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EN FRANÇAIS! p.26

BAC ISSUE 4 / 2017

BAC CRAFT AWARDS PAGES 3-13


Top 5 Reasons to Join BAC’s Texting Program Over 80% of American adults text, making it the most common cell phone activity, according to the Pew Internet’s 2015 research. The latest BAC members’ survey also shows that 79% of members text. BAC has its own texting program with more than 9,700 members and the number is growing every day. Here are the top 5 reasons why you should join if you haven’t:

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YOU GET INFORMATION FAST Texts about job opportunities, union meetings, job rallies, contract negotiations, health and safety updates, and training news are delivered to your cell phone within seconds after they are sent.

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TEXTS CAN BE CUSTOMIZED FOR YOU For example, if you are a veteran, you can text BACVETS to 877877. Then you will not only receive general texts, but customized texts on veteran-related news and events.

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YOU CAN TEXT US BACK When you text us, you are directly communicating with BAC. Whether it’s a job-related question or an opinion on a certain issue, we will get back to you in a timely manner.

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YOU DO NOT NEED AN INTERNET CONNECTION Can’t pick up a Wi-Fi signal? No problem. Texting doesn’t require an Internet connection, so even if you are out of range, you can still receive a text.

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YOU DO NOT NEED A SMARTPHONE TO DOWNLAD ANY APPS Text messaging doesn’t require a smart phone and there is no need to download anything, unlike other messaging apps. As long as you have a data plan for texting, you can text.

Join BAC's Texting Program today: Text BAC to 877877. (BAC’s texting program is currently open for members in the U.S. only and will be ready for members in Canada in the near future.) Any questions, feel free to email askbac@bacweb.org or text your question after you sign up for our texting program. [Safety Tip: Do NOT text while driving!]

Journal BAC

ISSUE 4 / 2017

IN THIS ISSUE 18 Legislative & Political 1 President’s Message 2 Mensaje Del Presidente 3 BAC Craft Awards 14 News In Brief 18 IMI and IMTEF 21 Legislative & Political 22 International Funds 24 MAP 25 Safety & Health 26 Canada 27 Local Compass

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30 In Memoriam


P R E S I D E N T ’S M E S S A G E J A M E S B O L A N D , P R E S I D E N T, I N T E R N AT I O N A L U N I O N O F B R I C K L AY E R S A N D A L L I E D C R A F T W O R K E R S

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Growing Our Union Together

s another year comes to an end, it is a good time to reflect on our accomplishments as a Union and examine our goals as we look forward to the New Year. This edition of the BAC Journal features the winners of the 2017 BAC Craft Awards. It is always exciting to celebrate the skills and achievement of our members. I am sure you will agree that this year’s winners are truly deserving, and examples of why BAC members have earned the title of “the Best Hands in the Business.” We have much to be proud of this year, including our commitment to growing our Union. For some time now, I have been saying that the top three priorities of our Union are organizing, organizing and organizing. Organizing is our priority, because it must be if we are to continue to be the longest continuous craft union in North America. Organizing is not easy, but we are up to the task. Focusing on organizing requires us to rethink the way we have been doing business. It cannot be just another item that we add to our list of things to do. There is an old saying that “if everything is a priority, then nothing is a priority.” We must make organizing our top priority, and we must allocate our resources and efforts to reflect that. Throughout the Union, Locals and ADCs are stepping up and doing the right thing. Rather than adding the task of organizing to already busy staff, we are hiring or designating organizers who have a singular focus on organizing. To support those organizers, we are

establishing organizing committees in every local jurisdiction—we are not just adding it as another issue to be addressed by the existing management structure. And we are developing strategic organizing plans designed to add new signatory contractors and recruit new members. When we organize, our members play a very important role. Our members know our industry: every BAC member knows at least one non-union craftworker and most know at least one non-union contractor. The information that you, our members, share with our Locals/ADCs is very powerful. Our organizers and Locals/ ADCs need your help growing our union. Contact your Local today if you would like to support or join the Local’s Volunteer Organizing Committee, or attend a COMET (Construction Organizing Membership Education Training) class to learn about organizing. Every BAC Local will offer COMET this year and next. We are already seeing some successes from our efforts. On page 14, you will read a story on how our members in Hawaii effectively protected their market against a low-road non-union employer. The Union is making the changes needed to focus on organizing for new members. It requires a different way of thinking and a different way of doing our business. On behalf of the International Union Executive Board, I wish you Merry Christmas, joyful holidays, and a happy and healthy New Year.

IS ISSSUE UE 44, , 22001177

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MENSA JE DEL PRESIDENTE

Haciendo crecer nuestro sindicato juntos

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on el fin de otro año, es un buen momento para reflexionar acerca de nuestros logros como sindicato y examinar nuestras metas mientras esperamos el año nuevo. Esta edición del diario presenta a los ganadores de los Premios al Oficio 2017 del Sindicato de Albañiles y Oficios Afines (Bricklayers & Allied Craftworkers, BAC). Siempre es emocionante celebrar las habilidades y los logros de nuestros miembros. Estoy seguro de que ustedes estarán de acuerdo con que los ganadores de este año de verdad se lo merecen y que son ejemplo de por qué los miembros del BAC se han ganado el título de “Las mejores manos del negocio”. Tenemos mucho de qué estar orgullosos este año, incluido nuestro compromiso con el crecimiento de nuestro sindicato. Desde hace un tiempo, he estado diciendo que las tres prioridades principales de nuestro Sindicato son la organización, organización y organización. Organizarnos debe ser nuestra prioridad si queremos seguir siendo el sindicato de oficio que más ha tenido continuidad en el tiempo en Norteamérica. Organizarnos no es fácil, pero estamos a la altura de esta tarea. Enfocarse en la organización requiere que volvamos a pensar acerca de la manera en la que hemos estado haciendo negocios. No puede ser simplemente otra tarea que agregamos a nuestra lista de cosas por hacer. Hay un viejo proverbio que dice que “si todo es una prioridad, entonces nada es prioritario”. Tenemos que hacer que la organización sea nuestra prioridad principal y debemos asignar nuestros recursos y esfuerzos para que sean un reflejo de ello. A través del Sindicato, las ramas locales y los Consejos Distritales Administrativos (Administrative District Councils, ADC) se acercan a la idea y están haciendo lo correcto. En vez de darle la tarea de organizar a un personal que ya se encuentra ocupado, estamos contratando o designando a organizadores que se centrarán únicamente en esta materia. Para ayudar a estos organizadores, estamos

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estableciendo comités de organización en cada jurisdicción local. No estamos simplemente agregándolos como otro problema que la estructura de gestión existente debe abordar. Asimismo, estamos desarrollando planes de organización estratégicos diseñados para incluir nuevos contratistas signatarios y reclutar nuevos miembros. Cuando nos organizamos, nuestros miembros desempeñan un papel muy importante. Nuestros miembros conocen nuestra industria: cada miembro del BAC conoce al menos a un artesano que no es miembro del sindicato y la mayoría conoce al menos a un contratista que tampoco lo es. La información que ustedes, nuestros miembros, comparten con nuestras ramas locales/los ADC es muy poderosa. Nuestros organizadores y las ramas locales/los ADC necesitan de su ayuda para hacer crecer nuestro sindicato. Contacte a su rama local hoy si quiere ayudar o unirse al Comité de Voluntarios para la Organización de la Rama Local, o si quiere asistir a una clase de COMET (Construcción Organización Membresía Educación y Capacitación, Construction Organizing Membership Education Training) para aprender acerca de cómo organizarse. Cada rama local del BAC ofrecerá clases COMET en este año y el próximo. Ya estamos observando algunos éxitos fruto de nuestros esfuerzos. En la página 14 podrán leer una historia de cómo nuestros miembros de Hawái protegieron su mercado de manera efectiva contra un empleador sin escrúpulos que no era miembro del sindicato. El Sindicato está trabajando para hacer los cambios necesarios para enfocarse en la organización para nuevos miembros. Esto requiere una forma de pensar diferente y una manera diferente de llevar a cabo nuestros negocios. En nombre de la Junta Ejecutiva del Sindicato Internacional, les deseo una feliz navidad, unas felices fiestas y un feliz y saludable año nuevo.

The Official Journal of the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers (issn 0362-3696)

Journal BAC

ISSUE 4 / 2017

Executive Board James Boland President

Timothy Driscoll Secretary-Treasurer

Gerard Scarano

Executive Vice President

Carlos Aquin

Executive Vice President

Regional Directors N ORT HE A ST

Al Catalano

IU Regional Director, Northeast 304 Kenwood Avenue, #4 Delmar, NY 12054 (518) 439-6080 SOUTH

Ed Navarro

IU Regional Director, South 6201 S.E. Beaver View Rd Lawton, OK 73501 (580) 357-3048 N ORT H CE N T R A L

Keith Hocevar

IU Regional Director, North Central 7640 White Pine Ct. Mentor, OH 44060 (440) 534-1108 WEST

Raymond Keen

P.O. Box 230460 Las Vegas, NV 89105 (702) 254-1988 CANADA

Craig Strudwick

IU Regional Director, Canada 2100 Thurston Drive, #3 Ottawa, ON K1G 4K8 (613) 830-0333 Editorial Staff: Brian Kennedy, Yin Yin The BAC Journal (ISSN 0362-3696) is published quarterly for $1.50 per year in advance, postage paid, for the U.S. and Canada ($1.75 per year in all foreign countries belonging to the Postal Union) by the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers. Periodicals class postage paid Washington, DC, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to the BAC Journal, International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers, 620 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20004. Canadian Postmaster: Send address changes to PO Box 503, RPO West Beaver Creek, Richmond Hill, ON L4B 4R6 Published for Bricklayers, Stone Masons, Plasterers, Tile Layers, Marble Masons, Cement Masons, Mosaic and Terrazzo Workers, Finishers, Pointers, Cleaners, and Caulkers.


BAC CRAFT AWARDS

BAC CRAFT AWARDS

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ince 1986, the BAC Craft Awards program has recognized the ‘Best of the Best’ examples of BAC craftsmanship and service. This October, a total of twenty-two Craft Awards were presented at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC. These awards honored exemplary Union and community service, and recognized the outstanding masonry projects across the country performed by skilled BAC craftworkers and signatory contractors. BAC President James Boland said in his opening remarks at the BAC Crafts Awards ceremony, “It really is a privilege reviewing the great projects and submissions that, together, embody BAC’s proud craft traditions along with the indispensable contributions of our signatory contractors, Local and ADC officers and staff, and most importantly, our members.”

BAC

BEST STONE PROJECT

Local 1 New York Davis Barracks United States Military Academy West Point West Point, NY Signatory Contractor: Acranom Masonry Inc. Middlefield, Connecticut Architect/Designer: Clark Nexsen Virginia Beach, Virginia

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his new six-story building features over 200,000 square feet of granite stone and 3,000 pieces of cast stone material including sills, lintels, jambs, panels and arches. Overseen by Acranom Masonry, this work took place over the course of 18 months. The granite stone was built using the New World Stone System by Cold Spring Granite Company. This unique system of installation was controlled as each individual stone was pre-numbered and located on drawings for its own position in the finished wall. In addition, the stone was prepared in pallets stacked in sequence from top to bottom for the most efficient productivity on installation.

The new Cadet Barracks will be named after General Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., one of the U.S. Military Academy’s first African American graduates and a brilliant military

pioneer who overcame segregation. This beautiful and historical building reflects the highest levels of craftsmanship by members of our great Union. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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BAC CRAFT AWARDS

BAC

BEST MARBLE PROJECT

Local 3 California Sufism Reoriented Sanctuary Walnut Creek, CA Signatory Contractor: The Cleveland Marble Mosaic Company Orange, California Architect/Designer: Philip Johnson/Alan Ritchie Architects New York, New York

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esigned by the renowned architectural firm of Philip Johnson/ Alan Ritchie, and built by members of BAC Local 3 California, this sacred design features marble-clad domes surrounded by contemplative gardens. Smaller domes surround a 78-foot diameter central dome that is bathed in light from a 20-foot diameter oculus. The design’s circularity creates a continuously flowing structure. The exterior cladding consists of white Carrera marble, with more than 3,000 pieces up to 3 inches thick curved front and back, weighing 180 pounds each. It also encases three garden alcoves. The pieces were installed BAC

Residential Colleges Yale University New Haven, CT Signatory Contractor: Grande Masonry Providence, Rhode Island Joe Capasso Mason Enterprises Inc. Middletown, Connecticut Architect/Designer: Robert A.M. Stern Architects LLP New York, New York

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embers of BAC Local 1 Connecticut working for the joint venture of Grande Masonry and Joe Capasso Mason Enterprises completed this project on the north side of the University’s campus over |

The grand staircase to the Prayer Hall surrounds a 39 foot sculpture, whose base is accented with raven black granite. The sanctuary is not only a spectacular sight; it creates a sense of clarity, peace and harmony. Construction was performed with quality materials, exquisite design, and master BAC craftsmanship to create a project with a stunning 700 year lifespan.

BEST BRICK AND STONE PROJECT

Local 1 Connecticut

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with stainless steel anchors with pins inserted into the edge of the stone. The centerpiece of the entrance is a circular infinity fountain constructed with raven black granite stone with a gold mosaic inlay surrounding the perimeter. The top stones had to be perfectly level for the water to flow evenly over the edge. The entrance of the Sanctuary leads to the Prayer Hall directly below the center dome. The dome directs light onto the marble flooring inlayed with brass medallions, creating an uplifting space.

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a two year period, working nearly 100 masons at its peak. The project design featured 1.4 million Glen Gery – Yale Residential Blend bricks laid in a Flemish Garden Wall Bond, and a concrete masonry unit back up of over 230,000 CMUs. Additionally, more than 49,000 pieces of lime stone, 45,000 pieces of cast stone, and 21,000 square feet of granite were set as window and door trim, tracery and accent pieces throughout this masonry masterpiece. The project, designed by the renowned firm of Robert A.M. Stern Architects, honors Yale’s architectural character with its use of timeless and beautiful materials. Stern opted for Collegiate Gothic at Yale in, as he calls it, full-blown “stylistic recall,” using brick to save money. “I wanted to add to the

tissue of the town, to connect the rest of the campus to Science Hill.” The colleges opened in the fall of 2017 and added 904 beds. As residential colleges and hybrid living-learning environments, they have rooms for faculty and teaching, and are faithful to the University’s design and mission.


BAC

OUTSTANDING LOCAL/ADC OFFICER AWARD

Don Brown Retired Director Administrative District Council of Eastern Missouri

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rother Brown is known for his leadership, his craftmanship at laying brick, and his ability to lay out opponents in the boxing ring. In the 1980s, he won a series of Golden Glove titles. Ultimately, he was ranked number seven in the nation. But at Local 1 MO, he was always ranked number one. He rose from sergeant-at-arms to trustee to business representative. After Local 1 MO merged with Local 23 MO, the International formed an Administrative District Council for BAC

Eastern Missouri, and President Boland appointed him Director, where he served until his retirement in March 2017. Brother Brown’s impressive achievements include guiding Local 1 MO through strikes in 2006, 2011, and 2015 without sacrificing member benefits. He also led the negotiating team that stopped an attack by the Mason Contractors Association on the Defined Benefit Plan. Brother Brown also served on the Executive Board of the Missouri AFL-CIO and was Vice President of the Building and Construction Trades Council of St. Louis. Brother Brown mentored and gave back to the boxing community. In 2004, he was inducted into the Gateway Classic Boxing Hall of Fame in St. Louis. And today, he receives an equally welldeserved honor by the Union he served so well.

BEST BRICK PROJECT

Local 4 Indiana/Kentucky Jenkins Hall Dormitory University of Notre Dame South Bend, IN Signatory Contractor: Ziolkowski Construction, Inc. South Bend, Indiana Architect/Designer: HBRA Architects Inc. Chicago, Illinois

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uilt by members of BAC Local 4 Indiana/Kentucky working for Ziolkowski Construction, this 14 month-project employed 40 bricklayers and apprentices at its peak. The last project to be constructed on the University’s DeBartolo Quad, Jenkins Hall will be among the first buildings to greet visitors entering the campus. The project’s exterior, featuring half a million Notre Dame brick and a concrete masonry unit back up of over 102,000 CMUs, pleasingly blends with the surrounding collegiate gothic architecture. Building highlights include two turrets constructed of Mankato limestone, a masonry veneer that features herringbone accent panels, 7,000 pieces

of cast stone, and nearly 15,000 pieces of Mankato stone used for trim, arches and accent pieces. While rivaling old world craftsmanship at its best, BAC members were also responsible for ensuring that the installation of all air barriers, insulation and flashing systems were seamlessly and

expertly integrated into the masonry wall construction. Named in honor of the late University President Reverend John I. Jenkins, this grand building is now the home of Notre Dame’s new Keough School of Global Affairs and a host of affiliated Institutes. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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BAC CRAFT AWARDS

BAC

BEST TILE PROJECT

Local 3 Massachusetts/Maine/ New Hampshire/Rhode Island The Cathedral Church of St. Paul Boston, MA Signatory Contractor: Port Morris Tile and Marble Corporation Boston, Massachusetts Architect/Designer: Context Architecture Boston, Massachusetts

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he cathedral, which was originally built from 1819 to 1820, required the replacement of 11,300 square feet of stone tile. The tiles were installed by members of BAC Local 3 Massachusetts/Maine/New Hampshire/ Rhode Island using Laticrete Hydroban as an anti-fracture membrane and Laticrete #254 platinum thin set adhesive. The largest feature is the 31-foot diameter water-jet cut Labyrinth, which BAC

was installed in the Nave area. In addition, 244 sandblasted tiles, with the names of all past and present parishes in the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, were installed throughout the Nave. And 14 tiles inset with brass Roman

BEST RESTORATION/REHABILITATION/MAINTENANCE PROJECT (CANADA)

Local 7 Canada West Block Rehabilitation Parliament Hill Ottawa, ON Signatory Contractor: RJW-Gem Campbell Stonemasons, Inc. Ottawa, Ontario Architect/Designer: Arcop Architecture Inc. Toronto, Ontario EVOQ Archtecture Toronto, Ontario

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he craftworkers of BAC Local 7 Canada, employed by RJW-Gem Campbell Stonemasons, worked for several years to complete the West Block rehabilitation in time for the iconic building’s 150th anniversary. The structure is built entirely of masonry elements, with load bearing masonry walls clad in various types of natural stone. This building also displays a large number of sculptural stone 6

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numerals were positioned along the Stations of the Cross. There is also a stair with flamed stone tiles, a footwashing area, a small chapel behind the Nave with waterjet cut tiles, and a stone and glass mosaic fountain. Thanks to BAC members’ craftmanship, visitors can now experience the Cathedral Church of Saint Paul in all its historic and spiritual wonder.

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BEFORE

AFTER

elements including colonnades, vaults, grotesques and friezes. At the peak of restoration activities, more than 200 masons from Local 7 Canada, including 62 apprentices and 18 women, were employed on the project. Nearly half of the 150,000-square-foot structure was dismantled and rebuilt anew, including one tower, two spires and 28 chimneys. The restoration work included rubble and carved stone replacement, approximately 1,500 dutchmen repairs, thousands of mortar/crack repairs, installation of 10,000 anchors, and a complete laser cleaning of the facade. The West Block’s painstaking rehabilitation, undertaken by the members of BAC Local 7 Canada working at the peak of their craft, ensures that the current and future needs of Parliamentarians will be met, while respecting the building’s heritage and architectural character – as befits a structure of such historic significance and national stature.


BAC

BEST RESTORATION/REHABILITATION/MAINTENANCE PROJECT (U.S.)

Administrative District Council 1 of Illinois Lane Tech High School Chicago, Illinois Signatory Contractor: Restore Masonry LLC Des Plaines, Illinois Architect/Designer: Bauer Latoza Studio Chicago, Illinois

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ane Tech High School, also a winner of Best Restoration/ Rehabilitation Project, is the largest college prep school in Chicago, home to 4,800 students, faculty and staff. Built in 1934, the exterior masonry on the 607,500-square-foot building had deteriorated from years of weather exposure. The renovation work was done over a 16-month period by members of BAC Administrative District Council 1 of Illinois working for Restore Masonry, all while the building was fully occupied. Classes and extracurricular activities continued uninterrupted. The project entailed rebuilding over 6,000 linear feet of brick parapet walls to accommodate a new roofing system. Additionally, over 34,000 square feet of masonry buttresses were demolished to expose structural steel and affect any necessary repairs. Led by an iPadBAC

equipped foreman, a small dedicated team of bricklayers worked with the structural engineer to document, catalogue and address all needed structural repairs, followed by reconstruction of the masonry buttresses. The restoration and repair of more than 15,000 pieces of the school’s terra cotta facade required careful coordination. Terra cotta units were removed from the façade, inspected, photographed, and inventoried for reinstallation, and where necessary replaced. Prior to reinstallation, BAC members applied custom, multi-colored

coatings to all terra cotta pieces to match the building’s original look and finish. In addition to the 163,000 square feet of grinding and tuckpointing, the project required the repair and replacement of 5,400 linear feet of steel lintels, and 18,700 linear feet of flashing. In total, more than 1.1 million new brick were laid to complete this extraordinary restoration project. Remarkably, over the full 16 months, there were no lost-time incidents. The faculty, students and staff were given a high school restored to its former glory by the craftsmanship only BAC members provide.

JOHN B. SCOLA OUTSTANDING INSTRUCTOR AWARD

Kenneth Bader Local 1 Oregon Retired Job Corps Director/ Local Instructor

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ith 67 years of experience, Brother Bader was among the first class of instructors certified by the International Masonry Institute. He spent over four decades teaching the craft through BAC’s apprenticeship programs and IMI’s Job Corps Program.

Throughout this time, he led by being the finest possible example of a true professional. He has been an extraordinary role model and an inspiration to apprentices and new staff alike. Many of those whose lives he touched chose a career in masonry thanks to his encouragement and support. Notably, Brother Bader never limited himself to just one trade — he learned and taught stone, brick, marble, tile, and

terrazzo alike. He was also instrumental in the widespread growth of masonry. He helped numerous apprenticeship programs improve their curriculum, program and recruitment goals. Brother Bader has recruited and nurtured hundreds of talented instructors, coordinators and union staff, shaping many of today’s BAC leaders. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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BAC CRAFT AWARDS

BAC

BEST REFRACTORY PROJECT

Local 5 Oklahoma/ Arkansas/Texas Ten Brick-Lined Reactors, Gulf Coast Chemical Facility Gulf Coast, Texas Signatory Contractor: Southwest Refractory, LP Alvin, Texas

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inety-seven members of BAC Local 5 OK/AR/TX were employed for 7 months on the project, installing 545,000 bricks, an assortment of special refractory shapes, board insulation, ceramic fiber and castable to complete this refractory lining. The work was extremely intricate and complex. Within each of the reactors, there were four main areas of brick construction: gravity barrel, support arches, catalyst support bed, and overhead suspended area. The gravity area was composed of BAC

New College House University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA Signatory Contractor: Dan Lepore & Sons Company Conshohocken, Pennsylvania Architect/Designer: Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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uilt by members of BAC Local 1 Pennsylvania/Delaware, New College House is the first new student residence to be constructed on campus since 1972. Designed by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson in collaboration with the University, the New College House uses masonry in creative ways to match the look of the campus, both complementing other buildings and adding its own distinctive architectural mark.

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Utilizing the best-trained refractory bricklayers in the business, Southwest Refractory and the members of BAC Local 5 OK/AR/TX completed the project on-time and on-budget, with a successful start-up and operation of all the chemical plant’s reactors.

MOST INNOVATIVE USE OF MASONRY

Local 1 Pennyslvinia/Delaware

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insulation backup and SD Fire Brick Hot Face. The Arch Supports Structures were composed of SD Fire Brick. The Catalyst Support Bed consisted of multiple layers of Special SD Fire Brick. And the Suspended Area was constructed of insulation backup and suspended SD Fire Brick.

B R I C K L AY E R S AND AL L IE D CRAF T WORKE RS

Opened last year, the 198,000-squarefoot, 350-bed building provides housing for undergraduate and graduate students, and for faculty and staff, in a shared suite-style community. The designer described it as

“both inviting and secure, open and private, embodying the comfort of home, and the power to form a campus gateway worthy of this place.” It is indeed a living embodiment of the craftsmanship of BAC masons.


BAC

OUTSTANDING BAC CRAFTSMANSHIP

Anthony Iacona Stone Mason, Marble Mason, and Tile Layer Local 4 New Jersey

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rother Anthony Iacona has been a highly regarded member of his Local for 24 years. His skill level as a stone mason is that of a master craftsman. His work ethic is outstanding. He is extremely professional on all job sites, and has worked on many stone projects throughout his career at the Local. BAC

Brother Iacona’s beautiful, precise, and impeccable work speaks for itself. He is among the greatest examples of the kind of craftworkers that Local 4 New Jersey has to offer. He has dedicated himself to his craft as well as his Union. Equally important, he is a great mentor to BAC apprentices. He has passed along his unparalleled expertise and wisdom to many Union brothers and sisters. His knowledge of the trade and his skillset is a great asset to future journeyworkers. Brother Anthony Iacona represents the very finest of BAC.

BEST PLASTER PROJECT

Local 1 New York St. Patrick’s Cathedral New York, NY Signatory Contractor: Ernest Neuman Studios Brooklyn, New York Architect/Designer: Murphy Burnham & Buttrick Architects New York, New York

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embers of BAC Local 1 New York played a central role in the renovation of this 138-year-old historic icon on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. They repaired, replicated and replaced plaster on the interior of the Cathedral over a three-year period under a $1.8 million contract. The interior was originally intended to be carved stone, but when the Civil War interrupted construction, the architect decided to use plaster painted to look like stone. In recent years, it had become dark and dingy because of candle soot and pollution. The work was done in sections starting front to back. The plaster ceiling was inspected both below and above in the crawl space. Repairs were conducted 10 stories above the pews, using synthetic resin squeeze out with acrylic and rekeyed from above. Areas damaged by water or age required new wood lath and scratch

coat. Mold-making for different parts of the vault were done on site. Plaster was then painted to match. The outstanding craftsmanship of BAC members was not just appreciated

by parishioners. It was witnessed globally when Pope Francis led services at the just-restored, gleaming St. Patrick’s Cathedral during his New York City visit in September 2015. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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BAC CRAFT AWARDS

BAC

BEST TERRAZZO PROJECT

Administrative District Council 1 of Illinois Grand Victoria Casino Elgin, Illinois Signatory Contractor: John Caretti & Co. Morton Grove, Illinois Architect/Designer: Thalden Boyd Emery Architects, LLC St. Louis, Missouri

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embers of BAC Administrative District Council 1 of Illinois worked on the project to lay 10,700 square feet of terrazzo flooring. The beautiful nine-color pattern replaced an existing damaged and dull slate tile floor. New epoxy terrazzo was an obvious choice for the project’s designers because its endless color creations and pattern flexibility were able to create the desired Las Vegas-style bold look with low maintenance costs and a long useful life. Each of the nine colors had its own custom mix of marble and glass aggregate that was blended onsite. BAC

THE BAC CODE OF CONDUCT AWARD

Edward Wehrle Vice President Local 15 Missouri/ Kansas/Nebraska

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All of the metal divider strips bordering each color and creating patterns were hand-bent. The epoxy terrazzo was installed using a color map and then polished up to an 800 diamond grit pad. Despite

the difficulty and complexity of the project, the casino stayed open around the clock while the work was ongoing. Furthermore, BAC craftworkers were challenged to complete the installation one month ahead of schedule. With the challenges of an extensive pattern, phases, public traffic, and long work hours, BAC’s skilled craftworkers proved their worth and created magnificent art on the floor of the Grand Casino.

B R I C K L AY E R S AND AL L IE D CRAF T WORKE RS

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fter working for 30 years as a bricklayer, marble mason and stone mason, following in the footsteps of his father, Brother Wehrle became a Field Representative of Local 15 MO/ KS/NE in 2004. He has put the same hard work and dedication into serving his brothers and sisters, showing up at 7:00 A.M. and not leaving until he feels satisfied that he has done all he can do for Local 15 MO/KS/NE members that day. Over the past 13 years, Brother Wehrle has regularly traveled to worksites and met with as many members as possible from all branches of the trowel trades. He has also educated members about political action, and provided a host of other vital services. Brother Wehrle’s greatest achievement may well be Local 15’s Market Recovery Program, which he helped

launch and run. This remarkable union initiative helped re-establish successful relationships with contractors, increased hours by 10%, and put millions of dollars into the pension and health and welfare funds. His responsibilities have extended far and wide to all areas of the union and its affiliated organizations and funds. His brothers and sisters note that no matter what is thrown at him, his integrity and work ethic shine through and he always goes above and beyond the call. As Brother Wehrle approaches retirement, Local 15 MO/KS/NE members know and are grateful for how much they have benefited from his adherence to the BAC Code of Conduct, and his unsurpassed dedication and solidarity.


BAC

BEST CMU PROJECT

Local 1 Minnesota/North Dakota Simley High School Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota Signatory Contractor: B&D Associates, Inc. St. Paul, Minnesota Architect/Designer: Architects Rego + Youngquist, Inc. Minneapolis, Minnesota

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embers of BAC Local 1 Minnesota/North Dakota built this addition to the north side of the school. A centerpiece of the project was a major expansion of the auditorium, more than doubling its size from 300 seats to 750. It also included new office space, and new practice rooms for the band and choir. The project utilized a wide range of masonry materials, unit sizes, and BAC

patterns in expanding the auditorium and connecting hallway. The design used more than 30,000 face brick, and 50,000 concrete blocks arranged in stack bond, and ashlar pattern. The CMUs were mixed natural gray, burnished, glazed, rock-faced, and sound blocks. BAC members covered the auditorium walls

in burnished block laid in ashlar pattern. The corridor walls were wrapped in a pattern of running bond with an accent grid of 16 by16 rock-face block. The fine craftsmanship displayed on this project will greatly benefit the students and faculty of Simley High School for decades to come.

rooms, music practice rooms, and 10,000 square feet of ground-level retail space. A reading room on the top floor offers views of the city and Lake Michigan. The enclosure required the installation of approximately 1,050 white, customshaped precast panels to form three-story window “recessed” openings. Metal panels filled in the space between precast to conceal concrete stair and elevator shafts. There were many challenges to overcome on the project. Exposed ceilings and low deck heights required many systems to be cast into concrete decks. Two layers of radiant electrical runs and much of the plumbing waste lines were modeled, coordinated and cast into the nine-inch concrete floors. There were also nearly 10,000 embeds cast into the perimeter of the structure to attach the enclosure systems. Because the precast panels were designed to overlap in order to hide joints from panel to panel on the horizontal bands, the pieces had to be “jig sawed” up the face of the building. The right panels needed to be delivered in the right sequence, and even stacked on the trucks precisely.

Adding to the challenges, the precast panels were custom shaped, with a “wave” pattern up the building. There were more than 70 unique shapes. Due to the unbalanced geometry of the panels, a custom lifting device had to be designed, built and tested to erect the top-heavy panels. The result is some of the finest architectural precast Chicago has ever seen and a groundbreaking residence hall built with the idea of community in mind.

BEST PRECAST PROJECT

Administrative District Council 1 of Illinois Campus North Residential Commons, University of Chicago Chicago, Illinois Signatory Contractor: Creative Erectors, LLC Rockford, Illinois Architect/Designer: Studio Gang Architects Chicago, Illinois

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ver the course of 26 months, members BAC Administrative District Council 1 of Illinois built this 400,000-square-foot residence hall, housing 800 undergraduate students. Plazas, gardens, walkways, and courtyards connect four separate buildings that range from one to fifteen floors high. A single-story dining hall, equipped with floor-to-ceiling windows, overlooks a central quad. Each house has a three-story common area where students can gather, study, and relax. Also included are class-

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BAC CRAFT AWARDS

BAC

OUTSTANDING PUBLIC SERVICE BY A LOCAL/ADC

West Virginia Administrative District Council Augustus Pollack Monument Wheeling, West Virginia

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hroughout its great history, our Local 1 West Virginia brothers and sisters have come together for many volunteer projects, but this past year may have topped them all. First, Local 1 WV volunteers moved and reassembled the 38-ton Augustus Pollack statue in Wheeling, West Virginia. The granite sculpture, which honors a true champion of labor, is the only one in the country that was funded and built by a union for an employer. In addition, our brothers and sisters built a memorial to fallen fire fighters, a beautiful brick pier with inlaid granite plaques with the names of those who lost their lives in the line of duty. With these remarkable volunteer projects, Local 1 West Virginia members continue to lead the way in public service.

BEST HARDSCAPE PROJECT

Mountain West Administrative District Council The Park, MGM Las Vegas, Nevada Signatory Contractor: Superior Tile and Marble Las Vegas, Nevada Architect/Designer: Marnell Companies Las Vegas, Nevada !melk New York, New York Cooper Robertson & Partners New York, New York

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ocated between the Monte Carlo and New York-New York hotelcasinos, The Park is an immersive outdoor dining and entertainment space offering diverse restaurants, engaging public art, and dramatic desert landscaping. It was built by members of BAC Local 13 Nevada, working for the subcontractor, Superior Tile & Marble, Inc. The project included Thinset installed marble and granite pavers, Sandset installed marble and granite pavers, and anchored large cubic stone for planters,

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steps and water features. The 4.6 million pieces were installed by hand in an architectural free-form pattern and the work was completed within six months. The project was challenging, because it had to be done while Las Vegas tourists continued to move throughout the park. Logistics were also difficult due to tight spaces and the need to work around all other construction build-outs. Today, the area is a lush promenade,

featuring sculptures, meta-quartzite stone from a local quarry, trees, native plantings, monumental shade structures fitted with theatrical LED lighting, 100 feet of dynamic cascading water walls, and patio dining. Thanks to the brilliant craftsmanship of BAC members, The Park achieves MGM’s vision of being a central gathering place and an oasis from the hustle and bustle of The Strip.


BAC

BEST RAINSCREEN PROJECT

Local 1 Connecticut Waterbury Career Academy Waterbury, Connecticut Signatory Contractor: Joe Capasso Mason Enterprises Inc. Middletown, Connecticut Architect/Designer: S-L-A-M Collaborative Glastonbury, Connecticut

BAC

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uilt by members of BAC Local 1 Connecticut, the rainscreen was designed to fit an area the size of a football field on a very steep site, while preserving existing wetlands and other natural features. The result is a facility with a distinctive silhouette against the Waterbury skyline. The building takes advantage of beautiful panoramas of the city to the west and rolling hills to the east. The rainscreen highlights the many contrasts of the site as well as the school’s embrace of both trades and academics. The site design also provides separate circulation routes and destinations for bus traffic, parent drop-off and pick-up, and visitor and preschool parking. The school was designed in accordance with Connecticut’s High Performance Building standards, a LEED Gold equivalent.

BEST COMPREHENSIVE RESTORATION PROJECT

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uilt in 1892 and housing the Departments of Botany, Zoology and Geology, this High Victorian Gothic building is one of the oldest on the University of Illinois’ campus and is on

Local 8 Illinois Natural History Building Renovation University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois Signatory Contractor: Otto Baum Company, Inc. Morton, Illinois RG Construction Services, Inc. East Peoria, Illinois Missouri Terrazzo Company, Inc. St. Louis, Missouri TSI Commercial Floor Covering Champaign, Illinois Murphy Marble Company Chicago, Illinois Architect/Designer: LCM Architects Chicago, Illinois

the National Register of Historic Places. The renovation work was performed by members of BAC Local 8 Illinois, and involved the full range of BAC crafts, including masonry/PCC, plaster, terrazzo, ceramic tile, and marble. The project was launched in November 2014 and completed in May 2017. It generated approximately 40,000 hours for 70 BAC members. Thanks to their hard work, the building has state-of-the-art labs and classrooms, while also maintaining the integrity of the original building design. The Natural History Building Renovation is a true testament to the training, skills, and professionalism of all the BAC trades.

OUTSTANDING UNION SERVICE BY AN INDIVIDUAL

Richard Forcione Retired Executive Vice President Local 3 Massachusetts/Maine/ New Hampshire/Rhode Island

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fter completing his apprenticeship and working 20 years as a journeyworker and bricklayer foreman, brother Forcione was appointed administrator of the Apprenticeship and Training Fund in 1987. He served for 29 years until his recent retirement, empowering hundreds of apprentices to gain lifetime careers in all branches of our craft. With the consolidation of six Local Unions and the four-state merger, Brother Forcione was elected Executive Vice President of Local 3 MA/ME/ NH/RI, and became a Boston area Field Representative. While overseeing a wider training operation, he was also elected Region 1 Vice President, serving on the International Union’s Executive Council. He was a leader in organizing, signing up new members and contractors, setting up picket lines, and leafletting non-union sites. A 52-year BAC member, Brother Forcione gave back to his community, spearheading many charitable projects. He was active politically, working to elect BAC-endorsed candidates from President to local office and encouraging participation in phone banks and labor walks. He dedicated his entire career to the betterment of BAC members and their families. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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NEWS IN BRIEF

Organizing Success in Hawaii

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hen BAC Local 1 Hawaii members learned that an unlicensed out-of-state contractor was hired to perform tile flooring work at Pearlridge Center in Aiea, HI, as part of the center’s $33 million renovation, they took their fight to the public. More than two dozen members of BAC Local 1 HI chanted, “Local jobs, local contractors, and local workers!” while holding banners on a sidewalk outside Pearlridge Center on October 27th. Armed with the First Amendment and organizing skills, they passed out leaflets about the issue, answered residents’ questions, and participated in media interviews. The state’s Regulated Industries Complaints Office later confirmed that the out-of-state contractor, Prime Flooring LLC, does not have a Hawaii contractor’s license. As this issue of the BAC Journal goes to print, the case is being investigated. Meanwhile, the contractor has ceased working on the project, and a local company has been

BAC Local 1 Hawaii members took the fight to the public with banners and fliers.

hired to continue the work. BAC Local 1 HI President Jeff Ornellas told the local media, “Even though the contractor is now off the job, it shouldn’t be off the hook for violating the law.” Though the case is pending, fines in previous cases for breaking the licensing law have reached 40% of the contract’s value, according to the state’s Regulated Industries Complaints Office. Mel Silva, Business Manager and Financial Secretary of BAC Local 1 HI,

thanked the IU Organizing Department for working with the Local. “We were able to take action right after identifying the issue. Thanks to our organizing training, we defended our market and protected our members’ jobs successfully.” “From banners to flyers, our Local worked on the messaging and reinforced it through news media,” said BAC Director of Organizing Steve Nelms, praising the Local’s success. “This is a great example of utilizing market defense tactics in organizing.”

LCLAA Celebrates Latino Heritage Month

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ational Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15th - October 15th) honors the contributions made by Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United States and celebrates their heritage and culture. To highlight all the incredible work of the Hispanic community, the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), representing two million Hispanic trade unionists, hosted its 45th anniversary conference in Washington, D.C. on September 6-7th to discuss Latino workers and strategies to organize, mobilize, and resist. The conference featured actionoriented trainings and strategy workshops to organize and empower our communities. It also included an advocacy day on Capitol Hill where BAC members joined a hundred delegates to advocate protection of DACA recipients and 14

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their families, preserving the National Environmental Protection Act, and other Latino worker priorities. “A diverse workforce makes our economy stronger,” said BAC President James Boland. “Today, 55 million people, or 17%, of the American population are

of Hispanic or Latino origin. BAC will continue working with LCLAA to help more people understand the importance of unionization in securing workers’ rights and protections on the job, and empowering them to become voices for justices and change in their communities.” BAC delegates to LCLAA’s 45th anniversary conference. From left, Jairo Cabrera of the Ohio-Kentucky Administrative District Council, Hector Arellano of Administrative District Council 1 of Illinois, Danny Garcia of Local 4 California, Matildo Cristales of Local 13 Nevada, IU Representative Antonio Fernandez, Jose Cruz of Local 8 Southeast, South Regional Director Ed Navarro, IU Organizer Luciano Padilla, IU Executive Vice President Carlos Aquin, Luis Pinedo of Local 4 California, Dave Tafoya of Local 3 California, and IU Regional Representative Ernest Adame.


BAC Executive Council Focuses on Organizing, Apprenticeship and Training

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he BAC Executive Council met at the Tommy Douglas Conference Center in Silver Spring, MD on October 2nd - 4th. The meeting recognized recent retired BAC Executive Council members Bob Mantello, retired President of Local 2 New York/Vermont, and Dick Whitney, retired President of Local 4 California, and welcomed new Executive Council members – Glenn Head of Local 4 Indiana/Kentucky, Pat Tirino of Local 2 New York/Vermont, and Lupe Aldaco of Local 4 California. Since the Union’s overriding priority is growth, organizing new contractors and members, and graduating apprentices in sufficient numbers to replenish the organization’s ranks were the focal points of the meeting. “Construction is booming and it is projected to continue to grow even more. Now is the time for us to organize new members, and to ensure we grow along with the construction industry,” BAC President James Boland said at the meeting.

From left, BAC Secretary-Treasurer Tim Driscoll, Executive Vice President Carlos Aquin, retired Local 4 CA President Dick Whitney, and Executive Vice President Gerard Scarano.

From left, BAC Secretary-Treasurer Tim Driscoll, Executive Vice President Carlos Aquin, retired Local 2 New York/Vermont President Bob Mantello, and Executive Vice President Gerard Scarano.

Growing our Union is still the theme of this meeting, as President Boland said in his opening remarks, “This meeting isn’t about rehashing the need for growth. It’s about collaborating to figure out how we’re going to grow.” He called on Executive Council members to work together to discover organizing approaches for sustainable growth of the Union.

Organizing workgroups developing organizing strategies with the 4x4 organizing model.

At the Organizing session, BAC President James Boland presented IU data on Local/ADC organizing efforts. BAC Executive Vice President Carlos Aquin and BAC Organizing Director Steve Nelms presented best practices for target selection and strategy planning and development. Members of the BAC Executive Council worked collaboratively and identified action steps for Locals/ADCs to take to build organizing capacity, using the 4x4 organizing model. Led by facilitators from the International Masonry Institute and the International Masonry Training and Education Foundation, BAC Executive Council members formed ten workgroups during the Apprenticeship and Training Strategic Planning session. Each workgroup addressed a major challenge apprenticeship programs face and developed strategic plans to tackle these ten challenges. In addition to the working sessions, the meeting featured a line of guest speakers, including the DNC Chairman Tom Perez, Mary Filardo of the 21st Century School Fund, Dr. Richard Migliori from United Health Group, and neuroscientist Dr. Beau Lotto.

Workgroups discussing the challenges our apprenticeship and training programs are facing at the Apprenticeship and Training Strategic Planning session. After a full day of distributing aid in Puerto Rico, Democratic National Committee (DNC) Chairman and former U.S. Labor Secretary Tom Perez joined our members at the BAC Executive Council meeting on October 3rd. “What we saw in Puerto Rico was unbearable, but we also saw a remarkable American spirit… We will work together to help the people of Puerto Rico rebuild,” said Chairman Perez. Perez also spoke about the Silica Standard that took effect on September 23rd. “Safety is not a simply ethical requirement. It’s in the interest of our workers’ lives. In 1936 we knew the danger of silica dust. It took 80 years for us to get here. It was my proudest moment to finally get it done. We’ll continue to fight to make sure it stays in effect.” IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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NEWS IN BRIEF

BAC President James Boland supporting the Criminal Justice Reform Resolution at the AFL-CIO Convention. “We must urge policymakers to support community policing training and de-escalation tactics. We must support adequately staff and resources for our correctional facilities and alleviate prison overcrowding,” said Boland.

BAC delegates and alternates at the AFL-CIO Convention in St. Louis, MO. From left, Tim Brown of Wisconsin District Council, Director of Eastern MO ADC Brian Jennewein, Local 2 Michigan President Chuck Kukawka, Director of Wisconsin District Council Gary Burns, IU Executive Vice President Gerard Scarano, Secretary-Treasurer Tim Driscoll, Ruby Nieves of Local 1 New York, IU President James Boland, Local 8 Southeast President Glenn Kelly, IU Executive Vice President Carlos Aquin, and BAC North Central Director Keith Hocevar.

BAC Delegates Participate in AFL-CIO’s National Convention

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ver 1,200 delegates, alternates and guests gathered in St. Louis, Missouri, October 22nd-25th for the national AFL-CIO’s 28th Constitutional Convention. The Convention reelected AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, Executive Vice President Tefere Gebre, and the Executive Council made up of 55 vice

presidents including BAC President James Boland, and elected four new Executive Council members – George McCubbin III of American Federation of Government Employees, Vonda McDaniel of Central Labor Council of Nashville and Middle Tennessee, Gwen Mills of UNITE HERE, and Charles Wowkanech of New Jersey State AFL-CIO.

BAC Local 2 Michigan member Tom Ward shared his personal story on silica dust exposure at the AFL-CIO Convention. Thanks to the contributions and continuing efforts of BAC brothers and sisters, the OSHA’s new silica standard took effect September 23rd. 16

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The Convention adopted a total of 56 Resolutions, including rebuilding the country and investing in infrastructure; making healthcare accessible for all; defending and extending immigration and citizenship programs; building a diverse and inclusive leadership for a thriving labor movement; fighting for safety and health for all workers; supporting criminal justice reforms; and calling for immediate federal action to help Puerto Rico and disasteraffected states recover, just to name a few. To view the adopted resolutions, go to: aflcio.org/2017-adopted-resolutions.

BAC Local 15 MO/KS/NE member Marvin Monge, a beneficiary of Temporary Protected Status (TPS), thanked the AFL-CIO Convention delegates for adopting the Resolution on immigration and citizenship. A crucial program that provides work permits, TPS allows people to stand up for their rights on the job. TPS holders are members of our families, our unions, and communities who have made positive contributions to our society for many years.


Twenty-One New Leaders Graduate from BAC New Leaders Program

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AC’s New Leaders Program, a comprehensive orientation for newly appointed or elected Local/ADC officers and staff, welcomed twenty-one new leaders from across the U.S. and Canada this November at the Tommy Douglas Conference Center in Silver Spring, MD. In addition to learning about their new job responsibilities, the key Union functions from the IU officers and staff, and labor history, BAC new leaders were able to learn hands-on organizing tactics, communications strategies, record keeping methods, and time management skills. New leaders also provided their comments and suggestions for BAC/IMI apprenticeship and training programs. “As BAC leaders, it’s your responsibility and your duty to grow our Union, advocate for our members, and protect our craft jurisdictions,” said BAC President James Boland, who attended the program as a new leader in 1989. He encouraged the new leaders to continue to learn without forgetting what they are fighting for. “I challenge you to remember why we’re here and what we value. Our primary and most important task is to fight for the dignity of those who work. Everything we do should be toward that end.”

Twenty-one new leaders graduated from the BAC New Leaders Program in November. Front row from left, Adam Gibson of Local 5 OK/AR/TX, Thomas Tobin of Local 1 HI, Cesar Torres of Local 15 MO/KS/NE, Edwin Hernandez of Local 1 MD/VA/DC, Christopher Avallone of Local 7 NY/NJ, and Matthew Neeson of OH-KY Administrative District Council; second row from left, Tim Brown of WI District Council, Tim Linder of OH-KY Administrative District Council, David Tafoya of Local 3 CA, Richard Boyd of Local 6 IL, Jairo Cabrera of OH-KY Administrative District Council, Tobin Boyle of WI District Council, and Eduardo Zavala of Mountain West Administrative District Council; third row from left, Norman Bone of Local 7 Canada, Matt Zink of Local 2 NY/VT, Eric Mrowicki of Local 6 IL, Jeff Hoeger of Local 3 IA, and Chris Brisson of Local 4 CA; back row from left, Cordell Fischer of Pacific Northwest Administrative District Council, Raul Zamarron of Local 2 MI, and Frank Williams Jr. of Local 7 NY/NJ.

Women Build Nations Conference Builds Support for Tradeswomen

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he annual Women Build Nations conference, hosted by North America’s Building Trades Unions and Chicago Women in Trades, brought together a record-breaking 1,906 tradeswomen and their allies in Chicago on October 13-15th. Many tradeswomen, including attendees, worked on the Hyatt

Regency McCormick Place where the conference was held. It was the second year that BAC sent over 50 women members to the conference, among whom over a quarter were apprentices or pre-apprentices. BAC Executive Council member Liliana Calderon, who has been actively involved

Over 50 BAC members attended the 2017 Women Build Nations conference held in Chicago in October.

with Chicago Women in Trades, introduced the conference on October 14th. A platform for tradeswomen to address their everyday challenges while learning about career advancing opportunities, the Women Build Nations conference has also helped attendees build mentoring relationships to support and learn from each other. Mary Lovette, a 38-year member of BAC Local 2 Washington/Idaho/Montana shared her career advice with BAC apprentices and pre-apprentices at the reception hosted by the IU on the first day of the conference, “Don’t say you don’t know how to do something, but ask, how can I learn that?” Chicago Women in Trades and the National Taskforce for Tradeswomen’s Issues also hosted the pre-conference institute entitled “Building Women’s Equity in Apprenticeship and Employment: An Institute for Practitioners’ and Employers.” Around 260 apprenticeship programs, contractors, workforce development organizations and other stakeholders attended the pre-conference meeting to build their capacity to recruit and retain women in the industry. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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IMI & IMTEF

ICP graduates along with BAC and IMTEF leaders, front row from left: Bob Arnold, IMTEF National Training Director; Eric Doherty of Local 4 NJ; Richard Taylor of Local 5 OK/AR/TX; IU Secretary-Treasurer Tim Driscoll; IU President James Boland; Joseph Pugliano of Local 9 PA; Joseph Schmidt of Local 3 NY; Dennis Whytas of Local 3 NY; David Naprstek of Local 74 IL. Back row from left: Jeffrey Garnett of Local 18 OH/KY; Keith Inglin of Local 4 NJ; Christopher Busch of Local 3 IA; Gavin Collier of Local 21 IL; Stephen Carney IV of Local 1 CT; David Manko of Local 9 PA; Anthony Demme of Local 21 IL, and Dan Flores of Local 4 IN/KY.

14 BAC Members Graduate from IMTEF’s 2017 Instructor Certification Program

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ourteen BAC instructors graduated from IMI/IMTEF’s annual Instructor Certification Program (ICP) in November 2017. ICP is a 5-year, 200-hour educational program that develops instructors’ skills so they can more effectively train BAC members. “Training apprentices is an extremely rewarding career,” said Gavin Collier, Tile Apprenticeship Coordinator at the BAC ADC 1 of Illinois District Council Training Center in Chicago (DCTC), reflecting on ICP. “Although I took pride in all the work I did in the field, it’s a different feeling when you can train

“I now specifically find myself trying to identify learning styles with my students to improve their retention of knowledge from the start of their apprenticeship.” —DAN FLORES, LOCAL 4 INDIANA/KENTUCKY

someone and then get him or her a union job. For a lot of my apprentices, these are life-changing opportunities.” ICP participants are journey-level craftworkers employed as instructors by local apprenticeship programs. Through ICP, these instructors learn how to

“Training apprentices is an extremely rewarding career. Although I took pride in all the work I did in the field, it’s a different feeling when you can train someone and then get him or her a union job. For a lot of my apprentices, these are life-changing opportunities.” —GAVIN COLLIER, TILE APPRENTICESHIP COORDINATOR, ADC 1 OF ILLINOIS DISTRICT COUNCIL TRAINING CENTER 18

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structure a training program that meets the needs of members throughout their working life. “ICP has provided me with the structure and knowledge to put together a solid [training] program,” said Christopher Busch of BAC Local 3 Iowa. “I now specifically find myself trying to identify learning styles with my students to improve their retention of knowledge from the start of their apprenticeship,” remarked Dan Flores of Local 4 IN/KY. Eric Doherty of Local 4 New Jersey affirmed, “To be a certified instructor in the eyes of IMI will be the greatest accomplishment of my career in the masonry field.”


Rain Screen Wall Systems Offer Work Hours for BAC Craftworkers and Contractors

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opular new rain screen wall systems are a rapidly growing segment of the cladding industry and a source of man hours for BAC craftworkers and contractors. The International Masonry Institute (IMI) and the International Masonry Training and Education Foundation (IMTEF) developed a market strategy for rain screen wall systems in early 2017 to train BAC members and educate both signatory contractors and designers on proper design and detailing. The goal is to ensure BAC jurisdiction for all rain screen wall systems, encourage BAC contractors to competitively bid them, and make sure BAC members are ready for the work. Rain screen wall systems include an exterior cladding, usually made of terracotta, porcelain slabs, calcium silicate, or building stone. The cladding is supported by a proprietary clip and rail metal subframe system with insulation and water/ air/vapor control layers. BAC signatory contractors and BAC craftworkers can install any of these systems, including panels made from non-traditional materials, because they share similar features

Dave Naprstek

Rain screen suppliers brought mock-ups and material samples to IMI’s Rain Screen Expo this fall at the BAC District Council Training Center in Chicago. Pictured, a representative from Terreal North America shares product information with an architectural attendee.

with each other and with other work traditionally done by BAC members. As architects, engineers, and building science professionals better understand the

Scott Conwell

BAC members installing rain screen tile panels at 640 N. Wells in Chicago. General Contractor: Lend Lease. Tile Contractor: DTI.

dynamics of air flow, moisture, condensation, and thermal control, wall systems continue to evolve in details, materials and construction. IMI and IMTEF offer a Rain Screen Training program that covers building science, rain screen installation details, and best practices. It includes both classroom and shop training, followed by a written test. To learn more about rain screen training, contact your local BAC/ IMI training program. Additionally, IMI provides training to signatory contractors on project management and estimating for these systems. To raise awareness of BAC’s involvement in the rain screen market, IMI launched an Expo series for designers and contractors, which offers technical sessions as well as product samples and displays by suppliers. The Expo has traveled to Chicago, IL, Providence, RI, Pittsburgh, PA and the San Francisco Bay area, with future events planned for Los Angeles (February 2018) and New York City (April 2018). IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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IMI & IMTEF

INTERNATIONAL MASONRY TRAINING AND EDUCATION FOUNDATION

TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES - WINTER 2018 The John J. Flynn BAC/IMI International Training Center 17101 Science Drive • Bowie, Maryland 20715

Train-the-Trainer Courses April 9 - 13

OSHA 500

January 23 - 26

OSHA 510

February 6 - 8

OSHA 502

Trainer Course in OSHA Standards for Construction OSHA Standards for the Construction Industry Update for Construction Industry Outreach Trainers

Continuing Education Courses February 12 - 20 April 2 - 10

Refractory

February 21 - 23 April 11 - 13

MSHA New Miner

Class size is limited to 16. Allows BAC Members to work on MSHA-governed construction sites.

January 29 - February 2 March 5 - 9

JAHN/Edison Coatings/Conproco/Lithomex ABAA Air Barrier Certification

Air Barrier Association of America (ABAA) requires $250 for ABAA Certified Installer License Fee (1st year) and $100 annual renewal fee payable to ABAA by the installer to receive and maintain their Installer Certification Card.

March 26 - 28 January 9 - 24 January 30 - February 14 February 20 - March 7 March 13 - 28 April 3 - 18 April 24 - May 9 January 22 - 27 February 26 - March 3 March 12 - 17 March 19 - 24

Welding class size limited to 8 students. A $100 equipment fee is required.

Historic Masonry Preservation Certificate

Must have 5 years of BAC Journey-level craftworker experience. 6 full days including 3 evening classes with travel in on Sunday

Cross-Craft Training Upgrade Training Pre-Job Training

January 16

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Welding

Please contact your local officer or your training coordinator to register early as class sizes for these courses are limited. Local Officers/Training Coordinators: To enroll your members for training or receive information on additional courses, contact Serenia Holland • (301) 291-2105 • sholland@imtef.org

Union Masonry Craftworkers Contractors & Consultants 20

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LEGISLATIVE & POLITICAL

Labor-Endorsed Candidates Win Big Across the Country

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ff year elections this November saw labor-backed candidates cruise to victory in a number of states. Voters strongly rejected the TrumpPence agenda by electing labor-endorsed

candidates across the country, including Governorships in both New Jersey and Virginia, and impressive gains in House races at the state level. Labor’s agenda is moving forward with elected officials who are

From left, New Jersey Senate President and Ironworkers General Vice President Steve Sweeney, BAC Director of New Jersey Administrative District Council Rich Tolson, and Governor-elect of New Jersey Phil Murphy on Election Day.

committed to the values of working families. The results of these 2017 elections, and the hard work of those BAC Local unions to achieve that result, lay the groundwork for the labor movement to make further gains in next year’s mid-term elections. In New Jersey, Democrats flipped the governor’s seat from red to blue by electing labor-backed candidates Phil Murphy and Sheila Oliver. In Virginia, Ralph Northam is the Governor-elect, Justin Fairfax is Lieutenant Governor-elect, and Mark Herring was re-elected Attorney General. As this BAC Journal goes to print, four ongoing recounts in House races will determine which party controls the chamber following Democratic gains in the election. If the certified results hold, Republicans would narrowly keep their majority 51-49. In New York, voters rejected the Constitutional Convention proposal, known as Proposition One, the idea of holding a convention to overhaul New York’s Constitution. Thanks to the efforts made by the organized labor, this tremendous victory made sure that worker protections are preserved in the Constitution. Other major wins were reported up and down the ballot in Oklahoma, Georgia, New Hampshire, Washington, and Florida.

Public School Construction Presents Opportunities for BAC

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chool facilities represent the second largest sector of public infrastructure spending after highways. According to the State of Our Schools report, school districts should be spending at least $77 billion per year to ensure healthy, safe, and efficient facilities and an additional $10 billion a year to meet 80% of the projected enrollment growth. Federal school facilities proposals were introduced in 115th Congress including H.R. 2475 Rebuild America’s Schools Act of 2017 to support the long-term improvement of public school facilities and S. 1674 School Building Improvement Act of 2017 to provide grants for the repair, renovation, and construction of public

elementary schools and secondary schools, families, the economy and education. We should also bring information to and to establish a school infrastructure and engage working men and women bond program. in the issue of adequate, stable, and “I think we have a unique opporequitable funding for public school tunity to increase and stabilize school modernization and construction.” construction funding,” said Mary Filardo, Executive Director of K–12 Facilities Account for About One-Quarter the 21st Century School of State and Local Infrastructure Investments Fund, a Washington D.C.Percent of total state and local capital outlay, 1995–2012 based organization that is dedicated to building the 10% 16% public will and capacity to 1% modernize public school Natural Resources Higher Education 7% 24% Parks and Rec K–12 infrastructure. “We need Sewerage Hospitals 4% Solid Waste Highways to communicate with state 2% Utilities Public Safety 1% and federal representatives 3% 32% about our communities and the benefits modern Source: U.S. Census of Governments, State and Local Government school facilities bring to F-13 Fiscal Survey, FY 1995–2012, omitting 1997,2001, 2003 IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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INTERNATIONAL FUNDS INTERNATIONAL PENSION FUND

Get Updated on Recent Fund Developments with the 2016 Annual Report

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he 2016 International Pension Fund (IPF) and International Health Fund (IHF) Annual Report focuses on the retirement, financial, and health needs of BAC members in the United States and Canada and how the International Funds are working with Local Unions to meet those needs. The Report reviews IPF Plan changes and charts the progress of the Plan’s Funding Improvement Plan, the ensuing Rehabilitation Plan, and how these measures are stabilizing IPF’s ability to meet its obligations to participants. The Report also reviews the performance and growth of the BACSAVE Retirement Savings Plan, including its outstanding 2016 return of 7.25%. As always, the Report features a selection of commonly asked questions and provides answers to help participants understand IPF benefits, benefit options, and application procedures. Member Portal Expanding Content, Gaining Users

Join the increasing numbers of Union members turning to the BAC Member Portal. Report changes in contact information, beneficiary designations, upload forms, and even pay dues to Locals and ADCs that have opted for that capability. Members can review their IPF and BAC SAVE RSP Annual Statements, and review work opportunities posted to the BAC Job Network. BAC SAVE RSP participants can now view their account balances and apply for benefits through the Portal. Participants can also access this information on tablets or smartphones with BACMobile apps for both Android and iOS users. Both the IPF and IHF Boards of Trustees encourage you to read the Annual Report and carefully review the benefits available under these plans with your families. For questions regarding the 22

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International Pension Fund or the BAC SAVE Retirement Savings Plan, contact: David F. Stupar Executive Director International Pension Fund dstupar@ipfweb.org 1-888-880-8222 For questions regarding programs available through the International Health Fund, contact: Robin Donovick Executive Director International Health Fund rdonovick@bacweb.org 1-888-880-8222

Can I work after Retirement? The Fund office receives many requests for information regarding work after retirement. The following information summarizes Plan Rules regarding this type of employment for both the U.S. and Canada Plan participants. Answers to these and other frequently asked questions can be found in the recently published 2016 IPF/ IHF Annual Report and on-line at www.ipfweb.org. IPF retirees may work after retirement, but there are important restrictions based on the type of employment, your age, and your income. To be considered retired, the IPF pensioner must separate from covered employment for the entire month their pension starts. Ages 55-61: Pensioners under the age of 62 will have benefits withheld for any month worked in Disqualifying Employment. Ages 62-63: Those aged 62 and 63 may work until they have earned $17,040 (the Social Security Earnings Maximum for 2018) and must contact the Fund office when they have earned that sum. Age 64: There are no earnings limits for those aged 64 or over.

IPF Canada Retirees

To be considered retired, an IPF Canada pensioner must separate from covered employment for the entire month their pension starts. Afterwards a participant may be employed in retirement in any capacity without the suspension of his benefit but with no further pension accrual. If the participant returns to Covered Employment, he is required to notify the Fund office in writing within 15 days about any such employment undertaken so that appropriate tax reporting can be prepared as it could reduce the amount he is able to contribute to other retirement arrangements. If you are unsure of the status of an employment type, please contact the Fund office. Those receiving Local Union pension benefits should contact their Local Union regarding work after retirement under Local plan rules.


INTERNATIONAL HEALTH FUND

IHF Provides Top Quality Benefits for Canadian Members

T

he BAC IHF keeps its focus on the members and their families to deliver top quality benefits at the most competitive rates. Early in 2017, the IHF conducted a comprehensive market evaluation of Canadian insurance carriers and administrators. It had been over 15 years since any change in carrier for the Canadian plan. In reviewing the market, a new benefits administrator, NexgenRx was selected. The Canadian health benefits plan moved to NexgenRx, effective July 1, 2017, for medical, dental and prescription drug benefits. Subsequently, our Canadian members received new plan ID cards. The benefits program in effect with NexgenRx mirrors the prior plan that had been administered by Industrial Alliance for many years. At the same time, the IHF added ManuLife, a wellrespected large carrier in Canada to provide short-term disability benefits, life insurance, and accidental death insurance for our Canadian members. Although any change comes with challenges, the transition to the new plan administrator is completed and the program is up and running! Prescription Drug Card Implemented for all Members

NexgenRx enabled the plan to provide a Drug Card to use at the pharmacy for all members. The card is recognized at the pharmacy and the member pays the plan copay at the point of service. No claim

NexgenRx Launches New Member Website

NexgenRx launched its new and improved member website: memberweb.nexgenrx. com. The site can also be accessed via its corporate website at nexgenrx.com under the Login Tab. Member online services allow you to:

Lakov Filimonov

forms are required to be submitted. Approaches that have been in place for many years in the U.S. were added to the plan to promote continued cost effectiveness. For example, a mandatory generic drug program was implemented with Nexgen Rx. For higher cost prescription drugs, sometimes referred to as specialty drugs, NexgenRx will work with each member if they require a drug that costs $10,000. NexgenRx’s network, Canadian Provinces, and drug manufactures work together to ensure that each member receives provincial and drug company’s assistance available. The plan includes a $10,000 per molecule drug maximum per covered individual. If a Canadian member or their family needs assistance, a NexgenRx representative will be there to help with every step. In addition, the IHF office staff in Newfoundland or New Brunswick are always a phone call away. Out of Country Services

Effective November 1, 2017, there is a change in the Travel Provider with NexgenRx. Members will be receiving a new card shortly in the mail with the new provider phone number in case of Emergency while travelling.

• • • • • • • •

Update your user profile Review personal information Review plan/benefit details View claims activity Submit claims View resources Print your benefit card Self-Serve with Frequently Asked Questions

In order to access the site, members need their User ID and Password. If a member lost or forgot login credentials, contact NexgenRx Member Help Desk at 1-866-424-0257 for assistance.

Looking Ahead

By selecting NexgenRx, there were reductions in the overall plan administrative costs and additional services for members. NexgenRx allows for more electronic transmission of claims (Health, Dental, Drugs), which in the long run translates to improved service and easier ongoing administration. We have already seen significant returns on these changes with NexgenRx amounting to savings to the Canadian Health & Welfare Fund. In today’s health care era, the IHF continues to monitor services and costs to deliver quality benefits for its Canadian members. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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23


MAP

Understanding the Opioid Epidemic

C

ompared to workers from any other profession, construction workers are among the most at risk for suffering from alcohol and drug addiction. Construction workers rank second in alcoholism and third in addiction to illegal street drugs, such as heroin and cocaine. In addition, they also rank among the “Top 10” at highest risk for clinical depression. With substance abuse and mental health risk factors like these, it is no wonder that union construction workers are particularly susceptible to the worst opioid epidemic in our nation’s history. Accidental overdose deaths from opioids have skyrocketed, taking the lives of members in their prime. Younger members may begin via recreational use

of prescription pain pills. They may find themselves quickly hooked, and then typically transition to more readily available and cheaper heroin. Older members struggling with chronic pain and trying to continue working may follow a similar path of switching from prescription opioids to heroin. Workers may struggle to talk about their addiction, much less seek professional help. They may worry about how to feed their family while they are in treatment; who will look after their kids while they’re away; how to afford treatment; and which treatment options are best. Many will no longer have health insurance coverage because their addiction has caused them to miss too much time from work. Finally, workers often worry about being blacklisted and no longer having a job to return to after treatment. 24

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How have so many workers in the construction industry gotten hooked on opioids? Why are so many opioid addicts suffering accidental overdose deaths? What can the construction industry do to foster prevention and encourage treatment? These questions are best answered by more fully understanding how the current opioid epidemic emerged. The Opioid Epidemic Tsunami

The current opioid epidemic swept the nation in three great waves. Since 2000, the opioid epidemic has killed more than 310,000 Americans. Opioid accidental overdose is now the leading cause of death for adults under age 50! The first wave began in the 1990’s, with a sudden, sharp spike in the overprescribing of painkillers to treat acute and chronic pain. The development of Oxycontin, an unusually powerful pain medication misleadingly touted by the pharmaceutical industry as “completely safe,” but later found to be dangerously addictive, was a chief contributor. Wellintentioned but unknowing doctors were encouraged to more fully treat their patients’ pain by prescribing higher dosages of drugs for longer periods of time. At the same time, “pill mill” clinics, in which patients are unethically overprescribed pain pills for huge cash profits, began popping up everywhere. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) efforts to close pill mill clinics floundered as multiple new clinics were opened for every clinic closed. Sadly, the rate of accidental opioid overdose deaths rapidly increased handin-hand with overprescribing pain pills. By the early 2000’s, physicians were becoming more aware that “Big Pharma” had lied about the safety of powerful narcotics such as Oxycontin. Aware of the dangers, physicians began to cut back on prescribing Oxycontin and other addictive pain medications. Heartbreakingly, by the early 2000’s, hundreds of thousands of Americans were already hooked on prescription pain pills, setting the stage for the third wave.

It occurred when vast numbers of adults began seeking heroin on the streets as a substitute for prescription pain pills. Statistics showed that seven out of 10 people hooked on heroin had switched from prescription pain pills. In decades past, heroin use was stigmatized, but it became commonplace. The devastating third wave of opioid addiction hit in 2010, when illegal drug manufacturers in Mexico and China began lacing synthetic heroin with Fentanyl to offer the ultimate potent heroin. Fentanyl, a powerful and potentially deadly narcotic, was originally developed as an anesthesia for surgery and for the excruciating pain of cancer patients in hospice. However, by 2010 and beyond, synthetic Fentanyllaced heroin was being widely distributed on the streets to heighten an addict’s high. Unsuspecting heroin addicts began dying in droves as they accidentally overdosed on Fentanyl-laced heroin. Whereas in the past, it might take several hours for someone to die of accidental overdose, addicts now were dying within minutes. This narrowed window of time from overdose to death meant many addicts had already died before the ambulance could arrive. By 2013, more than 10,000 Americans had died sudden, tragic, accidental overdose deaths attributed to Fentanyl-laced heroin. MAP Helps Impaired Workers

The BAC Member Assistance Program (MAP) offers free, professional intervention and assistance by licensed mental health professionals to our Union members and their families. If you are or a worker you know is struggling with opioid addition, anxiety or depression, and need help, please call MAP’s licensed mental health professionals for help. MAP is generally open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST Monday through Friday. All calls are strictly confidential. With the member’s permission, MAP can monitor treatment progress and make recommendations about when a member is ready to safely return to work. Call MAP today toll-free at 1-888-880-8222.


SAFETY & HEALTH

Training Center and Apprentices Test Helmet Cam Technology for Measuring Silica Exposure

W

ith the active support of the Southern OhioKentucky Regional Training Center in Batavia, OH, the Masonry r2p Partnership has been working with NIOSH researcher Dr. Alan Echt and his team to measure silica exposure during tuckpointing, in order to find better ways to reduce members’ exposures (see bacweb.org/journal/2017_01/ safety1.php). During a recent round of testing at the Training

Researchers set up the new Helmet Cam technology on BAC Local 18 OH apprentice Caleb DeLaVega before he begins tuckpointing.

Center, the Partnership invited a research team from NIOSH’s Mining Division to demonstrate a new Helmet Cam technology developed for mining that has promising applications for construction. The Helmet Cam system consists of a camera worn by a worker, along with instruments required for measuring exposure to dust and other hazards, including noise and chemical exposures. For this masonry test, the camera captured a visual of the dust generated by the task while the dust monitor measured the worker’s actual exposure. The two are then linked so the video can be viewed simultaneously with the exposure data. This allows the researchers to not only determine how much dust the worker is exposed to in real time, but to pinpoint exactly where the highest exposures are coming from. BAC Local 18 OH apprentice Caleb DeLaVega assisted researchers by wearing the Helmet Cam technology for six separate tests. In addition to obtaining useful data, lessons learned about how the Helmet Cam can be used for the first time in construction. Information gathered will enable the Masonry r2p Partnership, CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training, and the construction industry to identify ways to use this technology to detect and address hazards, and lead to new and better engineering controls or solutions to protect workers.

Changes to ANSI Cut Standard – Making Gloves Safer for the Best Hands in the Business

C

hanges to ANSI/ISEA voluntary standard 105-2016 are making it easier to figure out how cut resistant a glove is – an important issue in an industry that relies on skilled hands. Gloves are subject to several tests and rated based on their performance related to various mechanical, chemical, and other types of protection (i.e. cut-resistance, puncture resistance, abrasion resistance, permeation resistance, degradation, ignition resistance, and vibration reductions). The most significant change to the standard is the acceptance of a different cut test – the ISO 13997 test method, also known as the “TDM-100 Test.” After years

of trying differing testing methods, it was found that the round, rotating blade used in the “Coup Test” would dull quickly when testing yarns with high levels of glass and steel fibers, which resulted in unreliable cut test scores. The introduction of the TDM machine as well as the addition of the second cut test will provide a more accurate measure of cut resistance. An expansion of the classification levels will bring the U.S. more in line with international standards. Both the old and new ratings will be visible on glove markings for now. The TDM test classification will be marked as a letter (A-F) to avoid confusion with the original Cut or Coup test number. In

Going forward, glove markings will contain two new rating letters, indicated in red.

addition, an Impact Protection rating will be added only for gloves designed for protection against impact. An “X” rating indicates that the gloves were not designed for impact and therefore were not tested. For more information on the ratings, testing methods used, and other changes to the standard, visit ChooseHandSafety.com. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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25


CANADA

BAC Stands in Solidarity with CUPE Brothers and Sisters

O

n July 7th, more than 600 members of Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Local 1816 were locked out by their employer, Pacific Blue Cross, after the company decided to cut retiree benefits for current employees. BAC Local 2 British Columbia members walked the picket line in solidarity with CUPE brothers and sisters, saying no to

proposed benefit cuts and demanding the Pacific Blue Cross CEO Jan Grude to get back to the bargaining table. The two-month strike led to a sixyear collective bargaining agreement signed on September 9th that includes an annual wage increase, retiree benefits preservation, and establishment of a health and welfare trust to be managed by joint union-management trustees.

On September 18th, CUPE Local 1816 members employed by Pacific Blue Cross returned to work. “Though it’s a long and difficult struggle for brothers and sisters of CUPE, together we finally made it through and achieved a new contract. This is what labor organizing looks like,” said BAC Local 2 British Columbia President Geoff Higginson.

From left, BAC Local 2 British Columbia President Geoff Higginson, and CUPE members Heather, John, Albert, Jason, Louis and Reginald on the picket line in July. De gauche à droite, Geoff Higginson, le Président de la section locale 2 du BAC Colombie-Britannique, et les membres du SCFP Heather, John, Albert, Jason, Louis et Reginald sur la ligne de piquetage en juillet.

Le BAC est solidaire avec ses frères et sœurs du SCFP

L

e 7 juillet, plus de 600 membres de la section locale 1816 du Syndicat canadien de la fonction publique (SCFP) ont subi un lock-out de la part de leur employeur, Pacific Blue Cross, après que l’entreprise ait décidé de couper les prestations de retraite des employés en poste. Les membres de la section locale 2 du BAC Colombie-Britannique ont participé à des piquets de grève en solidarité avec nos frères et sœurs du SCFP pour dire non 26

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B R I C K L AY E R S AND AL L IE D CRAF T WORKE RS

aux coupures de prestations proposées et demander au PDG de Pacific Blue Cross Jan Grude de revenir à la table des négociations. La grève, qui a duré deux mois, a permis de signer le 9 septembre une convention collective de six ans incluant une hausse annuelle des salaires, la préservation des prestations de retraite, et l’établissement d’une fiducie de santé et de bien-être, devant être gérée par des fiduciaires conjoints patronaux-syndicaux. Le

18 septembre, les membres de la section locale 1816 du SCFP employés par Pacific Blue Cross sont retournés au travail. « Même si c’est au terme d’un combat long et difficile pour nos frères et sœurs du SCFP, ensemble, nous avons enfin finalisé un nouveau contrat. C’est un bon exemple de syndicalisation qui a porté ses fruits, » a déclaré Geoff Higginson, le Président de la section locale 2 du BAC Colombie-Britannique.


LOCAL COMPASS

Local 3 Massachusetts/Maine/ New Hampshire/Rhode Island

L

awrence “Larry” Durso was initiated as an apprentice in former BAC Local 10 Massachusetts in November 1939. After serving in the military during World War II, he joined the family business with his father, who was also a Gold Card member of BAC, uncle, and four brothers. The firm worked as a combination development company and general contractor throughout the New England area. Their list of clients included Howard Johnson Restaurants, Esso Gas Stations and McDonald’s, just to name a few. “Brother Durso is 101 years young, and in great health,” BAC Local 3 MA/ME/NH/RI President Chuck Raso said. “By presenting this plaque, we want to celebrate his life-time service to our Union and contributions to the industry.”

Local 3 MA/ME/NH/RI leaders had the honor of presenting 75-year member Larry Durso with a plaque to recognize his service to the Union. From left, BAC Local 3 MA/ME/NH/RI Vice President Riley Kreamer, retired Executive Vice President Richard Forcione, President Chuck Raso, brother Larry Durso, Executive Vice President Chuck Raso Jr., and Field Representative Mike Sara.

Local 2 Washington/Idaho/Montana

BAC Local 2 WA/ID/MT 40-year member Barry Houx, left, and 25-year member Wayne Madsen. Not pictured is 25-year member Gerald Sturges.

BAC Local 2 WA/ID/MT 50-year member Dean Moser receives his Gold Card.

Local 1 Prince Edward Island

BAC Local 1 PEI 50-year member Edward Doyle, left, receives his Gold Card from Local 1 PEI President Cedric Blanchard. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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27


LOCAL COMPASS

Local 15 Missouri/Kansas/Nebraska

BAC Local 15 MO/KS/NE 70-year member Leo Binninger receives his plaque recognizing his life-time dedicated union service.

 BAC Local 15 MO/KS/NE Nebraska Chapter 70-year member Jerry Delhay receives his plaque from Nebraska Chapter Field Representative Rod Oviatt, left, and President Craig Hydeman. u BAC Local 15 MO/KS/NE Nebraska Chapter 70-year member Brian “Junior” Woodcock receives his plaque from Nebraska Chapter Field Representative Rod Oviatt, left, and President Craig Hydeman.

BAC Local 15 MO/KS/NE Nebraska Chapter 60-year member Theodore Seifert receives his plaque from Nebraska Chapter Field Representative Rod Oviatt, left, and President Craig Hydeman.

28

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Local 1 Nova Scotia From left, 40-year member Anthony Boudreau, Gold Card member Leonard Doucette, 40-year member Wyman Jordan, Gold Card members Tullio Callegari and David Hatt, and 40-year member Leonard MacDonnell.

BAC Local 1 NS 50-year member Garth Gertridge poses with his Gold Card.

BAC Local 1 NS 50-year member Angus Davidson receives his Gold Card.

BAC Local 1 NS 40-year member Harold Cole, right, receives his 40-year service award from Mainland Chapter Chair Anthony Boudreau.

BAC Local 1 NS 40-year member Romeo Dube, right, receives his 40-year service award from Local 1 NS President James Moore. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

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29


IN LOCAL MEMORIAM COMPASS

July Death Benefit Claims for July 2017 Total Amount Paid Total Union Labor Life Claims Total Death Benefits Total Number of Claims Average Age Average Years of Membership MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

BRANCH OF TRADE

Arcarese, Carl - 03, NY

$119,000.00 $2,000.00 $117,000.00 67 80.76 52.88

MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

BRANCH OF TRADE

YEARS OF AGE

Johnson, Clarence W. - 01, AB

MEMBERSHIP

B, SJ

64

41

Jung, Lothar - 05, OH

B

92

60

Kelly, Dennis - 02, ON

B

86

53

Kloha, Raymond J. - 02, MI

B

83

60

Krampetz, Waldemar - 01, MB

B

82

63

Krushefsky, Frank A. - 01, CT

B

84

65

Lazar, II, Maynard - 07, OH

TL, TW, MM

69

30

Lipira, Sr., Joseph C. - 01, MD/VA/DC

B

83

67

Little, Glen F. - 08, SE

B

88

70

Lore, Norman H. - 05, NJ/DE/PA

B, CM, P

70

47

Malone, Jack - 02, WA/ID/MT

B, M

90

64

YEARS OF AGE

MEMBERSHIP

B, CM, P

89

51

Askins, Herbert L. - 01, MO

CB

91

66

Barajas Garcia, Raul - 01, HI

MM, TL, TW

32

1

Marulic, Casimir R. - 04, IN/KY

B

87

63

FN

46

14

Barde, Gerald E. - 02, MI

B

91

71

McDade, Steven J. - 04, IN/KY

Benusa, James D. - 01, MN/ND

B

64

41

McKinney, Richard K. - 01, MO

B

64

41

Bracken, James S. - 08, SE

B

91

69

Moje, Richard M. - 04, CA

B

56

36

Brown, Bernard E. - 21, IL

B

83

64

Nordstrom, Sr., Robert E. - 21, IL

B

87

68

Burkett, Sr., Robert F. - 08, SE

P

91

70

Novak, Frank - 05, OH

B

89

68

Buttery, Jereld - 18, OH/KY

B

82

57

Osika, Miezyslaw - 01, CT

B, M

89

50

Chmielewski, Edward J. - 01, MN/ND

CB, B

68

31

Contreras, Joe - 04, CA

FN

95

26

Pearey, Sr., Leslie A. - 15, MO/KS/NE

B

88

64

D’Amico, Peter A. - 03, NY

CB, CM

100

47

Pierce, Everett G. - 05, NJ/DE/PA

B, CM, P

88

52

Debenack, David C. - 09, WI

B, M

87

66

Pisello, Pietro - 21, IL

FN

76

17

Deruise, Gustave J. - 08, SE

B

89

59

Rodgers, Robert W. - 04, NJ

P

83

61

DeSimone, Amidio - 04, NJ

B, CM

91

65

Rusinovich, Robert A. - 11, WV

B, M

76

50

Djurkowitsch, Josef L. - 21, IL

B

80

61

Santoro, Leonard - 21, IL

B

80

59

Doty, Mervin F. - 03, IA

B, M, MM

78

60

Schincariol, Giuseppe - 06, ON

B

77

50

Downing, Richard J. - 01, CT

TL

88

56

Smithson, Virgil - 04, CA

TL

93

69

Stallone, James - 21, IL

B

87

67

Stener, Harold O. - 01, MN/ND

B

92

67

Tenaglia, Jr., Gerald - 09, PA

B

82

46

Torre, Arthur R. - 04, NJ

B, CM

93

62

Torrey, Clarence - 02, MI

B

85

48

Filiputti, Graziano - 02, MI

TL, TW, CM, P

79

58

Flejter, George M. - 08, WI

B, CM, M

78

55

Franco, Vincenzo - 02, BC

B

86

56

Fuller, Richard W. - 01, CT

B

66

46

Fusaro, Charles E. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B, M, P

87

70

Gallina, Sr., John E. - 04, NJ

B, CM, P

86

59

Graziani, Albert - 01, CT

B, CM, M, P

95

69

Visintainer, Rodney A. - 02, MI

B, CM, M

73

50

Houston, Edward - 02, MI

B

85

53

White, Luther - 09, PA

B

95

42

Hows, James H. - 08, SE

B

76

54

Williams, Shaun P. - 04, IN/KY

B, RE

48

9

Jeffries, William A. - 02, MI

B, CM

86

69

Wilson, Jr., Chester - 05, OH

B

73

49

Jekot, Mark J. - 08, SE

B

57

3

Winter, Randy L. - 08, IL

B

60

40

Johnson, Burton F. - 01, MN/ND

M, B

91

69

Zera, Stanley J. - 04, NJ

CM

91

59

IU Death Benefit Claims must be filed within one year of the member’s death. 30

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B R I C K L AY E R S AND AL L IE D CRAF T WORKE RS


August Death Benefit Claims for August 2017 Total Amount Paid Total Union Labor Life Claims Total Death Benefits Total Number of Claims Average Age Average Years of Membership MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

BRANCH OF TRADE

Anastasio, Anthony - 01, CT Anderson, Michael L. - 01, MN/ND Baratta, Jr., Walter V. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

$141,400.00 $2,000.00 $139,400.00 76 84.34 57.05

MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

BRANCH OF TRADE

YEARS OF AGE

MEMBERSHIP

Hower, Max E. - 15, MO/KS/NE

B, M

85

65

Ingulli, Antonio - 01, NY

B

78

54

Kasler, Donald F. - 55, OH

B

93

67

Ketter, Houston - 01, NY

B

91

63

Klimas, Ronald A. - 02, WA/ID/MT

B

72

45

Kreiser, Harvey D. - 05, PA

TW

55

28

Kusian, Reinhold F. - 04, CA

B

90

61

Landry, Frederick A. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B, CM, P

95

71

Lopez, Manuel V. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B

93

61

YEARS OF AGE

MEMBERSHIP

Lucania, Antonino - 21, IL

B

81

57

B

91

52

Martino, Thomas J. - 09, PA

B

83

65

B, CM

73

48

Massaro, Amos - 09, PA

B

88

64

54

McKee, Gregory T. - 01, PA/DE

PC

33

9

TL, B, MM

80

Benschoter, Robert G. - 01, OR

B, M

92

69

Mentch, Frank W. - 09, PA

B

96

64

Bomben, Eliseo I.- 07, CN

TL

90

63

Michaelis, James R. - 01, MN/ND

B, CM

70

15

Bonelli, John C. - 01, NY

B

68

33

Monahan, Joseph G. - 04, NJ

B, CM, M, P

97

68

Boyle, John H. - 08, OH

B

88

65

Montagno, Dominick E. - 01, PA/DE

B

84

55

Mosca, Henry W. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

CM

90

68

Brooks, Melvin G. - 04, CA

B, M, P

101

70

Brown, Jr., Lawrence M. - 01, MN/ND

B, M, MM

77

52

Byrd, Jr., Thomas M. - 08, SE

B, CS, M

91

65

Callahan, Jr., Frank P. - 04, IN/KY

B

92

68

CoFrancesco, George - 01, CT

TL, TW, CM

79

46

Collins, Lavada S. - 04, IN/KY

FN

81

32

Cowgill, Charles F. - 55, OH

B, M

86

60

Derouen, Jr., Oland - 08, SE

B

87

72

Emmanuele, Salvatore J. - 03, NY

B

91

57

Falone, Frederick - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B, CM, P

85

68

Nagel, Vernon E. - 08, IL

B

94

64

Nowak, John B. - 01, PA/DE

B

94

69

Osborne, James P. - 09, PA

B

88

63

Padula, Jr., Anthony - 05, NJ/DE/PA

B, CM, P

79

51

Paton, Stewart H. - 09, PA

B

91

62

Pekrul, Edward E. - 02, MI

B

91

67

Perretta, Mario - 21, IL

B

90

66

Pratt, Danny E. - 01, MO

B

68

50

Prikler, Jr., Paul - 21, IL

B

61

34

Favretto, Dino A. - 04, IN/KY

B

85

69

Ferino, Oreste - 07, CN

TL

85

59

Quiroga, Guillermo T. - 03, OH

PC, B

83

59

Ferrari, Alberto - 07, NY/NJ

FN

83

28

Sacco, Anthony - 06, OH

B

88

52

Ferrera, Louis J. - 07, NY/NJ

FN

95

28

Seale, Wesley H. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B, M

87

60

Flowers, Joseph A. - 09, PA

B

86

56

Seidel, Loren P. - 01, MN/ND

B

91

66

Forrest, Lewis R. - 03, IA

B

85

63

Seitter, William J. - 05, NJ/DE/PA

B, W

92

67

Fosco, Jr., James H. - 46, OH

CM

91

65

Shisler, Jr., John D. - 04, NJ

B

77

49

Fries, Leonard F. - 74, IL

B

86

60

Frye, Raymond H. - 02, WA/ID/MT

B

82

61

Gay, Clyde - 15, MO/KS/NE

B

89

69

Gerencser, Stephen S. - 05, PA

TL, TW, M, MM

88

53

Gheaja, Nicholas - 04, IN/KY

B

68

50

Giacomini, Gilberto - 01, NY

B

88

56

Gowdy, Joselyn U. - 04, NJ

B, CM, M, P, W

92

65

Gruhle, Bernhard E. - 01, MB

B

63

Hauhe, Louis D. - 01, MO

B

Hickey, Ralph B. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B

Smith, Clayton H. - 02, MI

CM, B

85

54

Smith, James E. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B, CM, P

68

44

Speth, Emil - 01, NY

B

87

68

Texeira, Gordon N. - 01, HI

M

77

48

Tipperreiter, Jr., John J. - 21, IL

B, M

91

65

Turner, Doyle R. - 03, CA

TL

89

68

42

Vesci, Ralph R. - 08, IL

B

95

65

80

61

Way, Sr., William H. - 03, CA

TL

91

69

93

69

Weber, James N. - 74, IL

B

88

68

IU Death Benefit Claims must be filed within one year of the member’s death. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

|

31


IN MEMORIAM

September Death Benefit Claims for September 2017 Total Amount Paid Total Union Labor Life Claims Total Death Benefits Total Number of Claims Average Age Average Years of Membership

$132,375.00 $132,375.00 78 80.54 52.69 YEARS OF AGE

MEMBERSHIP

MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

BRANCH OF TRADE

YEARS OF AGE

Jones, Kenneth D. - 04, IN/KY

MEMBERSHIP

PC, B

70

45

Johnson, Neil R. - 01, MN/ND

TL

58

29

King, Sr., Howard M. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B

91

68

Leffler, Lars A. - 02, WA/ID/MT

B

93

66

Levesque, Normand G. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B, M

85

68

Macaleese, James J. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B

56

11

MacLennan, Robert E. - 02, MI

B

87

68

Mantegna, John J. - 01, MD/VA/DC

B

81

63

McAndrew, Joseph C. - 01, PA/DE

B

82

65

Milliken, Daniel B. - 02, MI

PC, B

90

66

Minick, Charles L. - 03, IA

B

89

69

MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

BRANCH OF TRADE

Amaral, Antonio - 04, NJ

B, CM

85

44

Mitchell, Sr., Lonnie M. - 18, OH/KY

B, GU, W

68

26

Anderson, Robert D. - 01, MN/ND

B

88

69

Molea, Frank C. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B, M, TL

78

54

Angelus, Charles J. - 01, PA/DE

M

75

55

Montanari, Dante - 02, BC

B

80

51

Armes, Robert A. - 15, MO/KS/NE

B

94

56

Ayers, Charles M. - 08, SE

PC, B

85

62

Passero, Theodore - 03, NY

B, M

86

65

Ayres, James L. - 01, MO

PC, B

78

57

Ballew, Jr., Oscar L. - 08, SE

B, M, PC, W

73

53

Bartholomew, Howard A. - 02, NY/VT

B, CM, M, P

78

39

Basnec, Leonard - 02, MI

B

73

49

Bass, George - 03, CA

TL

82

52

Beierschmitt, William F. - 03, NY

B, CM, M, P

86

66

Biery, Miles K. - 04, IN/KY

B, M

81

63

Borkowski, Matthew H. - 07, NY/NJ

MM

21

2

Brown, John D. - 21, IL

B

63

42

Paulson, Daniel D. - 19, WI

B

60

24

Perea, Kerry J. - 02, WA/ID/MT

B

91

64

Picker, William M. - 04, IN/KY

B, M

94

70

Pietramala, Michael A. - 01, UT

TW, TL

91

54

Pirastru, Mario J. - 03, NY

B, M

88

69

Precht, Dawn K. - 05, OH

B

61

39

Prigge, Delbert W. - 03, OH

B, M

89

59

Rapp, Wilhelm - 05, NJ/DE/PA

B

82

60

Rhett, John B. - 08, SE

B

102

73

Richards, Richard F. - 04, IN/KY

B, M

68

41

Bruggeman, Robert D. - 01, MO

B

65

26

Burroughs, William L. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B

68

30

Schindley, James F. - 46, OH

B

75

53

Schroeder, Anton - 01, MB

B

92

61

Carter, Jr., Elmer L. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B

77

48

Casali, Otello - 21, IL

B

87

59

Sharp, James M. - 15, MO/KS/NE

TL

84

63

B

89

62

B

88

68

Cunha, Rogerio F. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B

62

23

Simpson, Eric - 21, IL

Czernicki, Joseph - 08, WI

B, M

81

62

Smith, Sr., Ronald C. - 01, MD/VA/DC

Daines, Gladwyn H. - 13, WI

B, CM, M, P

93

61

St. Angelo, Astillodore - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

PC

85

49

B, M

89

28

B, CM, M, P

93

51

DellaSala, Agostino - 04, QC

B, M

94

54

Stahler, Robert W. - 05, PA

Dorow, Robert H. - 02, MI

B

87

62

Stice, Kenneth E. - 08, IL

Fee, Patrick A. - 03, NY

PC, B

84

49

Ferrie, Harry J. - 09, PA

B

82

63

Galante, Richard P. - 05, NJ/DE/PA

B

86

67

Stiles, Wayne E. - 08, SE

B

82

50

Sylvester, Robert - 08, SE

B

90

64

Tralongo, Joseph - 01, CT

B

84

34

Gnesotto, Onorio D. - 02, MI

TL

88

49

Van Dam, Kenneth J. - 74, IL

B

81

49

Gunville, Edward L. - 02, WA/ID/MT

B, M

81

59

Van Handel, Arnold L. - 09, WI

B, CM, M

90

68

Halonen, Edward L. - 01, MN/ND

B

81

59

Vandevelde, Jr., Melvin A. - 03, WI

B

81

28

Harris, Sr., Philip J. - 09, PA

B

83

47

Viola, Rocco - 01, NY

M

79

48

51

Webb, Jewell G. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B

88

70

Hartke, Walter F. - 06, IL

B

77

Haugen, Joseph A. - 05, OK/AR/TX

MH

23

1

Wigglesworth, Clyde M. - 08, SE

B

84

67

Hollerud, Edward - 02, MI

B

91

60

Wolchesky, John - 01, CT

B, P

91

66

Jeske, Edward C. - 09, WI

B

91

71

Young, Joseph A. - 04, IN/KY

B

74

54

IU Death Benefit Claims must be filed within one year of the member’s death. 32

|

B R I C K L AY E R S AND AL L IE D CRAF T WORKE RS


October Death Benefit Claims for October 2017 Total Amount Paid Total Union Labor Life Claims Total Death Benefits Total Number of Claims Average Age Average Years of Membership MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

BRANCH OF TRADE

Carboni, Samuel - 01, CT

$71,600.00 $3,000.00 $68,600.00 45 80.71 48.60

MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

BRANCH OF TRADE

YEARS OF AGE

MEMBERSHIP

Johnson, Kenneth A. - 01, MN/ND

B

81

51

Johnston, Edker M. - 08, SE

B

86

61

Johnston, James R. - 09, PA

PC, CM

65

42

Koontz, Timothy J. - 09, PA

B, M

72

51

Krupienski, Thomas - 05, OH

B

86

64

Lounsbury, Jeffrey - 02, NY/VT

B, M, P

54

5

Lunger, Robert K. - 05, PA

FN

89

28

YEARS OF AGE

MEMBERSHIP

CM, M

92

62

Casimino, Leonard - 03, NY

PC, CM

73

48

Marino, Jr., Peter R. - 74, IL

B

69

42

Comaniuk, Tom P. - 01, AB

B

57

15

Martin, Richard O. - 04, NJ

B, CM

74

55

Corbell, James M. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B

79

62

Mayfield, Gregory R. - 15, MO/KS/NE

W, CS, M, MM

69

34

Deotto, Bruno - 02, ON

B

84

54

McDonald, James J. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B

94

68

DiMaulo, Jack - 07, NY/NJ

FN

91

29

Moers, Henry J. - 04, IN/KY

B

91

66

Dingman, Donald C. - 02, NY/VT

B, M, P

89

65

Moriwaki, Nolan G. - 01, HI

M

82

52

DiSalvo, Albert J. - 01, PA/DE

FN

86

23

Mucker, Louis - 02, MI

B

88

44

Dodd, Lawrence J. - 21, IL

B

91

67

Mueller, Roy R. - 18, MO

TL, MM

88

67

Domingo, Dominic - 04, CA

B, M, MM

82

55

Paolucci, Jr., Salvatore J. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B, M

87

69

Fathers, Basil W. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B

95

55

Ponsi, Frank J. - 21, IL

B

88

69

Fazzini, Mario J. - 21, IL

B

90

69 Ricardo, Charles R. - 03, CA

B

90

54

Fisher, Robert H. - 01, OR

B, M, MM

79

51 Rosa, Michael K. - 01, HI

TL

27

1

Fleck, Peter L. - 03, WI

B

75

24 Siddoway, Ty D. - 01, UT

MM, TL

59

1

Girardi, Francis A. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B

82

19

Gray, Merle R. - 02, MI

B

93

69

Smith, William P. - 02, MI

B, M

81

29

Souchek, George J. - 21, IL

B

89

66

Hall, Raymond W. - 03, OH

TW

80

54

Hawkins, Vandy L. - 21, IL

B

72

48

Trematerra, James A. - 04, NJ

B, M, MM

95

52

Hawthorne, Stanley B. - 04, SD

B, M

95

71

Woodland, Harry - 01, NL

B

86

63

Hurliman, Robert G. - 02, BC

B

73

53

Zavodsky, Sr., Robert R. - 01, OR

B, M

84

60

IU Death Benefit Claims must be filed within one year of the member’s death. IS S UE 4 , 2 0 1 7

|

33


Journal BAC

ISSUE 4 / 2017

B AC • 620 F ST R E ET, N.W. • WA S HI N GTON, D.C. 20004

34

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B R I C K L AY E R S AND AL L IE D CRAF T WORKE RS

Issue 4 - 2017  

Issue 4 - 2017