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Breana

Woodville

Architecture Graduate


Table of Contents


Studio Projects

Additional Projects

Houseboats to Energy Efficient Residences (HBEER)

001

‘Our Urban Front Porch’ - Lexington Public Space Development

007

Habitat for Fruit

013

Cincinnati Art Museum - Schmidlapp Design

019

St. Elizabeth Hospital - Bereavement Center

025

Chicago Theater - ‘Wolf Point’ Development

029

New York Studio Apartment

033

Smith House Studio Addition

037

Lexington Cemetery Project

041

Mobile Architectural Research Community

045

Abstract Light Study

049

Mobile Camping Project

053

Building Systems Integration (BSI)

059

Methods and Materials in Architecture

063

Building Information Modeling with Revit

069

Case Study House #22 Booklet

073

Freehand Drawing Course

077


Studio Projects


Houseboats to Energy Efficient Residences (HBEER) ‘Our Urban Front Porch’ - Lexington Public Space Development Habitat for Fruit Cincinnati Art Museum - Schmidlapp Design St. Elizabeth Hospital - Bereavement Center Chicago Theater - ‘Wolf Point’ Development New York Studio Apartment Smith House Studio Addition Lexington Cemetery Project Mobile Architectural Research Community Abstract Light Study Mobile Camping Project


Houseboats to Energy Efficient Residences

1st Year, 1st Semester Graduate Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Graduate Instructor: David Biagi, Mike Jacobs, and Bruce Swetnam (Joe Tanney as Visiting Instructor)

Students in this studio were asked to design various housing, school, or barn designs based on two-person groups. I was asked to create a horse barn in association with another students project, but our two-person group worked and design separately. The projects were designed then had a cost analysis with real-world products, materials, and construction costs as well as assumed operating costs. The “HBEER” project has gotten some attention for its innovation in creating new designs for various typologies (mainly housing) that are sustainable. The studio works with a Kentucky houseboat manufacturer, Starcraft Cruisers, to keep the company and it’s hometown working.


D5

D5

D6

D6

Left: Short Section with Details

S2

Below: Long Section with Details

Short Section Scale: 1/4” = 1’

Stall Door Movement Render

D3 D1

D2

D4 D1

D2

This project was designed to be an insulated draft horse

barn with lighting, water reclamation system, fire suppres-

D3

sion, wind power, and radiant heating. The barn does contain a wash rack (horse shower), tack room, and mechanical room all of which have operable doors and windows. The panelized

S1 A

Long Section: Wash Rack Scale: 1/4” = 1’ D4

system for building the barn enables the purchaser to create a one or more horse barn with any facilities they choose.

The design shown here is a four-horse barn with two

wash racks, a tack room, and a mechanical room. The walls and roof are insulated to keep the temperature stable within the barn. The water and feed troughs swing out of the stall

HBEEB 003

from behind each building to keep both workers and animals safe. (As shown in the image on the right.)

Stall Door Movement Render


Above: Interior Render

Above: Full Model Render

HBEEB

Below: Build Process Diagram

004


Short Elevation

A3

Short Elevation Scale: 1/4” = 1’

4 Draft Horse Stalls Plan

Long Elevation: Tack Room

A1

Long Elevation: Feed/ Tack Room Scale: 1/4” = 1’

Long Elevation: Wash Rack

HBEEB 005

4 Draft Horse Stalls Ceiling Plan

A2

Long Elevation: Wash Rack Scale: 1/4” = 1’


Right: Rough Cost Analysis

HBEEB

Below: The Selected Material Detailed in the Cost Analysis

006


Lexington Public Space Development

1st Year, 2nd Semester Graduate Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Graduate Instructor: David Mohney

In this project the studio was asked to select and develop separate public spaces, or what should be public space, but work together in how to display them and how to link them together. The first public space selected had to be in downtown Lexington and develop the space; for me this was Duncan Park. The second space selected was an underutilzed space that should be public space; for me this was an employee parking lot behind several restaurants and bars.


Flower Shelters and Fountains

Play Areas and Benches

Day Care Basketball

Playground Stage

Current Plan of Space

Lexington Development 009

Flower Beds

Buildings and Paving

The current layout of Duncan Park in

Lexington, KY is very simple. Its not used very often for anything other than a means of circulation from one corner to another. There is a day care center that uses the current manor house and a secondary building in the park.

Project Elements Axonometric


Render from alleyway

The day care center is well used

and as such I did not remove that function when designing a proposal for the park. The play areas, that are used by the neighborhood as well as the day care, are lacklusfor the park. Duncan Park is, however, the Proposed Plan

former property of Cassius Clay and my intent was to have that information made know in the play areas.

North Elevation

Lexington Development

ter and was another area of improvement

010


Render from alleyway

The

“Employee

Lot” is a currently a parking lot for employees of UK

Lexington Development 011

and the surrounding businesses and a Rasing Cane’s Restaurant. This location is

Proposed Plan

currently a void in local’s minds.

North Elevation


Stage

Flower Shelters

Net Walls and Towers

Benches, Tables and Bike Racks

Theater and Paving

This lot could be used for more than parking as it

is almost completely surrounded by restaurants, bars, and other food-based shops. What I proposed for the site was a means for a public ‘lunch area’ with shading devices, bike racks, benches, and a stage for performances. This space, in theory, could be used by the local businesses or Project Elements Axonometric

the University of Kentucky for outdoor events.

Lexington Development

Current Plan of Space

012


Habitat for Fruit

6th Year, 2nd Semester Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Graduate Instructor: Len Wujick

Using the concepts used in earlier jewelry projects of line, plane, and mass (the core of the prior and shown projects) were translated into three conceptual bowl forms using only one of each of these understandings. Those conceptual ‘habitats for fruit’ could be chosen for the final project, modified or blended together. I chose to modify a mass idea from my own concepts and used cost and materials to motivated the final design further. For the gallery showing at the end of the semester we were told to chose three descriptors for ours habitats, I chose texture (due to material differences), contrast (the colors), and radial (the general shape of the habitat).


Right: photograph taken in a studio

Starting as an oval stretched

in various ways vertically and horizontally it was then sculpted into its current form. The first item when sculpting was to break up the mass RADIALly and mirroring the shape as a puncture in the center. Reducing the amount of mass came next as the 3D Printed material needed reduction due to time and money constraints. Finally wood was chosen to support the ABS plastic as a CONTRAST between both the TEXTURE and color.

Habitat for Fruit 015

Right: photograph during gallery review


3 - 1/8”

16 - 1/4””

Above: long axis elevation (nts)

Above: short axis elevation (nts)

Habitat for Fruit

2 - 7/8”

12 - 3/8”

016


Habitat for Fruit 017

16 - 1/4”

13 - 1/4”

Below: Top View (nts)

9 - 1/4” 12 - 3/8” Right: studio photographs


Below: photograph during gallery review

Habitat for Fruit

Above: photograph taken in a studio

018


Cincinnati Art Museum- Schmidlapp Design

4th Year, 1st Semester Graduate Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: (Thomas) Drura Parrish

In this graduate studio, undergraduates and graduates worked in teams to create a design for the Schmidlapp Art Gallery. This gallery in the Cincinnati Art Museum is a high traffic area that is unfortunately being treated as a ‘hallway’ by some visitors. This studio was to work with the director of the museum, Aaron Betsky, and the head curator to create a new design. These designs would give more space to the museum and attract more attention to the Schmidlapp (since it is the first area you see upon entering the museum). Another issue the Cincinnati Art Museum has is that it holds one of the largest collections of works on paper and no way to display them. These works have to be carefully kept under low light and it was required that we display them properly. The works on paper displays had to allow for a change of art at least every few weeks which meant a display and storage system. This was completed by a team of three, Breana Woodville, Tiasa Sehic, and Matthew Knowles. Work will be annotated.


The final design shown on the previous page and to the right are the A A

results of seven prior iterations with several outside influences. The design was based on a concept that all the sight lines of a 5 ft. tall person. The 60 degree, from a average eye height

c

three group members agreed upon, Floor Plan

and width, and 30 degree sight lines were used to place display cases and free-standing statuary. In a previous iteration, mod-

Section A

eled and conceived by Matthew Knowles, the placement of various ‘inscenements’ were solidified. The design for the display cases was

Section B

based of the previously designed in-

Schmidlapp Gallery

OODVILLE

scenements and was headed by Taisa Sehic with various influences from the other two members. Base line work and weights for section A, B, and plan done by Breana Woodville. Line weights, model, and section C done by Taisa Sehic

021

Section C 08 DEC 2010

FINAL

SCHMIDLAPP GALLERY


Top: Rendered image and render model alterations completed by Breana Woodville, model by Taisa Sehic. Above: The current Schmidlapp Gallery.

Schmidlapp Gallery

Exploded Axonometric

Axonometric model and base line work done by Breana Woodville. Line weights done by Taisa Sehic

022


Axonometric model and line work completed by Breana Woodville. Base model for the drawing machine, main structure, completed by Matthew Knowles

The machine for works on paper started as an idea to use a hexagon to increase efficiency in the design. It started out as a column which eventually turned into a series of doublesided frames perpendicular to each side of the hexagon. These first ‘pods’ were in four sizes to accommodate the various sizes of works on paper. This changed once again when the average size of works on paper were taken into consideration. Once only one ‘pod’ size was chosen, the frame was developed into what is shown on the right. Lighting requirements made a constant restriction for the design,

Schmidlapp Gallery 023

the had to be light tight with the exception of the display area, which made for much of the progression

Drawing machine render and model completed by Matthew Knowles.

Knowles, Sehic, Woodville

in the design. The lighting required by the design is what influenced the bare structure.

Drawing Machine Axonometric

08 DEC 2010

FINAL


The network strategy was not used on the final review but was designed to be a way to possible share artwork between museums, galleries, and in other previously unsafe areas for art. This idea was also used to place delicate artwork in all areas of the Cincinnati Art Museum.

Schmidlapp Gallery

Model and rendered image completed and designed by Breana Woodville

024


Bereavement Counseling and Learning Center


St. Elizabeth Bereavement Center

3rd Year, 2nd Semester Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Jason Scroggin

In this Project we were to design a possible solution for a bereavement center for St. Elizabeth hospital. The design carried over the entire semester and began as a vehicle model, that evolved differently for each individual, to become a viable prototype for what could become the St. Elizabeth Bereavement Center. The project was shown in various stages to a jury for a critical analysis of the project. The final result was shown to a representative few from St. Elizabeth Hospital and to a jury within the university.


III

X III

IX I

I believe that a bereavement center is a place for families to come together and overcome the pains of a loved one’s

I

death together. This will not only be a place of healing but of

I

IX

learning and communicating as well. The new center should

VII

not be a place that is avoided but embraced for the services offered in order to help anyone with a loss.

when the importance of each program is considered. The gen-

V II V

Diagrams showing the layout and location of the rooms.

XVI IX

XII

XII

XII

XII

I

IX. X. XI.

VIII

IX

The program for the center will be a division in learning, communicating, healing and uniting. The program alters

II IV IV I

VI

I

II

XIII

XIII

XI

XIII XIII

XIII

X XIV

XIV XIV XIV

I. Kid's Classroom II. Restroom III. Stage Lighting and NPR Corps IV. Conference Room V. Volenteer OfďŹ ce VI. Exercise Room VII. Giftshop and Bookstore VIII. Exhibit Space Classroom Meeting Hall Loading Dock/Storage

XII. XIII. XIV. XV.

eral program, however, does not match the program size and program importance. Uniting will be the central hub for all other divisions, communicating will contain conference rooms and the meeting hall, learning will contain the

Bereavement Center 027

Private Counciling Theraputic Services Library/Research and Computer Lab

XVI. Laundary Room XVII. Kitchen

II

classrooms and reference services, and healing will contain the counseling rooms and therapeutic areas.

Ground Plan

Counciling

1st Floor Plan


Right: Physical Model

Bereavement Center

Above: Modified v-ray render.

028


Chicago Theater

3rd Year, 1st Semester Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Kyle Miller

In this project, our studio was to work in groups to design a theater for Chicago’s ‘Wolf Point.’ This theater would start with design models and work its way to completion with full facilities, including light and sound designs. This project was completed in a group of two but all work will be properly cited. In another class, taught by Bruce Swetnam, we were asked to use our current studio project as the basis for assignments in the class. This work will appear in a later section in the portfolio.


Indoor Public Area Loading Area Storage Space

This theater had a requirement to have a major

and minor theater, storage space, loading area, public

Admin./Public Affairs Space Performer’s Spaces

Maintenance Space Minor Theater

areas, room for performers, and administrative/office space. All of this program also had a maximum and minimum square footage, all of which had to fit onto

Program Diagram

the fairly small, Wolf Point in Chicago, IL. The final design was developed from several program interations and several skin manipulations.

Chicago Theater 031

Skin Manipulation


Section A

Section B

View From River

2nd Floor Plan

1st Floor Plan

Chicago Theater

Section C

032


New York Studio Apartment

2nd Year, 1st Semester Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Clyde Carpenter

This studio project required us to have a double height studio space, gallery space, access to the beach behind the building, have north light, an included garage, use the column grid, and have a particular division of spaces. We also were not allowed to exceed the original foundation without a reasonable cause and to not block the road leading to the boat ramp.


On this page are the required

hand-drawn plans and section that were inked then scanned into the computer. These drawings show the division, based on floors, of in-

Ground Floor Plan

creasingly intimate spaces from the ground floor to the 2nd floor.

1st Floor Plan

Studio Apartment 035

Long Section

2nd Floor Plan


Above: Side street (east) elevation

Street (south) elevation

Studio Apartment

Left: Model Photograph

036


Smith House Studio Addition

2nd Year, 1st Semester Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Clyde Carpenter

In this studio project we were required to have north light, a minimum square footage, a double height studio space, an office, and a direct connection to the house. We were asked to work with the site and site lines that were made by the landscape and pre-existing building. In another class, taught by Bruce Swetnam, we were asked to use our current studio project as the basis for the class. Some of this class work will appear along with the studio work.


Roof Plan

This project was meant to be

an addition that was congruent with

1st Floor Plan

the pre-existing Smith House. This project satisfied this by mimicking the columns, stairwell, and window arrangement that was found in the smith house. This addition was, however, had far more square footage than it needed to have but it was

Ground Floor Plan

allowed in order to use all available space in the footprint.

Originally the addition was

built with only the roof, 1st, and ground floors while the basement

Smith House Addition 039

was a solid foundation to meet with the 45 degree hill. This was changed to make the structure, addition, more efficient and was suggested by the professor and several class mates.

Basement Plan


Left: 1/8 scale model photograph

Smith House Addition

Above: Bay side Elevation

040


Lexington Cemetery Project

2nd Year, 2nd Semester Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Bob Kelly

In this project, the studio was asked to design a project for the undeveloped portion of Lexington Cemetery. We were asked to create everything without the assistance of computer programs. There were no limitations on what could be placed or how much one could design to develop this space. We did not have to but most of the individuals creating the project often had an importance placed on the procession through the space.


Chapel Layout

N

Small Chapel Plan: N

Building Complex Section W

W

Breana Woodv

Section

Lexington Cemetery Project: Development of the Pre-existing Cemetery

Chapel Layout

Main Chapel Plan: N

Small Chapel Plan: N

W

Site Plan:

Small Chapel Section:

With pre-existing paths, roads, and buildings

Plan

W

Main Chapel Section Small Chapel Section: W

Lexington Cemetery 043

W

N

Site Map


Lexington Cemetery

Right and below: Photographs of a completed 1/16th scale model on site.

044


Mobile Architectural Research Community

2nd Year, 2nd Semester Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Bob Kelly

This studio Project was to design a structure that would provide for the group and still be a shelter for the main occupant. This project had to provide a service to the group, in this case it was a performance space. The ‘performance’ could be a speaker, comedian, musician, or any other performer. It was to be built full scale with the necessary materials. It was also required that the structure be mobile enough to be moved easily by a standard vehicle. Images of this project was displayed at ‘Field Work’ the 6th annual Architectural Humanities Research Association International Conference at the University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland on 19 November 2009.


Below, top right, and lower right: Preliminary study models.

Mobile Community 047

The study models on this page show

the possible interations this project would take. The model above shows a basic shape and is shown built at 1/2 scale, as are the other models on this page. The models on the right enhance the design and are more detailed in their construction.


Above: The final study model before beginning construction.

The completed project, shown on

space and be only a few inches in height. Some assembly is needed to place the project on site. This project could have its overhanging arms, swing down and touch the Above: This is an image of the completed project at its final review on the University of Kentucky’s agricultural farm.

ground to be a shelter for its main occupant.

Mobile Community

the left, could collapse into a 2 ft. by 4 ft..

048


Abstract Light Study

1st Year, 1st Semester Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Rokshana Kahn

In this studio project we were required to create light studies that would eventually become an abstract representation of a ‘space’ for an artist, a musician, and an architect. This ‘space’ was to mimic what they did or what they may need involving light and shadow. This ‘space’ was not meant to be occupied on any level. We were then required to pick one ‘space’ and develop it further. This developed ‘space’ would be placed between two projects done by others and have to mildly incorporate those other ‘developed spaces’.


Below and left: The Artists’s Space.

Above and right: The Musician’s Space.

Above: Exterior view of the three combined ‘spaces.’

Below: Exterior view of the three combined ‘spaces.’ Above: Interior view of the three combined ‘spaces.’

Abstract Light Study 051

Left: Interior view of the three combined ‘spaces.’


052

Abstract Light Study


Mobile Camping Project

1st Year, 2nd Semester Studio Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Rokshana Kahn

In this 1st year studio project we were asked to conceptualize a full scale project that was able to be carried a reasonable distance and fit reasonably inside a vehicle. The project was to be designed to be collapsible so that it could more easily fit inside a vehicle and be carried on ones person. This was developed from abstract drawings representing body, mind, and spirit on a specific size of paper and had to be two dimensional. From these we created a series of prototypes which turned into a mini-model.


The three works to the right

are the ‘body in motion’ concept pieces that were to be our inspiration for the, at the time, unknown final project. This is what created the preliminary concept model seen below. These were to become a mobile camping object that worked with a body in motion. Above, left, and below: the 3 ‘body in motion’ conceptual artworks

Mobile Camping 055

Left: the concept model created from the ‘body in motion’ art.


Below: drawing of the initial model that motivated the final design.

The drawings that produced

the concept and were the concepts behind a body in motion pushed the design for the model shown above. If this had been more than a conceptual project this could have been a shelter comfortable enough and light enough to fit a individual of reasonable height.

Mobile Camping

Above right and above left: design models to help in the full scale construction.

056


Additional Projects


Building Systems Integration (BSI) Methods and Materials in Architecture Building Information Modeling with Revit Case Study House #22 Booklet Freehand Drawing Course


Building Systems Integration

1st Year, 1st Semester Required Graduate Course University of Kentucky School of Design Graduate Instructor: Bruce Swetnam

Building Systems Integration (BSI) is taken as part of the comprehensive studio Houseboats to Energy Efficient Residences (HBEER). All of the work shown for this class worked with the studio project directly to work out the more detailed aspects of design. Most projects were done in groups of two with the exception of my project and one other. All the work was completed by myself for the BSI course, not all of the work completed for the course is shown in the following pages.


Plumbing Diagram

Sprinkler

The sustainable items are water

Flow Direction Sprinkler Supply

reclamation, day lighting, natural ventila-

Outlet/Faucet

tion, and energy efficient electrical lighting and water distribution. This barn will

Flow Direction Water Supply Storage Tank Gutter Inlet

have no HVAC unit as is common with

Flow Direction Rainwater Supply

horse barns.

Drain

It will be insulated to keep the heat

Flow Direction Waste Water

of the horses, which have average temperatures of between 99.8 ยบF and 101.3 ยบF, helping the barn stay warm in the mild Kentucky climate. The ventilation, which is assisted by an open atrium above the alley, will keep temperatures down in

Lighting and Ventilation Diagram

summer by moving higher volumes of air than average barns.

The electrical lighting is intended

to be used only after dusk until dawn as

Mechanical Box

Socket/ Water Chase Light Fixture

a compensation for lack of day lighting.

Building Systems 061

The electric waterers in each stall will serve as a constant supply of water on a cistern and pump based system, supplied by rainwater runoff from the white metal roof.

Wall Plug

Ventilation

Lighting Chase


Circulation Diagram

The circulation in this design fol-

lows the tradition of Kentucky barns

Horse Paths

having a dual axial access, meaning that Human Paths

there are exits at the ends and through the middle. The circulation of horses has an individual case where there is horse only access, which is out of the stall through the paddock. The human only access is through the mechanical /storage room and feed/ tack room. All other circulaStructural Load Diagram

tion paths are shared which is not always the case in modern barns.

The structural system is based

on post and beam construction where the beams carry the load to the posts. Major Forces

In this system the load is still carried by

Minor Forces

barn appearance’ than for true structural support. The SIPS panels imbedded in

Post

between beams and post carry the load from the center out to the posts on the corners of every stall.

Building Systems

the posts but the beams are more for ‘a

062


Methods and Materials in Architecture

4th Year, 2nd Semester Elective Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Gary Rohrbacher

Materials and Methods in Architecture was an elective course that taught the class how to detail certain aspects of building construction or solve construction problems in another manner. There were multiple typologies, architects, and locations use in the course. Only four of ten projects are shown in this portfolio as they are the most exemplary details from the class.


In each of these structural de-

signs is another way, to handle various forces. These are meant to move in many directions to compensate for the

Version 1

shock created by an earthquake.

Version 2

In all of these designs only the

inner shell is considered as the pivot joint can handle the forces for the outer curtain wall.

In version 1, the pre-existing mo-

ment reduction system to use on the inner portion of the shell since I believe it should move in multiple directions to

Methods and Materials 065

handle the movement necessary.

Version 2 is a series of hydraulic

arms that is meant to support and move when an earthquake strikes.

In version 3, placing the post on

an enclosed ball will allow the inner

Reinforced Concrete

shell to shift without breaking. GluLam Wood

Original Design

Version 3


Design Process

Final Brick Panel (4 Combined)

Fou mor

Positive Mold

Methods and Materials

Negative Mold

066


Section A

In this project I attempt-

ed to use the actual structural system but still keep the idea of a ‘box within a box.’ Doing

Methods and Materials 067

this meant having the standard beams, trusses, and glass block found in the current structural system. The new innovation was using a thick metal plating sys-

Elevation- From Bay

tem to cap the end nearest the windows facing the bay.

Stone

Steel Member

Reinforced Concrete

Iron

Glass

GluLam Wood


Detail B

Stone Detail A

Steel Member Glass

Reinforced Concrete GluLam Wood

Section A

Methods and Materials

Iron

068


A102 1

6"

9' - 0"

6"

6' - 7 1/8"

6"

A102

1

2

3

A101

A101

A101

25' - 6"

6"

6' - 4 7/8"

6"

9' - 0"

2 A101

3

6" 6' - 7 1/8"

6"

25' - 6"

6"

6' - 4 7/8"

6"

2"

6"

UP 6' - 0"

1' - 0 15/32"

10' - 8"

9

1' - 7 15/32" 6' - 9 15/16"

9

2

1 A101

6' - 4 7/8"

9' - 0"

3' - 0"

7' - 0 1/4"

3' - 0"

2' - 11 3/4"

6"

4

"4' 3' - 0

15' - 6 7/8"

2' - 11 7/8" 2' - 6 3/32" 1' - 2 5/16" 3 31/32"2' - 6 3/32"

'2"3 5/3 12

0"

1

A102

3' - 0"

3'

63

/4"

A102

2 A101

3 25' - 4"

8' - 4 1/16"

6"

3' - 6"

7' - 3 21/32"

3' - 0"

9

4

DN 3' - 0"

- 0"

3/4"

11

3'

6"

6"

2"

3' - 6 11/32"

3' - 0"

9

6' - 10 9/16"

6"

3' - 0 5/16"

DN

/16 " 3 ' - 0"

A102

Level 2 1/8" = 1'-0"

A101

25' - 6"

6"

6"

9

9

4

8' - 2 13/32"

6' - 7 1/8"

53

1

4' - 0"

8 9

5' -

9

18' - 4 7/16"

3' - 0"

9

12

7' - 0"

A102

2

6"

3

6 15' - 4 7/16"

0"

3

3' - 0"

3' - 0"

9

4

Crawl Space 1/8" = 1'-0"

9' - 0"

9 21/32"

DN

A102

3

5

3

9

7' - 0"

0' -21 ' -1 15/13 21"3 /332 "' -

A102

3' - 6"

5

3

2' - 0"

4 A101

3' - 0"

4

1

3' - 6"

5

1' - 2 15/32"

2

A101

A101

3' - 5 17/32"

9' - 0 9/16"

A102

A102

1' - 7 5/16" 5 7/8" 2' - 6 3/32"

1

21' - 6 3/32"

2

6"

9"

9

9

2' - 6 3/32"

A101

2' - 6 3/32"

3

A101

29' - 3 3/4"

3

6' - 9 15/16"

3

3' - 6"

2' - 6 3/32"

2' - 6 3/32"

3' - 9 5/16"

59' - 6"

A102

3' - 6"

7' - 3 23/32"

11 1/8"

DN

DN

8' - 8 1/32"

4' - 0 11/32"

UP

9 3'

10' - 8 13/16"

9

10' - 8"

- 0" 3' - 0" 3'

UP

3

- 0"

9

3'

9 3'

9

18' - 0"

9 9

17' - 8 19/32"

15' - 0 31/32"

9 9

A102

A101 2

7 5/16" 4 31/32" 22' - 0"

4 A101

1

5 3/4"

22' - 0 3/32"

9

9' - 8"

2' - 10 3/4" 2 1/2" 2' - 9 1/2" 2 1/2" 2' - 10 3/4"

3'

9

9 2"

A102

26' - 1 25/32"

9

- 0"

2

- 0"

A102

- 0"

9

3 A101

9' - 8"

2"

4 A101

1

Level 1 1/8" = 1'-0"

-1

1/3

2"3 '

-0

"

4' -

0"

9

9

9 9

3' - 0 "

4' - 0"

9 3' - 0"

4' - 0"

3' - 0"

4' - 0"

1 03"' 3' -

19/3

23"'

0"3

'-

55

" /16

6' - 11 1/8"

3'

8 15/32"

9

4

4

A102

A102

4

Level 3 1/8" = 1'-0"


Building Information Modeling with Revit

4th Year, 1st Semester Elective Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Mark Siever

This course is the only one offered by the University of Kentucky Architecture School for a modeling program alone. This class taught those in it how to use Revit Modeling software for creating buildings, objects for those buildings (object families), apply and adjust materials, render, and make construction sheets within the program. The class was asked to select a 2,000 sq. ft. to 5,000 sq. ft. project to model within Revit. This project could be from a pre-selected list or a personal project. Most projects were not ‘designed’ but merely modeled.


4

2

1

A101

A101

1

2

A101

A101

Level 3 19' - 3 3/16"

Level 3 19' - 3 3/16"

Level 2 10' - 3 3/16"

Level 2 10' - 3 3/16"

Level 1 0' - 3 3/16"

Level 1 0' - 3 3/16"

Crawl Space -3' - 8 13/16"

Crawl Space -3' - 8 13/16"

Section D 1/16" = 1'-0"

3

Section C 1/16" = 1'-0"

2

1

A101

A101

Level 3 19' - 3 3/16"

Level 2 10' - 3 3/16"

BIM with Revit 071

Level 1 0' - 3 3/16"

Crawl Space -3' - 8 13/16"

3

North Elevation 1/8" = 1'-0"


1

4

3

3

4

A101

A101

A101

A101

3

4

A101

A101

Level 3 19' - 3 3/16"

Level 3 19' - 3 3/16"

Level 3 19' - 3 3/16"

Level 2 10' - 3 3/16"

Level 2 10' - 3 3/16"

Level 2 10' - 3 3/16"

Level 1 0' - 3 3/16"

Level 1 0' - 3 3/16"

Level 1 0' - 3 3/16"

Crawl Space -3' - 8 13/16"

Crawl Space -3' - 8 13/16"

Crawl Space -3' - 8 13/16"

East Elevation 1/16" = 1'-0"

1

3

4

A101

A101

Section A 1/16" = 1'-0"

2

Section B 1/16" = 1'-0"

Level 3 19' - 3 3/16"

Level 1 0' - 3 3/16"

Crawl Space -3' - 8 13/16"

2

West Elevation 1/8" = 1'-0"

BIM with Revit

Level 2 10' - 3 3/16"

072


1959-1960

Architect: Pierre Koeing

1625 Woods Drive Los Angeles, CA Rendering And Booklet: Breana Woodville


Case Study House #22 Booklet

2nd Year, 2nd Semester Required Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Karen Lewis

In this project the class was required to create a portfolio of all the work done in the class.* Through creating this booklet and creating the necessary visual aids required by the instructor, we learned how to make pleasing portfolios in the future and the programs needed to continue successfully in the school of design. Each class member was to draw one of the original Case Study Houses to create plans, sections, diagrams, Google Sketchup models, and Photoshop manipulations of our model.


A full image of the 3-D model without any changes.

075


Case Study House

An image of the ‘exploded’ model, showing separate layers of vertical and horizontal planes.

076


Freehand Drawing Course

1st Year, 1st Semester Required Course University of Kentucky School of Design Undergraduate Instructor: Adam Wiseman

This course was taken in addition to the 1st year studio course to help improve our ability to measure space and draw from real life objects. These are all drawings from nude models that sat for one hour for the more detailed drawings. There were fifteen minute and thirty minute drawings for each of these models but they will not be shown here. Some models appeared for more than one session and as such, may be shown twice. Not all drawings from the class will be shown.


080

Freehand Drawing



Breana M. Woodville Complete Portfolio