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2011 of e h t h h wit o Coaced Lam i r a t n O ar Alfr the Ye

S E H C A

CO

R E RN

CO

One of the challenges that coaches face everyday is how to keep badminton interesting for their students. Even the most dedicated of athletes occasionally become bored with their sport. After all, many of the drills that are commonly used have most likely been practiced ad nauseum. The goal is to keep badminton interesting by changing how an athlete trains. Much like changing a work out routine, changing drills will help keep an athlete’s interest and prevent the athlete from reaching a plateau in their performance. At the A. Bujak badminton club, here are some of the spins we add to our drills to make them both more challenging and fun. 1) Feather Picking Feather picking is a simple drill that can be used to improve both fitness and footwork. Using a pile of shuttles, students use a form of footwork to move one shuttle to a second location. This drill can be used to train multiple types of footwork including a side-to-side motion mimicking smash defense, a “V” movement mimicking net play, etc. Feather picking is usually one of the most dreaded drills for most students as it quickly becomes monotonous. A team aspect can be introduced into the exercise to prevent this boredom. Instead of a single student picking up birds and then placing them at a location, create a chain of students and have them pass birds down the chain. By creating a team atmosphere students build camaraderie and are able to motivate each other whenever anyone starts to lag behind. To make things more interesting, create multiple teams to introduce a competitive nature into the drill.

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2) Resistance Training Once students become accustomed to a particular drill, it becomes necessary to make

it more challenging by adding resistance. However, beware of weighted vests as they may lead to spinal compression when performing exercises that place a large amount of impact through your spine such as running and jumping. Instead, try bungee cords attached to a padded belt. From there, students can perform many different exercises while

of resistance can be used for any type of shot on the court. 3) Nets Another way to train students is to replace the conventional net with an opaque net. Opaque nets can be made by sewing lengths of black fabric together and running a string through the length of the net. This change in net helps students decrease their reaction time, as they can no longer see the bird until it has reached at least the height of the net. In addition, students will be unable to see their opponent during net play. Drills involving cross-court net shots become especially effective as they become much more difficult to see. Opaque nets can also be used to practice service reception. Receivers will have to react much more quickly to both short and long serves. 4) Games Changing the rules of the game can have a large effect on all players. Suddenly, everything they know may or may not work depending on the variations of the game. This forces students to adapt to an unusual situation. One popular variation is the “box” game. It is similar to a regular game of half court singles except that the lines are now the doubles service lines. Any shots before the front service line and behind the doubles long service line are out. This game promotes quick, aggressive play since the dimensions of the court are significantly smaller.

another student holds onto the other end of the bungee cord. This will add resistance in a safe way as long as students are careful to not let go of the cord. To increase the difficulty, add additional cords. This drill is also helpful to the student holding the cords, as they are able to train their arm and core strength when done properly. First time users of the bungee cord should practice moving from the centre of the court to the front of the net first just so they can become accustomed to the pull of the cord on the way back. As students become more experienced, this type

By regularly adding small changes to their training regiment, students can stay interested in their sport while they continue to develop their skills. I whole-heartedly encourage every coach to think outside the box and be creative with his or her lesson plans. By doing so, your students will surprise both you and themselves with what they can achieve. Hau Saang Cheen for life! Peace out! Rock on! Troll PRIDE! Alfred Lam

the Shuttler magazine - Volume 2 Issue 2  

The official magazine of Badminton Ontario

the Shuttler magazine - Volume 2 Issue 2  

The official magazine of Badminton Ontario

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