Page 1

community review www.jewishharrisburg.org

January 18, 2019 | 12 Shevat, 5779 | Vol. 93; No. 27 Published by The Jewish Federation of Greater Harrisburg | Greater Harrisburg’s Jewish Newspaper

Building Bridges:

Religions and Cultures of Harrisburg Meet in the Middle

I

BY RABBI CARL CHOPER, CHAPLAIN AT JEWISH HOME OF GREATER HARRISBURG, RABBI AT TEMPLE BETH SHALOM

t is often the case that religious traditions do not play nice with each other. They often make conflicting truth claims. The resulting misunderstandings can lead religious communities to demonize each other. Given access to power at times they have been known to use force to impose their will on others. Governments have used religion to bolster themselves up, and religious authorities have used governments to spread themselves far. Often specific religions have dominated their own parts of the world for generations and centuries at a time, so they have not felt any pressure to allow room for others. Then, as borders shift or people migrate to distant lands, followers of different faiths bump up against each other. In those circumstances, people have to learn how to live with each other, or tear each other apart. Sometimes religion becomes in those moments a force for unity, and sometimes a point of division. The United States is simultaneously one of the most religious and religiously diverse societies in the developed world. India is another large democratic society that shares the distinction of being both religious and diverse. Many other countries of the world may be very religious but not very diverse, or very diverse but not very religious. Where there is both religious commitment and diversity, interfaith dialogue and mutual understanding become especially important for maintaining peace and social order. Indeed, when we look across our nation and the world today, we cannot easily come to the conclusion that religious conflict is a thing of the past. There is no question that religious conflict still exists. The question yet unanswered for the 21st century is whether religious conflict will increase or diminish, and whether religious traditions themselves will be more part of the solution than part of the problem. In the Harrisburg area, despite the small size of the region, we have no shortage of religious diversity. It surprises people to note that we have not only Catholics, Jews, and very many expressions of Protestant churches in our region, but also organized communities of Orthodox Christians, Coptic Christians, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus, Sikhs, Baha’is, Wiccans,

Mormons, Unitarians, non-Believers, and many others. There also are individual Zoroastrians and adherents of various African traditions and Native American traditions just to mention a few that I know of. Within most of these religious traditions themselves you can find liberals who view doctrinal claims as metaphor, literalists who view those same claims as Divine dictation, and mystics who see all articulated doctrine as drapery masking over the larger underlying truths. When you see the religious diversity just in our area it is amazing to think how diverse our nation’s larger cities have become. All of this diversity brings with it opportunities for greater culture in our region. A person can experience more of the world and become better citizens of the world without leaving home. At the same time, the diversity presents a call to us as a Jewish community to share the insights and beauty of our own tradition as well. Judaism Rev. James Jackson, Rabbi Carl Choper, Qassim Rashid and Mayor has much to teach and much that the world needs to hear. Eric Papenfuse at Harrisburgs 9-11 Commemoration (2015) The lives of others can be enriched by the gems we are sitting on top of just as much as we can be enriched by learning of the traditions of others. We need to bring our own gifts to the table as well. Otherwise we diminish ourselves and the experience of others. In the Harrisburg area there is an active network of organizations and efforts to help strengthen the fabric of our diverse society and share the cultural wealth that comes with that diversity. It is important to realize that large numbers of small dialogue interactions are actually more important than a small number of large programs. Several years ago, Yanke Tewner, the then-director of the Jewish Federation of Greater Harrisburg’s Community Relations Committee, compared these two scenarios to a gap bridged by many small bridges verses a gap bridged by one large bridge. If we depend only on one large bridge, we are entirely isolated from each other if that bridge is damaged. If on the other hand there are many smaller bridges there we always have other means to connections if one of two disappear. Interfaith efforts in Harrisburg include activities focused on learning, on shared celebration and on joint service and advocacy. Each of these modes of interactions have their place. Throughout the year, there are different moments when people come together to celebrate commonality in our diversity. The Interreligious Forum each year organizes an interfaith presentation of music in late January, around the time of the Baha’i World Religion Day. The Interreligious Forum also organizes an annual Harmony Walk each September when hundreds of people walk and visit different houses of worship in Uptown Harrisburg. Different communities throughout the region hold interfaith Thanksgiving services. Beth El Temple for several years has held an interfaith Freedom Seder around Passover time that has included participation from black churches, white churches, and Islamic groups. At times different faith-based advocacy groups have worked together towards common visions of social justice. These groups include, but are not limited to, the Pennsylvania Jewish Coalition, the Pennsylvania Council of Churches, the Unitarian Universalist Policy Legislation Action Network, the Lutheran Advocacy Ministry of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Interfaith Power and Light (relating to climate change), Heeding God’s Call (relating to handgun violence) and many other groups. For ten years the Pennsylvania Council of Churches and the Interfaith Alliance of Pennsylvania has convened an annual Commonwealth Interfaith Service of Prayers for Justice and Peace in the first week of May, corresponding to the timing of the National Day of Prayer. This annual event helps to emphasize in the capital city of Harrisburg that the peaceful, multi-faith character of our society really is a very special and historically unusual thing that should not be taken for granted. In the midst of this diversity, various efforts have taken place over the years to create opportunities for dialogue and learning. Marilynn Kanenson, z’l started the Women’s Interfaith Symposium which meets six times annually at the JCC Continued on page 9


Message from the CEO BY JENNIFER ROSS

E

veryone is welcome at the J. Our Jewish community is stronger because we have wonderful friendships with our interfaith friends and neighbors and they are part of our JCC family. Through happy and challenging times, we are here for each other. There are many opportunities throughout the year to learn more about the spiritual practices of our neighbors. I participate in the Interreligous Forum (IRF), which hosts four meaningful programs each year. Just after Super Sunday, on January 27, at 3:00 PM, you have an opportunity to participate in an uplifting interfaith program “Music That Brings Us Closer to God” celebrating World Religion Day. This event is sponsored by IRF and the Spiritual Assembly of Baha’is of Harrisburg. It will be held at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints at 4788 Union Deposit Road in Harrisburg. Several religious communities will perform a song, music, or chant typical of their

worship of God. Kol HaNeshamah, Harrisburg’s Jewish Chorus, will participate. In the summer, IRF hosts Race Unity Day on City Island where each religious and civic group can have a table to share information and food about their religion and/or culture. On September 15, after you recover from the JCC Annual 5k, you can take a leisurely stroll in midtown Harrisburg for the Harmony Walk. You will visit several local congregations and one additional stop where you can learn about other places of worship which are not in walking distance. The final program is IRF’s Thanksgiving Eve Service which I wrote about in December 21. I am closing my column with a prayer I was honored to read at last year’s event written by Rabbi Eric Cytryn. I think it is a perfect reflection of the value of interfaith relations and am thankful that he has permitted us to share it with you in this edition of the Community Review. Thankfulness: Welcoming Others with the Spirit of Gratitude (Genesis 1:26) Your image, God, bonds us to one another; Your Image brings welcome, friendship, And love to our relationships. We are ever grateful to be created in Your Image; We are ever grateful to be commanded “Love Your Neighbor Because Your Neighbor Is Just Like You.” Your Image brings absolute equality, Infinite value and shared purpose To our Human existence.

CANDLE LIGHTING TIMES Jan 18 » 4:49 PM Jan 25 » 4:58 PM Feb 1 » 5:06 PM

How goodly are our homes, When we sense Your Presence In the bonds that intertwine Our families, our neighborhoods, Our congregations, mosques, churches and temples; We are grateful for your presence With all your peoples, every family, Every tribe, every party, every expression of religiosity, Every nation on earth. On this year’s commemoration of our Nation’s Thanksgiving Grant each of us your ultimate blessings; That You Bless us by Protecting us from fear and harm; That you Bless us by showing Yourself to us Through the welcoming faces of loving neighbors; That you bless us with light, grace, kindness and compassion, And you inspire us to live in absolute Peace with our fellows.

Community Review Vol. 93 No. 27 January 18, 2019 (ISSN 1047-9996) (USPS 126-860) Published bi-weekly by the Jewish Federation of Greater Harrisburg, 3301 N. Front Street, Harrisburg, Pa., 17110. Subscription rate: $50 per year. Periodicals postage paid at Harrisburg, Pa., and additional entry office. President/CEO Jennifer Ross Editorial Board Members Roberta Krieger Rabbi Carl Choper Rita Gordon Jeanette Krebs Jennifer Ross STAFF Editor Adam Grobman a.grobman@jewishfedhbg.org Sales Director Ayelet Shanken 717-409-8222 a.shanken@jewishfedhbg.org Design and Layout Lisette Magaro Designs Graphic Designer Lisette Magaro Postmaster: Send address changes to Community Review, 3301 N. Front Street, Harrisburg, Pa., 17110. Mission Statement of The Community Review: Inform readers about local, national and international events of interest to Jews. Promote Jewish values, Jewish identity and a sense of Jewish community in central Pennsylvania.

Amen.

A copy of the official registration and financial information of the Jewish Federation of Greater Harrisburg may be obtained from the Pennsylvania Department of State by calling, toll free within Pennsylvania, 1-800-7320999. Registration does not imply endorsement.

Jenn can be reached at 717-236-9555 x3104 or j.ross@jewishfedhbg.org.

2 | community review | greater harrisburg’s jewish newspaper

The opinions expressed in the Community Review do not necessarily reflect the position of the Jewish Federation of Greater Harrisburg. The Federation does not endorse any candidate or political party for any elected office.


Heeding God’s Call Interfaith Organization Remembers Victims of Gun Violence in Harrisburg BY ADAM GROBMAN people of equal faith and conscience can come to different conclusions. We need to be careful about getting involved in politics, but there are moral issues and ethical teachings that relate to what’s going on in the world, and to ignore that is to reduce Judaism to something that would have been unrecognizable by the prophets and rabbis.” The support has not been one-way in the slightest. Following the fire at Chisuk Emuna’s building on Division Street about a decade ago, Rabbi Muroff remembers standing at a vigil for a murder victim and being approached by members of the group who extended support and expressed sorrow over what had happened to the building. “Here we were standing on Allison Hill, and there are members of clergy of different faiths standing in solidarity with their

Jewish brothers and sisters. It’s significant. We really have much more in common than whatever separates us. So, if we can find issues where we can work together to increase awareness and take action as a society that will increase understanding and mutual solidarity, that’s a good thing.” Heeding God’s Call to End Gun Violence holds quarterly vigils, Memorials to the Lost, to honor lives taken by gun violence in Harrisburg, with additional chapters throughout the region. The most recent vigil was held on January 15th. Keep an eye out for information on future vigils, as well as the Souls Shot project, an art exhibit that will pay tribute to the 123 individuals who have died by gun violence in Harrisburg since 2009. For more information, visit heedinggodscall.org.

Memorial to the Lost, a traveling exhibit paying tribute to victims of gun violence in Harrisburg.

I

n 2016, the City of Harrisburg was home to 13 murders, making it one of the most dangerous cities (per capita) in the state. Heeding God’s Call to End Gun Violence, an interfaith clergy organization, is helping to bring that fact to the forefront throughout the Mid-Atlantic Region. The organization began in Philadelphia in response to increased gun violence there, and additional chapters later followed in several locations, including Harrisburg. Rabbi Ron Muroff of Chisuk Emuna became involved in the program in the early 2010s. “I was moved by the work they were doing to try to raise awareness about the prevalence of the use of illegal handguns in this city, and the devastation that has been caused by the violence throughout our neighborhoods.” When we spoke on January 2nd, Rabbi Muroff noted that a resident was murdered in Harrisburg on New Year’s Day.

The group works on several projects, and it’s most prominent is their vigils for victims. Since its founding, the group has held services for each murder victim in the city, usually at or near the scene of the crime. Recently, they’ve transitioned into holding a vigil once every quarter. “It is very moving to me,” says Rabbi Muroff. “You read about crime in the paper, but when you’re standing on a street corner where a murder took place and you’re standing with the victim’s family, it makes it that much more real.” In addition to its vigils, the organization maintains an exhibit of t-shirts, The Memorial to the Lost, that bear the names of victims and dates of their murder. Heeding God’s Call has worked on reducing easy access to weapons, as well, calling for universal background checks for purchasers. “Since 2009, we’ve lost 123 people to gun violence in Harrisburg,” says Ann Van Dyke, co-chair of the Harrisburg chapter. “We take an interfaith approach to this project because we all believe that non-violence is a spiritual matter. At the heart of all faiths is a commitment to non-violence for all God’s children.” Rabbi Muroff says that although his participation with the group has ebbed and flowed, his support for Heeding God’s Call stems from his study of Judaic writings, laws, and thought. “I don’t think the Torah says ‘support this legislation’ or ‘don’t support that legislation.’ It’s not always so clear. So individual rabbis and congregations need to decide which issues they’re going to engage with study and humility, and recognize that

www.jewishharrisburg.org

| January 18, 2019 | 3


You’re Invited!

Legacy Celebration

This celebration is for YOU! Join us! THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21 Registration 6:00 pm—Awards Presentation 6:30 pm

SUSQUEHANNA ART MUSEUM (SAM)* 1401 N. 3rd Street, Harrisburg, PA 17102 f

Michael Halak, Syrian-African Cracked Olives, 2014-15, oil on canvas, courtesy of Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art

FREE for LOI signers, spouses, and their guests

Please RSVP by Wednesday, February 13 (717) 409-8220 OPTION 2— rebecca@pajewishendowment.org

THANKS TO YOU…

our organizations achieved success and will receive grant awards! Israeli style hors d’oeuvres Beer/wine Dress—business casual Free valet parking front of SAM Glat Kosher Dairy Dietary Laws will be observed

Tal Shochat, Afarsemon (Persimmon), 2011, C-print, courtesy of the artist and Rosenfeld Gallery, Tel-Aviv, Israel

* Includes exciting Israeli Art: Visions of Place: Complex Geographies in Contemporary Israeli Art The Jewish Community Foundation of Central PA is sponsoring and presenting our community-wide legacy initiative. It is a collaborative effort between the following organizations:

4 | community review | greater harrisburg’s jewish newspaper


The Secret to Interfaith Dialogue BY SAM YOLEN, RABBI AT CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL, LEBANON

L

ast month, Congregation Beth Israel of Lebanon, PA hosted Imam Ala Shargabi of the Bronx Islamic Center to discuss interfaith dialog between Jews and Muslims. Ala is originally from Yemen, though his training comes from his studies abroad in Syria and Jordan. He has been in America as a refugee on a student visa for the last several years, where I established a working relationship with him while interning at Congregation Tehila in Riverdale, NY. We were connected by a sisterhood and brotherhood initiative between his mosque and my Congregation. Since our friendship began a half decade ago, we’ve held public interfaith discussions, celebrated each other’s simchas, and texted frequently. Our class focused on concepts like similar religious practices to Muslim and Jewish communities, such as Kashrut and Halal food, the Haj and the Chag, and more. It revealed much on how Sunni Yemenites view Jewish people. For instance, Ala explained that there were still Jewish communities in old cities

such as the port city of Aden and the capital of Sana’a. That there were even Yemenite Jews who felt uncomfortable in the budding state of Israel, choosing to return to Yemen after feeling culturally left out. As is often the case, “all politics are local,” and the Islamic understanding of Judaism varies region to region, location to location. Historically, Jews arrived in Yemen before the first exile in 586 BCE. The kingdom for Yemen was originally Jewish before the advent of The Quran. In one of the foundation myths of the Yemenite Jewish population, Jews chose to desecrate Shabbat in order to assist Mohammed with his holy war, thus earning the Jewish community protection from Muslim rulers. Non-Muslims were prevented from migrating to non-Muslim lands, so Jews in Yemen were landlocked on the Arabian peninsula. They were more connected to the Afghani Talmudic academies of Pumbadita and Sura than to the Sephardic peninsula of Andalusia. When Moses Maimonides created his yeshiva in Cairo, after fleeing his homeland

AARP DRIVER SAFETY CLASS WHERE: Jewish Community Center 3301 N. Front St. Harrisburg, PA 17110 WHEN: • • • • • • • •

March 20 and March 21, 2019 12:30 - 4:30pm

8 hour classroom – no test – minimal fee ($20 to AARP – if you belong to AARP you receive a $5 discount Nation’s first and largest – Geared to your safety needs Learn how to compensate for age-related changes Learn the new traffic laws Review the rules of the road and much more State law requires all auto insurance companies provide a multi-year discount to program graduates* Millions of graduates; are you missing out? Registration: Call Cheryl at 717-236-9555 x 3115

Rabbi Sam Yolen (right) with Imam Ala Shargabi

of Córdoba in Spain, he made specific reference to the generosity of Yemenite Jews, whose magnanimous benefaction was known to the entire Jewish world. Ultimately, there are times of surplus and good harvest, whereby rulers can extend rights and honors to minorities, and times of famine and distress, whereby fear and intimidation are tools for governments to manage their population. The Jews of Yemen reveal a complicated relationship with power that has shifted back and forth from peaceful neighbor to mistrustful outsider over the course of centuries. In America and the modern times we live in, we should emphasize time periods in history whereby collaboration

FREE Rx DELIVERY SEE-RIGHT PHARMACY 2647 NORTH 6TH ST. HARRISBURG, PA 17110 (717) 236-9094 www.SeeRightRx.com

HARRISBURG PHARMACY 2645 NORTH 3RD ST. HARRISBURG, PA 17110 (717) 232-0400 www.HarrisburgRx.com

GOOD DAY PHARMACY 2025 TECHNOLOGY PARKWAY, SUITE G04 MECHANICSBURG, PA 17050 (717) 728-4200 www.GoodDayRx.net

*Most Insurance companies will give you a minimum of 5% off your Insurance Premiums for three years when completing this course! Call your Insurance Company to see if you can financially benefit from taking this class!!!

We offer this two-day course just once a year and you must take this course before being able to take the one-day refresher course in the future.

and toleration were hallmarks to a country’s prosperity. By developing friendships with neighbors, earnestly and in a public and symbolical way, we can fight hate with love, fear with understanding, and callousness with friendship. It’s comforting to hear my friend sing the Arabic music of Yemenite Jews while I play djembe. While this synthesis of culture may not be the current reality in war-torn Yemen, our ability to find and model reference points in our respective faiths demonstrates the power of the individual: to humanize the other is the beginning of realistic peace. May we all be so blessed with religious diversity, and may we be brave enough to celebrate it.

ALL TOGETHER HEALTHY  Caring

 Compounding

 Special

Professionals Who Listen Medication Packaging  Diabetic Supplies

 Accept

Specialists Most Prescription Insurance  Senior Citizen Discount

We’ll deliver what you need! www.jewishharrisburg.org

| January 18, 2019 | 5


Senior Update BY ROBERTA KRIEGER

T

he party’s over, and as the cliché goes, “a good time was had by all.” Times Past, the trio consisting of Gary Clements, Dave Coleman, and Terry Gingrich, made us glad that they were with us in “time present” and hopefully will be again at some point in our future. They entertained us for a few hours after our Senior Adult Club New Year’s lunch and even had some of us on the floor swaying to their music. We couldn’t have asked for more than we had; a luscious meal created by our great caterer, Norman Gras, with the help of his sous chefs and super service (with smiles) from the JCC staff. None of this could have happened without Cheryl Yablon, our most organized, fearless leader. Believe me, there are many times that “fearless” is a much needed adverb! Also must give credit to Beverly Gorny, Cheryl’s sole assistant in setting the tables and giving the Mary Sachs a “magical look.” Prior to our New Year’s party we had an invigorating after-lunch “party” with Herm Minkoff. As is the norm, most of us got into the act and had a fun afternoon. On December 20th, Spanish class was cancelled due to Sra. Lee’s illness. I am happy to inform you that she is coming along nicely. In Senora’s stead, Cheryl showed a movie, “Rumor Has It” with Jennifer Aniston, Kevin Costner, Mark Ruffalo, Richard Jenkins, and a favorite of mine, Shirley MacLaine. It was a cute movie and we had several good laughs.

While 2019 officially has not made its appearance as I’m writing this, when the Community Review is in your hands, we would have enjoyed at least half of January’s scheduled programs. In addition to our regular offerings (business meeting, Spanish, and Herm Minkoff), on January 10 we will have had a tablecloth art project with one of our club members, Sandy Gilleo. We had a great time with Sandy’s art project when she worked with us several months ago. In the future, we look forward to a lecture on “The Scourge of the Century: The Great Spanish Flu Epidemic of 1918.” John Maietta, a retired Army colonel, will be giving this lecture on January 22. We will welcome him back after a long hiatus. He will be followed on January 24 by Pat Dodd, our favorite DCAAA Nutritionist, giving us the “scoop” on facts about blood sugar and what you need to know. Hopefully, Norman will not skip our dessert on that day. Our next program will be Bingo on January 29. To end off the month of January, our favorite History Professor from HACC, Dr. Koones, will lecture on “A Nostalgic Return to Mayberry” on January 31. Looks like I’ll have lots of good things to tell you about in the next issue of the Community Review.

6 | community review | greater harrisburg’s jewish newspaper


Did your ancestor serve in the Civil War? The Shapell Roster, a searchable database of JewishAmerican soldiers who fought in the Civil War, will go live with a limited set of records in 2019.

Event – Free and Open to the Public

Storytelling with Yiddish Folk Artist Susan Leviton Tuesday, February 19, 2019 Noon • W107, Olmsted Building Penn State Harrisburg For additional information, contact Neil Leifert at 717-580-2954 or shoahteach@comcast.net. 777 West Harrisburg Pike, Middletown, PA 17057

Make sure your ancestor is on the list! Contact Eliza, eliza@shapell.org, to connect.

<< Private Joseph Levy, 4th NY Infantry (Company K), pictured in his Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) Drum Corp uniform with his son. The GAR was a fraternal organization composed of Union veterans who served in the American Civil War.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS FITNESS CENTER HOURS:

Monday-Thursday: 6am-10pm Friday: 6am-6pm Saturday: 7am-4pm Sunday: 7am-5pm

FRIDAY, APRIL 19 SATURDAY, APRIL 20 SUNDAY, APRIL 21 FRIDAY, APRIL 26 SATURDAY, APRIL 27

Erev Passover – JCC closes at 6pm Passover – Building Closed Passover- JCC Open Passover – JCC Open/ Federation Offices closed Passover – JCC Open

For a full list of community activities, please visit jewishharrisburg.org and click on the Community Calendar. www.jewishharrisburg.org

| January 18, 2019 | 7


Dr. Michael Kleinman: Saving Souls and Lives

C

BY ANITA CHERRY

hildhood sweethearts Lili and Josef this.” This made him a forerunner as one of the first became separated while they were in the board-certified ER doctors in the country. What concentration camp during the Shoah, the did he and the others need to know? Holocaust.  When the prisoners at Auschwitz were An excellent Wikipedia entry notes: “The liberated by the Soviets in early 1945, Josef went to emergency physician requires a broad field of find his love again. He walked throughout Germany knowledge and advanced procedural skills...They for six months anxiously asking if anyone had seen must have the skills of many specialists--the ability her.  When some claimed that they heard she was to resuscitate a patient, manage a difficult airway, dead, Josef refused to believe them. He didn’t give suture a complex laceration, reduce a fractured up; he kept searching.  He eventually ran into an old bone or dislocated joint, treat a heart attack, friend who said she was recuperating in a nearby manage strokes, work-up a pregnant patient with hospital.  He found her and nursed her back to health.  Dr. Michael Kleinman vaginal bleeding, stop a severe nosebleed, place Ready to start a new life, they got married.  The a chest tube, and to interpret (imaging studies).  longed-for State of Israel was created on May 14, 1948, and They also provide episodic primary care to patients during off Josef and Lili moved there to help build the nascent country hours and for those who do not have primary care providers.” and to start their family.   Whew, that’s a mouthful! Lili and Josef are the “two dear parents” of Dr. Michael “After all of your years in practice was there a single event Kleinman, York Hospital ER physician. Dr. Kleinman said of that especially moved you?” I asked. his parents, “They rarely talked about the horror they saw and “As an intern, all the patients affected me equally,” he were not bitter.  Instead, my parents were protective of me said.  Yes, they were all important to him.  But he went on, and my sister.  (They were) nurturing, but not stifling.”  This “I clearly remember this one patient, a young woman in her awareness of their actions instilled in him a strong desire to early thirties with metastatic ovarian cancer.  She was married be kind and fair to others.  He did not want to see “the other with two small children.  She was admitted to the hospital side of humanity” that his parents had witnessed and lived and never left.  She died quickly.  There was nothing we could through.   do. This was in 1981 and there were no tools to help her back They often reminded him to “never forget” the Golden then, and I remember feeling so helpless.”  Rule.  The Jewish version of this foundation for all ethical “That was me in 1981, but I lived, I left the hospital!” I conduct is, “That which is hateful to you, do not do to your replied, frozen in fear, “Wait...what did you just say?” fellow.” He said that this deeply-felt belief steered him in the I asked Dr. Kleinman to repeat the story to me, and he did.  direction of service to his community. “And so the path of He was momentarily surprised by what I had just told him; medicine became clear,” he offered. that I couldn’t take in what he was saying.  When I listened “But how did you decide to become an ER doctor?” I asked. to my recording of the interview later I was jarred by my He went to the Des Moines University College of Osteopathic deafness.  Why did I not hear what he said?  I don’t really Medicine and graduated in 1979, and after his internship, he know.  I guess that’s why doctors learn to repeat themselves, went into a general medical practice with Dr. Kieren Knapp.  repeat themselves, repeat themselves. He enjoyed this, and after seeing patients in the office he spent Yes, denial.  “Something horrible happens, and our minds some time “moonlighting”  in the Emergency Department at play tricks on us, tell us that it never happened, occurred the York Hospital.  How could Dr. Kleinman work in an ER differently than it did, isn’t quite what it seems.”  This often without special training?   works well for what has happened in the past as, according to Through the early years of the 1900s and into the 1970’s, George E. Vaillant (1993), “such trickery can reveal the mind ERs were typically staffed by a general surgeon, general at its most creative and mature, soothing and protecting us in internist, or general practitioner who called in individual the face of unbearable reality, managing the unmanageable, specialists as needed.  Seeing the need for improved care ordering disorder...putting out in the world what was not there and the benefit of specialization, the American College of before.”  But in the ER, the truth must first be faced directly, Emergency Physicians was founded on August 16, 1868 by and denial is a poor option. eight maverick physicians in Lansing, Michigan.  The first Dr. Kleinman knows this well.  In his decades of work, how dedicated ER Residency program was started in 1970 and the many thousands of times has he had to give unwelcome news AMA quickly recognized emergency medicine as a distinct to his patients?  How many times has he imparted unbearably specialty in 1972.   sad information to loved ones?   How many times has he been Early in his career, Dr. Kleinman experienced this forced to give up and admit failure?  That Josef will not find change in approach first-hand as ER physicians became Lili.  But how many more thousands of times have things their own specialists.  Falling in love with the experience turned out well, much better than expected?  and the privilege of seeing a wide variety of patients,Dr. Maybe, like the Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg or Oskar Kleinman realized that if he was “going to do this” he had Schindler, he is just trying to save as many souls as possible. better switch his own specialty and get further training. Dr. Kleinman did his emergency medicine training at Memorial Hospital in York, the first such program in the county.  He This piece is an amended version of Anita Cherry’s article completed the residency in 1982 and received his certificate on Dr. Kleinman, originally published on her blog, www. in 1984.  He and several other physicians including Drs. anitacherryhealthcare.blogspot.com, where Anita publishes the Ron Benenson, Merrill Cohen, Dave Eitel, and Lynn Jensen developed the program at the York Hospital in 1988.  With a stories of doctors from Central Pennsylvania. Anita can be wide smile, he said, “My certificate is number 11.  I treasure reached by email at malkamarie@gmail.com.

8 | community review | greater harrisburg’s jewish newspaper

ORDER YOUR 2019 MAH JONGG CARDS TODAY I WILL BE PURCHASING THE CARDS ON JANUARY 30TH, 2019! The Harrisburg JCC Senior Adult Club is once again selling the National Mah Jongg League’s card for 2019. The price of the 2019 card is $8.00 for a standard card and $9.00 for a large print card. Please make your checks payable to the Harrisburg JCC Senior Adult Club and mail them to: Cheryl Yablon Harrisburg JCC 3301 N. Front St. Harrisburg, PA 17110 By January 23, 2019. I will be paying for ONLY the number of cards ordered! The Mah Jongg League will mail your card to you in the spring. Thank you, Cheryl

HBG JCC Indoor Triathlon February 10, 2019

How far can you go? 15 Minute Swim in our indoor pool 20 Minute Ride on a spin bike 15 Minute Run on a treadmill Join the JCC for the fifth annual indoor triathlon. Participants ages 13 and older of all skill levels are encouraged to participate. Cost: $25 JCC Member/$30 Regular Rate All Individual Pre-Registered by 1/28/19 will receive a t-shirt. First heat starts at 8am. Preregistration required as limited spots. For a registration form contact t.travers@jewishfedhbg.org HBG JCC 3301 N. Front Street Harrisburg PA 17110 717-236-9555


Building Bridges: Religions and Cultures of Harrisburg Meet in the Middle Continued from page 1

for dinner and dialogue. The Religion and Society Center has held a Jewish-Christian dialogue effort that has been ongoing for over a decade and continues as a monthly bible discussion at Beth El Temple. This list of activities only begins to scratch the surface of interfaith learning and relationship-building that has been happening in the Greater Harrisburg area. No one person really knows the extent of one-on-one connections that have come out of these learning opportunities, and the full extent that each small activity has led to new developments. I can tell you that in the aftermath of the armed attack on the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh this past October, all of us felt the effects of these links and relationships as they have been built up over the years. The Jewish community felt a huge wave of support from the interfaith community, and we were able to see that much of that outpouring of support came through lines of relationships that have been established through years of interfaith interaction. In that time of crisis, there was not the need to build relationships before responding through them. The relationships already existed before the terrorist attack, and in many ways only grew stronger as a result. Interfaith activity is a means of exploring who we are as human beings and, by comparison and contrast, exploring who we are as Jews. It is also a way of helping our society to maintain an unusual mix of harmony amidst diversity, which has been more the exception than the rule throughout the course of history. We are fortunate to have these opportunities. We cannot take them for granted.

www.jewishharrisburg.org

| January 18, 2019 | 9


Upcoming Sports Schedule 1.18.19 – 1.31.19

Kids Corner: Word Search Name:

Created with TheTeachersCorner.net Word Search Maker

Interfaith Word Search

3rd – 5th

L

E

A

I

C

S

U

I

H M

R

N

Y

P

N

1/20 –vs East Penn Rec Team, Girls 3pm

V

H

P

E

A

C

E

A

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

1/27 –vs TBD Rec Team, Girls 3pm

D

Q

N

N

O

I

Y

T

Z

N

U

E

Q

F

P

I

X

P

T

R

K

W P

J

V

A

Z

T

C

T

Middle School

I

L

K

W N

N W P

W W C

C

N

C

R

1/22 at Lancaster County Day,

O

A

R

P

A

E

O

T

I

Y

D

O

A

J

H

Girls 4pm, Boys 5pm

U

J

O

Y

W T

R

I

O

C

S

P

J

X

T

A

H

K

M

E

I

K

E

G

P

M

I

V

N

K

L

W Y

X

A

N

A

Q

F

I

T

G

N

F

G

V

O

D

N

X

U

H

A

X

F

L

N

O

G

I

H

R

E

Y

U

E

I

V

S

N

I

E

I

N

J

X

L

T

N

E

K

H

U

R

K

O

D

R

B

P

X

D

C

V

A

L

U

E

S

R

X

R

B

E

B

U

Y

T

I

S

R

E

V

I

D

I

N

O

C

B

O

C

T

S

R

Y

T

E

I

C

O

S

M

S

G

CULTURE RELIGION PEACE WORLD

VALUES DIVERSITY UNITE

Culture Values Society Religion Diversity Different Peace Unite Impact World

1/23 vs Harrisburg Academy, Girls 4pm, Boys 5pm, 4th-7th Boys 6pm 1/28 vs Grace Baptist, 4th-7th Boys 4:30pm 1/29 vs Heritage Christian, Girls 4pm, 4th-7th Boys 5pm 1/31 vs Carlisle Christian, Boys 4pm High School 1/21 vs St. Joe’s Hanover, Girls 7pm

SOCIETY DIFFERENT IMPACT

1/24 vs TBD, Boys 6:30pm and 7:45pm

Search up, down, and sideways to solve the puzzle.

1/28 vs TBD, Boys 6:30pm and 7:45pm 1/29 vs Heritage Christian, Girls 6pm, Boys JV 7pm 1/30 vs TBD, Boys 6:30pm and 7:45pm

y p ip

Enjoy delicious treats!

1/31 vs Carlisle Christian,

pa rt F For kids ages 3-5 and their Adults

Experience painting with your child.

y

s

PJ Library Turns 8!

cup & paint

Create a

masterpiece together!

Celebrate PJ Library’s birthday with us! Enjoy lunch, games, crafts, face painting, moon bounce, party bags, birthday cake, and more!

Sunday, February 17 | 11am - 1pm Harrisburg JCC -- Fun for all ages! Register by February 13 to a.weikert@jewishfedhbg.org. In lieu of fee, please bring an item to create a party-in-box for a child in need (birthday cake mix, icing, candles, small gift, decorations) PJ Library is made possible by the Jewish Federation of Greater Harrisburg, The Harold Grinspoon Foundation, and through generous grants and donations.

Led by Debra Rietmulder,

Art Teacher at The Silver Academy

Sunday, January 27, 2019 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Located at

The Silver Academy 3301 N. Front Street Harrisburg, PA 17110

RSVP by Wednesday, January 23rd to https://jewishharrisburg.org/community-calendar/sippy-cup-and-paint Sponsored by

10 | community review | greater harrisburg’s jewish newspaper

Girls 5pm, Boys Varsity 6:15pm Swim Team 1/27 at Delaware Bold = JCC Home Game


Amos Oz, Iconic Israeli Novelist, Dies at 79 (JTA) — The cause was cancer, the Israeli media reported. Barely older than the country he chronicled in dozens of novels, essays and nonfiction books, Oz represented a generation of writers who traced the country’s emotional arc from its adolescence to the present. He also was one of the country’s most vocal peace activists, calling on successive governments to resolve the Palestinian issue and embrace what he called “the logic of demography and the moral imperative to withdraw from governing a hostile population.” In novels like “My Michael,” “Black Box,” “Where the Jackals Howl” and his 2002 autobiographical novel “A Tale of Love and Darkness” — later made into a film by and starring Natalie Portman — he drew on his own experience as a first-generation Israeli raised in Jerusalem and later a kibbutznik to tell intimate stories that were inevitably read — despite his frequent protestations — as political allegories. “A Tale of Love and Darkness” tells the story of his mother’s family’s roots in Volyn (historic Volhynia), Poland, his father’s roots in Russia, and his own childhood in Mandatory Palestine where Oz – then Amos Klausner – was born in 1939. His was a family of scholars: His great uncle Joseph Klausner  was a  Jewish  historian and professor of Hebrew literature and chief editor of the Encyclopedia Hebraica. His mother, Fania Mussman, died a suicide when he was 12. At 14 he left home to live at Kibbutz Hulda and took the Hebrew name Oz, meaning “strength.” He spent much of his young adulthood there before moving to the desert town of Arad. He studied philosophy and literature at Hebrew University in Jerusalem and fought as a reserve soldier in the 1967 Six-Day War in the Sinai Desert, and in the 1973 Yom Kippur War on the Golan Heights. He later became a founder and spokesman for Peace Now, a movement formed in 1978 to promote reconciliation between Israelis, Palestinians and regional antagonists. Americans for Peace Now, in a statement, said “Oz worked throughout his life to advance peace and to establish an exemplary society in Israel. He was one of our founding fathers and will always be remembered as having charted a way, with his sharp words, for a large peace camp yearning for a liberal Israel that pursues peace with its neighbors.”

He and his wife Nily, whom he met at the kibbutz when they were both 15, had two daughters and a son. For years Nily ran the International Artists’ Colony in Arad; his daughter Fania OzSalzberger is a professor of history at the University of Haifa School of Law and collaborated with her father on the 2013 book, “Jews and Words.” His wife and children survive him. The kibbutz was the setting for his first short story collection, “Where the Jackals Howl,” in 1965. He would soon be recognized among the so-called New Wave of Israeli authors that included  A.B. Yehoshua, Aharon Appelfeld and Yoram Kaniuk. The late Gershon Shaked,  a professor of Hebrew literature at the Hebrew University,  said the New Wave  “produced antiestablishment allegories that to some degree veiled their intentions.” Oz would often insist that he tried to keep his politics and fiction separate. “I’m not a political analyst or commentator,”  he told the Paris Review in 1996. “I have never written a story or a novel to make people change their minds about anything—not once. When I need to do this, I write an essay, or an article. I even use two different pens, as a symbolic gesture: one to tell stories, the other to tell the government what to do with itself. Both, by the way, are very ordinary ballpoint pens, which I change every three weeks or so.” His 1983 nonfiction work “In the Land of Israel” was a prescient dissection of the various political streams threatening to tear the country apart. It took the form of monologues by Jews and Arabs from various political standpoints, including a Jewish nationalist known only as “Z” whose ideology would come to dominate Israeli politics after the fall, decades later, of the Oslo peace process that Oz championed. Oz served as a professor of Hebrew literature at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, in Beersheba. He won countless awards, including the Israel Prize, and his books have been translated into dozens of languages, from Arabic to Chinese. For several years he had been mentioned as a candidate for the Nobel Prize for Literature. Oz will be buried at Kibbutz Hulda.

www.jewishharrisburg.org

| January 18, 2019 | 11


Life Cycle Obituaries FRANKLIN ABEL Franklin D. Abel passed away at age 92 on December 28th, 2018. He was born in Washington, DC in 1926 to Bessie Tolstoi and Milton Samuel Abel, the youngest of six children. At age 16, he made the fortunate move to Harrisburg, PA, which became his lifelong home until his retirement to Florida. Frank graduated from William Penn High School and entered the Navy during WWII. Upon his return he spotted Dorothy Grosky across a crowded floor, and knew she was the one. They were married for 67 years, and had two children – Debby/Josh and David/ Tonya; six grandchildren Justin/Ashley; Rachel/ Jason; Daniel/Jennifer; Jonathan/Becca; Zachary and Victoria, as well as six great-grandchildren. Together with Dottie, he founded Abel Personnel in 1969. Frank grew the company to be a successful business and enjoyed a reputation as a dedicated, honest, and compassionate businessman. He was grateful for the wonderful people working at Abel Personnel and the clients who have been so loyal. Frank has been an active and charitable member of the Harrisburg Jewish community. Frank was an avid bridge player and life master, and a Dunkin Donuts regular.

Funeral services were held on January 1st, 2019 at Mount Moriah Cemetery with Rabbi Peter Kessler officiating. Burial at Beth Israel Cemetery, Lebanon, PA. Memorial donations in Franklin’s memory can be made to Hadassah, 3301 N. Front Street, Harrisburg, PA 17110, Temple Ohev Sholom, 2345 N. Front Street, Harrisburg, PA 17110, or to the American Heart Association, 4250 Crums Mill Rd., Suite 100, Harrisburg, PA 17112. LAWRENCE SILVER Dr. Lawrence Silver MD, CPT MC USNR (Ret.), a nine-year resident of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, passed away on December 31st. He was 97-years-old. Dr. Silver, a longtime resident of Syosset, New York, before moving to Harrisburg, grew up in Middle Village in the New York City borough of Queens. He attended Grover Cleveland High School and graduated from Queens College in 1941. A year later, Dr. Silver went on to earn his Masters Degree in Chemistry at the University of Idaho. Dr. Silver was commissioned by the U.S. Navy in 1943 and served as a degaussing officer stateside. He later shipped out to Casablanca,

Morocco, and Palermo, Sicily for the duration of World War II and was the liaison officer in charge of transporting pilots from Europe back to the United States in 1944 and 1945. After the War, Dr. Silver served at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on shore patrol and spent the next four decades in the U.S. Naval Reserve, ultimately rising to the rank of Captain. In 1950, Dr. Silver received his medical degree from New York University Medical School and went on to do research at the Rockefeller University studying, among other subjects, the link between salt consumption and hypertension. From there he worked at Brookhaven National Laboratories researching radio isotopes, which later became an important diagnostic tool in the emerging field of cancer detection. Following his research career, he became Chief of the Nuclear Medicine Department at Queens General Hospital until his retirement in 1991. Dr. Silver is survived by his children, Lester, Roberta, and Edward, and five grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife of 64 years, Ida (nee Schenkman), in 2016. DORIS (HERVITZ) SUTZ Doris Jean (Hervitz) Sutz of New York passed away on December 30, 2018 at her home surrounded by her loving family. Doris was born on June 23, 1944 in Harrisburg, PA to the late Herman P. and Miriam (Gerson) Hervitz. She graduated from the Silver Academy, William Penn High School, and received her bachelor’s degree from American University in Washington, DC and her Masters-in-Counseling from the University of Colorado. She was a teacher and guidance counselor in the New York Public Schools for almost 30 years. Doris raised two wonderful daughters, Lisa Schwab of New York City and Debbie Sutz of Hidden Hills, CA and was the caring grandmother of Michael and Jonah Schwab

12 | community review | greater harrisburg’s jewish newspaper

and Maya Krutchik. She was a devoted mother, grandmother, and aunt who loved nothing more than filling her home with family. Her nieces and nephews looked on her as a mother. Throughout her life, Doris showed an incomparable and unconditional love for those close to her, always put others before herself, and exhibited a strong love of Israel – Ahavas Yisroel – for the people of Israel and the Nation of Israel. In addition to her children and grandchildren, Doris is survived by her sister, Janet Lilienthal and her husband, Gary Lilienthal of Wayland, MA, her brother, Joel Hervitz and his wife, Debra Hervitz of Harrisburg as well as her devoted and loving son-in-law, Solan Schwab of New York. Services were held on January 2, 2019 in New York, NY with Rabbi Elisha Friedman of Kesher Israel Synagogue of Harrisburg officiating. Burial at Mt. Moriah Cemetery, 685 Fairview Avenue, Fairview, NJ. In lieu of flowers, you may make a donation to the Silver Academy of Harrisburg, Friends of the Israel Defense Forces (FIDF) P.O. Box 4224 NY, NY 10163, or the ASPCA at www.aspca.org/.


They created their Jewish Legacy. Please join them and the many others who are remembering Jewish causes in their will, trust, life insurance policy or retirement accounts. THE JEWISH COMMUNITY FOUNDATION Of Central Pennsylvania INDUCTED

JOSH MILLMAN & DEBBY ABEL Look for Debby’s story in the next

Susquehanna Tzedakah Society May 8, 2018 Josh has embraced life as a serial volunteer, starting with leadership positions in the Boy Scouts and Young Judaea while a student in Framingham, MA. Josh’s penchant for being drafted to volunteer boards has ranged from being a condominium association president, to the president of his synagogue’s couples club (“The Chaverim Club”) in Massachusetts, to locally being president of the AIA Central Pennsylvania, President of Jewish Family Service, and Chair of the Central Pennsylvania Chapter of the US Green Building Council. He is currently Chair of the Jewish Community Foundation of Central PA and National President of the Manufacturing Council of the Interactional Facility Management Association (IFMA). Josh credits his draw to volunteer leadership to his father, George. Josh remembers how his Dad would be asked to volunteer for a board, only to quickly become very critical of the wastes of time and money. George would not allow himself to grouse on the sidelines; he couldn’t be critical about how others were performing unless he was willing to try to do it better. Once he had the vision, he stepped up to leadership. Both Josh and Debby have also sought opportunities to enjoy more hands-on volunteer work. During their graduate studies at the University of Minnesota, at Debby’s urging, they were big-brother/ big-sister to three elementary school children who were being raised by their grandmother, a Holocaust survivor. Beyond weekly visits to that family of four, Debby and Josh became involved in their school, cub scouts, brownies and the many activities for children in the Minneapolis Jewish Community. This culminated in a two week trip to Boston, NYC and Washington with the children and their grandmother. Between them, these children now have 16 children of their own, plus 2 grandchildren.

The Jewish Community Foundation of Central PA has a new phone number! You can still reach us by calling the JCC or you may call us directly at

717-409-8220. Our way of continuing to improve services to the Central Pennsylvania Jewish community.

Community Review Josh’s recent hands-on volunteering involved the ArchitectureConstruction-Engineering (ACE) Mentoring program in Dauphin County. This program introduces high school students to the different aspects of architecture, engineering and construction, from the design and management perspective as well as the construction trades. While not allowing his “real life” to get in the way of volunteering, Josh completed a master’s degree in architecture and an MBA in Finance from the University of Minnesota after earning an undergraduate degree at Penn. In 1995, at his father-in-law Frank Abel’s urging, Josh opened his own architectural office which evolved into Facilities Planners + Architects. After nearly 20 years, he moved his practice to NuTec Design Associates in York, where he is the Vice President. At the end of 2017 Josh achieve a milestone of 40 years in architecture. Aside from enjoying travelling with Debby and being with their grandchildren, Josh finds time to be an avid Chesapeake Bay sailor and a Rails-to-Trails bike rider.

The Jewish Community Foundation of Central PA offers its sincere condolences to the Millman-Abel Family on the recent passing of one of our founding leaders, Frank Abel. May his memory be for a blessing. The Jewish Community Foundation of Central Pennsylvania was founded, and is guided, by passionate Jews who recognize the need for a trusted, Jewish, charitable gift planning resource. For decades, the Foundation has been helping Jewish givers and Jewish organizations support Jewish and general life in central PA, Israel and around the world. In partnership with these Jewish organizations and donors, the Foundation is ensuring that our synagogues, agencies and rich Jewish heritage and traditions are vibrant now and secure for the future.

Call the Jewish Community Foundation to discuss what is in your heart and how you can leave a legacy to causes that are important to you! Contact Paulette Keifer at 717-409-8220 (ext 1) or email her at paulette.keifer@pajewishendowment.org

www.jewishharrisburg.org

| January 18, 2019 | 13


Synagogue Life Beth El Temple 2637 N Front St, (717) 232-0556 www.bethelhbg.org Minyan 7am daily and 5:30pm Sunday morning at 9am Friday Kabbalat Shabbat 6pm Shabbat morning service 9am Saturday night mincha/maariv/havdalah at same time as Friday evening candle-lighting time

Chisuk Emuna Congregation 3219 Green St, (717) 232-4851 info@chisukemuna.org www.chisukemuna.org Daily Morning Services: Sunday & Legal Holiday, 8:30am Monday & Thursday, 6:50am Tuesday, Wednesday, & Friday, 7am Rosh Chodesh, 6:45am Shabbat, 9:15am Daily Evening Services: Sunday thru Thursday, 7:15pm Friday & Saturday nights, sunset For more information, please contact the Chisuk Emuna office, 717-232-4851 or info@chisukemuna.org

Congregation Beth Israel, Lebanon

411 S 8th St, (717) 273-2669 www.congregation-beth-israel.org All are welcome to our egalitarian services: Sundays at 9am and Thursdays at 7:30am. Our Shabbat services begin at 7:30pm on Friday evenings and on Shabbat morning at 9:30am followed by Kiddush.

Congregation Beth Tikvah, Carlisle Asbell Center, 262 W High St, (717)-240-8627 www.bethtikvah.org

Friday Shabbat Services at 7:15pm Beth Tikvah meets twice a month. Check newsletter on website for dates and times.

Historic B’nai Jacob, Middletown Water & Nissley Streets, (717) 319-3014 www.bnai-jacob.org

Historic B’nai Jacob Synagogue, located at Water and Nissley Streets in Middletown, near the Harrisburg International Airport and Penn State-Harrisburg, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, will have Shabbos Services on Friday, February 1, 2019, at 7:30pm. Marc Bluestein will be leading the services and there will be an oneg in the social hall afterward. We are a community shul and all are welcome to join us.

Kesher Israel Congregation 2500 N 3rd St, (717) 238-0763 www.kesherisrael.org

Participate in daily Minyanim. Mornings: Sundays and Federal holidays at 8am, Monday-Friday at 6:45am.

Ohev Sholom Congregation, York 2090 Hollywood Drive 717-852-0000 www.OhevSholomYork.org

Ohev Sholom Congregation is a Conservative congregation serving York County in an inclusive, egalitarian manner. Established in 1902, the congregation is led by our student rabbi in association with our lay leadership. Worship services held in the sanctuary every Shabbat morning at 9:30am and at the homes of individual congregants on Friday evening at 7:30pm. Yarzeit Minyan are by request. Please call for details. Ohev Sholom provides adult educational opportunities in conjunction with our local Chabad Learning Center while embracing different levels of observance, stages of life, and family structures.

Temple Beth Israel

2090 Hollywood Dr, York (717) 843-2676, www.tbiyork.org York’s 140-year-old Reform congregation. Rabbi Jeffrey Astrachan leads services at 7pm each Friday, followed by an Oneg. Birthday celebration/family service first Friday of each month.

Temple Beth Shalom’s Friday evening Shabbat Services are at 7:15pm, followed by an oneg in the social hall. Services are led by Lay Leaders of Beth Shalom. Please call the office at 697-2662 or check the website calendar for Shabbat service dates, as well as updates on when Saturday Shabbat services will be held. Upcoming Shabbat services will be held at the Temple on Friday, January 25, February 8 and 22. Saturday Shabbat Services, led by Rabbi Choper, will be held at 10am at the Jewish Home on January 26, February 9, 16, and 23. All are welcome. The Sisterhood Book Group will meet on Wednesday, January 9 at 7pm at the home of Jodi Siliker, to discuss the book, “The Gravedigger” by Peter Grandbois. Please contact the Temple office at tbshalom@gmail.com if you are not active on the Book Club’s website, and would like to attend.” This group is open to all women! For details on upcoming Temple Beth Shalom services and events, check the website: http:// tbshalom.org.

Temple Ohev Sholom

Torah Study (Genesis) some Saturday mornings – call for details.

2345 N Front St, (717) 233-6459 www.ohevsholom.org

Please join Kesher Israel for 9am Shabbat morning services followed by Kiddush. Please contact Office Manager, Cecelia Baker, (717) 238-0763 for info.

krav maga at the jcc Sundays, 10:30am - 1:30pm 3 Hours of Training! $40/session (members) $55/session (regular) $60/walk-ins

Register at JCC Front Desk or call 236-9555 x 0.

NEW EXPANDED SESSIONS!

913 Allendale Rd, Mechanicsburg (717) 697-2662 www.tbshalom.org

Religious School on Sunday mornings.

Rosh Chodesh and fast days at 6:30am. Evening services begin 20 minutes before sunset.

Contact Andrea at a.weikert@jewishfedhbg.org for more info

Temple Beth Shalom

1/27, 2/10, 2/24, 3/10, 3/24, 4/7, 4/21 5/5, 5/19, 6/2, 6/16, 6/30

14 | community review | greater harrisburg’s jewish newspaper


JCC Senior Adult Programs Classes Available at the Jewish Community Center:

The JCC Senior Adult Club is Offering the Following Senior Events:

SilverSneakers® CLASSIC – Have fun and move to the music through a variety of

Every Tuesday and Thursday at 9:30am-10:15-30am - SilverSneakers Classic Every Tuesday from 1:30-3:00pm - Mah Jongg classes with Ellen Mussaf or play Farkle with Harold Williams and Mel Krieger After Lunch Program on the FIRST and THIRD THURSDAY – Spanish Class with Cecilia Lee. After Lunch Program on usually the THIRD TUESDAY – Current Events with Herman Minkoff

exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement, and activities for daily living. Hand-held weights, elastic tubing with handles, and a SilverSneakers ball are offered for resistance. A chair is available if needed for seated or standing support. Tuesday/ Thursday mornings 9:30 -10:15-30am. Drop-in Fee $7.00 per class. Free to JCC members, SilverSneakers®, and Silver and Fit participants.

SilverSneakers® BOOM (CARDIOFIT) – SilverSneakers® Boom (CardioFit) is an

advanced group exercise class designed for active adults who desire a safe and effective lowimpact cardiovascular workout. Energizing and easy-to-follow movements promote hearthealthy, total-body conditioning to increase cardiovascular and muscular endurance. In addition, a variety of strength training options are offered to provide a well-rounded workout. Mondays/Wednesdays at 10:30-11:30am. Drop-in Fee $7 per class. Free to JCC members, SilverSneakers®, and Silver and Fit participants.

SilverSneakers® YOGA – SilverSneakers® Yoga will move your whole body through a

complete series of seated and standing yoga poses. Chair support is offered to safely perform a variety of seated and standing postures designed to increase flexibility, balance, and range of movement. Restorative breathing exercises and final relaxation will promote stress reduction and mental clarity. Mondays and Wednesdays 11:45-12:30-45pm. Drop-in Fee $7 per class. Free to JCC members, SilverSneakers®, and Silver and Fit participants.

Gentle Yoga – Easy stretching poses for those with intermittent back issues or those new

to yoga. Restorative breathing exercises and stress relief are emphasized. One must be able to get down on to floor. Thursdays at 5:00-6:00pm. Drop-in Fee $7 per class. Free to JCC members, SilverSneakers®, and Silver and Fit participants.

Zumba Gold – The class introduces easy-to-follow Zumba choreography that

focuses on balance, range of motion, and coordination. Perfect for beginners or older adults. Thursdays at 11:00-11:45am. Drop-in Fee $7 per class. Free to JCC members, SilverSneakers®, and Silver and Fit participants. SilverSneakers® SPLASH– Activate your urge for variety! Splash offers fun, shallow water movement to improve agility and flexibility while addressing cardiovascular, strength, and endurance conditioning. No swimming ability is required and a SilverSneakers® kickboard or other aquatic equipment is used to improve strength, balance, and coordination. Mondays/Wednesday 9:30 -10:30am. Drop-in Fee $7 per class. Free to JCC members, SilverSneakers®, and Silver and Fit participants.

Aqua Zumba – A challenging water-based workout that’s cardio-conditioning, body toning, and most of all, exhilarating beyond belief. Tuesdays and Thursdays 8:30-9:30am. Drop in Fee $7 per class. Free to JCC members, SilverSneakers®, and Silver and Fit participants.

Senior Lunch will be served Tuesdays and Thursdays at Noon. Reservations are preferred two days in advance if possible, but no later than 4:00pm the day before. Call Cheryl 236-9555 EXT. 3115 Upcoming After Lunch Programs are: • January 22, 2019 – Rretired Army Colonel John Maietta will lecture on The Scourge of the Century: The Great Spanish Flu Epidemic of 1918.” 1:30-3:00pm Mah Jongg with Ellen Mussaf or Farkle with Harold Williams and Mel Krieger • January 24, 2019 – Pat Dodd, DCAAA Nutritionist will address the group • January 29, 2019 – Bingo with prizes for all • January 31, 2019 – Dr. Donald Koones, History professor at HACC will lecture on “A Nostalgic Return to Mayberry”. Because of Dr. Koones’ teaching schedule, his lecture will begin approximately 1pm and be finished at approximately 2 - 2:15pm • February 5, 2019 – Freelance writer Mary Klaus will talk about some of her medical missions overseas. 1:30-3pm - Mah Jongg with Ellen Mussaf or Farkle with Harold Williams and Mel Krieger • February 7, 2019 - Spanish Class with Cecilia Lee or “Man & Woman of the Hour: Lucille Ball & Danny Thomas” – a Dean Martin TV “Roast” Special.

• February 12, 2019 – Business Meeting/Birthday Party.

1:30-3pm - Mah Jongg with Ellen Mussaf or Farkle with Harold Williams and Mel Krieger

• February 14, 2019 – TBA

• February 19, 2019 - Current Events with Herman Minkoff.

1:30-3pm Mah Jongg with Ellen Mussaf or Farkle with Harold Williams and Mel Krieger. • February 21, 2019 – Spanish Class with Cecilia Lee or expand your vocabulary with Group Crossword Puzzles • February 26, 2019 – “Unlocking a Few Secrets of your Devices” with Senior Tech Tutor, Barry Gordon. If you are struggling with the latest technology, this presentation is for you. 1:30-3pm - Mah Jongg with Ellen Mussaf or Farkle with Harold Williams and Mel Krieger • February 28, 2019 – HACC professor Dr. Donald Koones’ lecture will be on “The Pets of the Presidents”. Because of Dr. Koones’ teaching schedule his lecture will begin approximately 1pm and be finished at approximately 2 - 2:15pm.

www.jewishharrisburg.org

| January 18, 2019 | 15


Enjoy Dinner!

An Open House for all prospective Ganeinu (Pre-K), Kindergarten and 1st Grade students and their families Explore the school

Wednesday, January 30th from 5:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. The Silver Academy 3301 North Front Street Harrisburg, PA 17110

Meet the teachers

Experience your upcoming grade

Connect with other families RSVP by Monday, January 28th to Jackie Rubin, Director of Admissions, at jrubin@silveracademypa.org or 717-238-8775.

Check out our website at www.silveracademypa.org for more information or â&#x20AC;&#x153;likeâ&#x20AC;? us on Facebook!

Profile for Beth

Community Review - 1.18.19  

Community Review - 1.18.19  

Profile for b.romano
Advertisement