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BABYLIFEmagazine november/december 2012


BABYLIFEMAGAZINE New Zealand’s free­to­read, online parenting & lifestyle magazine, featuring a wide mix of real­life content, ideas and inspiration for women contemplating parenthood, currently expecting or already a mum.

in this

Read online, on your iPad or via your Smartphone. EDITOR Emma Brooks CONTRIBUTORS Erin Young, Andrea Little, Angela Noblet­ Kirby, Dr Janette McCormick, Sarah White. COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Tracey D'Arcy Wright INK photography facebook.com/inkphoto/ All images are © copyright of their respective owners. Any copying or reproduction in part or whole is illegal without the permission of the owner. Copyright © Baby Life Magazine 2012

ADVERTISINgenquiries We offer a range of affordable advertising opportunities for small businesses, both in our monthly e­zine and on our website and online directory. To find out more, please contact Emma at: E | emma@babylifemagazine.co.nz P | 07 825 7411 Our next issue will be published: 31 January 2013

http://www.babylifemagazine.co.nz

Haveawonderful Christmas&NewYear!

02 | BABY LIFE MAGAZINE

FEATURES

06

SUMMER READING

OUR PICK OF THE BEST BEACH AND BACH READS.

08

FUTURE'S SO BRIGHT

BANZ NZ'S ANDREA LITTLE ON PROTECTING THE EYES OF OUR LITTLE ONES WHEN THE SUN COMES OUT TO PLAY.


s issue WELLBEING

10

STICKYTIKI

18

PREGNANCY NUTRITION

THE IMPORTANCE OF EATING WELL BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER PREGNANCY. WITH NATUROPATH ERIN YOUNG.

12

CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSESSING YOUR CHILD'S DEVELOPMENT. WITH PAEDIATRIC CHIROPRACTOR DR JANETTE MCCORMICK

13

SUMMER INTERVAL TRAINING

TIPS FOR STAYING IN SHAPE OVER SUMMER & A FREE HIIT WORKOUT. WITH PERSONAL TRAINER ANGELA NOBLET足KIRBY

BUILD A BUSINESS

HOW WILL YOUR CUSTOMERS FIND YOU ONLINE? ONLINE MARKETING TIPS FOR SMALL BUSINESSES.

SHOPPING

04

CHRISTMAS GIVING

GIFT IDEAS FROM SMALL, KIWI BUSINESSES.

07

TRAVEL PRODUCTS

NIFTY IDEAS FOR EASIER TRAVELLING WITH KIDS AND BABIES.

HANDMADE

16

SUGAR BODY SCRUB

WITH THE NATURAL GODDESS' SARAH WHITE.

20

MUMS IN BUSINESS

LINDA CARDIFF AND KATE DAY OF WELLINGTON'S TINY ADVENTURES.

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BABY LIFE MAGAZINE | 03


1

2

CHRISTMAS GIV 4

04 | BABY LIFE MAGAZINE

SHOP LOCAL THIS CH SUPPORT SMALL, KIW

5


2

VING 3

HRISTMAS & WI BUSINESSES.

WHERE TO BUY:

6

1 . WASHHOUSE DESIGNER TEA TOWELS www.etsy.com/shop/Washhouse 2. MUSHYMOO MINI HOOTY HOOS $27 www.felt.co.nz/shop/mushymoo 3. OUTIE 'BELLY BUMP' MATERNITY TEES $40 www.outie.co.nz 4. STICKYTIKI CHRISTMAS TREE MURAL (INCLUDES WREATH AND PAUA STARS NZ) $1 56.00 www.stickytiki.co.nz 5. BELLBIRD DESIGNS FLAX FLOWER PENDANT www.bellbirddesigns.com 6. SWINGS & ROUNDABOUTS SLEEPSACKS from $65 Facebook BABY LIFE MAGAZINE | 05


summer

READING

Our book picks for quiet moments at the beach and bach... FICTION The Forrests by Emily Perkins Kiwi writer Emily Perkin’s fourth novel follows the life of Dorothy Forrest, who moves from New York City to Auckland in the late 1960s. A gentle tale of life, love, commitment and discovery. Swimming Home by Deborah Levy Arriving at their holiday home on the French Riveria, the Jacobs are greeted by a lady swimming naked in their pool. Who is she and why is she there? Levy’s exploration of love was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn On the morning of her fifth wedding anniversary, Amy Dunne suddenly goes missing from her home in North Carthage, Missouri. Page­ turning thriller that will keep you on the edge of your seat. 06 | BABY LIFE MAGAZINE

CLASSIC PICK The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald Take a read of Fitzgerald’s classic portrayal of the Jazz Age, before Baz Luhrmann's film adaptation hits the big screen next year. FOR DAD A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, selects one hundred man­made objects which represent turning points in human history. Originally a Radio 4 (UK) series and sure to appeal to the male mind. FOR FOODIES A Home­grown Cook: The Dame Alison Holst Story Television cook and food writer Allison Holst’s memoir, and a fascinating insight into growing up in New Zealand. Includes recipes!

FOR CHILDREN Poo Bum by Stephanie Blake Once there was a little rabbit who could only say one thing... Toilet humour that’s sure to appeal. Wooden Arms by Sarah Johnson Winner of the 2011 Joy Cowley Award for children's literature. Illustrated by Queenstown artist Scott Tulloch and translated into te reo Maori (Poupou Tauawhi) by Ngaere Roberts. The Margaret Mahy Treasury by Margaret Mahy A hardback anthology of eleven of Mahy’s classic stories.


‘RIDE­ON CARRY­ON’ Transport your child effortlessly through busy aiports. This nifty attachment clips easily to your wheelie suitcase, transforming your luggage into a handy travel stroller, & folds flat for storage during flight. $80 www.rideoncarryon.co.nz

SHAMOZZLE CARSEAT PROTECTOR Protect your car's upholstery from little feet. Doubles as a handy, pocket organiser ­ perfect for storing toys, wipes and snacks! $39 www.shamozzle.co.nz

travel PRODUCTS Cool ideas to make travelling with little ones just that little bit easier...

OiOi NAPPY BAGS White English Rose Nappy Bag $225 ssential Bionic Dot Turq Hobo Nappy Bag $125 www.babybirdie.co.nz

E

BABY LIFE MAGAZINE | 07


RED U T A E F I NES S B US

BRIGHT FUTURE'S SO

I

Banz NZ's Andrea Little talks about protecting the eyes of little ones when the sun comes out to play.

t's great to see the sun again after the winter blues. We all love getting out and about, enjoying the warmer weather with our families. And while it's second nature to 'Slip, Slop, Slap and Wrap,' we often overlook one area: protecting the eyes of our little ones. New Zealand has some of the highest levels of UV radiation in the world, courtesy of the hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic. Since eye experts agree that half of all UV damage in a lifetime occurs before the age of 18, and that children’s eyes are much more sensitive to the sun than adults’, protection from the earliest possible age is vital. And, UV damage is cumulative; it builds up over time and, long term, can lead to nasty eye diseases such as cataracts, macular degeneration and cancers. Not the kind of thing any parent wants for their child in later life. 08 | BABY LIFE MAGAZINE

NOT SURE WHAT TO LOOK FOR WHEN CHOOSING KIDS' SUNNIES

?

Several factors combine to make a great pair of sunnies that the kids will love to wear

:

1) Make sure the lenses are of good quality. Children's sunglasses should meet the Australian and New Zealand standard for sunglasses ­ AS/NZS1067:2003. Sunglasses which carry a Category 3, UV400 sticker meet this standard. This means that the lenses will block 100% of damaging UVA and UVB rays. Beware of buying sunglasses with inferior lenses. Behind tinted lenses the iris opens to allow more light into the eye; if the lenses are poor quality they will let more UV light into the eye instead of blocking it, which is potentially damaging.

2) Your child's chosen shades should be a close fit to their face. Wraparound styles are not only fashionable, they are the best design for blocking out sunlight from all angles. 3) Check the sunglasses are robust enough to take the knocks. Sunglasses companies do wonderful things with polycarbonate frames, which means children's sunglasses should be rugged enough to take whatever punishment the kids throw at them. Expect the odd scratch on the lenses, though ­ most will be scratch­ resistant, rather than scratch­ proof.

Adventure Banz Blue Check Sunglasses


KEEPING THEM ON New Zealand company Banz NZ imports the high­quality Baby Banz range of children's sun protection gear. The company's top sellers are their sunglasses for babies and children, which feature an adjustable headband, instead of the traditional 'arms' of standard sunglasses. "The headband design means that the sunnies stay on much more easily and there is nothing to poke at little eyes," says Banz NZ owner, Andrea Little.

Because the sunnies fit exactly, they are more likely to be accepted.

The sunglasses come in two sizes, as the headband is adjustable for growth. "This means a baby can begin by wearing the Baby Banz size, adjusted to the smallest setting, from around two months," she explains. "As the child grows, the headband can be made bigger, giving a perfect fit with every wear.

Faces grow as well as heads, so it's not possible to simply swap for a longer headband at this age

"

"Banz sunglasses are also the only ones on the market to have soft silicone inserted along the inside of the frame, around the nose and eye area,

which makes them extra comfy and stops long baby eyelashes touching the lenses.

"

"Once the child is around the age of two, it's time to move up to the Kidz Banz size, which will last until they're about five.

High quality breast pumps, milk storage solutions, cloth nappies, family vitamins & more.

www.expressthebest.co.nz

."

Buy Banz sunglasses in styles to suit from newborn to 10+ years at www.babybanz.co.nz. Also available are sound­ protective earmuffs; wide­ brimmed, adjustable sunhats; sun­safe swimwear & natural sunscreen.

TOP TIPS for encouraging sunglasses wear in little-ones:

1. Model good sun­safe behaviour yourself by always wearing sunglasses in the glare of the sun. You're the ones your children will follow ­ make sure they pick up good habits. 2. Get your child used to wearing sunglasses by putting them on outside, in full light. Children will quickly realise that the sunglasses cut the glare and discomfort in their eyes. 3. Distraction is useful. Point out something in the distance... or the cat in the garden. While the child is distracted, secure the sunglasses. 4. Keep practicing, even over winter. Wearing sunglasses is a new experience for children and needs to be reinforced regularly when young. A good time to practice is in the car.

Maternity, infant & wedding photography Tracey D'Arcy-Wright inkphotography@xtra.co.nz facebook.com/inkphoto

5. It's natural for kids to try to pull off their sunglasses. But the more you put them back on and encourage your child to wear them, the easier it gets. This also applies for sunhats! BABY LIFE MAGAZINE | 09


HEALTH & WELLBING: PREGNANCY NUTRITIO

W

Naturopath Erin Young on the importance of eating well be hile there are many

millions of factors involved in the creation of a ‘good’ or

‘difficult pregnancy, one of the things we can do something

about to increase the chances

of things going well – and that

will make a huge impact on the

health of both mother and baby for many years to come – is

nutrition. What Mum eats, baby eats, and what Mum eats, baby

is made from, so it is extremely important that a woman’s diet is as good as possible, ideally

from the pre­conception period, and throughout the time of

breastfeeding too. Here are

some tips on what to look out for:

CHOOSE FRESH & UNPROCESSED Firstly, the more fresh, unprocessed, and whole a food is, the better off you’re going to be. There are several reasons for this. For a start, many of the water soluble vitamins – that’s vitamin C and the B complex – are destroyed by heat and light. This means that the longer it’s been sitting around on the supermarket shelf, the less nutrition it will contain, and some say the weaker its inherent ‘life force’ is. Whether you buy into the concept of a ‘life force’ or not, you can’t deny things taste so much better when they’re fresh, and they almost glow with nutrients! 10 | BABY LIFE MAGAZINE

Likewise, many nutritionists now advocate a proportion of your daily food intake be eaten raw – this is because fruits and vegetables (and activated nuts/seeds – more on that later) contain enzymes that allow our bodies to properly break them down and utilise the nutrients they contain, as well as heat­sensitive vitamins C and the B group. These enzymes, too, are destroyed by heat, which means our bodies generally can’t digest the food as well. In addition the high­ heat cooking of carbohydrates

and proteins can lead to the formation of various toxic compounds such as acrylamide, which is another reason many people now recommend making at least a portion of your daily food intake raw. In pregnancy, of course, there are additional worries around various microbial contaminants in fresh, raw foods, such as listeria and toxoplasmosis. The best advice here is to ensure everything you eat is fresh and well washed with a non­toxic fruit and vege wash and warm water. Salads that have been sitting around in a plastic bag on a supermarket shelf for days on end are far more risky in terms of contamination and bacterial growth than a salad picked fresh from your garden, properly washed, and eaten. It’s also important, on that note, to keep cats away from wherever it is you grow your

food if you do grow your own, as their poo is a common source of toxoplasmosis. NUTS & SEEDS Nuts and seeds are an excellent source of good fats, and are very high in minerals. To properly utilise them and be able to digest them, however, you need to de­activate the phytate content, by soaking them in water for several hours or overnight. Phytates are chemicals present in nature to stop them from sprouting in drought conditions and subsequently dying. Soaking will mimic a good rainfall and allow the plant to sprout, releasing its goodness.

THE MINERAL EFFECT Minerals are a hugely important consideration to any woman growing a healthy baby. Minerals are needed for the proper formation of bones and teeth, connective tissues, organs, and other structures throughout the body. A demineralised body is one that’s far more prone to tooth decay, bone weakness, malfunctioning organs, and to the effects of environmental toxins and heavy metals and all that entails. Magnesium, zinc, calcium, phosphorous, iron, manganese, boron, iodine, selenium, and others all play vital roles in the development of the body – and various vitamins, such as Vitamins D and K2, act as co­


ON

efore, during and after pregnancy. factors to allow for their correct absorption and utilisation. If your diet is lacking in whole foods, it is often a good idea to include a liquid multi­mineral supplement in your daily routine that can be added to a bottle of water and sipped throughout the day to keep stores up. Note that many vital nutrients are lacking in New Zealand soil, including selenium, iodine, and zinc, and as such it may be necessary to supplement these at some point for some people. VITAMIN D Another key vitamin during pregnancy. Manufactured naturally from sunlight in the oils of the skin, it plays a role in many systems of the body. Vitamin D deficiency is rife in New Zealand (estimates range from 30­80% of the population being chronically deficient!), and low levels in pregnancy have been linked to a wide variety of disorders, ranging from rickets to immune disorders to autism. As such, either taking a Vitamin D3 supplement, or practicing sensible and safe sun exposure, are good options. This means allowing the sun to hit your skin directly for 10­15 minutes a day, around lunchtime, without sunscreen, glass, or moisturisers in the way. Obviously, this does not mean ‘allow yourself to burn’ –

the amount of time a person needs will vary according to skin colour. Somebody very pale will need a much shorter time than somebody whose skin is very dark. IRON Iron is another key consideration. The iron stores a baby is born with should last it until solid foods are introduced, so ensuring Mum has plenty of iron during pregnancy is hugely important (exclusively breastfeeding for at least six months is also a great way of

protecting against anaemia). Green vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, cacao, and lean meat are all good sources of absorbable iron, and many people find taking a spirulina supplement daily also helps to boost their levels. Avoid drinking tea when taking iron supplements, and make sure you have adequate Vitamin C to allow for proper absorption. ORGANIC, SPRAY­FREE & NON­GMO As much as possible, it is also wise to choose organic foods, or at least spray­free and non­ GMO. Pesticide contamination has been linked to a number of learning and behavioural disorders, and can create serious health problems for mothers and children. While it can be more expensive or hard to source in shops, farmers markets are a great place to find spray­free organically­

grown vegetables for less than conventional produce in a supermarket, and there are numerous mail­order organic boxes available online as well. Growing evidence is showing genetically modified organisms (present in a large number of processed foods here, and in non­organic meat and dairy from GMO animal feed) can disrupt gut flora and cause serious damage to people and animals. The documentary Genetic Roulette, released last month, is a must­watch for anybody concerned.

Clearly, there are many considerations to make during pregnancy, but ultimately it comes down to common sense. Eat a variety of foods, eat things that are fresh and organic where possible, eat things that are ‘whole’ (i.e. fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, meat, and eggs), avoid food additives and overly processed products… be sensible! And if you are concerned about your diet or have any specific issues, see a naturopath or nutritionist for tailored advice for your own situation.

Erin Young is a Naturopath, Nutritionist and Medical Herbalist at Apothecare Natural Health. www.facebook.com/apothecarenz

BABY LIFE MAGAZINE | 11


HEALTH & WELLBEING: CHILD DEVELOPMENT

e live in such a ‘flat world.’ Our children spend hours sitting in front of computer screens, tablets and televisions; fixated at images that flash before their eyes. So, why is this a problem? It’s about how ‘sitting still’ affects a developing brain. Babies and children need movement to make sense of their world and to build new brain connections. Sitting for long periods in front of flat screens will not enhance brain development; tummy time, rolling, crawling and playing will! At birth, babies’ brains have 100 billion neurons and 50 trillion synapses (connections). In the first month synapses increase 20­ fold, and neurons form at 250,000 per minute!

So the first few years of a child’s life are crucial to their overall lifelong learning, health and wellbeing. And while each child will develop at a different rate, it is important to address any issues that become apparent when milestones or stages are significantly delayed.

one side persistently? For older children, are they sitting in a slumped posture?

Primitive reflexes: These are the reflexes that babies are born with to help them survive in the world. As the brain grows and more synapses are made these reflexes are integrated, usually around six months. Reflexes can be tested in both babies and older children. Reflexes that haven’t been integrated by six months of age indicate how the nervous system is functioning. Postural reflexes (if age appropriate): These reflexes start to appear when the primitive reflexes are integrated. If there is delay in their presence, this also indicates how the nerve system is functioning.

HOW DO I KNOW IF DEVELOPMENT IS PROGRESSING WELL? There are certain things to look for in babies and toddlers:

Motor tone: This refers to the background tension within the muscular system. Tone that is too low, or too high, is one of the components of impaired development. Low or decreased tone is indicated by: • Poor head control • Late development of postural reflexes • Feeding/sucking issues • Abnormal or late motor milestones • Delayed cognitive development

Body posture: What is the overall posture of the baby? Are they lying in a banana­ like shape? Is the head turned to

Gross Motor skills: Activities that require large motor muscle groups and coordinated movement are assessed. Postural

112 | BABY LIFE MAGAZINE

stability is a requirement of these skills and walking, skipping, hopping and swimming are examples of this. Movement: Is the movement appropriate for age? Is it well coordinated? Is it smooth? Is there a sign of good motor planning? Crawling style: Is baby cross crawling or bottom shuffling? Crawling (creeping) is an important stage of development and can have a direct impact on a child’s ability to work through cognitive processes like reading and writing. Crawling also helps develop mobility, muscle tone, hand­eye coordination, alternate arm and leg action, upper body strength, spatial awareness, finger development and independence.

If you have any concerns about your child's development, consider an assessment by a paediatric chiropractor, who will be able to assess how well the brain and nervous system are working. Chiropractors correct subluxation, a condition of the spine that negatively affects the way the nervous system, including the brain, is functioning. If the nervous system is functioning correctly, a child’s development will progress optimally. Dr. Janette McCormick is a paediatric chiropractor at Creating Wellness Family Chiropractic Centre: www.creatingwellness.co.nz.

Adapted from Inspiral Resources, Kids…. Dynamic Development Seminar Series.

W

Paediatric chiropractor Dr. Janette McCormick looks at ways to assess your child's brain development.


HEALTH & WELLBING: SUMMER INTERVAL TRAINING

Think you'll never be able to stay in shape over Xmas? Personal trainer Angela Noblet-Kirby shows you how.

C

hristmas can be a tough time of year to stick to healthy living. Life routines tend to be disrupted as we travel and spend more time with friends and family, meaning the usual exercise routines often go out the window

.

If you are attempting to lose weight, or stick to an exercise or eating plan over the festive season, don't despair; there are plenty of ways to build activity and healthy eating into your holiday ­ and still enjoy the occasional indulgence

!

WEIGHT LOSS 101 While there are loads of diets and theories out there to confuse you, in reality achieving weight loss is simple ­ you need to create a caloric deficit which means you are burning more calories than you are consuming. Let's take a look at what this involves: PORTION CONTROL This is a huge part of the weight loss equation and where many people make mistakes. I

don't think it's realistic to totally stop yourself from having the foods you enjoy. This may work as a crash diet for a week or so, but it's not sustainable long­term. After all, who wants to live on lettuce leaves alone, particularly over Christmas? A more realistic way to reduce

calories is by reducing the amount you eat. Don't dish up the same­sized dinner as your husband if he's 6ft5 and has a physical job. Use a smaller plate and fill up on vegetables if you need to. It's also really important to drink plenty of water, especially over summer and if you're breastfeeding. People often mistake thirst for hunger and reach for something to eat, when in fact they just need to rehydrate. Always go for water first: soft drinks and even fruit juices are loaded with sugar and contribute unwanted calories to your diet.

INCREASE YOUR ACTIVITY There are three components that contribute to your energy expenditure: 1. Your basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the energy it takes to maintain your bodies’ functions. So even at rest, your body is using energy to control things like your breathing, circulation, temperature and building new cells. This accounts for a huge 60­70% of your overall energy expenditure. 2. Thermic effect of food (TEF) is the energy used to digest, absorb, store and use the nutrients from what you eat. TEF accounts for about 5­ 10% of energy expenditure so is a relatively small factor. 3. The energy cost of physical activity is the final factor in the energy expenditure equation. This is the energy

used for all of your daily activities including standing, walking and higher intensity activities. It accounts for between 20­35% so gives you the most control over increasing or decreasing the total amount of calories you are burning every day. Even small activities add to the amount of energy you are burning – this is termed incidental calorie expenditure. A study by the Mayo Clinic found that leaner people fidget more than those who were overweight and during a typical day, thin people spend over two hours more than obese people moving around and making small movements like tapping their feet. This incidental activity can burn up to 350 additional calories per day! On holiday there are plenty of ways to remain active: walking, taking the stairs, parking further away from your destination, dancing and swimming

.

And workouts don't have to be super long. It takes far less time than you think to make a difference, with studies showing that short intervals of exercise can be extremely effective, provided they are performed at high intensity. Keep reading for a quick and effective summer workout

...

BABY LIFE MAGAZINE | 13


SUMMER WORKOUT: HIGH INTENSITY INTER High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), is a type of workout that involves short periods of high intensity exercise, followed by short recovery periods. These sessions last between 10 and 20 minutes (making them ideal for busy mums) and are really effective at improving cardiovascular fitness and burning fat. The key to success in this type of training is the high intensity though, so you really need to dig deep and put in 100% effort. During the work periods your heart rate needs to be up to around 80­90% of it's max – this means that you are really puffing and would struggle to hold a conversation. With this sample HIIT workout, complete each of these exercises for one minute, with a 30 second rest period in between where you march on the spot.

#1 SQUAT JUMP

Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Lower into a squat and swing your arms back behind your body. Quickly jump up, swinging your arms overhead. Land back into squat position and swing your arms backwards again. Repeat as fast as possible for the minute.

#2 BURPEE WITH PRESSUP

Squat down and place hands on the floor in front of your feet. Jump your legs back, landing in full plank position. Do a press up, either remaining on your toes or dropping onto your knees. Jump your legs back into your squat position and then stand up and jump while raising your hands over your head. 14 | BABY LIFE MAGAZINE

#3 V SIT-UP

Sit with your knees bent into your floor. Clasp your hands behind you both legs straight out and touchin your head and shoulders off the g the start position for one rep. Rep for one minute.

MOUNTAIN

Start in push­up position with yo and your hands directly below y button in and contract your abs. the knee toward your right arm. and switch sides; bringing your Continue to alternate legs as qu motion. To make this exercise ea on a platform or step to elevate

#5 TABLE

From a sitting position, bend your knees into your body with both feet flat on the floor and hip­width apart. Put your hands on the ground behind your bottom, with the fingertips facing in. Lift your hips off the ground, keeping your abs firm, and hover just above the floor. Lift your hips upwards; your body should r your elbows and lower your body hips drop. Extend your arms and hover position. Don't touch the gr


RVAL TRAINING

Angela Noblet足Kirby is a personal trainer and director of fitness company M足Fit: www.mfit.co.nz

SIDE LUNGE CHOPS

#6

P

r chest and your feet lifted off the ur head. Lean back, extending ng your back to the floor. Keep ground. Sit back up and return to peat as many times as you can

Stand with feet together, your hands clasped, and your arms lifted overhead. Take a wide step to your right, bending your right knee and 'chopping' your arms towards your right foot. Push off your right leg and return to your standing position, reaching your arms overhead. Repeat the movement on your left side, stepping to the left this time. Complete as many reps as you can for one minute, alternating sides each time.

#4

CLIMBERS

our legs and arms extended your shoulders. Pull your belly . Bend your right leg, bringing . Return to the starting position left knee to your left arm. uickly as you can in a running asier you can place your hands your upper body.

TOP DIP

g

resemble a tabletop. Now bend into a dip, without letting your lower your hips back to the round. Repeat for the minute.

#7 PLANK

PIKE JUMPS

Go into full plank position, then bend your knees and jump your feet into your hands. Land in a crouch on the balls of your feet. Jump up and extend your legs back out to plank position for one rep. Repeat as fast as you can for one minute, making sure to keep your weight in your arms. If you find this too tough, run your feet in and out of crouch position, instead of jumping.

#8

Lie face up with your knees and hips bent at 90 degrees. Lightly place your hands behind your head and lift your shoulder blades off the ground. Extend your right leg straight, at the same time bringing your chest toward your bent left knee 足 imagine you are trying to bring the bottom of your right ribcage to meet your left hip. Come back to the centre and repeat on the opposite side余 extending your left leg straight and bringing your chest up to your bent right knee. Keep your elbows wide and breathe out as you twist your upper body toward your knee. Repeat for the minute, alternating legs.

BICYCLE CRUNCHES

BABY LIFE MAGAZINE | 15


WHAT YOU NEED...

2 cups sugar - standard white is best

MAKE YOUR OWN :

SUGAR BODY SCRUB

1 cup oil – good quality like sweet almond, sunflower, or olive

Sarah White, of all­natural skin and bodycare companies Natural Goddess & Natural Bubba, shares an easy­to­make summer body scrub.

A few drops of essential oil (optional) – lavender is always a favourite of mine

With both summer and Christmas knocking on the door, this is the perfect recipe for soft summer skin. It makes a lovely homemade gift and only takes a few minutes to prepare ­ my favourite kind of recipe

A few drops of food colouring (optional) – keep it to one colour and be aware that some colours can fade over time

HOW-TO

Airtight glass jars; jamming jars or jars from a $2 shop work well .

!

1) Mix the sugar and oil in a bowl, ensuring the mixture isn't too wet or too dry. 2) Mix in a few drops of essential oil, then the food colouring if using. 3) Spoon body scrub mixture into clean jars. Wipe clean any spills, then decorate to suit. Store in a cool place away from sunlight. To use: scoop out

mixture and apply liberally over body, then shower/bath as usual. Voila silky smooth skin! For more recipe ideas see: www.naturalgoddess.co.nz

DECEMBERMARKETS For those last-minute gifts...

NORTH ISLAND

08

Auckland Art and Craft Fair, Aotea Centre, The Edge, Auckland Central, 11am­3pm. Gold coin entry.

08

Parnell Artisan Craft Market Jubilee Hall, Parnell, 8am­12pm.

08

Gordonton Country

16 | BABY LIFE MAGAZINE

Market. Hukanui Park, Gordonton Village, 8.30am­ 1pm.

15

Crafternoon­Tea Market, Trinity Methodist Church Hall, Kingsland, Auckland. 10am­ 2pm. SOUTH ISLAND

08

12

15

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New Rags Christmas Market. Genesis Recreation Centre, Masterton, 4pm­9pm. St Heliers Bay Artisan Craft & Gourmet Food Market, Tamaki Ex­Services Association Hall, 10am­3pm.

Kiwi Christmas Market. Regent Theatre, Hokitika, 4­ 8.30pm. Shop Me Pretty Night Market. St Marks Church, Avonhead, 6.30­9.00pm.


BUILD A

BUSINESS REGULAR TIPS, HINTS & INSPIRATION FOR BUDDING ENTREPRENEURS

BABY LIFE MAGAZINE | 17


ONLINE MARKETING :

HOW WILL YOUR CUSTOMERS FIND YOU ONLINE?

Ewhenightlooking out of ten Kiwis now claim their first point of contact for products and services is searching on Google. Which means if you’re in business, having a website is no longer optional; it's essential.

But getting a web presence is only the first step towards building a successful online business. With literally hundreds of thousands of sites jostling for attention on the web, it takes time and effort to ensure you're being noticed by both the search engines and your potential customers. Emma Brooks takes a look at how you can use online marketing to get noticed on the web: 1. ENSURE EACH PAGE OF YOUR WEBSITE IS SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZED FOR RELEVANT KEYWORDS If you’ve already set up a website, you’ll no doubt have heard a lot about search engine optimization. It’s the method through which business owners can ensure their website is visible to search engines like Google – and their potential customers. When a searcher types a phrase or word (known as keywords) into Google, the search engine’s aim is to deliver the most relevant results for that particular keyword. In order to do this it regularly “crawls” the web in search of content; indexing the results in its giant 18 | BABY LIFE MAGAZINE

databases and using complex algorithmic functions to rank these findings. Because search engines are mathematical creatures, they need to receive information in a way that they can understand. From a content point of view this means you need to think about the different words and phrases people will use to search for your particular business and then ensure they’re used at regular intervals throughout your website copy. As a starting point, the best places to position keywords on your website include the page title, headline, sub­heading, first paragraph and last paragraph. You’ll also want to put keywords into your META

tag – this is the short description that people see when your website appears in the search engine rankings. For more detailed information head online: there are literally hundreds of articles covering SEO available for free.

A word of warning though: you need to be careful that you’re not simply stuffing your website full of keywords and little else; firstly because people won’t be interested in reading this sort of content and secondly because Google now penalises websites that carry out such practices with lower search engine rankings.

So writing good, effective web copy is about maintaining a balance ­ creating interesting and useful content that people want to read while still ensuring that keywords appear at regular intervals. 2. USE CONTENT TO BUILD AN AUDIENCE Ensuring your website has good SEO is important, but small businesses will always find it hard to compete against the big guns. That’s why you also need to focus on building an audience for your products and services – and that’s where content comes in. Content can take any number of forms: blog posts, news updates, newsletters, articles, videos, photo boards. By publishing new content on a regular basis you’re keeping your website fresh and interesting, and giving people a reason to keep coming back for


more. That’s why blogs are such an effective marketing tool; they provide the perfect platform for keeping your customers up­to­date with news, resources and information.

Consistently posting new content to your website will also indirectly help your SEO, since Google rewards relevant, popular content with higher search engine rankings. If you’re struggling to find topics to talk about, take some

time to think about your audience. What kind of information would be useful and helpful to them? For example, a personal trainer could publish regular exercise tips, while a party planner could use their blog to publish photos of their recent parties. 3. TAP INTO SOCIAL MEDIA TO SHARE, CONNECT AND ENGAGE Social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter are great marketing tools that can help you reach potential customers, for a relatively low cost. (Free to set up but making social media work does take time and effort). Sharing and cross­ promoting your website or blog content across your social media profiles is a great way to drive traffic to your website – which in turn will help improve your search engine rankings. The key to successful social media marketing is in the name: it’s a place for social interaction so don’t just focus on your sales pitch – remember to ask questions, respond to

IDENTIFYING THE RIGHT KEYWORDS TO MATCH YOUR BUSINESS IS CRUCIAL ­ A SURVEY BY CHITIKA INSIGHTS SHOWED THAT WHILE 94% OF WEB USERS CLICK ON A FIRST PAGE RESULT, LESS THAN 6% CLICK TO THE SECOND PAGE. queries and engage your audience too. Also, remember that any social media site is a platform that you have very little control over, so it’s best not to invest or rely too heavily on one particular site. Facebook is a good case in point: recent changes to their Edgerank algorithm has seen the reach of business pages drop dramatically. In fact according to Gokul Rajaram, Facebook’s Director of Product Management Ads, “Organically, you get anywhere from 15 percent to 20 percent of your fans. In order to reach the remaining 80 to 85 percent, sponsoring posts is important.” Facebook is obviously attempting to find new ways to fund their business – and having been a free service for so long who can blame them? Nonetheless it drives home the point that if you’re an online business you really need to invest your time in building your own platform i.e. your website, and use social media as a secondary method of advertising. 4. BUILD LINKS WITH OTHER WEBSITES Another factor that Google rewards highly are the number of credible links pointing to your site from other websites. In Google’s eyes, links are a

sign of popularity and show that your site is trusted by other users. There are a number of ways you can build reputable and valuable links to your website; guest posting on blogs and websites that talk about similar topics to your own, writing articles for relevant publications, directory listings, trading reciprocal links on friend’s sites, banner advertising. And links don’t just help build

your own ranking; they also act as advertising, helping to grab the attention of readers and hopefully, draw them to your own website. Just make sure that you’re placing the links in the right places. A banner ad on a car website when you sell baby clothes isn’t likely to get much attention. Avoid at all costs the link­ building offers that often get emailed to website owners. Known as “black hat” techniques, these use spamming tactics to get your website listed on hundreds of other sites... and Google takes a very poor view of such behaviour. Further reading:

www.copyblogger.com www.mashable.com

www.socialmediaexaminer.com

BABY LIFE MAGAZINE | 19


linda cardiff & kate day

TINY ADVENTURES

M UM S I B US I NE N SS

Wellington mums Linda Cardiff and Kate Day run Tiny Adventures, a series of interactive, fun-filled baby classes designed to nurture and enhance development through music, movement and sensory experiences. Here’s their business story:

Can you tell us a little about your backgrounds? Linda: I grew up in Wellington and met my husband Andrew in our final years at Victoria University.We travelled overseas through America and Europe together for about four years, returned to New Zealand and I worked for a Wellington advertising agency for eight years until the birth of Oliver. Kate: I grew up in the UK and lived in London, before moving to New Zealand five years ago with my husband Mike, (also a Brit), as we fancied a bit of an

adventure. I am a trained primary school teacher, specialising in the early years, and worked as a new entrants teacher until having Freddie in 2010. How did you meet and what led you to setting up Tiny Adventures? We met through our antenatal classes and ended up sharing a hospital room together when our babies were born. After our babies turned one, we were both looking for something else to do, but didn’t want to compromise the time we had with our children by returning to an inflexible working environment. As we both share a passion for infant development, setting up an activity class that combined all of the things we loved doing with our children made sense.

What do your classes involve? Tiny Adventures is a series of interactive classes for babies and parents. Each session is themed and carefully designed to nurture and enhance each baby’s emotional, intellectual and physical development. We provide hints and tips on how to support development at home and make playtime fun and stimulating for both parents and children in a relaxed and social environment. We love the fact mums are able to enjoy their babies, have fun, and support each other at the same time. Lots of our mums catch up for coffee after the class, or go for walks together, and have made new friendships through the classes. What has been your biggest business challenge? Losing the time you had for yourself and your husband. Toddler in bed equals time to get to work! We try to make a real effort to ensure our families still come first – but it can be a challenge to maintain a healthy balance when there is

so much to do. Starting up a business is rewarding and fun, but definitely takes a lot of time and patience. We have been lucky enough to have families that include marketers, a graphic designer, lawyers, an accountant and of course, two very supportive husbands. What do you love most about running Tiny Adventures? Getting to work with all those yummy babies! We get a healthy dose of cuddles and smiles from the babies while dealing with their lovely mums and dads. We also love the fact we are giving parents a fun and supportive environment where they can engage with other parents in the same phase of life. What are your plans for the next few months? We are both on the countdown with number two. Although we know the next year will be a busy time for us, we are 100 per cent committed to continuing Tiny Adventures with the help of an additional class facilitator. We also hope to begin to expand into the wider Wellington suburbs such as Ngaio & Johnsonville and will be having a special Christmas class in both Brooklyn (9 Dec) and Miramar (15 Dec). For more information visit www.TinyAdventures.co.nz


Baby Life Magazine Issue #2  

Baby Life Magazine is New Zealand's free, online parenting and lifestyle magazine.

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