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POR TFO LIO

B A H R A M YA R A D A N G U L I Y E V


Academic Portfolio B a h r a m Ya r a d a n g u l i y e v 150399953 Newcastle University 2017-18


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

REFLECTION

STUDIO INTRODUCTION

CHARETTE

PRIMER

01

02

03-04

05-42

S TA G I N G

R E A L I S AT I O N

REFINEMENT

TECTONIC I N T E G R AT I O N 0 1

43-72

73-92

93-126

127-138

TECTONIC I N T E G R AT I O N 0 2

THINKING THROUGH MAKING

LIST OF FIGURES/ BIBLIOGRAPHY

New work

147-148

Updated work

139-142

143-146


REFLECTION

The year has been a steep learning curve since Stage 2 in terms of project scale as well as the depth of research. After a summer placement in London, I acquired knowledge and skills that gave me the confidence and encouragement to produce high quality work throughout my third year. Additionally, visiting architectural gems and degree shows in London provided inspiration for representation, something which I feel is one of my strongest assets. Overall third year has been a roller coaster of emotions, especially when efforts were not reflected with the desired result. However, I have learned to not let a discouraging result dishearten me, but to use the outcome to motivate and push me to improve my work. The piece of work I struggled the most with was my dissertation due to the ambitiousness of the topic as well as writing problems coming from English being my third language. The topic I chose was very experimental and relatively unexplored; hence, there was much struggle in terms of finding the right amount of sources as well as establishing and defending the argument. However, I must thank Martyn Dade-Robertson for always being honest and helpful throughout the journey, which pushed me to achieve my best. The final result, even though not to the standard I ideally wanted, was rewarding enough. Design has been an enjoyable, yet a tough journey. I cannot recall how many times I collected my feedback sheets thinking that I did not deserve the good grades I have been getting. This is what I assume let me down slightly towards the refinement stage where the feedback I received was actually less complimentary than I expected. However, I am eternally grateful to my tutors, Anna Czigler and Amy Butt, for a continuous encouragement and support as well as constructive criticism. The studio’s brief fit me perfectly due to its emphasis on research and social side of architecture as well as working with an existing building, the field of architecture I am extremely passionate about. The primer has been quite a surreal experience due to a more artistic and creative brief than usual. However, it did involve much research, which I believe aided my graduation project significantly. I have learned that it is important to think realistically, while being ambitious. For example, the initial brief I chose was way too complex for the amount of care and thinking that was supposed to go into each space. I also realized that treating each space individually works better than the building as a whole object. Overall, the experience has been very eye-opening and has also helped me understand what type of architectural practice I would want to pursue my career at. �Architecture is unnecessarily difficult. It is very tough� Zaha Hadid

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STUDIO INTRODUCTION

Space of Fictions (SoF) The studio aimed to explore the possibilities of a “utopian design” within the area of opportunities - Elephant and Castle. The site is by far one of the most authentic spots in London, but the ongoing regeneration is gradually stripping it off its authenticity. The particular points of interest were the Walworth Road as the main space of fictions in Elephant & Castle. The studio’s focus revolved much around architecture as a social discipline which involved engaging with local communities to inform design decisions. We progressed by the principle of S, M, L starting off as cherishing an experience / object from the site, to making a medium scale installation and eventually, designing a building. The brief was to design a public building with a strong social focus with either a library or an archive from the existing Town Hall, both destroyed by fire in 2013 (Agarwal, 2015).

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CHARETTE

“Do not fluff your lines” they say... well...then, go and fluff them! Performance art piece based around the idea of mistakes - fluffing up.

Architects make mistakes that make them grow; hence, mistakes shall be embraced and valued. The performance is centred around a wrongly built space where everything is fluffed. The performers decide to embrace them and have fun while “fluffing the lines.”

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4


PRIMER: “LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION!”

Our group was focusing on the cinematic spirit of Elephant and Castle due to its reputation as the “Piccadilly of South London”.

CAMERA! chapter focused around the amount of CCTV cameras in the area, their angles, distribution and relevance to crime rates yet again

LIGHTS! chapter explored street lighting in the area to discover any black spots and how relevant they were to the crime rates.

ACTION! chapter portrayed locals as actors without them realising it, turning the whole process of mapping into a subliminal shoot. Additionally, theatre related activities and moments were also explored within the chapter.

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STREET LIGHTING- LIGHTS!

Street lights in the park

Atmosphere at night

Street lights in the roundabout

Atmosphere at night

Various street light designs 6


CCTV CAMERAS - CAMERA!

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C R I M E R AT E S I N T H E A R E A

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T H E AT R E S A N D C I N E M A S I N T H E A R E A

Fig. 1 - ABC Cinema

Fig. 2 - Surrey Pleasure Gardens

Fig. 3 - London Trocadero

Fig. 4 -The Cinema Museum

Fig. 5 - Palace of Varieties

Fig. 6 - Surrey Theatre

Fig. 7 - Odeon Cinema

Fig. 8 - The Coronet

Fig. 9 - Southwark Playhouse

Fig. 10 - The Backyard Cinema

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DEVICES DEPLOYED

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D E V I C E : F R A M I N G T H E PA S T A N D P R E S E N C E

To record our site, we designed compact frames with the outlines of the past theatres (inc. Surrey Theatre, Palace of Varieties, ABC cinema, and Pleasure Gardens). We used them to frame the spots where the theatres once were and compared to what was there at the moment to see how the regeneration affected the area.

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SCENES - ACTION!

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LOCALS AS PERFORMERS

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F I L M L O C AT I O N S

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FILM SNAPSHOTS

Fig. 11 - Main films included are “Attack the Block” of 2011 and “Harry Brown” of 2009

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U N D E R TA K E N R O U T E

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T H E AT R E R E L AT E D M O M E N T S F O U N D

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S C E N E S A LT E R E D : D Y S T O P I A N V S U T O P I A N

Script taken from “Hachiko: A Dog’s Tale” (after the death of the owner)

Script taken from “Hachiko: A Dog’s Tale” (before the death of the owner)

Script taken from “The Pursuit of Happyness”

Script taken from “Intouchables”

Script taken from “The Pursuit of Happyness”

Script taken from “Gifted Hands: the Ben Carson’s Story”

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M O N TA G E S : S TA G I N G T H E A R E A

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H E Y G AT E E S TAT E

Besides featuring many theatres, the area, and the Heygate Estate in particular, were featured in many films such as “Attack the Block” which portrayed it in a very unpleasant way. Even the director named the estate a “rotten place, not fit for animals” which was disrespectful to the people that used to call it home (Heygatewashome.org, n.d.). This affected the reputation of the site as a dystopian environment; hence, we decided to cherish the missing scenes of a happy life locals once had in Heygate Estate. Unfortunately, when Heygate was demolished people were forced out of their homes and the new apartment blocks ended up being unaffordable and sold to foreign investors with locals and past residents having no voice in the situation (Booth, 2017).

Heygate Estate in 2013, just before the demolition was about to begin

Site in 2017 with the new developments coming up and Elephant Park being built

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Fig. 12 - Elephant Park and the new developments within it

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Heygate in the eyes of the director

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Heygate unscripted: a place where people used to be happy

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3D collage: Director’s “Dystopia”

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3D collage: Developers’ “Utopia”

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L AY E R E D M A P

Due to the complexity of the site, we decided to build a layered physical map to represent all of our site research within one piece.

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The general map of the area

Each layer representing one map feature

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Final layered map built

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The map at the Primer exhibition

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I N S TA L L AT I O N

Due to the effectiveness of the layered map, we designed our installation as a multi-layered architectural object as well. As a location, we chose the public square where the Heygate Estate used to be (and where the Elephant Park is soon to be built) to frame the past yet again. Additionally, as a black spot with almost no CCTV or street lighting, it allows the locals to escape the pressure of social control.

The installation comprises of a black box with the selection of frames that feature negative and positive, background and foreground elements of the area. We would let the local people choose 4 out of 16 screens to slot into the box to visualise their ideal site with all its perfect imperfections. The aim was to bring out the true voice of local residents that is currently being stifled.

Initial sketch

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Test model

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Positive screens The screens have been collaged mostly out of photos/renders of new developments to reflect the council’s idea of a “Utopian City”

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Negative screens The screens have been collaged out of scenes of “Attack the Block” as well as featuring old “Dystopian” estates within the area.

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Street lighting map engraved

CCTV map engraved Stage curtains

“Negative” frames

“Positive” frames

Display doors

Stands

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Finished product

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Site plan

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Perspective

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Key Section

Plan

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PRIMER EXHIBITION

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Testing the installation in Newcastle

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The installation on site in London

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S TA G I N G

As a site, I chose Walworth Town Hall due to its strong link to the main hub of the area - Walworth Road as well as its appreciation by local people and its rich heritage. My project strives to preserve the existing Town Hall, renovate it and extend it. Walworth Town Hall is a Grade II listed building on Walworth Road in Southwark designed by Henry Jarvis (Exploringsouthwark.co.uk, 2017). It got damaged by fire in 2013 which has destroyed the roof and some interior spaces. Our Primer’s installation was based around the theatrical heritage of Elephant and Castle; hence, I am using the concept of a “performance” in my design by interpreting the roof of the Town Hall as a stage and the West elevation as a backdrop. The former is going to accommodate a new theatre, while the latter will house a small theatrical library as well as a bookshop. The East wing is housing the new Newington library and a cafe.

One more reason behind the new theatre proposal is the recent closure of the Coronet due to regeneration (Bbc.co.uk, 2015). The building has been a very significant cultural treasure in Elephant and Castle for a long time and is to be missed greatly by local residents. My aim is to celebrate the heritage of the Town Hall and Elephant and Castle by proposing a bold, yet contextually sensitive extension. Within the new proposal all parts of the community will be welcomed, including. The resulting scheme is supposed to be a subtle reflection of the context, yet a bold statement in its own right. It is aimed to connect different communities of Elephant & Castle while putting forward a vision for the area as a place for not just tall residential blocks, but also for meaningful projects.

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Concept collage: Linking primer with staging

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FIELD TRIP: LONDON

Our studio field trip has covered London and Berlin. However, due to Inability to go to Berlin, I stayed in London for additional few days. During the stay, I have explored different architectural attractions for inspiration. My focus was on either bold forms within a conservative context, or a reuse of an existing fabric. One of the main gems on the list was the V & A extension by AL_A due to its juxtapositional nature. For the case study report on the building, please refer to Tectonic Integration Part 01 section*.

V & A extension: view from the Boiler Yard

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Top: City of London Information Centre by Make Architects

Bottom left: Tate Modern Switch House by H&deM

The bold form stands out from the lugubrious masonry buildings and is noticebale from every corner of the street making the Information Centre asily identifiable.

A geometrically striking extension that reflects the existing building, yet stands out. The innovative use of brickwork makes the building glow at night.

Bottom right: 10 Hills Place by AL_A

Top Right: Royal Academy of Arts

The striking reflective facade attracts attention from Oxford street, while the curved skylights solve the daylight

The exposed brickwork combined with an elegant metal additions has made it a strong interior precedent for my project

access problem within a constrained site

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S I T E A N A LY S I S

Roads/Little traffic Railway Roads/Heavy traffic

Noise levels

Sun path Wind

Commercial/public Mixed-use Residential/private

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Construction sites Views Site boundary Active frontage Main road Bus stops Access to the existing building

Listed buildings Pedestrian paths Clinic School Car service Nursery Rehearsal spaces Churches Hotels Pub Trees

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DEMOGRAPHICS Graphs taken from the “A Castle for the Elephant” research piece by Ida Lien et al.*

Unemployment level

Low English Proficiency

Welfare benefit customers

Business base

Low skills

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Figures of students of two campuses in Elephant and Castle

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TOWN HALL Walworth Town Hall consists of a number of smaller buildings that have been added over the years in various stages and degrees of cultural significance. During fire, the main bits that got destroyed were the roof and the middle section.

Fig. 13 - Henry Jarvis - the architect of the original Vestry Hall

Fig. 14 - Vestry Hall

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Fig. 15 - Town Hall after the fire damage

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DEVELOPMENT THROUGH HISTORY

1870 - Vestry Hall

1890 - Newington Library added

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1910 - Town Hall extended

1950 - Health Clinic added

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CURRENT TOWN HALL

Partially damaged Destroyed

Basement

Ground Floor

Second Floor

First Floor

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STRIPPED STRUCTURE

Retained circulation

Basement

Ground Floor

Second Floor

First Floor

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THE CORONET

Development through history

1890 - The Coronet as The Elephant & Castle Theatre

1950 - The Elephant & Castle Theatre extended

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1960 - The Elephant & Castle Theatre extended further. Charlie Chaplin pub opened.


Appreciation of the Coronet expressed in both physical and online forms (Fig. 16). The book was part of the exhibition dedicated to Coronet. It took place in the Art Academy, the former Newington Library

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MOOD BOARD

The Coronet and The Town Hall: establishing the relationship 59


Merging two gems of cultural significance to create a landmark, a statement and bring different communities of Elephant & Castle together.

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BRIEF DEVELOPMENT

Having almost established theatre as the main programme, I decided to turn to the community to aid the decision-making process. I have discovered, that based on Southwark Council’s poll, the majority of people voted for the library, a cultural event space (like theatre) and a space that tells the history of Southwark. Based on that, I have came up with the main programme that includes: a theatre, a library and a theatrical library that houses books related to the cinematic heritage of Southwark. The former is added on top of the Town Hall due to its scale and complexity that would not fit within the existing building. It would also create a landmark within the area. The rest are accommodated selectively within the Town Hall. Additional parts of the programme include a cafe and a dance studio to bring people together and provide some funding for the library.

Fig. 17

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New Basement Ground Third Fourth

Existing Basement Ground First Second

Circulation

Volumetric programme

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NEWINGTON LIBRARY

Fig. 18 - The adjacent to the Town Hall building where the Newington Library used to be before The Art Academy took over

Fig. 19 - Newington Temporary Library at the Artworks Elephant

Map showing the location of the old and the new libraries 63


Library spaces

17,866 books total

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ADJACENCY DIAGRAM

Library office 30 m2

Library archive 40 m2

Plant 18 m2 Study room 57 m2

Staff room 25 m2

Library space 161 m2

WC 8 m2 Restaurant 75 m2 Kitchen 20 m2

Computer room 55 m2

Study room 63 m2

Storage 20 m2

Waste 14 m2 Heart space 147 m2

WC 8 m2

WC 13.5 m2

Plant 28 m2

Plant 19 m2

Bookshop 95 m2

Theatrical library 120 m2

Storage 18 m2

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Gallery / Hall 115 m2

WC 13.5 m2


Dance studio 100 m2

Rehearsal space 100 m2

Library space 161 m2 Staff room 20 m2

Reception 18 m2

Seminar room 30 m2

B/O 10 m2

WC 15 m2

C/R 8 m2

Group study 18 m2

Study room 63 m2

Control 15 m2 Main Auditorium (120 people) 130 m2

WC 10 m2

2

Stage 50 m2

Dressing rooms 40 m2

Costume storage 20 m2

Stage craft 40 m2 New

Existing Basement

Basement

Direct

Ground

Ground

Visual

Third

First

Delivery

Fourth

Second 66

WC 10 m2

Common room/ kitchen 40 m2

Studios for designers / writers 64 m2


MASSING

Using the refurbished roof and the West elevation as a “stage” and a “backdrop” respectively

Adding the theatre and the theatrical library

67


Changing volumes to establish a dialogue with the refurbished roof

Playing with roof shapes for the purposes of daylight and acoustics

68


PRECEDENTS

Fig. 21 - 130 Fenchurch Street by FMA Sleek rippling glass panels with black tint make the building stand out

Fig. 23 - La Samaritaine by SANAA Rippling glass veil covers the existing facade creating a statement within the area

Fig. 20 - Polare Bookstore by Merkx + Girod - Smart reuse of the existing church via structural bookshelves

Fig. 22 - House Rehabilitation by BAST - a sloped extension added on top is covered in reflective cladding and allows northern light

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Fig. 24 - Louvre Lens by SANAA Polished aluminum cladding links the building to its surrounding environment


Fig. 26 - Centro Cultural Daoiz y Velarde by Rafael De La-Hoz - Metal cladding juxtaposes the existing masonry

Fig. 25 - Elbphilharmonie by H&deM - Reflective chrome coated glass cladding contrasts the red brick and reflects the context

Fig. 28 - Nhow Hotel by Tchoban Voss - Mirror finish on the cantilever creates an effect of an infinite space

Fig. 27 - Ecole de Musique by Opus 5 Glass curtain wall mirrors the adjacent neighbour making the extension appear light and translucent

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TECTONIC INTENT

Concept model exploring materiality and structural strategy

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R E A L I S AT I O N

Realisation was the stage where all the fun began. The most exciting part of the process has been the form finding-the aim was to let form go hand in hand with function to avoid form for the sake of form alone. One of the initial drives behind the form has been to reflect the undulating roofscape of the Town Hall. The concept has later been adjusted to suit the programme requirements such as daylight access and floor to ceiling heights. Initially the form of the extension has been repeating its bottom neighbour. However, in order to make the theatre more acoustically advanced, I tried a horse shoe shape which has later aided an angular approach throughout to eliminate unnecessary area, to allow views on to the Town Hall’s roof and the whole of Walworth. This has also created exciting moments to be explored from the street level.

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Initial massing model in context at 1:500

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Design development

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Exploring form through section

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Design development

Replacing the old stairwell with a new one going all the way to the top extension 77


Form finding diagrams in plan view.

For a more thorough process please refer to the attached booklet on form-finding*. 78


Exploring through elevations and sections 79


Updated massing model in context at 1:500. An additional circulation shaft has been added to separate the entrances between the library and the theatre for the ease of navigation. The stairwell does not affect the spaces within the part of the Town Hall it is placed in front of due to the spaces being ancillary / infill.

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THINKING THROUGH MAKING WEEK

My thinking through making model has been exploring the connection between the old and the new: particularly how the steel frame structure hovers above the existing mansard roof almost following its shape due to split levels.

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Final output at 1:10

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Exploring the design potential of the Town Hall through a study sectional model at 1:100. The aim was to open up the extremely cellular layout to improve circulation, navigation and daylight access.

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Utilising the middle section as the “heart space” by creating a void tthat allows an exchange of views

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Proposed ground floor plan (originally drawn at 1:200) Pink spaces are not part of the programme

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Proposed first floor plan (originally drawn at 1:200)

Pink spaces are not part of the programme

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Proposed second floor (originally drawn at 1:200) Pink spaces are not part of the programme

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Proposed third floor (originally drawn at 1:200)

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Proposed fourth floor (originally drawn at 1:200)

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Proposed site plan (Originally drawn at 1:500)

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Axonometric showing the proposal’s structure and the surrounding context 91


Key Section (Originally drawn at 1:100)

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REFINEMENT

Refinement began from stepping back to the programming and making slight changes. For example, the bookshop and theatrical library have been removed from the front of the Town Hall. The latter has been accommodated within the heart space of the existing building. This has been done in order to preserve the existing garden and utilise as much of the usable existing fabric as possible. Additionally, during refinement, much attention has been paid to materiality. The aim was to create a public artwork within the facade of the extension. I wanted to subtly reflect the existing Town Hall, but also make a reference to the Coronet. The process involved experimenting much with elevations and modelmaking to find the right solution. The eventual facade kills two birds with one stone: reusing the metal panels from the Coronet and cladding the Northern facade of the extension with them-the facade that is facing the Coronet. Finally, much more attention has been paid towards furniture and landscape design to make sure that the concept and materiality translate throughout the whole project.

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Providing jobs

Exchange of knowledge

Entertainment for people with health problems / disabilities

Restaurant / Bar

Improving the reputation

Library

Theatrical library

Providing extra facilities for LSBU BA Drama students

Theatre

Dance studio

Teaching immigrants English via library facilities

Extra study spaces for students from both universities

Affordable office spaces for rental within the Town Hall*

Updated adjacency of key spaces and their social focus. The theatrical library / screening space now serves as a link between the existing fabric and the extension. * Office spaces are not part of the programme, but they are considered to aid funding and help start-up businesses

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THE CORONET: REFERENCE

Fig. 29 - Reusing the metal cladding panels of the Coronet after its demolition

95


Joining a few smaller panels

Sandblasting the panels to remove the blue paint and etching the Town Hall window patterns to establish a relationship between the two

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Applying the black finish


Refining the approach

Refurbishing the burnt roof of the East wing

Adding the extension

Continuing the walls of the Town Hall to merge the two

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Testing out materiality and facade options through elevation studies. For a more thorough explanation, please refer to the ARC3015 submission*

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PRECEDENT STUDY

Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg, Germany (2016) The iceberg like structure is added on top of the old brick cocoa warehouse in Hamburg, Germany. The chrome coated glass panels make the extension change its appearance based on the context due to the reflective qualities. The project transforms the city and establishes a link with river Elbe by creating a landmark.

Fig. 30

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CAIXA forum in Madrid, Spain (2009) The walls of the abandoned power station were refurbished and elevated to create a plaza underneath. A bold extension covered in oxidised cast iron is added on top. Its form reflects the surroundings, while perforations filter daylight, views and provide privacy.

For a more thorough explanation, please refer to the ARC3015 submission*

Fig. 31

100


Undulating stainless steel cladding with a mirror finish 1:100

Undulating metal mesh screen 1:100

For a more thorough explanation, please refer to the ARC3015 submission*

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Corten steel 1:100

Blackened stainless steel with etched ornamentation 1:100

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Exploded axonometric showing structural hierarchy with steel frame being primary, concrete outer skin and bracing being secondary and cladding being tertiary. For a detailed structural report, please refer to the ARC3013 Part 2 report*

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South Section (not to scale) showing the updated roofscape of the extension.

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North Elevation updated (not to scale). The window patterns of the Town Hall are etched over the weathered blackened steel facade of the extension. The approach refers to the Town Hall, yet juxtaposes it.

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Abstracting and collaging the window patterns to generate a form of art

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M AT E R I A L E X P E R I M E N T S

Oxidizing steel to mimic the antiquity of the Town Hall

Etching a window pattern onto the steel panels

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Applying a black finish to make the building more noticeable


Final collage of panels at 1:2. The etching process has been repeated to reveal certain segments of the window patterns. The ornamentation is not just a reflective piece of artwork, but also a sattire - Developers and the council strive to preserve the heritage while considering selling listed buildings to private investors. This under appreciation of heritage is reflected in the abstraction of the window patterns.

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M A S H R A B I YA E F F E C T

In places that require daylight, but also need shading, privacy or filtration of views, the effect of mashrabiya has been created. The window patterns have been diffused to generate perforations to achieve the desired effect.

109


The main hall within the new theatre and the atmosphere created by the South facing perforated cladding 110


An exploded axonometric showing structure and the placement of the new panels against the reused ones onto concrete panels via brackets.

111


A diagram showing the external cladding in relation to the fenestration. Workshop, rehearsal space, dance studio and office have large windows and / or skylights for daylight access, but the perforation patterns provide privacy from the street level. Scale of perforations has been affected by window sizes (which have been affected by structure)

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LANDSCAPE DESIGN

Fig. 32 - The existing slate fish tiles of the West facade of the Town Hall. The roof of the West wing is the only part of the whole roof that remained relatively undamaged and required only minor repairs. The concept is to make the landscape a “monument� dedicated to the roof the martyr.

Fish tile pattern extracted

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Axonometric showing the application of the pattern onto the square. Some tiles (individually and as a group) are extruded to form public seating and small gardens. While people use the created public realm, they can see the exposed roof of the Town Hall to subconsciously understand the reference

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Key Section (originally produced at 1:100) 115


116


Site plan 1:500 117


4

5

8 3

6

9

7

Ground floor (originally at 1:200). Pink spaces are offices and not part of the scheme

1

1) Reception 2) Staff room 3) Main hall 4) Bar 5) Restaurant 6) Kitchen 7) Changing room 8) Dry store 9) Cooler

2

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2

3

1 4

5 6

First Floor (originally at 1:200). Pink spaces are offices and not part of the scheme) 1) Theatrical library 2) Computer / study room 3) Library 4) Reception 5) Office 6) Staff kitchen

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2

3

4 1 5

Second Floor(originally at 1:200) 1) Small cinema space 2) Computer / study room 3) Library 4) Seminar room 5) Group study

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8 9 11 7 12 6

14 10

4 5

2 1 3

Third Floor (Originally drawn at 1:100) 1) Box office 2) Cloak 3) Hall 4) Dance studio 5) Lounge 6) Auditorium for 160 people 7) Backstage 8) Rehearsal 9) Costume atelier 10) Green room 11, 12, 13) Dressing rooms 14) Laundry 121

13


4

3

5 1

2

Fourth Floor (Originally drawn at 1:100) 1) Control 2) Data 3) Catwalk 4, 5) Storage

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Stairwell design: The new staircase features oxidised blackened handrails to continue the material language of the facade. The main core is an insulated steel structure with glass panels seating within it. The staircore is covered in perforated panels with The Coronet - style signage on them to emphasize the reference, highlight the function and draw people in.

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The diagram showing how the roof’s form is reacting to the context: the closer to the Walworth Road, the more architecturally exciting it gets, while it is more tame facing the residential district

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An external perspective showing the proposal in use within the everchanging context of Elephant & Castle

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T E C T O N I C I N T E G R AT I O N 0 1

Exhibition Road Quarter AL_A Bahram Yaradanguliyev

ARC3001 Tectonic Integration Part I Ciara McClelland Monica Said Kevin Wong Konstantin Briskins

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A: overview

129-130

B: design intent

131-132

C: site appraisal

133

D: atmosphere and materiality

134

E: structural strategy

135

F: energy and environmental studies

136

G: key details / moments

137

Bibliography

138

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A: OVERVIEW

The V&A Museum is a Grade I listed Building located in South Kensington, London. The competition-winning 2017 futuristic extension, designed by AL_A (Amanda Levete Architects), provides an underground exhibition space under the new porcelain-tiled courtyard, a cafe and a gift shop.

Area - 6360 m2 Completed - 2017 Engineering - ARUP Client - Victoria and Albert Museum Project cost - ÂŁ35 million Principal - Amanda Levete

Photo of the proposal model taken by Ciara

Rendered proposal in Bird’s view vam.ac.uk

Aerial view of the completed extension www.youtube.com

Section A archdaily.com

Entrance floor archdaily.com

Section B archdaily.com

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Image by Bahram

Image by Ciara

Image by Ciara

Image by Bahram

Image by Ciara

Image by Bahram

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B: DESIGN INTENT & EXPERIENRIENCE

The architect’s intention was to make the new extension bright and accessible. The new building helps establish a dialogue between the courtyard and the main road. Additionally, the concept was to juxtapose with the traditional masonry of the existing building. The new extension slots in the yard featuring dynamic angles that are confusing, yet making spaces flexible.

The series of skylights allow natural light to flood in to act as navigators within a dynamic space. The Oculus skylight makes the exhibition space a “well-serviced black box, which exhibition designers could remake however they fancy… Exhibition designers can black this out if they want, but it gives the chance of animating this great room with daylight.”

Image by Bahram

Image by Bahram

Image by Bahram

Image by Bahram

Skylights closed. Image by Bahram

Skylights open. Image by Hufton + Crow

Skylights closed. Diagram by Bahram

Skylights open. Diagram by Bahram

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During the visit, a few people were interviewed about their experience of the extension: Visitor #1 - “Following the trend” Visitor #2 - “You know where to go” Worker #1 - “The layout of the shop is not well-thought, it is claustrophobic” Worker #2 - “Not very friendly to the elderly because of only one hidden lift” Worker #3 - “Reflects the Exhibition Road’s transformation”

Image of the lift by Ciara

Exhibition space. Image by Bahram

Exhibition space. Image by Bahram

Image by Bahram

Shop. Image by Bahram

Image by Bahram

Image by Bahram

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Location of the lift. Diagram by Bahram


C: SITE APPRAISAL

The site for the building is located in the former Boiler Yard of the museum in South Kensington, London. The Yard was a garden in 1860’s becoming a boiler room after 1909. Afterwards, when the boilers were not needed, it housed offices and a gallery space in 1970s’. The renovated Ashton Webb perforated metal screens act as a permeable surface between the museum and the street.

The northern side is the Godfrey Sykes designed red brick and terracotta graffito-facade of a five storeys 1873 block by Henry Scott, which since 1983 has been the V&A’s Henry Cole Wing. Wings of Webb’s enormous main museum building come up on eastern and southern sides, and along Exhibition Road, spanning the gap between it and the Henry Cole Wing, is the Aston Webb Screen.

Daniel Libeskind’s proposal “The Spiral” on the site was an anticipated project, which, however was not approved by the planning committee.

During sunny days the shiny roof porcelain tiles reflect the sun rays into the lobby making the guides and visitor assistants wear sunglasses.

Pedestrian Main road

Access Active frontage Refurbished gate The site before the construction began

Sun path Wind

Museum buildings Vegetation Site boundary

Site axonometric by Bahram

Site plan showing the sun ray refletcion into the space. Edited by Bahram

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The gate before and after. archdaily.com


D: ATMOSPHERE AND MATERIALITY

Formed pattern. rbkc.gov.uk

Individual tile types. rbkc.gov.uk

The Sackler Courtyard is the first of its kind due to its porcelain cladding. The ceramic tiles are made out of Portland stone pillar of a reinstated 1901 screen. They are complexly patterned and grooved and inset with primary colours. All of the tiles were handmade. The resulting materiality creates an atmosphere of a big, bright and open space. However, the tiles are fragile and difficult to clean. The tile pattern extends into the interior lobby space.

Exhibition road redevelopment right outside the courtyard creates a ‘shared space’, where pedestrians and vehicles, through the removal of kerbs, pavements and other obstructions, come together. The new proposal encourages motorists to slow down and engage with the pedestrians in a respectful manner.

Image by Kevin

Image by Kevin

Image by Kevin

Image by Kevin

Image by Kevin

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E: STRUCTURAL STRATEGY

The extension is constructed out of steel frame which is made visible to contrast its surroundings with its red colour which is for fire-proofing and so that “you notice how much work it’s doing in holding up the old building above” (Moore, 2017). The Oculus consists of polyester powder coated mild steel lining, Insulated low iron glazing unit and stainless steel balustrade. The courtyard itself is constructed in concrete.

Steel framework. youtube.com

Image by Ciara

Image by Ciara

Image by Ciara

Supporting beams diagram by Bahram

“The Oculus” plan and axonometric rbkc.gov.uk

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Closeup by Ciara


F: ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY

To make the V&A extension more eco friendly the building’s designers added a green roof. The decision has a number of environmental benefits such as reduction of overheating/overcooling by adding thermal mass and increasing U-value and to combat the urban heat island effect. The building’s roof has a continuous insulation and has a relatively good U-value of 0.17 W/m2K but it is still lower than 0.14 W/m2K, which is the recommended value for new building’s flat roofs in England.

Diagram by Konstantin

In the Exhibition Road Quarter the issues related to cold bridges were solved by the use of continuous insulation. The insulation prevents any excessive heat loss covering roof, floor and their junction.

The water is provided by the water pumps located in a chilled room in the basement.

The roof lights allow sunlight into the space contributing to the solar gain. There is a limited access to natural ventilation due to the majority of the volumes being under ground; hence the it is mechanically ventilated. However, due to the fact that the basement is well insulated, it helps to store heat in winter.

Diagram by Konstantin

Diagram by Konstantin

Diagram by Ciara

Heating system. rbkc.gov.uk

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G: KEY MOMENTS / DETAILS

One of the key moments is the connection between the existing building and the extension which is joined by glass panels. The glass panels almost slot into the carved fragments of the existing masonry facade and are sealed to prevent water ingress.

Another detail that the architect plays with is the balustrades that have a glossy finish on one side and a matt one on the other.

Junction #1 rbkc.gov.uk

Junction #1 Image by Ciara

Image by Ciara

Junction #2 rbkc.gov.uk

Junction #2 Image by Ciara

Image by Ciara

Junction #3 rbkc.gov.uk

Closeup Image by Ciara

Image by Ciara

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

http://www.ala.uk.com/projects/va-exhibition-road/ https://www.archdaily.com/874825/v-and-a-museum-al-a https://www.vam.ac.uk/info/exhibition-road-building-project https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CiyiFtRU6hs&t=40s https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/jul/02/v-and-a-victoria-and-albert-museum-courtyard-amanda-levete-exhibition-road-revuew https://www.rbkc.gov.uk/planning/searches/details.aspx?adv=0&simple=Exhibition+Road&simpleBatch=20&simSubmit=Search&pgdec=3&id= CON/15/01164&cn=188154+AL-A+14A+Brewery+Road+London+&type=decision&tab=tabs-planning-2#tabs-planning-6 https://www.archdaily.com/874825/v-and-a-museum-al-a/595648e0b22e38536800015a-v-and-a-museum-al-a-section https://www.archdaily.com/874825/v-and-a-museum-al-a/59564841b22e385368000158-v-and-a-museum-al-a-entrance-floor https://www. archdaily.com/874825/v-and-a-museum-al-a/595648f1b22e38e5e6000263-v-and-a-museum-al-a-section https://www.archdaily.com/874825/v-and-a-museum-al-a/5956475db22e38e5e600025b-v-and-a-museum-al-a-photo https://www.archdaily.com/874825/v-and-a-museum-al-a/59564905b22e38536800015b-v-and-a-museum-al-a-site-plan https://www.archdaily.com/874825/v-and-a-museum-al-a/595648c7b22e38e5e6000262-v-and-a-museum-al-a-concept

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T E C T O N I C I N T E G R AT I O N 0 2

The existing brickwork is stripped of finishes to celebrate it and highlight juxtaposition with the industrial feel of metal. The structure is exposed so that visitors from the heart space can witness the work it is performing.

1 2

1 - Auditorium 22 mm oak parquet 24 chipboard Timber framing on wooden supports Acoustic fleece 120 mm rigid insulation for acoustics 130 mm Reinforced concrete slab on top of the galvanized metal deck 900 mm Load-bearing steel I beam Suspended ceiling (mirror finish) Services (sprinkler system, electric pipes)

3

2 - Internal wall Painted OSB 100 mm insulation for acoustics OSB Battens with insulation in between Acoustic panels 3 - Continued brick wall Exterior brickwork on wall ties 100 mm cavity with cavity barriers 100 mm insulation 2 layers of exposed brickwork

4

4 - Existing wall 139


Zoomed in sectional perspective showing the exchange of views within the heart space and the exposed structure of the extension

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The steel columns are inserted within the existing fabric with bracing holding it together on the inside. This tectonic intent of material juxtaposition is celebrated within the whole building.

1

3

2 4

5 1 - Existing masonry load - bearing wall 2 - 1/3 cement and sand mix 3 - Steel I beam 4 - 500 mm concrete pile cap 5 - 9000 mm deep concrete pile Foundation underpinning 1:20 141


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THINKING THROUGH MAKING WEEK

Wood joinery workshop

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Final output: A dove tail joint

Joinery strategy applied to stand design for the Primer installation

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Concrete carving

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Final outputs: exploring different mixtures, moulds, aggregates, scales and tints

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LIST OF FIGURES / BIBLIOGRAPHY

Fig. 1 - http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/27019

Fig. 17 - Poll taken from the report of research undertaken by Walworth Society; www.walworthsociety.co.uk

Fig. 2 - http://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vol25/plate-59

Fig. 18 - https://artacademy.org.uk/newington/

Fig. 3 - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:London_Trocadero.001_-_ London.JPG

Fig. 19 - http://mouthtosouth.com/drinking/the-daytime-drinkers-guide-to-thewalworth-road/

Fig. 4 - http://www.cinemamuseum.org.uk/visit/

Fig. 20 - By Roos Aldershoff 2007

Fig. 5 - by Arthur Lloyd, http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/SouthLonPalace.htm

Fig. 21 - Courtesy of FMA

Fig. 6 - by Arthur Lloyd, http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/surrey.htm

Fig. 22 - Courtesy of BAST

Fig. 7 - http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/18493/photos/119450

Fig. 23 - Courtesy of SANAA

Fig. 8 - by Steeve Poole, https://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenpoole/

Fig. 24 - Courtesy of SANAA

Fig. 9 - by Safavi PR, https://www.thestage.co.uk/news/2018/southwark-playhouse-return-london-bridge-2019/

Fig. 25 - By Sophie Walter

Fig. 10 - https://www.backyardcinema.co.uk/the-last-chapel/

Fig. 26 - By Alfonso Quiroga

Fig. 11 - Images used are from “Harry Brown” by Daniel Barber and “Attack the Block” by Joe Cornish

Fig. 27 - By Patricia Parinejad Fig. 28 - Courtesy of Opus 5

Fig. 12 - https://www.elephantpark.co.uk/elephant-park/explore-the-development

Fig. 29 - By Nick Sarebi

Fig. 13 - https://www.architecture.com/image-library/ribapix.html?PageIndex=1875

Fig. 30 - By Patricia Parinejad Fig. 31 - By Roland Halbe

Fig. 14 - http://www.exploringsouthwark.co.uk/newington-town-hall/4594105604

Fig. 32 - http://walworthtownhall.com/media-gallery/

Fig. 15 - http://walworthtownhall.com/media-gallery/ Fig. 16 - https://www.change.org/p/southwark-council-save-the-coronet?lang=en-GB

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Agarwal, A. (2015). Plans to rebuild fire-ravaged museum. [online] BBC News. Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-30672107 [Accessed 25 May 2018]. Booth, R. (2017). Foreign investors snapping up London homes suitable for first-time buyers. [online] the Guardian. Available at: https://www.theguardian. com/society/2017/jun/13/foreign-investors-snapping-up-london-homessuitable-for-first-time-buyers [Accessed 25 May 2018]. Heygatewashome.org. (n.d.). Heygate was Home ¡ Digital Archive. [online] Available at: http://heygatewashome.org/muggers-paradise.html [Accessed 25 May 2018]. Exploringsouthwark.co.uk. (2017). Newington Town Hall - Exploring Southwark. [online] Available at: http://www.exploringsouthwark.co.uk/ newington-town-hall/4594105604 [Accessed 25 May 2018]. Bbc.co.uk. (2015). Another iconic music venue in London - The Coronet - is to close. [online] Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/ article/34724661/another-iconic-music-venue-in-london---the-coronet---is-toclose [Accessed 25 May 2018]. Lien, I., More, T., Thibault, S. and Walker, T. (2014). A Castle for the Elephant.

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THANK YOU


Part I Architecture Portfolio 2018  

Portfolio of work produced during Stage III of BA Architecture 2017-18 at Newcastle University

Part I Architecture Portfolio 2018  

Portfolio of work produced during Stage III of BA Architecture 2017-18 at Newcastle University

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