Issuu on Google+

BRIAN H

PORT FOLIO


BRIAN HARDY 436 E. Magnolia Blvd #210, Burbank, CA 91501 // Phone: (951) 294-8794 // Email: b.e.hardy8@gmail.com

OBJECTIVE Collaborate with forward thinking practitioners to gain project experience in a professional design process while focusing on the integration of hands on practices into comprehensive projects in a creative work environment.

EXPERIENCE

EDUCATION

Jennifer Trapnell Architects, PC – Culver City, CA Entry Level Designer September 2013 - Present  Integrated new technology into design practices  Assisted in the preparation and production of construction documents for multiple residential projects  Contributed to schematic design and design development phases of multiple projects

Woodbury University – Burbank, CA School of Architecture August 2008 – May 2013  Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) – May 2013  Fulfilled requisite studies equal to a Photography minor

Woodbury University – Burbank, CA School of Media Culture and Design, Photography Studio Lead Photographic Technician February 2010 – May 2013  Collaborated in the administration of studio operations  Educated technicians on lighting equipment and techniques  Assisted students with various photographic projects Unseen: A Photographic Exhibition – WUHO, Hollywood, CA Concept and design by Niku Kashef and Zone V Exhibition Organizing Committee Co-Chair December 2012 – January 2013  Administrator of gallery preparation and collection of artworks  In charge of installation and hanging of artworks Plan C – Little Tokyo Design Week – Los Angeles, CA Concept and design by Tim Durfee and Sean Donahue Media Design Practices (MDP), Art Center College of Design Project Intern/Design Assistant June 2011 – July 2011  Presentation proposal drawings  On-site installation/construction of exhibit  Model Maker, design mock-up construction Active Sports Lifestyle – Burbank/Lake Elsinore/Temecula, CA Key Holder, Cashier, Sales Associate November 2005 – January 2012  Responsible for daily operation of the store  Managed store during absence of General Manager

PROFICIENT IN Software: AutoDesk: AutoCad 2013, Revit 2013 , 3D Studio Max; Rhinoceros 5.0, V-Ray Render, Maxwell Render; Adobe Master Suite 6: Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop, Premiere Pro; Google SketchUp 8; Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, Powerpoint; Hands-On Practices: Sketching, Drafting, Model Making, Woodshop, Hand Transfer techniques; Digital Fabrication: CNC Milling, Laser Cutting, 3D Printing; Photography: Nikon + Canon Digital, Studio Lighting Equipment

Rome Center for Architecture and Culture (RCAC) – Rome, Italy Woodbury University Semester Abroad Program January 2012 – May 2012  4 month full immersion stay focused on Rome’s layered history  Urban excursions and discussions focusing on architecture as a response to cultural context, history and theory London College of Communication – London, United Kingdom Woodbury University Summer Abroad Program June 2010 – August 2010  4 week stay focused on a visual/cultural experience of London  Focused explorations in photography, letterpress, cut and paste, journaling, and bookmaking techniques California State University, Sacramento – Sacramento, CA College of Engineering and Computer Sciences August 2006 – May 2008  Focus: Mechanical Engineering  Completed two years before transferring

ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS Zone V Photographic Organization – Burbank, CA Woodbury University Photography Club May 2010 – Present  President 2012-2013, Vice President 2011-2012  Exhibition Administration: Organizing, delegating and executing the preparation of spaces and hanging of artwork American Institute of Architecture Students – Burbank, CA Woodbury University Student Chapter August 2010 – Present



Active member of AIAS

RECOGNITIONS AND EXHIBITIONS Unseen: A Photographic Exhibition, WUHO Gallery, January 2013 Dean’s List, Woodbury University, Fall 2012 2D3D II, WUHO Gallery, Spring 2011 Fresh Produce II, Woodbury University, Spring 2011 London 2010: A visual experience, Woodbury Univ., Summer 2010 References Available Upon Request


SFAC_CERAMIC ART CENTRE

The vessel for the creation of ceramic art at the Santa Fe Art Colony Location: Vernon, Los Angeles County, CA Geographic Coordinates:+34° 0’ 57.25”, -118° 13’ 53.20” Class: Design Studio 4A Term: Fall 2012 Instructor: Mark Stankard Ceramic art pieces are balanced art forms that illustrate the suspension of mass. This project achieves this effect by utilizing a central void as a vessel for structure, ventilation, and light. A series of programmatic spaces resting on top of one another twist towards their optimum solar orientation, while being penetrated by the crystallized void.

N

20

Conceptual transverse sketches of the crystalized void

60

The project is situated in an industrial zone that was re-appropriated in the late 1980’s to become the Santa Fe Art Colony. The site is a 100’ by 40’ rectangle adjacent to a larger building full of artist’s studios. Specifi c elements of the program twist toards Downtown Los Angeles area framing views of the larger urban context.

10

30

Western Elevation

Southern Elevation


1

1

Level 6 - Ceramic Studio / Rooftop Garden

2

Level 5 - Artist Residence

2

3

3

Level 4 - Art Gallery

4

4

Level 3 - Community Centre OďŹƒce

5

6 5

Level 2 - Community Centre

10

6

Level 1 - Project Entrance

Cross-Section through the Vessel

30


4

5

3 2 3

4

3 2 2 2 1 1

1 5

5

5

5

1

Exploded Axonometric Vertical Circulation Ease of Access/Upward Mobility

Structrual Concrete Vessel Air Exhaust/Light Well/Circulation/Structure

Structrual Concrete Towers Emergency Circulation/Elevator/Structure

Concrete Floorplates Horizontal Circulation/Programmatic Space

Operable Glazing Natural Light/Ventilation/Porosity

Recycled Formwork Fenestration Re-used Plywood Formwork Skin System

Interior Partitions Programattic Serperation/Visual Framework

Structural Sheer Walls Building Stabilization/Building Envelope

Community OďŹƒce Floor Plan 1. Outdoor Mezzanine 2. Community Conference Room 3. Community Center OďŹƒce 4. Restroom

15

Ground Floor Plan 1. Entry Hall 2. Vessel Entrance 3. Multi-purpose Auditorium

15

15

15

Basement Floor Plan 1. Storage 2. Mechanical Equipment

Community Centre Floor Plan 1. Community Kitchen 2. Restroom 3. Community Library 4. Community Ceramic Studio 5. Outdoor Mezzanine


6

4

5

2 3

2 4 2

3

1

5

6

3

4 1

2 5

5

5

5

1

2 1

The elevator and emergency stair cores of the project take advatage of the unused concrete wall by acting as a blank canvas for local graffiti artists to come and legally perform street art.

Studio Floor Plan 1. Kilns(1 gas, 1 electric) 2. Hand Building Space 3. Greenware/Bisqueware Storage 4. Wedging/Preperation Space 5. Glazing Area 6. Throwing Area

15

Western looking view of project:

Residence Floor Plan 1. Bedroom 2. Restroom/Laundry Room 3. Kitchen/Dining Room 4. Outdoor Patio Space 5. Living Room 6. Study/Office

15

Model Images: (From bottom left) 1. Conceptual model illustrating the twisting of volumes to frame views. 2. Sectional Sketch Model exploring the relationship between the void and floorplates. 3. View of 3D-Printed Model 4. View of 3D-Printed Model

15

15

Gallery Floor Plan 1. Individual Show Gallery Space 2. Restroom 3. Outdoor Mezzanine 4. Group Show Gallery Space

Roof Garden Floor Plan 1. Rooftop Mezzanine 2. Rooftop Garden


Hot/Cold H2O

Grey/Waste H2O

Glazing/HVAC

Cold H2O

Waste H2O

Glazing

Hot H2O

Grey H2O

HVAC

10

30

Natural Ventilation Diagram

Structural Cores

Load-Bearing Structure


Summer Solar Study Date: June 21, 2012 Time: 8:00 am - 4:00 pm

12:00 pm 10:00 am

2:00 pm

8:00 am

4:00 pm

N

Winter Solar Study Date: December 21, 2012 Time: 8:00 am - 4:00 pm

12:00 pm

2:00 pm 4:00 pm

N

10:00 am 8:00 am

Thick Drawing Construct: (Clockwise from top right) 1. Thick Drawing Construct, Dim: 9” x 12” 3” 2. Operable window detail image 3. Natural Ventilation window detail image Materials Used: Basswood, Piano Wire, Acrylic Methods Used: Hand cutting, Laser Cutter, Woodshop

Poured in Place Concrete Slab

3/4” Rebar

Rooftop Garden taking advantage of maximum Solar Exposure

‡ƒ–Š‡””‘‘Ƥ‰–”‹’ ‹†‘™ ”ƒ‡Ȁ Žƒ•Š‹‰

2’ Concrete Floor with 1” Rebar

‹”‡ƪ‡…–‘”•

Emergency Fire Extinguisher System Dispersion/Reflection Lighting System

Window Mullion

1” Window Mullion

Window Pane

Passive Ventilation Window Detail

Operable Window System allowing for Natural Ventilation

Poured in Place Concrete Slab Bottom Plate with 1” x 9” Anchor Bolt

3/4” Rebar HVAC System with 1.5’ x 3’ Ducts Drop Ceiling System Recessed Can Lightining System Top Plate/Flashing Combination that incorporates Natural Ventilation

Top Soil for Roof Garden ‡ƒ–Š‡””‘‘Ƥ‰–”‹’

‡ƒ–Š‡””‘‘Ƥ‰–”‹’

5

Detail Section

Bottom Plate with 1” x 9” Anchor Bolt and weatherproofing strip

‹†‘™ ”ƒ‡Ȁ Žƒ•Š‹‰

4’ x 3’ Concrete Footing with 1.5” Rebar

Window Mullion

Roof Garden/Operable Window Detail

Window Pane


CULTIVATING REHABILITATION

Midigating the Homeless Condition Through an Urban Micro-Farm Location: Downtown Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA Geographic Coordinates: +34° 4’ 24.47”, -118° 24’ 67.07” Class: Design Studio 3B Term: Spring 2011 Instructor: Gerard Smulevich Partners: Jorge Jocol, Alexis Urtiz Cultivating Rehabilitation is a homeless assistance facility located in the heart of Skid Row in Downtown Los Angeles, California. The chronically homeless population in Los Angeles , which are the people that continually remain homeless, are the target population for rehabilitation at the Cultivating Rehabilitation Homeless Assistance Center. The center will bring a unique approach in homeless assistance to the already existing network of shelters and missions in the Skid Row area of squalor in Downtown Los Angeles. The main programmatic aim of the project for homeless rehabilitation is assisted by the Urban Micro Farm (U.M.F) creating the link between improving one’s environment through full immersion into the agricultural assistance programs and the reintegration into society by successfully completing the offered substance abuse and mental health rehabilitation programs . The Micro Farm is a Hydroponic system that scales the entirety of the southern facade along the circulation grill creating shade for the programmatic spaces and allowing the inhabitants to tend to the farm throughout the day. The farming provides a system of interaction between the three populations by having the residents in the year long program take part in a mentor program to help the thirty day residents gain a more comprehensive understanding of the farming process. The thirty day residents in turn mentor the overnight residents to continue the education of farming cycle at the center. In order to accommodate the existing site necessities of near by business for parking, shipping/receiving products and access road the structure is lifted above the ground plane to allow for movement below the building. Causes of Homelessness in Skid Row

Conceptual Approach

12,000 homeless individuals in the entire district Mental Illness

Drug Abuse

Misc. Causes

+

Community Farming 24%

41%

Communal Rehabilitation

=

C.U.R.E.

35%

Cultivating Rehabilitaion would become a part of the existing network of homeless assistance facilities in Downtown Los Angeles. Its focus would be providing meals, lodging, educational programs, assistance with job placement, and crop growth for the Skid Row Area. Of the 40,000 homeless individuals in downtown Los Angeles, 12,000 (30% of the population) reside in the Skid Row area. The Midnight Mission, one of the oldest shelters in the area, located adjacent to Cultivating Rehabilitation and provides the majority of the meals served to the homeless on a daily basis.

Physical relationship of the site (in green) to the nearby major homeless shelters and missions.


The open ground plane below the project becomes a shipping and receiving area for both the project and the commercial and idustrial businesses below.

6t

hS

tre

San

Jul ian

St.

W

all

St .

et

50

Site Plan and existing traffic flow

20

100

The STEEL STRUCTURE SUSPENDS the building over the pre-existing industrial area

Water Tank

Farming

7-12 Month residence

UMF

01

ƥ…‡’ƒ…‡ –‘”ƒ‰‡‹–•

UMF

05

1-6 Month residence 163’-0”

‘’—–‡”‘‘

UMF

09

Classrooms

’‡ ”‘—’Š‡”ƒ’›’ƒ…‡

30-Day Housing

UMF

13

Classrooms

UMF

17

Classrooms

Overnight Housing Lounge hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

Overnight Cafeteria 43’-0”

Private Plaza

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

hrvyd3sprt2@yahoo.com

Public Plaza 23’-0” Delivery Zone

Program Cafeteria UMF

19

UMF

20 5

15

30

60


Distribution of Inhabitants

Facilities

Residents in Program 500 People

Overnight Residents 250 People

Education Rehabilitation Administration Offices Overnight Sleeping Pavilion

Housing

Overnight Housing 30 Day Residence 1-6 mo. Residence 7-12 mo. Residence

Program Cafeteria, Public Plaza, Administrative OďŹƒces

Farming

Circulation Hydroponics

The STEEL STRUCTURE SHIFTS to accomodate the necessity of southern exposure for the hydroponic farm Farm Morphology Standard ground plane farm next to mid-rise structure.

G FARMIN

Overnight Cafeteria, Private Plaza, Lounge Space

Lifting of farm onto building façade. Vertical Farming.

UMF

01

UMF

02 UMF

03

Rotation of hydroponic farm towers for optimum solar orinenation.

UMF

04

1-6 month Residences, Classrooms, Storage

W

E S

N

15

30

60


The outdoor pavilion on the San Julian side of the project turns into an additional sleeping area for the homeless individuals of skid row.

The act of farming in an urban environment becomes the main focal point of the rehabilitation process at the assistance center.

HOT WATER

COLD WATER

Detail model of circulation paths, investigating the implementation of garden spaces.

Bathroom (12)

Kitchen (2)

Water tanks, located on the top of the building, utilize direct sunlight to heat stored water that is later dispersed throughout the building. Farming

Storage

The circulation through the project acts as support and workspace for the micro-farm.

Detail model of multi-level garden spaces, investigating the opportunity for hydroponic farming Housing

Shopping carts are repurposed to enable the homeless to move farming materials throughout the building.

UMF

03

UMF

06 0 6

Southern Facade

Hydroponics


The building has three major structural steel components. The two vetical trusses that span the height of each tower, the truss cage that stabilizes the towers, and the system of I-beams that support each floorplate.

The wall of Hydroponics connects to the primary strucuture at each vertical shift of the circualtion path.

The STEEL STRUCTURE SUPPORTS the homeless assistance center by cantilevering each floor in tension from the central cores

2’ x 2’ Steel Thin Wall Tubing

2’ x 1’ Steel I-Beam Intersecting structural approaches create space for group therapy sessions, social gatherings and agricultural education lessons.

4” Tapered Steel Pipe


The hydroponic wall consists of a series of vertically stacked PVC tubes, which support the network of crops 1. 3” Threaded steel rod 2. 3” Threaded coupling 3. 6” Diam. steel plated PVC pipe 4. 1” Drip Line for distribution of nutrients to crops

Detail photograph of the circulation paths and structure system that becomes the shear support for the building. 3

Program process model exploring the relationship of overnight and long term residents. 4 Form process model illustrating the opportunity for placement of garden spaces on top of housing areas.

2

Structure process model investigating vertical growth and cirulation paths on exterior of project.

1 1

Intermediate design process model exploring the steel structure necessary to support a 300’ tall building.

3

3” Steel Threaded Coupling

Each level of the tower stucture is in a state of compression and tension by supporting the floorplate above and below. 1 1/2” Diam. Steel Bolts

4” x 4” Welded Gusset Plate at 1/4” thick The corten steel exterior facade is supported by a mullion system that attaches to the load bearing structural members. 3” Steel Deck

6” Diam. Thin Wall Tubing Multiple structural systems layer together to form a refuge of steel stucture for the homeless individuals of Skid Row.

View of Cultivating Rehabilitation from San Julian St.


Richman Residence Location: Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA Geographic Coordinates:+34° 12’ 24.53”, -118° 20’ 70.22” Class: Profession Practice I Term: Fall 2009 Instructor: Giulio Zavolta Partners: Chris Genest, Matt Hughes, Chuck Romero, Kevin Wild The Richman Residence was a project in which as a team of students we went through the design processes of research, design development, schematic design. For our final project of the semester we produced an abriged set of construction documents as a semester project. The documents prodeced ranged from site analysis, grading plan, a variety of floorplans (standard floor plans, finish plans, framing plans), sections, elevations and a series of construction details (stairs, windows, wall sections, foundation details. Site Plan

5

15

N

1

Project Longitudinal Section

1

5

15


Mezzanine Floor and First Floor Plans

Mezzanine Floor and First Floor Finish Plans

Mezzanine Floor and First Floor Framing Plans

5

15

N

1


Exterior Fascia Detail 1/8” GLVNZD STEEL ROOF FLASHING

1/8” 2-LYR ASHPALT ROOF, DRK. GRY. FNSH

2 X 16 EXT. FASCIA PTD. LIGHT GREY

3/4” PLYWOOD

ROOF INSULATION 5” CAN LIGHT, 2” LIGHT GRY POWDER COAT BZT 1/2” PLYWOOD 3/4” PLYWOOD 4” WOOD PNLG BTWN EXP. RF BEAMS, LT TEAK WOOD 4” EXT WD. PANEL, PTD LIGHT GREY 2 X 12 EXPOSED ROOF BEAM 2 X 12 INTERIOR WOOD PLATE 6”

5/8” GYPSUM WALL BOARD

2’

Interior Wall Foundation Detail PLYWOOD SHEETING PER PLAN

1’-0”

2 X 12 FLOOR JOISTS

4”

6 5/16”

4 X 6 WOOD GIRDER

(N) SIMPSON PC44

2’-11”

(N) 4 X 4 WOOD POST

5 11/16”

(N) SIMPSON PB44

(N) CONC. PIER

1’-2”

FINISH GRADE

6”

2’

1’-6”


Wall Section 2-LAYER 1/8” ASPHALT ROOFING MATERIAL 4” INT WOOD PNLG 1’-0”

3/4” PLYWOOD

2 X 12 EXPOSED ROOFING BEAM

1/8” SHEET METAL ROOF FLASHING 4”

1’-2” 2 X 12 INTERIOR WALL PLATE

3/4” PLYWOOD

4 X 24 EXTERIOR FASCIA

2 X 12 DOUBLE TOP PLATE

4” EXTERIOR WOOD PANELING

5/8” GYPSUM WALL BOARD

3/4” PLYWOOD 4” WOOD FLOORING 24 X 24 STONE AND STEEL PANELING SYSTEM 2”

3/4” PLYWOOD

2 X 12 SILL PLATE

2 X 12 FLOOR JOISTS

3’-5”

11”

12” FOOTING WITH 36” BASE

1’-0”

1/2” BOLT AND WASHER WITH 4” SQUARE RETENTION PLATE

EXISTING GRADE

1’

5’

3’-0”


PORT CONTACT INFORMATION Address: 436 E Magnolia Blvd #210 Burbank, CA 91501 Email: b.e.hardy8@gmail.com Phone: 951-294-8794


Work Samples Spring 2014