BABI PUNK MAGAZINE #6a1

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our focus CURRENTLY, WE ARE FOCUSING ON PROMOTING MAINLY: GRAPHIC DESIGN, PHOTOGRAPHY, FASHION, PAINTINGS, MUSICIANS, ETC.

Experience 2020

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We publish monthly, receiving submissions from 1st to 25th of that month.

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based WE ARE BASED IN EUROPE BUT WE TRY TO MAKE OUR MAG AS INTERNATIONAL AS POSSIBLE.


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Anamaria Oprinesc A DZH Cristian Usai Nadzeya Pakhotsina Daria Gizdavu Michela Sangiuliano GABRIEL CASTE Inma Vivas LUIGI ULISSE IOVANE Fuad Muhtadi Boga Patricia Martina Civardi Jean Ocídio

BABI PUNK B A B I

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discomfort of being lost in a moment of their lives.

Inma Vivas


“self” and the connection with our own true essence.


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BABIPUNK

CONTENTS 8 "IN-BETWEEN" he main drive behind my work is the subjectiveness of our perception, the fact that what we see is shaped by how we feel in that particular moment and it is

14 EXPERIMENTS Throughout 2020 (and before) I've always felt stuck in a way, as if my mind could never flow properly, and so I've always lived with some kind of uncertainty in me.

16 MICHELA SANGIULIANO

I've found encyclopaedias on the centimeters of my skin. I'm studying.

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UNDER THE LIGHT OF THE TV SCREEN

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EXCLUSIVE!

MISMATCHED MEMORIAL 20 LOMO THE NEW DADA IN PHOTOGRAPHY Most people until now know about dada as an art movement that had a big impact of the European avant-garde in the early

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MISMATCHED MEMORIAL

"PEMBANGKANG"

Mismatched memorial A series of analog collages From an unknown film, lost. With an unknown people, lost

I took these on the spur of the moment of chaos when students and police clashed. The event took place last year after the Indonesian president signs and passed the controversial

END OF THE TUNNEL?

I use photography as a means to identify and confront myself with the hidden qualities of my character, to better understand reality and the world in which I live.

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"INBETWEEN"

ANAMARIA OPRINESC

The main drive behind my work is the subjectiveness of our perception, the fact that what we see is shaped by how we feel in that particular moment and it is unique to every single one of us, however, we are still connected by some similarities. The inspiration behind this piece was an in-between state of mind, a play of heaviness and lightness, inviting the viewer to question whether the subject is sinking or emerging at the surface. Maybe accepting both states into our existence is the key to finding that floating-on-water inner feeling.

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iasU naitsirC YB

'The Next ......Day'

In my art I like to create abstract or sunreal figures without going to load my works of too many imsages for this reason I consider my art minimal but essential to me to find more and more inspiration and stimulus. 10


All my works are in black and white and hand made, I don't tend to use digital, not for a particular hatred towards it but rather for a factor of field and consequently aesthetic. As I said earlier I like to create abstract or sunreal figures but I love, as in "Contemplation" and "The Next Day", also to create images that recall landscapes but s ometimes given the technique I use I don't always have the full control of my creations, which is good for me, it creates a limit, and for me having a limit means being more creative and being more solicited in making art.

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Khotsina



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I'VE FOUND ENCYCLOPAEDIAS ON THE CENTIMETERS OF MY SKIN.

I'M STUDYING. AND WHILE I'M STUDYING, NATURE APPEARS, IN FRONT OF ME. ALMOST IN MY 30S, I SEE NATURE ALL OVER MY CURVES. ALL OVER MY BODY CAUSE I'VE LEARNED HOW TO PROTECT IT, TO TAKE CARE OF IT, THE TEMPLE OF MY SOUL. I'M NOT MY BODY, I'M NOT MY MEMORIES, PAST AND FUTURE. I'M NOT THE WALL WHERE A FIRE IS BURNING, I'M NOT THE PROJECTION, I'M THE WALL. AND THE WALL IS NOT BURNING, A WALL IS A WALL AND I CAN SEE EVERYTHING I'M ABLE TO IMAGINE. IF I SEE A BLOOMING GARDEN IN THE INSIDE, I HAVE THE DUTY TO CREATE A BLOOMING GARDEN IN THE OUTSIDE. MY BODY IS THE TEMPLE OF MY HEART, THE CATHEDRAL OF MY VISIONS. WATCHING IT, VISUALIZING IT, I ALLOW TIME TO PASS. NOW MY BONES ARE NOT SHARP CORNERS, BUT STRONG SHADOWS. MY SKIN IS MUCH SMOOTHER, MY MUSCLES MUCH MORE RESISTANT TO THE CHANGING WINDS. I ALLOW MY HAIR TO GROW OVER MY SHOULDERS, LIKE THE BRANCHES OF A TREE, SOMETIMES BROWN, SOMETIMES WHITE. I DON'T REGRET THEM, THEY ARE CONNECTED WITH NATURE. I DON'T REGRET SCARS, IMPERFECTIONS, STAINS THAT WILL NEVER GO AWAY. I CAN PEACEFULLY WATCH THEM AND BE GRATEFUL. I SEE A DIFFERENT KIND OF BEAUTY IN THE NAME OF A NEW NATURAL CONSCIOUSNESS WHICH INTRODUCES ME TO A HIGHER STEP, TO A HIGHER CLICK OF A CREATURE THAT I AM IN THIS LIFE. IN THIS NEW WAY, NEW ERA, NEW THIRST, I'VE UNDERSTOOD THAT NO OTHER LOVE CAN GIVE ME BACK WHAT I CAN RETURN TO MYSELF. NOT EVEN THE LOVE OF A SON, NOT EVEN THE LOVE OF A MAN, OF A SISTER. THIS LOVE IS *A BIGGER/THE BIGGEST* PLAN, THAT, WHATEVER IT TAKES, I HAVE TO DISCOVER ON MY OWN, AND THAT WILL ALWAYS REMIND ME THAT I'M A PASSING BEING, A PASSING CREATURE BUT A PERMANENT BEING OF LIGHT AND BEAUTY. LIKE EVERYONE ON THIS PLANET WHO CHOOSES A RIVER, A WIND BLOW OR A MOUNTAIN AS EXAMPLES OF LIVING. A CONTINUING, MOVING, HARD, PASSIONATE AND SOFT INVESTIGATION. DON'T TELL ME THAT I'M BEAUTIFUL, TELL ME THAT I'M ON THE WAY FOR A GOOD JOB.

BY Michela Sangiuliano

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JESUS SAVES-

THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN IN LOS ANGELES, FEBRUARY 2021. ABOUT A YEAR INTO WASTING AWAY IN MY LIVING ROOM. MY WIFE AND I WENT FOR A DRIVE TO PICK UP FOOD AND I REMEMBER BEING SO ENAMORED BY THE BEAUTY OF THE OUTSIDE WORLD. IT HAD BEEN A LONG WHILE. 18


My wife is camera shy, but thanks to the pandemic she’s become to subject of most of my recent portraits. We talk about how our routines have started to feel like one long day.

STATIC DREAMS GABRIE LCASTE 19


LOMO THE NEW DADA IN PHOTOGRAPHY Most people until now know about dada as an art movement that had a big impact of the European avant-garde in the early 20th century in Zürich, Switzerland, at the Cabaret Voltaire 1916. New York Dada began 1915, and after 1920 Dada flourished in Paris. Dadaist activities lasted until the mid 1920s.Developed in reaction to World War I, the Dada movement consisted of artists who rejected the logic, reason, and aestheticism of modern capitalist society, instead expressing nonsense, irrationality, and anti-bourgeois protest in their works. The art of the movement spanned visual, literary, and sound media, including collage, sound poetry, cut-up writing, and sculpture. Dadaist artists expressed their discontent toward violence, war, and nationalism, and maintained political affinities with radical left-wing and far-left politics.Dadaism represents an artistic and literary movement. Artistic Freedom Dada artists rejected cultural standards and values, and were in this way dissatisfied with traditional definitions of what art could be. Duchamp advocated for a philosophy of absolute freedom in art, and many followed suit. Artists used group, collage, and mass-produced everyday objects to reject cultural standards. Poems were fractured. French poet Stéphane Mallarmé scrambled syntax and scattered words across the page to compose poetry. 20


Much like DADA, Lomography

Artistic Freedom

now has a thriving community of enthusiasts around the world. Before the popularization of social networks, Lomographers

And now allow me explain my view of why I think dada and lomo have similar principles nowadays regarding photography and the influence on the very popular comeback of film. Stranziger and Fiegl caused what is called the “Lomographic Society,” which consisted then, as it does now, of Lomographers across the globe who use low-fidelity cameras to produce

swapped film photos at small photo exhibitions or even through the mail. This day, the Lomographic community is also online, with web sites in 21 different languages and specialty retail stores in 29 cities, including Rio de Janeiro,

vintage-looking, vignetted, and brightly colored

Shanghai, New York, Barcelona,

film photos. The Lomographic Society

and many more major world

unexpectedly maintains a list of “10 Golden

cities.

Rules” to follow as a Lomographer. Disposable cameras have been around for ages and for many people that makes it much more fun and easy as not everyone has the skills means and money to buy an affective digital camera. ...now back to lomo the 10 principles of lomo are easy,as they also published on their website 'Our 10 Golden Rules - they’re the very essence of our“Don’t Think, Just Shoot” motto! After all, Lomography is all about having fun while capturing good pictures, so memorize them by heart or break all the rules; either way, be ready to throw your photography inhibitions away!" . Some of the rules are including “Be Fast,” “Take Your Camera Everywhere You Go,”and“You Don’t Have To Know Beforehand What You Captured on Film.”, one of them precisely rule #6 says," Don’t think' here I think exactly like dada they support and encourage you, be fast, twords the idea of just do, catch the moment, don't overthink feel.

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INMA VIVAS

BREA KING FREE THROUGH MY WORK, I EXPLORE DEEP EMOTIONS, those that we try to ignore and hide, but prove impossible to supress. I deal with fears and try to underline the importance of facing them. My photography examines the theme of identity by blurring the lines between the beautiful and the surreal. When the pandemic began and loneliness was so present in our lives, many emotions surfaced and memories and thoughts once believed to be forgotten reemerged, forcing us to confront them. For me it was the right moment to start exploring the world of self-portraits and use it as a form of therapy, allowing me to get to know myself better.

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I truly believe in the importance of introspection of the “self” and the connection with our own true essence. I hope that the viewer can identify with my work in some way and, if not, maybe they can understand the strangeness or discomfort of being lost in a moment of their lives.

BY INMA VIVAS 23


GREEN IS THE COLOR OF THE EGO, HOPE, VITALITY

Will we see the light at the end of the tunnel? I use photography as a means to identify and confront myself with the hidden qualities of my character, to better understand reality and the world in which I live. A clearer understanding of myself and my world allows me to explore “fragments of life” as an abstract form and also to interact with people with whom, otherwise, I would not be able to interact. My goal is to create photographs that are capable of producing an effect of “alienation” and visual and emotional fascination in the public. The choice of subjects derives from my background and cultural history and from my interest in ideas about beauty and their emotional connections. I recently started working with abandoned places trying to show abstract and evocative landscapes as a reason to embody the idea of imagined spaces. I use and blend together the languages and techniques of analogue and digital photography exclusively to satisfy my creative ideas. Therefore, on a visual stylistic level, I feel more fascinated by abstract and experimental artists. However, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Aaron Siskind, Bill Brandt, Robert Demachy, Peter Hujar, Lucas Samaras, Edward Weston and Andre Kertesz have always been a great source of inspiration. 24


LUIGI ULISSE IOVANE

Green is the color of the ego, hope, vitality. Green is the color of nature, fertility and abundance. It also represents energy and the need to dominate both people and events. 
 The question we ask ourselves today is: "Will we see the light at the end of the tunnel? 25


Misma tched memor ial Mismatched memorial A series of analog collages From an unknown film, lost. With an unknown people, lost

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analog collage, film

@ondy_warhol


"PEMBANGKANG" I took these on the spur of the moment of chaos when students and police clashed. The event took place last year after the Indonesian president signs and passed the controversial Omnibus Bill, resulting in massive waves of protest on the whole country, initiated by college students and worker unions to pressures the president to cancel it by issuing a perppu -- a regulation in lieu of law. "Pembangkang", is what I want to call this series, it's an Indonesian word for people who go against orders. @kommkuma 28


idathuM dauF yb

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BY Boga Patricia


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BY Jean Ocídio


TRUST:

UNDER THE LIGHT OF THE TV SCREEN NEVER WAS THERE AN INVENTION THAT WAS SO PUBLICLY AND PARADOXICALLY BOTH LOVED AND REVILED AS THE TELEVISION SET. ESPECIALLY IN THE WORLD OF INTELLECTUALIST CULTURE, THE MASS AMOUNT OF INFORMATION AND ENTERTAINMENT AVAILABLE THROUGH THE ADVENT OF TV - A CONCRETE THREAT TO TRADITIONAL FORMS OF MEDIA AND EXPRESSION - SPARKED WAVES OF FEARFUL RETALIATION IN THE LITERARY, CINEMATIC, AND EVEN MUSICAL SPHERES. NEVERTHELESS, TELEVISION SETS SOON FOUND THEIR WAY INTO ALMOST EVERY HOUSEHOLD CAPABLE OF PURCHASING ONE, OFTEN INFILTRATING THE HOMES OF THE VERY ‘INTELLECTUALS’ WHO HAVE BEEN DECRYING THEM. THAT’S THE SIMPLE, SHORT VERSION OF THE STORY, AT LEAST. MOVE NOW TO HAL HARTLEY’S TRUST (1990), A FILM OFTEN MARKED FOR ITS OFF-BEAT, ABSURDIST WRITING STYLE AND FORTHRIGHT ALMOST-ROMANCE. IT REALLY IS SUPERB: ATMOSPHERIC AND JUST THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF ODD, WITH SOME INCREDIBLY COMPELLING DRAMA AND MOVING PERFORMANCES FROM THE WONDERFUL ADRIENNE SHELLY AND MARTIN DONOVAN ALIKE. PLUS, IT CONTAINS ONE OF

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THE COOLEST FUCKING MOVIE LINES EVER: “FAMILY’S LIKE A GUN. YOU POINT IT IN THE WRONG DIRECTION, YOU’RE GONNA KILL SOMEBODY.” TRUST ME (A-HA), IT’S A THOUSAND TIMES BETTER IN CONTEXT.WHAT INTRIGUED ME MOST ABOUT THE WORK, HOWEVER, WAS ITS BOLD TREATMENT OF (SURPRISE) TELEVISION, WHICH FROM THE FIRST FEW MINUTES IS MADE THE SUBJECT OF DEEP HATRED FROM ONE OF THE FILM’S MAIN LEADS, MATTHEW. YOUR CLASSIC BROODING INTELLECTUAL, MATTHEW IS ALL TRENCH COATS AND CIGARETTES AND NONDESCRIPT BOOKS ON WESTERN PHILOSOPHY, A WALKING CLICHÉ OF THE MODERN ERA. AND YES, HE DESPISES TVS WITH HIS ENTIRE BEING: DESPITE HIS UNMATCHED GENIUS WHEN IT COMES TO ELECTRONICS REPAIR, HE ABSOLUTELY REFUSES TO FIX THE MASS-PRODUCED, CHEAPLY-MADE TELEVISION SETS HIS BOSS KEEPS BRINGING TO HIM, PREFERRING MORE ANALOG TECHNOLOGIES INSTEAD.AT FIRST SIGHT, IT’S A CLASSIC MODERNIST READ OF THIS NEW TECHNOLOGY. NONETHELESS, IT’S IMPORTANT TO NOTE HOW UNPLEASANT OF A CHARACTER MATTHEW TRULY IS; HE MAY HAVE HIS CHARM AND AN ARGUABLE REDEMPTION, BUT HE IS STILL AN ANTI-HERO IN THE STRONGEST


sense of the term. That is to say that the coarse modernist viewpoint he embodies isn’t presented as objective fact, contained instead within the context of an extremely fallible character. Even more interesting, however, is the television’s function within the film’s setting, with the ever-present invention existing just off-screen for a majority of the film’s scenes. Characters caught in dead-end domesticity are constantly watching TV, gazing blankly offscreen throughout monotonous conversations that reveal the prescribed nature of their housewifery or, just occasionally, husbandry/fatherhood. Even when a television set isn’t explicitly present, Hartley borrows from the Theater of the Absurd to turn remaining scenes into deadeyed monologues reminiscent of Waiting for Godot, with characters stubbornly staring off camera as they contemplate their troubles; in fact, rarely do characters make eyecontact at all in the film, preferring to look anywhere else instead. Though not explicitly indicated in the context of every single scene, these thematic and visual ties imply that the influence of the television set is never far, offering characters somewhere else to direct their gaze and attention. You’ll notice the brief mention(s) of domesticity throughout here, and I wanted to draw special attention to them.

With a narrative already dedicated to spearing the ‘80s construct of the latent Reaganite household, the distracting powers of this film’s ever-present TV gain a new edge in soothing (and thus reaffirming) the pains of unhappy domestic existence. One-by-one, nearly every single side character drowns their sorrows in the blue light of the TV screen: troubled relationship with your son? Watch some TV. Childless marriage has you feeling empty? Check the news. Loveless divorce left you ravaged? Switch the channel; maybe something good will be on. Is the TV directly to fault for any of these things? Of course not; it’s a hunk of (cheap, mass-produced) metal and plastic. But is it still related? Yeah. Fucking hell, yeah. This union between post-WW2 absurdism and the rise of escapist TV-watching is, perhaps, Hartley’s greatest element of genius present in the film. Not only is this an uncommon, surprising union, it’s one that provides us with some resounding thematic conclusions: the modernist viewpoint offered by Matthew may be flawed, but its also nestled within the absurdist disaffection of postwar America and the complacency offered by mass-produced media, both of which resound in our notions of domesticity. The argument is so much more complex than simply “TV bad,” which, sure, may not seem like that radical of a statement to make, but too many artworks refuse to make it anyways. Too many artworks, especially in the modern and post-modern eras, walked around like un-ironic Matthews, simply decrying TV in some fit of jealousy and shock and only a grain of actual criticism. Trust acknowledges that (Obviously so. Exhibit A: Matthew), but it goes beyond that surface-level assessment to give us some more complex reasoning. And boy, is it rare, really, that this complex relationship is

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ACTUALLY SO DELICATELY ARTICULATED BY A WORK OF ART THAT TAKES ITSELF SERIOUSLY. NOT ONLY ARTICULATED, BUT FELT: HOW WONDERFUL TO FEEL, IN HARTLEY’S ICE- COLD, TV-LIT, SULLENLY ABSURDIST WORLD, HOW LONELY AND DULLING IT ALL REALLY IS. AS ALWAYS, HOWEVER, THERE’S A BIT OF A CATCH, A SMALL BIT WHERE THE VIEWER FEELS JUST THE TINIEST BIT CHEATED. IT IS, AFTER ALL, QUITE DIFFICULT TO ASSAULT THE DISTRACTING NATURE OF THE TV SCREEN WHEN YOUR OWN ARTWORK IS, AHEM, PROBABLY BEING SHOWN ON A TV SCREEN; MODERN FILM MAY NOT BE TV, BUT IT’S AWFUL CLOSE. AND THOUGH TRUST IS FAR FROM CONVENTIONAL IN EVERY SENSE OF THE WORD, IT STILL REQUIRES ITS AUDIENCE TO SIT IN RAPT, DISTRACTED ATTENTION FOR A DURATION OF JUST OVER 100 MINUTES, A PERFECT MIMICRY OF THE FILM’S LONELY, TV-DEAD CHARACTERS THEMSELVES. THE SCREEN GOES BLACK, AND THERE YOU ARE, ESCAPING YOUR OWN DOMESTICITY THROUGH THE SOOTHING LIGHT OF THE TELEVISION SCREEN.

BY A. DZH For many, that may seem clever enough. But I just wish that there was some acknowledgement given, some second self-aware nod - especially since this is technically from the ‘90s, an era so famous for its self-aware nods - that this work is made of the same stuff as the medium its critiquing. Wouldn’t it be killer if, just once, one of those staring-offthe-screen protagonists looked dead into the camera, and in that moment we knew, we just knew, that we were looking back at ourselves?

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Vol.4 Issue 4 27 Dec. 2020 Cover Image iasmina anlutaghe o.w. Editor o.w Deputy Editor Teodoran e.T. Senior Editors Executive Art Director

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