplan

TRAUM


Level 1 10' - 0"

fro nit

Level 1 10' - 0"

back co

Level 2 20' - 0" Level 1 10' - 0"

ambulance side

MA CENTER

ELEVATION

Roatan, Honduras


tiles corkcork tiles cork tiles

timber timber timber

volcanic stone volcanic stone volcanic stone

bamboo louvers bamboo louvers bamboo louvers

wooden siding wooden siding wooden siding

aterials aterials

2

Siteplan Groundplan


3

Siteplan


Groundplan


pectives

Building renderings

exterior perspectives

Perspective of the entrance


3 main goals of the project:

1. easy and clear access – a question of life and death– a 1. easy and clear access question of life and death

2. create pleasant welcoming space sopleasant people can feel 2. create welcoming relaxed space so people can feel relaxed

3. create a cheap, sustainable 3. create a expandable cheap, sustainable and easily design

and easily expandable design

northBuilding elevation elevation

3D section

sectional elevation 3D 3D sectional elevation

interior perspectives

Building elevation

east elevation

east elevation


Entrance hall

ER wing

Comunity center

Health center hallway


Alex Taylor Sarah McDonald

gn Structural 3D section

Structural grid 20x20


Kelsey Vusich

Andre Pei

the incredibles


phases 1


2

3


1

Groundplan


Elevations

Perspective

Circulation


2

Groundplan


Entrance hall

Courtyard

ER part


3

Siteplan


Groundplan


Elevations

Sections


Elevations


Interior rendering


Sunset rendering


Garric Baker

Tracy Ford

the lionfish


phases 1


2

3


1

circulation

Diagrams

emergency patient circulation


nurses and doctors circulation

Ambulance drop off


2

Groundplan


Nurses station

Emergency area


3

Diagrams


Groundplan


Diagrams

Structural details


Exterior rendering


Overview rendering

Ambulance drop off area


II. the island r

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roatan health center Veronika Adamova, Garric Baker, Joy Ding, Tracy Ford, Andre Pei, Kelsey Vusich

A. the island of roatan

who is an islander? // who is the tourist?

B. existing facility C. trips

trip one // trip two: return to roatan

D. presentations


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roatan health center


A

the island of roatan Roatan, Honduras is a beautiful island that makes up part of the Bay Islands in the Caribbean Sea. A mixture of palm and pine trees are scattered through golden coasts and up steep mountain sides. The soil is a rich red color eroded from the mountains that rose up several centuries ago as volcanoes. Lights from the mainland can be seen flickering in the distance on clear nights. The island is roughly 40 miles long and approximately 5 miles wide at it’s widest point. The population is humble and welcoming; the Studio 73 group was shown a great deal of hospitality from the time they stepped off the plane to the day they left on both visits. The atmosphere of the island is one unlike any other and is hard to leave behind. The culture is rich in it’s fishing heritage, delicious food, dancing, and island lifestyle. The beaches are a part of the daily life, harboring fishing boats as well as community events and gatherings. Buildings and houses made of bamboo, thatch roofs, and clay walls all face the ocean with the beaches serving as a communal space.


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roatan health center


The island of Roatan can be seen from two viewpoints: a tourist or an islander. Tourists only know a sense of luxury. They are catered to on the island and provided with decent housing and luxury cruise liners, and activities such as snorkeling, diving, yoga, zip-lining, sport fishing, and the list goes on. Coming from countries with more prosperous economies, the prices seem reasonable and at times low. The prices although low, serve as daily wages to the local islanders. Residents of Roatan live in shacks and houses constantly falling apart and being weathered by the salinity in the air, harsh downpours, and strong winds. These oftentimes make-shift houses are furnished with the bare necessities, and lack cleanliness, indoor plumbing, and even electricity.


who is an islander? “You become an Islander, not by blood or race. It gets into your blood. You smell it, you breathe it, its in you.� -Governor Hyde The beach is a vital part of the Honduras community and daily life. People live, come together and grow up on the beach. As a way to preserve the heritage of the community, dance is a way of actively passing down a beloved tradition. Not only is fishing a pass time as well, it is a livelihood for most and a means of providing for their family. Local diets have changed from that of local goods to artificial and processed foods. However, many islanders face the risk of injury from every day activities like fishing and diving.


who is the tourist? Tourism is a major source of income and provides jobs to many local islanders. With the island being located near the worlds second largest barrier reef, this has become an important destination node for cruise ships and scuba divers. Islanders know when the cruise ships are in port because there is a sudden influx of people as well as a sky-rocketing of prices. West End is the most popular town on the island. There are a variety of bars, restaurants, and dancing clubs. Coxen Hole is where the airport is located and most of life’s necessities can be found. Most tourists typically do not venture further east than French Harbor. Past this point are a few newer beach resorts such as Paya Bay, and some private towns like Jonesville.

Punta Gorda

Paya Bay

Jim’s House

French Harbor Site Location Coxen Hole

West End Point


B

existing facilities

The island of Roatan currently only has one public hospital which is insufficient for the population. The hospital attends to 20-25 patients daily, with a minimum of 1 or 2 being air lifted to the mainland due to inadequacy of the current facility. The facility is greatly understaffed and has inadequate resources to serve its users. The facility lacks storage for the equipment it does have, leaving several pieces of medical equipment sitting outside in the elements. Patrons also do not know how to enter the building as entrances, including an ambulance drop off that is located down a crowded alley, are very obscure. Exam rooms are thrown together lacking organization, security, and efficiency. It is Studio 73’s goal to provide a solution to all of these obstacles. The students realize that a central nursing station is required to make the center a more feasible option. By having this central node of service, it reduces the amount of staff on hand and allows the staff to be readily available in case of emergencies. Storage needs will be met and exceeded for future growth. Entrances will be easily recognizable as well as separated from ambulance drop-offs. Exam rooms will have organization, cleanliness, and be able to serve patients with greater efficacy.


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roatan health center


There are no defined waiting rooms. Patients are often forced to wait outside in the elements, or are crowded into a small hallway. Overcrowding and poor placement of medical devices such as X-ray’s makes everyday treatments difficult. Medicines are chronically out of stock. Estimates show that 1 out of 3 patients go home without medicines after having seen a doctor The main cause of hospitalization is drunk driving. it is estimated that 70% of traffic accidents on the island involve alcohol. Motorcycle accidents are the most common type. There are approximately 10-15 women per day that go into labor on Roatan. Many of these women give birth at home, however the hospital often deals with birthing issues. There is currently only 1 ambulance on the island. It is located in Coxen Hole and is typically used to transport patients to the airport. Roatan does not have a helicopter pad nor a helicopter because of the cost. All patients that need to be airlifted to the mainland must first be taken to the airport and flown by plane to their required destination. Electricity on Roatan is often unreliable. Power surges, faulty wiring, traffic accidents, and weather are all common causes of electricity failure. The hospital is often forced to function with limited means in a power failure. There is a small backup generator, but not as large as needed. The hospital also functions as a community space. Special holidays have celebrations that take place in the hospital such as children’s day. The community space within the hospital is a necessity. Families with sick members will stay at the hospital to cook and care for their loved ones in the community space. The community space also promotes hope and happiness in times of need. A community space can also double as a teaching space or even a space for vaccinations.


C

trip 1: initial island visit During the week of September 8, 2012 through September 15, 2012 a large group of students from Studio 73 traveled to Roatan, Honduras with their two professors Jim Jones and Dragoslave Simic. During their stay on the island the students performed site visits, participated in meetings with community members, local doctors, architects, and engineers; and they spoke with the two island mayors and it’s governor. The students were introduced to the island lifestyle including the culture, cuisine, and a plethora of recreational activities that the island provides to island tourists. The students were able to do yoga, zip lining, snorkeling, fishing, and even a dolphin encounter set up by one of the island mayors. While there the students also made local newspapers and television appearances spreading the word of their endeavors of creating a trauma center for the island. It was during this initial landing on the island that students were able to begin to understand the need for the trauma center. They toured the existing facility and were surprised to see the conditions that the doctors had to work around. The facility was understaffed and over populated with people needing to see physicians. Sterilization was another issue that needed to be addressed as the Roatan Hospital did not meet adequate standards of cleanliness. Upon returning to the United States the students began their work on the trauma center with having the intention of helping a community in need.


D

trip 2: return to roatan On January 28, 2013 seven students left out of Kansas City headed for Roatan, Honduras to present five solutions to island officials, the medical community, and the public. These five schemes consisted of two bar schemes, two courtyard schemes, and a hybrid of the two. The students were more immersed in the actual lifestyle of the islanders whereas the first trip was seen more in the eyes of tourists. Now that the students had experienced the island a first time, going back they were able to analyze the island life more closely. This second trip began with the students being interviewed by local media outlets the minute they entered the airport of Roatan. The news that several students from the United States were dedicating their time to generating plausible schemes for a health facility for their residents made for fascinating reports. The following Monday morning, the students found themselves presenting in front of several staff members of the one hospital on Roatan. This presentation was not warmly welcomed at first with doctors pausing the presentations after the introductions to inform the students of the real need on the island. The doctors felt that the island needed a new hospital, with better equipment, more funding, better environments, an educated staff, and much more. However, after much discussion the group helped the doctors to see that a new hospital, while much needed, was not feasible. Roatan lacks enough staff to facilitate the requirements of the current hospital, and therefore, our smaller scale health centers would ease this tension of the hospital. It would provide much better facilities, adequate equipment, and designs to counteract the lack of staffing. Once the doctors accepted this, they allowed the students to proceed with the presentations that showed just how the solutions planned to accommodate their needs as much as possible. These solutions were smaller scale, but allowed a health center to be built within the budgets the government felt comfortable in placing in the medical sector.


The second presentations were given to Mayor Galindo of the West End. Mayor Galindo was very excited about the progress the students had made since our last visit. His mentality was, “Let’s do it,� as well as a few other suggestions to be addressed. The third and final presentation was given to Mayor Wally Boden of the East End. He was introduced to the project as he had just recently taken office and was unaware of the possibility of a trauma center on the island. He was very receptive and willing

to work with the students in advising them any way he could. By the end of the trip the students had secured not only one possibility of a trauma center but two health centers, one for the East End and one for the West End. Throughout the week the students received the best hospitality everywhere they went. Club Natale offered the students a spacious condominium with a great view that could, on clear


nights, see lights from the mainland, as well as a beautiful beach, snorkeling along the reef, and a swimming pool. The students even attempted their own local cuisine after a few trips to Eldon’s, the local grocery store. The students were also welcomed at the West End where they enjoyed venturing in and out of shops offering local arts, crafts, and other souvenirs. They were able to snorkel and swim along the beaches as well as the reef in Half Moon Bay. The professors had impressive

accommodations at the Lost Paradise Resort. The students were also provided with the generosity of Olid and Larry, our drivers who made time for our schedule to drive us anywhere we wished at a moments notice.


E

presentations in honduras Seven students from the original Studio 73 traveled to Roatan, Honduras to present their designs to island officials, the public, and the hospital community. Valuable feedback was attained through people who actually live on the island and know the conditions that the students may have overlooked initially. During the presentation to the medical community many questions arose, especially early on in the delivery of the projects. It was announced that the group had been developing solutions to provide a Trauma Center to supplement the existing hospital. However, the doctors and nurses alike opposed to the idea of a trauma center because they realized the real need on the island was for a new hospital. Once a clarification was made to change the name, type, and services offered within the building the presentations were underway again. The key suggestions the students received were to create more separation for sterilization to decrease the chances of contamination, the intensive care units should be used as a recovery room in stead of a long-stay unit; the final comments were to include an x-ray space, as well as a lab space as the designs were lacking in those areas. The presentation with Mayor Galindo went much better and very enthusiastically. Mayor Galindo gave the students an

insight into the way the hospital in Tegucigalpa operated stating that even though the hospital was in a metropolis of over one million people, the hospital required roughly $1 million a year in operating costs alone. He also questioned the feasibility of using bamboo as a construction material in that termites could pose a problem. The mayor also suggested using concrete masonry units (CMU) blocks due to the availability on the island, and its durability to withstand the salinity in the air as well as the strong sea breezes. It was proposed that the buildings would be comprised of these concrete blocks on the exterior and then wood could be used within the structure for aesthetics. Mayor Gallindo also informed the group that excellent construction on the island ranged from $100-$120 per square foot. He also stressed that palm trees are the essence of the Caribbean and wished we would implement them more. In addressing the concerns of the doctors from the previous discussions he thought that it might be possible for the health center to serve as a small hospital to collaborate with the existing facility to relieve the pressure put on the Hospital Roatan.


III. roatan trauma center r

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roatan health center Veronika Adamova, Garric Baker, Joy Ding, Tracy Ford, Andre Pei, Kelsey Vusich

A. site analysis process // program

B. roatan trauma center diagrams // floor plans

C. roatan trauma center elevations // sections // wall details

D. roatan trauma center photo realistic renderings


A

site analysis

Roatan, Honduras is a beautiful island that makes up part of the Bay Islands in the Caribbean Sea. A mixture of palm and pine trees are scattered through golden coasts and up steep mountain sides. The soil is a rich red color eroded from the mountains that rose up several centuries ago as volcanoes. Lights from the mainland can be seen flickering in the distance on clear nights. The island is roughly 40 miles long and approximately 5 miles wide at it’s widest point. The population is humble and welcoming; the Studio 73 group was shown a great deal of hospitality from the time they stepped off the plane to the day they left on both visits. The atmosphere of the island is one unlike any other and is hard to leave behind. The culture is rich in it’s fishing heritage, delicious food, dancing, and island lifestyle. The beaches are a part of the daily life, harboring fishing boats as well as community events and gatherings. Buildings and houses made of bamboo, thatch roofs, and clay walls all face the ocean with the beaches serving as a communal space.


The proposed site for the East End of Roatan is located in Punta Gorda. Punta Gorda is the oldest permanent settlement in Roatan. For most of the year, Punta Gorda is simply a sleepy seaside town—dozens of cayucos pulled up on the beach, a steady breeze blowing in the palms, and Garífuna residents moving at a very deliberate pace, usually happy to spend a few minutes or hours chatting with a visitor.


W in

Summer nrise Su

ter S unrise

et uns Winter S

Summer Sunset Wind Direction

Site Location


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roatan health center


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roatan health center


B

roatan health center Roatan, Honduras is a beautiful island that makes up part of the Bay Islands in the Caribbean Sea. A mixture of palm and pine trees are scattered through golden coasts and up steep mountain sides. The soil is a rich red color eroded from the mountains that rose up several centuries ago as volcanoes. Lights from the mainland can be seen flickering in the distance on clear nights. The island is roughly 40 miles long and approximately 5 miles wide at it’s widest point. The population is humble and welcoming; the Studio 73 group was shown a great deal of hospitality from the time they stepped off the plane to the day they left on both visits. The atmosphere of the island is one unlike any other and is hard to leave behind. The culture is rich in it’s fishing heritage, delicious food, dancing, and island lifestyle. The beaches are a part of the daily life, harboring fishing boats as well as community events and gatherings. Buildings and houses made of bamboo, thatch roofs, and clay walls all face the ocean with the beaches serving as a communal space.


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roatan health center

Site plan


geometry

golden section


parti


circulation


level 1

level 2

spaces


sun

heat


water

structure


phases

Phase 0

Phase 2

Phase 4

Phase 1

Phase 3

Phase 5

Cistern 1 (underground) 500 sq ft

Community

500 sq ft (900 sq ft)

Community

500 sq ft (900 sq ft)

Medical Spaces 7000 sq ft

Support Wing 2100 sq ft


Terrace

1460 sq ft

Apartments 3100 sq ft


136' - 11 15/16"

10' - 0"

15' - 0"

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

15' - 0"

10' - 0"

Treatment

Treatment

5

4

Recovery 25' x 25' 29

Breakroom

reco 15' - 0"

11

nurse station 10´x 15´

Emergency ward 25'x 25' expandable to 25' x 60'

c

20 UP

30

15' - 0"

Emergency or Community expansion 25' x 10'

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

75' - 0"

Community Space 25x20

10' - 0"

31

34' - 10 3/16"

33

10' - 0"

Lab

15' - 0"

32

36' - 11 1/4"

Ground floor

73' - 2 1/


15' - 0"

10' - 0"

15' - 0"

10' - 0"

15' - 0"

Laundry Dirty sterilization 10´x 15´

OR 15´x15´

3

17

2

15' - 0"

34

OR 15´x 15´

Laundry Clean 15´x 15´

10' - 0"

1

ords 7.5´x 20´ X - Ray 10´x 15´

/8"

25

Storage supplies 35´x 15´

24

10' - 0"

15' - 0"

15' - 0"

Mech/Elec 15´x 15´

Pharmacy 20´x 15´

10' - 0"

14

15

26' - 10 19/32"

91' - 1 5/8"

15' - 0"

6

10' - 0"

check desk

"

15' - 0"

23


30' - 0"

12' - 7"

10' - 0"

16' - 0 5/16"

10' - 0 5/16"

6' - 0"

7' - 11 7/32"

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

5' - 0"

5' - 0"

40' - 0"

supply storage

DN

15' - 0"

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

8' - 0"

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

5' - 0"

5' - 0"

10' - 0" 76' - 4 1/8"

Level 2

1

Level 2 1/8" = 1'-0"


10' - 0"

15' - 0"

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

15' - 0"

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

15' - 0"

10' - 0"

41' - 3 5/8"

10' - 0"

15' - 0"

10' - 0"


Ground floor


Flloorplan // level 2


materials

C

wall stucco paint plaster

polished concrete

textured concrete

- interior walls

- floor

- exterior wall finish


dark wood

light wood timber

standing seam

- facade screens

- wooden columns and truss

- roof


C

roatan health center Roatan, Honduras is a beautiful island that makes up part of the Bay Islands in the Caribbean Sea. A mixture of palm and pine trees are scattered through golden coasts and up steep mountain sides. The soil is a rich red color eroded from the mountains that rose up several centuries ago as volcanoes. Lights from the mainland can be seen flickering in the distance on clear nights. The island is roughly 40 miles long and approximately 5 miles wide at it’s widest point. The population is humble and welcoming; the Studio 73 group was shown a great deal of hospitality from the time they stepped off the plane to the day they left on both visits. The atmosphere of the island is one unlike any other and is hard to leave behind. The culture is rich in it’s fishing heritage, delicious food, dancing, and island lifestyle. The beaches are a part of the daily life, harboring fishing boats as well as community events and gatherings. Buildings and houses made of bamboo, thatch roofs, and clay walls all face the ocean with the beaches serving as a communal space.


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roatan health center

Sectional perspective


h = 1'-0"

South elevation


Roof end 33' - 0"

Roof 20' - 0"

Level 2 12' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"


North North elevation 1/8" = 1'-0"


Roof end 33' - 0"

Roof 20' - 0"

Level 2 12' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"


East elevation


West elevation


3D section // both wings

3D section // emergency & community center


3D section // OR and ICU


South elevation

East elevation


Front elevation

North elevation


17' - 6"

9' - 0"

15' - 6" 2' - 0" North to South // Building Section

crosssection_1 1/8" = 1'-0"


3' - 0 1/32"

2' - 11 7/16"

11' - 0"

20' - 5 5/8"

9' - 8 17/32"

1' - 0"

0' - 6"

1' - 10 9/16"

4' - 4"

8' - 0"

Roof end 33' - 0"

Roof 20' - 0"

Level 2 12' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"


3' - 0" 5' - 0" 3' - 0"

3' - 6" 12' - 0"

1

crosssection_3_BW

East to West // Building Section


2' - 0"

8' - 0"

0' - 6"

1' - 4"

4' - 6"

8' - 0"

3' - 6"

1' - 0"

4' - 0"

15' - 6"

11' - 0"

6' - 8"

9' - 6"

Roof end 33' - 0" Level 6 29' - 6"

Roof 20' - 0"

Level 2 12' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"


wall details


Corrugated Metal Roof Vapor Barrier 3/4” Plywood 2”x6” Roof Joist 2”x12” Truss Flashing Gutter 2”x6” Box Beam 2”x4” Wood Screen

Gutter // Roof Detail

3/8” Gypsum Board Plaster Concrete Masonry Unit with 3/8” Mortar Joints

Plaster Concrete Masonry Unit with 3/8” Mortar Joint 2”x4” Wood Screen 2”x6” Box Beam

Poured in Place Concrete Fill Gravel 6” Diameter Drain

Footing Earth Footing // Floor Detail


wall details


all Detail 2

Corrugated Metal Roof Vapor Barrier 3/4” Plywood 2”x6” Roof Joist 2”x12” Truss

Roof // Truss Detail

Concrete Masonry Unit with 3/8” Mortar Joint 2”x4” Wood Screen 3/4” Plywood Gutter Poured in Place Concrete Slab Metal Decking Concrete Lintel 2”x4” Wood Trellace Plaster Second Storry // Trellace Detail

Concrete Masonry Unit with 3/8” Mortar Joint 2”x4” Wood Screen Plaster

Poured in Place Concrete Slab with Control Joints

Interior Floor // Exterior Wall // Floor Detail

Fill Gravel Footing 6” Diameter Drain Earth

3

Wall Detail 3


wall details


Corrugated Metal Roof 3/4” Plywood Vapor Barrier 2”x6” Roof Joist 2”x6” Truss 2”x6” Truss 2”x6” Box Beam 2”x4” Wood Screen Plaster Concrete Masonry Unit with 3/8” Mortar Joints Concrete Masonry Unit Wall // Roof Detail

Concrete Lintel Window Header 1/4” Double-Paned Glass

Window Footer Window Sill

Concrete Masonry Unit Wall // Window Detail

2”x4” Wood Screen Plaster


wall details


Corrugated Metal Roof Vapor Barrier 3/4” Plywood 2”x6” Roof Joist 2”x6” Truss

Roof // Column Detail

6”x6” Column 2”x6” Truss 3/8” Gypsum Board Concrete Masonry Unit with 3/8” Mortar Joint 2”x4” Wood Screen Plaster Truss // Concrete Masonry Unit Wall Detail

Concrete Masonry Unit with 3/8” Mortar Joint 2”x4” Wood Screen Plaster

Poured in Place Concrete Slab with Control Joints Metal Decking

Second Floor // Interior Wall Detail

Lead Shield for X-Ray Room Concrete Masonry Unit with 3/8” Mortar Joint


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bamboo


IV. bamboo truss r

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roatan health center Veronika Adamova, Garric Baker, Joy Ding, Tracy Ford, Andre Pei, Kelsey Vusich

A. project overview

the experiment // bamboo properties

B. the procedure

manufacturing // fabrication

C. strength trials

engineering // water drums

D. conclusion open house


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A

bamboo // it isn’t just for pandas anymore Last year a group of 5th year Architecture students came up with the idea to design and build a bamboo structure. This year Studio 73 chose to continue their research and implement a bamboo design into each Trauma Center project. Bamboo has many positives, like being a native material and easily manipulated, but it also has its negatives being limited connections and shear strength.


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bamboo // what is it good for? The research that was made last year stated that the structural properties for bamboo are similar to that of douglas fir, which is commonly used for stud framing in the United States. Unfortunately the downfall of bamboo is its lack of shear strength and a low modulus of elasticity. While a bamboo beam would not be possible, a open web joist would be the perfect application for such a material. Open web joists are under the same physics as a truss, where all members are subjected to either compression or tension without bending moments or shear. Many different structural joint connections were researched last year as well and the best solution was to use fiberglass coated with a poly-resin. Fiberglass was chosen last year because it is a widely used product on the island. Many of the locals make their own fiberglass repairs to their fishing boats.


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B

method to the madness We used two inch diameter Tonkin bamboo rods from a San Diego, California company called Sunset Bamboo. They are fire straightened and termite resistant. The rods came in lengths of eight feet, which we would later have to cut down with a chop saw. To hold the bamboo members in place, we used a CNC (Computer Numerical Control) router to cut out a cradle in rigid insulation. Each of the bamboo members needed to be wrapped with tape when being cut with a chop saw to prevent splintering. They were cut on a sixty degree angle and placed fitting flush with their neighboring members. The final step in preparing the pieces for wrapping, is to use a metal rasp to rough up the ends to give the fiberglass something to adhere to.


fiberglass // the sticky situation Once the bamboo is prepared and sitting perfectly in the insulation mold, the next step is to wrap the fiberglass. Last year, the studio members perfected the wrapping technique and were able to provide us with instructions. We purchased fiberglass on a roll that came in a two inch wide strip, which we into strips of four feet in length to wrap twice around each joint connection. Fiberglass resin is a semi-solid material made with a combination of very fine glass fibers and resin. When working with the fiberglass, it was recommended we invest in a breathing apparatus. The particles are so small that they can be easily inhaled and cause lung damage. We learned it is important to have the fiberglass cross itself as much as possible to provide the greatest amount of strength. Each strip is painted with a fiberglass resin manufactured by 3M. It is waterproof, nonshrinking, but starts off being very sticky. As the chemicals react, the resin dries and hardens making the fiberglass strip no longer movable.


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C

testing the truss

Through the College of Engineering at Kansas State University, we were able to test the maximum axial load of our eight foot bamboo truss. The findings showed that our truss was able to support 6,600 pounds. The two to four foot long segments were subjected to joint load failure at 1,000 pounds. In comparison, a typical joint in the roof structure will hold 100 to 200 pounds. This testing also showed us that the material was actually failing before the connections were. The bamboo was beginning to split down the rod, where it was not wrapped with fiberglass.


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D

open house // april 20

Studio 73’s final test of the bamboo truss was on display during Kansas State’s Open House event. We fabricated a sixteen foot long truss to be on display outside of Seaton Hall. The two trusses would be secured on wooden crates three feet apart from each other. This spacing is typical of commercial roof construction. The trusses would be leveled and then loaded on top with plastic drums. These drums would each be filled with ten gallons of water. There were 160 gallons of water which equals 1,348 pounds of water. The maximum deflection for the truss is 0.8 inches and with the current loading the deflection was 0.5 inches. Based on this bamboo experiment, this method and use of material is appropriate for our proposed Honduras construction.

what is left to be discovered?


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thank you // The students of Studio 73 would like to thank all the people who made this year long studio adventure. We could not have done it without the initial vision from our Professor Jim Jones and Professor Dragoslav Simic. Thank you to Doctor Robert Sager for your generous contributions to our materials and models fund. Lastly, thank you to the Islanders in Roatan and the hospitality you showed when we came to visit your beautiful home.

Roatan Health Center  

A group thesis project developing a health center for the island of Roatan, Honduras.

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