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TABLE OF TABLE OF CONTENTS

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BRIEF HISTORY OF SEATTLE

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CITY MAP/HOTELS

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INEXPENSIVE GOOD EATS

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FOOD WITH A VIEW

Seattle Guide, Table of Contents


Seattle Guide, Table of Contents

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LOCATIONS OF INTEREST

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MORE LOCATIONS OF INTEREST

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EVENTS

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LAST MINUTE VISITS


BRIEF HISTORY OF SEATTLE

19TH CENTURY The great city of Seattle was founded in 1851. At first Seattle was very small but the little settlement was incorporated in 1869. However in 1870 Seattle only had a population of a little over 1,000. Nevertheless the population of Seattle grew rapidly in the late 19th century. By 1890 Seattle was a bustling city with a population of over 42,000. Meanwhile a hospital opened in 1878. On June 1889 a pot of flaming glue in a cabinet shop fell on some wood shavings and began a fire that devastated much of Seattle. Fortunately nobody was killed and

For mor information on Seattles history visit: https://www. seattle.gov/ cityarchives/ seattle-facts/ brief-history-of-seattle

Seattle soon recovered. Seattle University was founded in 1891. The Pioneer Building was built in 1892. It was designed by the architect Elmer Fisher after the fire of 1889. The Klondike Gold Rush of 1897 brought prosperity to Seattle and its population soared. By 1900 Seattle had a population of over 80,000. At that time lumber and shipbuilding were major industries in Seattle. Meanwhile Woodland Park Zoo opened in 1899.

20TH CENTURY Seattle continued to grow rapidly in the early 20th century. By 1920 it had passed 315,000. Pike Place Market was established in 1907 and in 1916 William Boeing founded an aircraft manufacturing company. Meanwhile Smith Tower opened in 1914. Its named after the industrialist Lyman C

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Seattle Guide, Brief History

Farmers markets are littered across Seattle.


Seattle Guide, Brief History

Smith (1850-1910). Fairmont Olympic Hotel was built in 1924. Seattle Art Museum opened in 1933. Meanwhile Bertha Knight Landes became the first woman mayor of Seattle in 1926. Seattle suffered severely in the Depression of the 1930s but its industries flourished again during the Second World War. Huge numbers of aircraft were made in Seattle. After the coming of peace in 1945 Seattle suffered an economic downturn. However in 1962 Seattle hosted a World’s Fair. The Seattle Center was built for the fair. Today Seattle is still famous for the Space Needle, which was built at that time. Seattle suffered again in the mid 1970s when Boeing cut its workforce. However at the end of the 20th century information technology brought new prosperity to Seattle. Meanwhile by 1950 the population of Seattle had risen to over 467,000. Seattle Museum of Flight opened in 1965 and Occidental Park was laid out in 1971. Gas Works Park opened in 1975. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park opened in 1976. Freeway Park also opened in 1976. Seattle Aquarium opened in 1977. It was extended in 2007. Seattle grew rapidly in the late 20th century. The Columbia Center was built in 1985 and Westlake Center opened in 1988. The Odyssey Maritime Discovery Center opened in 1998. Benaroya Hall also opened in 1998. So did Pacific Place Shopping Center.

21ST CENTURY The Experience Music Project Museum was founded in 2000. Central Library was built in 2004. It was designed by the Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas. The Olympic Sculpture Park opened in 2007.


MAP Map From:

.org

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Seattle Guide, Map & Hotels


Seattle Guide, Map & Hotels

HOTELS THE SHEARATON

$195

Spend a weekend visiting popular attractions like the Space Needle or the Seattle Aquarium, or venture to nearby Pioneer Square to immerse yourself in the charm of Seattle’s oldest neighborhood. While city attractions abound, take advantage of our hotel’s ideal location to embark on a day trip to the nearby Woodinville Wine Country or stunning Mount Rainer National Park. However you choose to spend your time here, relax knowing you’ll enjoy signature Sheraton service and an array of elevated amenities, including five unique dining options, a modern Sheraton Fitness Center and a heated indoor lap pool.

BEST WESTERN PLUS PIONEER SQUARE

$181

Set among the shops and restaurants of historic Pioneer Square, this straightforward, modern hotel is set in a Victorian building. It’s a 3-minute walk from the Seattle Ferry Terminal, a 6-minute walk from the Pioneer Square monorail station, and 0.9 miles from Safeco Field.

SILVER CLOUD HOTEL

$139

This straightforward hotel is 1 mile from the main University of Washington campus and 5 miles from downtown Seattle.

HILTON SEATTLE

$159

Connected to the Washington State Convention Center via a walkway, this contemporary high-rise hotel is a 9-minute walk from Seattle Art Museum, and 15 minutes from Seattle Aquarium and the waterfront.

THE PARAMOUNT

$157

This modern, upscale hotel is a 3-minute walk from the Washington State Convention Center, a 10-minute walk from Pike Place Market and 13 minutes from the Seattle Art Museum.


INEXPENSIVE GOOD EATS 1 MAN’OUSHE EXPRESS ($$$) 13721 Lake City Way NE These Middle Eastern flatbreads (mana’eesh), made in a wood-fired oven at Goodies Mediterranean Market, are one of Seattle’s best kept secrets. Gut-bustingly large and wallet-friendly, they’re piled high with za’atar, ground lamb, kefir, bulgur, and mint. With cozy new indoor and outdoor seating, Man’oushe is worth the trip to Lake City from all points north, east, south, west.

2 TIKO RIKO ($$$)

10410 Greenwood Ave N Diners should head to this Greenwood strip mall joint immediately for a pupusa done right. The national dish of El Salvador is perfect with a side of yucca fries and a Mexican coke.

3 RAIN CITY BURGERS ($$$) 6501 Roosevelt Way NE Sure, everyone knows about the cheap burgers at iconic Dick’s Drive-In, but Rain City Burgers’ offerings are a little more substantial while still hearkening back to a different time — a simpler time when $18 hamburgers didn’t exist and penny candy certainly did. This burger joint overflows with Seattle pride, featuring home team flags and Seahawk-inspired dishes. Nothing better than a meat or veggie burger, a cheap beer, and another football season on the cheap.

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Seattle Guide, Cheap Food


Seattle Guide, Cheap Food

4 CHILI’S SOUTH INDIAN RESTAURANT ($$$) 4220 University Way NE What’s most impressive about Chili’s? Is it the focus on cuisine from southern India, a region lesser known in the Seattle food scene? The perfectly griddled homemade dosas? The cheaper-than-dirt prices? The 2015 relaunch into a new space after twenty years of business? Whatever the answer, this U District favorite can do no wrong.

5 PASEO CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT ($$$) 4225 Fremont Ave N These stuffed-to-the-brim Caribbean sandwiches are the stuff of legend, and their mythos only seems to have grown since the iconic Seattle shop closed and reopened under new ownership. There are now even three locations at which to experience an affordable, satisfying classic.

6 KEDAI MAKAN ($$$) 1802 Bellevue Ave

Whether grabbing take-out to pair with Montana Bar’s cocktails on tap or braving the ever-present line for dining in, diners can rest assured that Kedai Makan’s truly unique and impressively cheap menu of delicious Malaysian street food would be worth it at any price. Those peanuts, though.


FOOD WITH A VIEW 1 RAY’S BOATHOUSE ($$$) 6049 Seaview Ave NW

Ray’s seafood restaurant in Seattle serves the freshest seafood prepared with classic technique and global inspiration. Situated on the shores of Ballard overlooking Puget Sound and the Olympic Mountains, Ray’s iconic seafood restaurant and bar believes in offering sea to plate fare while supporting sustainability and our local rockstar fishermen! 6049 Seaview Ave NW

2 WESTWARD ($$$) 2501 N Northlake Way

Scenery-seeking diners have two great options at this Wallingford staple: Park it in one of the Adirondack chairs and sip rosé while gazing at Lake Union, or opt for a patio table and dine on an outstanding menu of Mediterranean seafood and snacks.

3 AGUA VERDE CAFE ($$$) 1303 NE Boat St

Patrons can work up a thirst at this waterfront U District spot, renting a kayak and exploring Lake Union before recuperating with mangodillas and prickly pear margaritas. An early start is key to beating the crowds. For more info on inexpensive goo eats visit: https://seattle.eater.com/maps/best-cheap-food-restaurants-seattle

Going out to eat can quickly add up. That’s why Eater’s collected a list of some of the cheapest eats in the city This is damn good food that doesn’t cost that much.

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Seattle Guide, Food with a View


Seattle Guide, Food with a View

4 CANLIS ($$$$) 2576 Aurora Ave N

Patrons can work up a thirst at this waterfront U District spot, renting a kayak and exploring Lake Union before recuperating with mangodillas and prickly pear margaritas. An early start is key to beating the crowds.

5 PALISADE RESTAURANT ($$$$) 2601 W Marina Pl

Palisade specializes in steaks and seafood, plus a nice selection of cocktails at its choice location on Elliott Bay in the Magnolia neighborhood. It’s a bit of an old-school favorite, and certainly not at the cutting edge of Seattle cuisine, but those views are still hard to beat.

6 SMITH TOWER OBSERVATORY BAR ($$$) Suite 35 506 2nd Ave

Inspired by the speakeasies of yore, the bar perched atop the Smith Tower comes with serious 360-degree views that stretch over downtown Seattle, Elliott Bay, and the Cascade and Olympic mountains. The historic building in Pioneer Square has retained much of its original charm, including its old-fashioned elevators. The bar in the Observatory serves barrel-aged cocktails, freshly shucked local oysters, and plenty of classic drinks.


LOCATIONS OF INTEREST CHIHULY GARDEN AND GLASS The Chihuly Garden and Glass museum is dedicated to the work and career of locally born, world-renowned glassblower Dale Chihuly, who was introduced to the craft while studying at the University of Washington. It is the most comprehensive collection of his art to date, with interior galleries featuring a variety of his work in the medium. The pièce de résistance is the glasshouse, with a vibrant 100-foot-long sculpture in hues of red, orange, and yellow suspended from the ceiling.

SEATTLE AQUARIUM Down at the Seattle Aquarium on the waterfront’s Pier 59, learn all about salmon, meet a few adorable sea otters, and greet the various sea creatures of the Pacific Ocean, from puffers to giant clams. Watch scuba divers feed the fish, gawk at sharks swimming overhead in the underwater dome, and even touch a sea anemone. Down at the Seattle Aquarium on the waterfront’s Pier 59, learn all about salmon, meet a few adorable sea otters, and greet the various sea creatures of the Pacific Ocean, from puffers to giant clams. Watch scuba divers feed the fish, gawk at sharks swimming overhead.

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Seattle Guide, Locations


Seattle Guide, Locations

C H I N ATOW N - I N T E R NATIONAL DISTRICT The ornate Chinatown Gate welcomes you to this diverse neighborhood, where the food scene is incredible. After eating your fill of everything from pho to sushi, visit Wing Luke Museum, dedicated to the Asian Pacific American experience; practice your pinball game at the Seattle Pinball Museum; and shop for Japanese snacks and cute gifts at the supermarket.

STARBUCKS RESERVE ROASTERY & TASTING ROOM You won’t have trouble finding a Starbucks here in the company’s hometown, but you’ll want to seek out this special Starbucks experience on Capitol Hill. The Starbucks Reserve Roastery & Tasting Room is a Willy Wonka– esque coffee wonderland, where you’ll find exclusive beverages, various brewing methods, a coffee library, and more. You won’t have trouble finding a Starbucks here in the company’s hometown, but you’ll want to seek out this special Starbucks experience on Capitol Hill. The Starbucks Reserve Roastery & Tasting Room is a Willy Wonka–esque coffee wonderland, where you’ll find exclusive beverages, various brewing methods, a coffee library, and more.


MORE LOCATIONS OF INTEREST MUSEUM OF POP CULTURE While the museum’s roots and inspirations lie in rock ‘n’ roll, it has transitioned into a venue for showcasing and documenting contemporary pop culture—and, as of November 2016, the former Experience Music Project changed its name to the Museum of Pop Culture, reflecting the change. It has hosted and continues to house many notable touring exhibits, interactive galleries, sound sculptures, and rare artifacts. Founder Paul Allen and architect Frank O. Gehry combined their vision to create a venue for artists and audiences alike to come together and participate in today’s pop culture.

PIKE PLACE MARKET Seattle’s epicenter of fresh produce, specialty foods and independent businesses. Established in 1907 to connect citizens and farmers, the Market continues its “Meet the Producer” tradition with a year-round farmers market, owner-operated bakeries, fish markets, butcher shops, produce stands and specialty food stores. Within the nine-acre historic district you’ll discover dozens of farmers, a bustling crafts market, and more than 200 unique owner-operated shops. There are more than 80 restaurants to tempt you, from take-out counters specializing in donuts to fine dining establishments. Bring your appetite and enjoy exploring Pike Place Market.

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Seattle Guide, Location Cont.


Seattle Guide, Location Cont.

O R I G I N A L STARBUCKS When the very first Starbucks opened on 30 March 1971, its sign bore not a green mermaid but a brown one — and a more anatomically detailed one at that. Founders Jerry Baldwin, Zev Siegl and Gordon Bowker (friends from the University of San Francisco, all instructed in the art of roasting by Peet’s Coffee and Tea founder Alfred Peet) drew the theme of their new coffee company from nautical mythology, commissioning that first version of the company’s signature siren and picking a name out of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick – “Starbucks” having narrowly pipped the second-place contender, “Pequod”.

SPACE NEEDLE The Space Needle is one of the most recognizable landmarks in the world and is a treasured Seattle icon. Built for the 1962 World’s Fair—the Century 21 Exposition whose theme was “The Age of Space”—the tower’s futuristic design was inspired by the idea that the fair needed a structure to symbolize humanity’s Space Age aspirations. Since its grand opening on April 21, 1962, the landmark continues to symbolize the innovative and forward-thinking spirit of Seattle. Located at Seattle Center, the Space Needle stands at 605’ tall and is one of the most photographed structures in the world.


EVENTS For weekly events visit: https://www.visitseattle.org/things-to-do/events/

Every day of the year, there’s a festival, performance, concert, reading or sporting event happening in Seattle.

SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL SIFF believes in film’s unique power to share original stories, diverse perspectives, and rich emotional journeys. Beginning in 1976 with the annual Seattle International Film Festival, expanding into SIFF Education, and most recently operating our year-round five-screen SIFF Cinema, we have provided experiences that bring people together to discover extraordinary films from around the world. Our distinctly smart audiences allow us to take risks, host complex conversations, and truly appreciate film.

HEMPFEST Hempfest started in 1991, under the title “Washington Hemp Expo.” At the time, about 500 weed-lovers came and self-described themselves as “a humble gathering of stoners.” Since then, Hempfest has exploded, averaging over 100,000 people in attendance each year. 2008’s Hempfest had a chart-topping 310,000 pot heads. What was once a single day has transformed into a three-day affair, far from its beginnings as a small passion project for local activists. The fest takes place at Myrtle Edwards Park and Elliot Bay Park, located on Seattle’s scenic waterfront each year.

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Seattle Guide, Events

The Seattle International Film Festival is the largest film festival in the United States, with more than 155,000 people attending each year. The 25-day event held each May is renowned for presenting over 400 features, short films, and documentaries gathered from more than 85 countries. We receive over 4,000 independent film submissions annually, and screen debut discoveries alongside established master filmmakers and arthouse cinema hits. More than 70% of the films screened at Festival will not return to theaters, making SIFF an amazing place to discover and celebrate new work from around the world.


Seattle Guide, Events

BUMBERSHOOT Bumbershoot is an annual international music and arts festival held in Seattle, Washington. One of North America’s largest such festivals, it takes place every Labor Day weekend at the 74-acre Seattle Center, which was built for the 1962 World’s Fair. Seattle Center includes both indoor theaters and outdoor stages.The name of the festival was taken from bumbershoot, a colloquial term for umbrella, probably coined in the 19th century as a portmanteau of the words umbrella and parachute.


LAST MINUTE VISITS SPEND A SUNNY DAY AT ALKI The last thing most people expect to find in Seattle is miles of sandy beaches. And they’re right Seattle doesn’t have those, but West Seattle does. Something else people don’t expect? How glorious Seattle’s summers are. To get the full effect, head over to Alki, which is just minutes from Downtown but somehow manages to feel like a charming little beach town complete with a row of bars and restaurants highlighted by West Seattle Brewing’s Tap Shack, Sunfish, and El Chupacabra.

RIDE THE FERRY Washington State has the largest ferry system in the county (the fourth largest in the world) and some of the boats sail right from Seattle. The best day trip is probably from Mukilteo, a half hour north, to Langley -- a lovely little seaside town on Whidbey Island full of art galleries, and restaurants like Village Pizzeria, or Prima Bistro. Don’t have time for that? Don’t worry, you can take a water taxi to West Seattle (and get something to eat at Marination Ma Kai) instead.

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Seattle Guide, Last minute visits


Seattle Guide, Last minute

CATCH A GAME AT SAFECO Let’s face it, you don’t go to a Mariners game for the baseball -- the team’s current playoff drought is longer than any other team in sports -- but you should go for that feeling you get sitting in the bleachers on a sunny day, listening to the crack of the bat, and eating a hot dog (or because this is Seattle, some sushi, or Din Tai Fung’s world-famous dumplings). And the best part? Tickets cost as little as $7.

SEAPLANE AIR TOUR No matter how many tips and tricks to improve flying they know, nothing’s gonna make your guests want to get back into a plane once they get here, right? Wrong. They’re gonna want in on what has become a quintessential Seattle experience, featuring stunning views, and the unbeatable thrill of taking off, and “landing,” on a lake in the middle of the city.


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