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ICE CUBE

INTEGRATED COLLEGE EXPERIENCE COLLECTIVELY UNIFYING THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

DRH DESIGNS

DAISEY│ROTENBERGER│HENNIG


Special thanks to Edgar Stach and Matthew Naugle for supplying their expertise in the development of this project.


// Table of Contents:

Site Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Program Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Precedents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Design Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Final . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

ICE CUBE is the newest addition to Philadelphia University’s College of Architecture and the Built Environment’s educational facilities. The new addition to the college houses all the studios of every year and major in the undergraduate program. Through simplification of studio design, a single generic studio is able to serve the architecture, interior design, and landscape architecture students. This generic studio module allows for all years and majors to combine into one area. This allows interaction and collaboration between students with different areas of concentration. The communication that is supplied on the student level is also applied to the campus level. ICE CUBE completes a secondary quad that the campus center and the newly completed DEC building have started. This creation of a secondary quad better utilizes the main campus of Philadelphia University and creates a higher level of interaction between the entire campus.


//Site Analysis:

“Architects must confront the perennial issues of light, heat, and humidity control yet take responsibility for the method and the materials by which, and out of which, a building is made. The considerations, context, and the landscape are some of the factors that are constantly at work in my architecture.� -Glenn Murcutt


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Our launching point for the project started with analyzing the entire Philadelphia University campus and completely in depth studies of various topics that could potentially determine different aspects of ICE CUBE, including the site location.


9 SITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PRECEDENTS DESIGN PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES

Public transportation is easily excessable with our main road through the campus being Henry Ave. This map shows the way that students can take advantage of traveling into the city for items such as design supplies or just simply to explore Center City.

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10 We also took a look at the surrounding area, showing the differences in the demographics of Phiadelphia University versus the demographics of surrounding neighborhood areas, such as Germantown.


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The majority of the school consists of female students and the male to female ratio is 2:1.

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12 Our campus has a ton of history and the buildings are visibly different expressing the time periods in which they exist. By showing the buildings from earliest to latest, we could find where a more contemporary building would compliment the campus.


13 SITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PRECEDENTS DESIGN PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES

Building heights were recorded in order to gain perspective of the size and zoning of the different areas on campus and how the codes would affect the scale of our project.

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All of the buildings on campus have WiFi, but some areas have stronger signals than others. We concluded that in the denser areas of campus, the signals being emitted travel outside the structure making parts of the exterior have WiFi as well.


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We tested Verizon wireless and realized that the signal strength fairly consistent throughout both sides of the campus, but it did start to fade out towards the edges of our perimeter.

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Noting the suns position throughout the day was equally important in choosing our site. We examined the trees’ shadows and density across the ground and observed what regions had shade or ample amounts of light. The times that were documented were 10AM, Noon, and 4PM.


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Campus conditions led us to look at exactly where the drainage was located on campus. We combined the drainage along with the drainage grate map in order to inform us about the flow path of the water that collects.

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Emergency poles (noted as red stars) are located all over campus, especially along the paths. Security guards that are in place 24/7 are located in the solid red buildings. The hightlighted white areas are spots that people tend to stand and gather while traveling from one end of campus to the other.


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At night, the security was enhanced by the well lit paths. These lights are positioned to minimize the amount of secluded, dark areas to prevent dangerour situations.

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The next step was to measure different variables of the site. This is a study of the sound being produced at different major locations throughout PhilaU. The class shared a decibel meter to measure the amount of sound occuring throughout different points of the day, throughout an entire week.


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The wind was also measured throughout the week at the same times. We noted that the areas with less trees and buildings around them had a higher velocity of wind.

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A lightmeter was used to find the brightest and darkest parts of our campus. This was tested at three separate times on a sunny day and three separate times on a cloudy day so we could make a comparison with both.


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After generally analyzing our campus, we began to take the program and functions of the building into consideration. By taking note of all the free spaces that were not already occupied, we could narrow down candidates as a site location for the new building.


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Mapping out both, pedestrian and vehicular roads and paths on campus, gave us valuable information about how people circulate and move throughout the campus and how much traffic will accumulate from both factors.


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Since the project was focused on the College of Architecture and the Built Environment, we mapped out the current position of the college, noting that it was spread out and that our goal would be to condense everything to a general area through our design.


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Design students constantly need access to modelmaking materials and assorted supplies for our classes. We wanted to record the distances that are traveled in order to get to the school store and that, in turn, informed us on what an acceptable distance would be.


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We began to think about how students interact with the campus and it seemed as if most students gathered in the quad spaces. After noting all of these, we began searching for potential spots that new quads could be formed.

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The main campus was where a majority of the educational buildings were positioned. Therefore, we continued to move towards focusing in on that area to make an addition for the school.


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Once all of our full site analysis was conpleted, we took the opportunity to isolate main campus. This was a zoomed in analysis that allowed us to look at some details we had not before. This diagram shows the varying levels of pervious surfaces on main campus.

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30 At various times during the day, there are paths that receive larger amounts of foot traffic verses others so, we created a map that displays what the main routes are and which paths become secondary routes or under utilized.


31 SITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PRECEDENTS DESIGN PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES

Main Campus also had a sense of enclosure that we hadn’t felt when analysing the entire campus, but we did find one area that seemed to be an opening in this “enclosure” that had been formed by the acedemic building structures over time.

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32 Our final site choice was formed from all of the observations that were made throughout this analysis process. The choice was self explanatory, the current townhouse site.


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34 The townhouse site would allow us to form a new quad for the campus. We could make this quad stand out because its enclosure would be formed by the two most recent additions to the university’s campus: Kanbar Student Center and the DEC Building.


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//Program Development:

“Form follows function - that has been misunderstood. Form and function should be one, joined in a spiritual union.� -Frank Lloyd Wright


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38 Background Information The College of Architecture and the Built Environment at Philadelphia University is currently spread out across the campus. Within the college the first and second years of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, or Interior Design are all in separate studios scattered on the Ravenhill Campus. The studios on this part of campus are also considered “hot desks”, which does not allow any student to keep a single desk for the whole semester which causes problems when transporting projects and materials come into play. The largest concern with the college being separated between years is that the younger students have a disadvantage in being able to see upperclassman projects which could improve the current underclassman’s own designs.

Main Concept The main goal of creating a new building for the C_ABE part of Philadelphia University is that we could locate everyone in that college on main campus. Not only would this be easier for students to reach their professors and advisors easier, it would allow for greater interaction between students. This interaction would help improve the current standards of C_ABE and would give the students a more complete and collaborative education.

Collaboration-Nexus Learning One of Philadelphia University’s main mission statement in their education focuses on Nexus Learning. Nexus Learning allows students within the same college to work and collaborate with students in similar majors. This gives a “real-world” experience to each student before they enter the professional world. C_ABE is currently updating their curriculum to fit more Nexus learning experiences into each year. By creating a building where each major is mixed by not only year, but majors themselves, it allows the students to learn from each other and gain critiques outside of class.


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The C_ABE program is currently improving to draw more students to Philadelphia University and make our programs well known in the professional world. To make sure that the university can grow comfortably, we are going to account for a larger amount of students than the college currently holds. By creating an atmosphere that will allow for growth in the C_ABE community is important to the university’s standards as well as the students’ needs.

Analysis Conclusions Our main goals after looking into what the college needs in the university community allowed us to focus on making our site a central point on the main campus. We went through multiple iterations of programming and square footage charts to really narrow down the most important pieces of the C_ABE program. By creating a central point where students, professors, and professionals can interact all within one building was one of the most important focuses on choosing the correct sizes and program pieces. We also hope that by creating a quad with the College of Design, Engineering, and Commerce, we can take the concept of collaboration to an even higher level.

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C_ABE in Future Years…

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We diagrammed the open hours that the current building programs already have on campus. To the right shows the break down of each time cluster and how the buildings relate.


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This shows the potential hours that we think the future C_ABE building would be open. It also shows the breakdown of the program inside and when the students would have acess to it.


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The break down of our program and how it is all interconnected shows a hierarchy to which spaces are most important to the building.


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When looking into how the program would connect, we also started to size the programs. We took calculations depicting the square footage and the volumetric qualities of the spaces such as the ceiling heights.


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After looking at each piece of program, we decided to keep the full-time faculty offices in A&D. We also decided that the rest of the space would be turned into a gallery. This would be mostly used by the College of Architecture and the Built Environment, but could be utilized by all of Philadelphia University for events such as the Senior Show that happens each year.


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“Hot Desks”

Second Year Architecture

Landscape Studios

Fourth Year Interior

Fifth Year Architecture

Third Year Interior


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Through a randomization diagram, we are showing that each year and each separate major are able to be mixed with each other and every semester different students will be interacting with all levels and skill sets.

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Combined Layout

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48 As we began to look at the program, we decided that the studio spaces were the most important to this design. In order to accomplish this we tested the width of each to studio to minimize the square footage, but still keep a comfortable work space for each student. The fifteen foot wide studio was to make sure that the path of circulation between the desks would be comfortable to walk and also ADA accessible.

Students are constantly creating large-sized models of sites and projects. to accomadate the instances where models would have to be taken out of the studio or carried through it we again made sure two students could still be at their desks working while this process occured.

The last test to the stusio dimensions was to make sure that general student activity can occur in the studio without discomfort. This diagram illustrates a desk crit between a professor and student while directly behind them there is a sleep deprived student that is taking a power nap.


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Our final decision to keep the studios at fifteen feet wide and a length of about 50 feet was to test the multiple drafting desk layouts. Each studio has a setup for the potential amount of students that may be in the class during varying semesters. This shows about seven different layouts to allow the spaces to be more flexible for the College of Architecture and the Built Environment.

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Number

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Total Square Footage

Subterranean Level Parking Garage Classroom Digital Classroom Model Shop Digital Fabrication Center Digital Pin up Room Print Center Mechanical Rooms Restrooms Digital Studio Total Square Footage Circulation

1 2 1 1 3 1 6 1 1

12102 1171 1171 2222 486 2316 504 3837 1076 3639 37682 9158

Ground Floor Lecture Hall Student Lounge Pin Up Rooms Conference Room Rest rooms Offices Office Lounge Lobby Total Square Footage Circulation

1 1 4 1 1 6 1 1

2730 768 1900 605 610 1770 268 1370 19007 8986

20 11 1

15268 792 512 21614 5042

20 4

17851 320 21520 3349

Studio 1 Floor Studios Informal Pin Up Spaces/Flex Work Space Material Library Total Square Footage Circulation Studio 2 Floor Studios Informal Pin Up Spaces/Flex Work Space Total Square Footage Circulation Total Project Square Footage Parking Total Project Circulation

99823 12102 26535

Total Program Square Footage

61186

This is the finalization of the program we felt would be the best fit for C_ABE. This shows each individual piece, the location, and the final square footage for the whole building.


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This diagram demonstrates the placement of each piece of our program in the final design.

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//Precedents:

Man, there’s another freedom out there, and it comes from somewhere else, and that somewhere else is the place I’m interested in.� -Frank Gehry


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54 Apple Store, Upper West Side New York Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

The design of the Apple Store on Upper West Side by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson architecture, planning, interior design utilizes three large poured in place concrete walls that combine with a glass enclosure to create the ground floor space. Since the ground floor is mainly glass the second floor is located underground instead of above the ground. This allows for less energy costs when regulating the store overall temperature. The curtain wall system is supported with glass mullions that rise vertically the entire span of the glass. The combination of thick vertical mullions and consistent steel fasteners allows for the absence of horizontal mullion support. The stair case that links the ground and subterranean floors is a comprised of frosted glass and steel connections. The glass treads are approximately 2 inches thick. The steel connectors consist of two clips attached to each side of the tread and tie into a steel railing that follows the stairs from floor to floor.


The glass that encloses the space between the mechanical/structural walls is modular in design. Each piece is custom made to fit together, and is support by a steel structure that transfers the loads into the solid structural walls to either side or rear of the project. The mechanical systems are located in the structural walls. There is an elevator the supplies ADA access to the subterranean level of the Apple store, as well as the HVAC units which regulate the temperature throughout the building. The structural walls are poured in place concrete walls and are approximately 3 feet thick but are hollowed out for the mechanical mention previously.

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The steel structure that holds the glass enclosure also acts as an electrical run for the lighting of the interior. Though an abundance of natural light is supplied during the day there is need to illuminate the store during the night. The lighting on the steel structure is repetitive track light fixture that clips to the underside of the steel. The wiring for the lighting then runs on the reverse side of the steel’s profile so that it is hidden from view.

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56 The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City Steven Holl Architects

The nelson-Atkins Museum of Art utilizes channel glass as the exterior skin of the project. Each panel of channel glass spans the entire length floor to floor height with a maximum span of 24 feet. The museum utilizes these floor to floor planks to emphasize the floor levels with a simple cut in the facade that caps the planks of glass. Besides the caps of the glass the facades produce one monolithic object that sets on the landscape. To increase the U-value of channel glass it is easily assemble in double pane system. In the double pane system, a larger than ordinary air cavity is formed due to the shape of the planks. This cavity can then hold aerogel insulation that dramatically reduces heat transfer as well as dampens the sound of the surrounding context. With the application of the frosted channel glass, the atificial lighting is dispersed by the material properties of the glass and creates multiple sculptures that are set on and embedded into the landscape that surrounds the entire museum complex. The color of the landscape contrasts the white glow of the museum to further leave a more powerful impact on the surroundings.


There are select places, mainly on the first floor entrances, where the channel glass is substituted for regular transparent glass. This allows for some direct light into the building where there are no displays, and creates a break in the consistent interior and facade.

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The same way the channel glass diffuses the artificial light, the natural light is affected. Despite glazing occurring on all four facades of museum the harsh south light does not affect the interior displays because of the channel glass’ capabilities. The consistent flow of diffuse light throughout the museum is then amplified with white interiors that reflect light to reduce the need of artificial lightning during the day.

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58 Novartis Office Building, Switzerland Sanaa Architects

The Novartis Office Building by Sanaa questions the standard square footages that humans are used to adapting. The design takes the office building and minimizes the square footage by apply only one unit to the office and a standard circulation path and wraps the site boundaries to form a rectangle with an open courtyard in the center. The materials are minimalistic with glazing on both sides of the each office unit to create a transparent effect. The transparency passes through the building and goes into the surrounding landscape. The courtyard that is formed in the center is then bridged at select points of the office building to bridge the gap between sides of the complex. These bridges create dynamic spaces in the courtyard. The courtyard itself retains the simplicity of the building by utilizing gravel and pavers. There is select vegetation throughout the yard to appeal to the employees that occupy the office building. The structure is kept a simple as the rest of the building. There is only a single span from one side of the offices to the other. This holds true everywhere except where the bridges connect the two sides of the rectangle.


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Shelby Farms Park, Memphis Tennessee

Designed by James Corner Field Landscape Architects, Shelby Farms Park is a 4,500 acres of land. Throughout the park there are different areas that become destinations and the surrounding areas become circulation paths that accent the gathering space. In one area the landscape terraces down to a walking track and pond that become a gathering space for the surrounding community. In other regions, the planting is more sporadic and reflects the wilderness. This combination of groomed and wild landscape supplies different areas for people to experience.

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James Corner Field Operations

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//Design Process:

“As a architect you design for the present, with an awareness of the past, for a future which is essentially unknown.� -Norman Foster


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Through a series of explorations, we began testing different forms to fit on the townhouse site. We wanted to keep a linear form to accommodate the idea of our narrow studios. Most of these models were also testing the positioning of the C_ABE building on our site. We decided to choose the terracing model along with the straight studios. After selecting those two, we went through a series of iterations to combine the two main forms and straight linear bars above a terracing landscape.


63 RAM DEVELOPMENT PRECEDENTS DESIGN PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES SITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM PRECED FINAL


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Site Model 1/32”=1’-0”


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The ground floor terraces along with the landscape. It is formed out of completely clear glass giving the appearance that it is part of the landscape. As people go through the main circulation of the ground floor they can see almost straight through all of the shared spaces, such as the pin up spaces, offices, and conference rooms.

The subterranean level has many of the same qualities of the other pieces of the building. Skylights penetrate the ground to allow natural day lighting into the lower level. There are also sunken gardens that give a natural feel, again taking away the usual dark space that an underground level would have.

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The Mid Crit model shows how each floor works together to create the new C_ABE building. The studio floors sit above the terracing to give the appearance of light, white bars in a row. This also creates a monolithic look to our design, giving the building a cohesive appearance on the exterior.

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Mid Crit: Site from above


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Mid Crit: Perspective from Kanbar

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Mid Crit: Interior Perspective


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Mid Crit: Interior Perspective

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We delineated our magnetic glass pattern for pin-up room by looking at the ergonomics of a typical student. We guided the sight lines from different positions to create the dimensions for the glass. This is an example of someone being able to sit and have a visual connection to a studio across our light well atriums.

When slouching down, this student will have a visual connection up through the atrium space to the floor above. The sight lines, again, delineated the dimensions of the space that the student could peer through.

When standing, the student could peer across the way into the next studio. By creating this sight line, students could begin to really interact with each other.


7 71 SITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PRECEDENTS DESIGN PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES

The final height of our shelving storage that runs around the perimeter of the room was determined by the height of an average male and female student standing on their desk and reaching up. This would allow all students to use the storage without it getting in the way of the pin up spaces or visual lines.

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72 The subterranean level had circulation crossing in both directions, and ir created halls with the direction of the skylights and sunken gardens while also having a cross circulation that leads to the grand stair.

The ground floor has one main circulation along the long exterior wall with secondary circulation following the light well atrium pattern.


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Studio floor two has the same circulation as the lower studio floor, but the way that the hallway shifts changes depending on where the catwalks are positioned and how they affect each individual studio.

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Studio floor one has a main circulation in the center of the studio spaces. This space also acts as informal pin-up spaces for any of the classes inside.

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//Technologies:

“God is in the details.� -Ludwig Mies van der Rohe


Both diagrams explain our emergency egress on two levels; one shows it in individual plans and the other an overall vertical egress system.

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Emergency Egress


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The studios have a catwalk system that branches between each of them allowing flex space and gathering spaces to occur. The catwalks were randomized and varied in size, allowing different amount of people to use the space at once, whether it be an entire studio class or three or four individuals.

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HVAC System


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The HVAC System was split into two main parts. The roof had its own individual systems that ran to the studio and main floors through wall stacks that also formed the walls for pin up spaces on the interior. The second HVAC system was located in the subterranean level allowing ventilation to occur because of its location in the sunken garden. This system controlled only the subterranean floor which had a larger amount of square footage than any other floor.

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Radiant Heat


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Structure

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Sprinkler System


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Lighting and Sprinkler Diagram

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When thinking about the lighting and sprinkler systems throughout the building, we gave thought to the floors as individual pieces. The studio floors both had their sprinkler systems run down the middle of each studio to be able to completely cover each studio evenly with water if a fire did occur. The lights in the studio spaces were chosen to be down lighting recessed into the ceiling in a diagonal grid pattern. In the main hallway for both studio floors, we positioned track lighting that could be altered to any direction. This would benefit the students when informal pin-ups were held there. The ground floor also had track lighting in the pin-up spaces, but there was recessed lighting throughout the main circulation and lecture hall spaces. The more private spaces, such as the conference room and administration, had pendant lighting to be positioned above the main pieces of furniture in the space. The subterranean floor continued the general pattern of the recessed down lights, along with the track lighting in both the pin-up spaces and the main hallways that could also be used to display student work each semester.

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December

12:00PM

September/March

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8:00AM

June

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Summer Solstice

Spring Solstice

Fall Solstice

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Winter Solstice

After building a three-dimensional model in Revit, we used Vasari to find the solar patterns around our building during each major solstice and equinox. We found that the roof is always getting direct sunlight, which led us to a decision to place solar panels on top of the roof. We also found that our cantilevered design shaded the ground floor during the summer and let the sunlight in during the winter making the building more efficient. The last main point that we found was that the southwest corners were getting a lot of harsh sun as well. This led to a sun shading system to wrap around each of these corners, created from PV panels, so the sun would be harnessed for our building’s energy.

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Screen System Diagram

Lightwell Diagram PV Facade System


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PV Panel Detail

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Detail Section

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Roof Detail Connection

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//Final:

“Architecture appears for the first time when the sunlight hits a wall. The sunlight did not know what it was before it hit a wall.� -Louis Kahn


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Conceptual Diagram Master Plan


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Site Plan


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94 4

Landscape Plan


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View from Archer Hall

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97

View from DEC

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View on Terracing View Bottom of Terrace

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Axon Section Cuts


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The existing ruin that is located in the center of the newly formed quad between DEC and the existing townhouses acts as blockade to anyone that wishes to easily walk from one side of the quad to the other. The new landscape utilizes the ruin while eliminating the blockade. The wall that separates the quad is demolished and replaced with a stair case so that the quad opens up and flows with the landscape. The demolished stone work is then incorporated into the bearing walls of the terracing that are located throughout the landscape.

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View from Top of Terrace


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View from Gutman Path


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View from Gutman Path

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102

Subterranean Floor Scale 1/32”= 1’


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Ground Floor Scale 1/32”= 1’


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104

Studio Floor One Scale 1/32”= 1’


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Studio Floor Two Scale 1/32”= 1’


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Longitudinal Section Scale 1/32” = 1’


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108

View of Lecture Hall


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View on Main Circulation Path, Ground Floor

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View of Studio Space


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View in Studio Main Circulation/ Informal Pin Up Spaces

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Final Model 1/8”=1’-0”

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114

Final Detail Model 1/4”=1’-0”


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Final Site Model 1/32”=1’-0”

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117 SITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PRECEDENTS DESIGN PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES FINAL

View between Kanbar and Gallagher Center


DRH Designs Belinda Daisey bmdaisey@gmail.com Evan Rotenberger rotenbergerevan@yahoo.com Tara Hennig tjhennig311@gmail.com

Evan Rotenberger

Belinda Daisey

Tara Hennig


DRH DESIGNS

DAISEY│ROTENBERGER│HENNIG

PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT BELINDA DAISEY BMDAISEY@GMAIL.COM EVAN ROTENBERGER ROTENBERGEREVAN@YAHOO.COM TARA HENNIG TJHENNIG311@GMAIL.COM


ICE CUBE