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WORLD ACW Digital is sponsored by AIRPORTS.COM FREIGHTERS.COM

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The weekly newspaper for air cargo professionals No. 1,131

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10 MAY 2021

COVERING AIR CARGO EUROPE DAILY

DB SCHENKER SHIPS VACCINES GLOBALLY WITH SKYCELL

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B Schenker has signed a Master Lease Agreement (MLA) with SkyCell to enable it to enhance its vaccine logistics service with more flexibility through the new healthcare product DB SCHENKERlife+. SkyCell manufactures innovative temperature-controlled airfreight containers for pharma supply chains. As part of the new partnership with SkyCell, DB Schenker’s service is extended to transport lifesaving pharmaceutical products, such as vaccines against COVID-19, globally. Thorsten Meincke, global board member for air and ocean freight at DB Schenker: “Logistics matters extensively in trying to overcome the pandemic and DB Schenker is already transporting COVID-19 vaccines worldwide. With this agreement, we upgrade our existing broad portfolio of healthcare-re-

lated logistics services with even more capability for our customers for the widespread roll-out of global vaccinations. With SkyCell, we have found an excellent partner to provide high quality on a global level.” Richard Ettl, CEO of SkyCell: “We are committed to helping our partners achieve their goals and ensuring these vital medicines are transported in a safe and timely

manner. We are excited to be working with DB Schenker to help enhance vaccine logistics and the supply chain in this fight against COVID-19.” SkyCell provides hybrid temperature-controlled packaging that enables efficient belly-hold transportation of important vaccines and other pharmaceutical products to areas that lack adequate cool-

ing infrastructure. The high-quality hybrid containers allow transport at various temperature stages and can maintain temperatures without the need for electricity for more than eight days. Veronique Dameme, head of global vertical market healthcare at DB Schenker: “Managing supply chains and transporting critical pharmaceutical shipments has never been more important. With DB SCHENKERlife+, we offer successful logistics solutions that are tailored to our customers in the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries. “Using SkyCell’s packaging solution will not only provide ease of use for our employees, but a best-in-class solution for the safe transportation required by pharmaceuticals. “By signing the agreement, we are adding another reliable solution to our DB SCHENKERlife+ portfolio.”

ACW WORLD AIR CARGO AWARDS WINNERS AND FINALISTS 2021 INSIDE: PAGES 2/3

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INSIDE CARIBBEAN EXPANDS FREIGHTER

CARIBBEAN Airlines Cargo has expanded its freighter service from May 2. The airline has updated its schedule and increased its weekly ... PAGE 4

WFS EXPANDS SIA PARTNERSHIP

WORLDWIDE Flight Services (WFS) has expanded its partnership with Singapore Airlines with the awarding of a new contract by the airline ... PAGE 4 COLOGNE/BONN: HIGHEST AIRFREIGHT

WHILST passenger transport continues to be severely impacted by the pandemic, the volume of air cargo handled by Cologne/Bonn has ... PAGE 5

JETTAINER HARNESSES DIGITAL

JETTAINER is forging ahead with the creation of digital counterparts for every Unit Load Device (ULD) within its fleet, which numbers ... PAGE 5

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NEWS

ACW WORLD AIR C WINNERS FINALIST QATAR AIRWAYS CARGO ECS GROUP Cargo Airline of the Year 2021 Winner

Finalists Air France/KLM/Martinair Antonov Airlines Cargolux Emirates SkyCargo Ethiopean Cargo & Logistics Services Etihad Cargo Latam Cargo Qatar Airways Cargo Saudia Cargo Turkish Cargo United Airlines Cargo

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Air Cargo Industry Marketing & Promotional Campaign Award 2021 Winner

Finalists

ACL Airshop Air France/KLM/Martinair Amsterdam Airport Schiphol CargoAi ECS Group Lemon Queen Qatar Airways Cargo

Sponsored by ECS Group

Air Cargo Industry Customer Care Award 2021

ETHIOPIAN CARGO & LOGISTICS SERVICES Winner

Finalists

Cargoflash Dallas/Ft Worth Int’l Airport Ethiopian Cargo & Logistics Services Geodis Qatar Airways Cargo Saudia Cargo

Air Cargo Industry Achievement Award 2021

QATAR AIRWAYS CARGO Winner

Finalists

ACL Airshop Air France/KLM/Martinair Antonov Airlines CargoAi Qatar Airways Cargo United Cargo Sponsored by PayCargo

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IT For the Air Cargo Industry Award 2021

cargo.one Winner

Finalists

cargo.one CargoAi Cargoflash Unisys Webcargo Wisetech Global (CargoWise) Sponsored by Air France / KLM / Martinair

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R CARGO AWARDS ERS AND STS 2021 ECS GROUP A

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Airport of the Year

AMSTERDAM AIRPORT SCHIPHOL

Air Cargo General Sales Agent of the Year 2021 Winner

Winner

Finalists

Amsterdam Airport Schiphol Cologne Bonn Airport Dallas/Ft Worth Int’l Airport Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta Int’l Airport Incheon Airport Miami International Airport

Airfreight Forwarder of the Year 2021

KUEHNE & NAGEL Winner

Finalists

Dachser DB Schenker Dimerco Fracht Group Geodis Kerry Logistics Kuehne & Nagel Sarus Logistics Sponsored by Etihad

Finalists

Air Logistics Group ATC Aviation Aviacargo Inc ECS Group Groupe Concorde Kales Airline Services Strike Aviation

Sponsored by Geodis

Sponsored by Azura International

Air Cargo Handling Agent of the Year 2021

Air Cargo Charter Broker of the Year 2021

SWISSPORT Winner

Finalists

Alha Group Asia Airfreight Terminal Co Ltd Celebi dnata Swissport WFS Worldwide Flight Services

AIR CHARTER SERVICE Winner

Finalists

Air Charter Service Airnautic Chapman Freeborn

Sponsored by SAVE Group

ACW 10 MAY 2021

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WFS EXPANDS SINGAPORE AIRLINES PARTNERSHIP

Caribbean Airlines Cargo to expand freighter service CARIBBEAN Airlines Cargo has expanded its freighter service from May 2. The airline has updated its schedule and increased its weekly freighter capacity by 200,000 pounds to meet the growing demand for air cargo services on the Miami-Kingston-Miami as well as Miami-Trinidad-Miami routes. The schedule includes four weekly flights between Miami and Trinidad as the carrier launches a new Monday flight. Caribbean Airlines will be increasing its capacity between Miami and Kingston on Tuesdays by upgrading the aircraft which

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operates the service. Additionally, the airline will move its Monday flight between Miami, Kingston and Montego Bay to Sunday. The carrier’s freighter schedule also includes a third weekly flight between Miami and Kingston and weekly flights on the Miami-Trinidad-Guyana-Miami as well as Miami-Barbados-Trinidad-Miami routes. In addition to the direct freighter services, onward carriage of cargo is available throughout the entire Caribbean Airlines network and beyond.

WORLDWIDE Flight Services (WFS) has expanded its partnership with Singapore Airlines with the awarding of a new contract by the airline in Brussels and renewals of existing agreements in Paris, London and Manchester. The contract in Belgium is a major win for WFS’ new cargo terminal operation at Brussels Airport, which opened in January. The threeyear deal to support Singapore Airlines’ five Boeing 747 cargo flights a week from Brussels reinforces WFS’ decision to invest in the new 250,000 tonne capacity freight facility less than two years after opening another new 9,000 sq. mt. terminal in the Brucargo West development. The new, additional terminal is designed to support WFS’ customers’ premium products and uses new technologies to improve operational efficiency and customer experience.

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This includes a dedicated pharma zone as well as kiosk-based, self-service reception points for truck drivers, enabling them to stay in their vehicles when completing cargo deliveries and collections, and expediting their assignment to one of the terminal’s 40 cargo gates. In line with WFS’ core priority of safety and security, the new building is also equipped with state-of-the-art security access controls and cargo screening technologies. Barry Nassberg, group chief commercial officer at WFS, said: “This is a significant strengthening of our relationship with Singapore Airlines and represents big gains for our operations in Belgium, France and the UK because of the airline’s size and importance in the market. We understand this responsibility and greatly value Singapore Airlines’ confidence in WFS.”

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Jettainer Cologne/Bonn records highest harnesses airfreight increase for decade digital twins WHILST passenger transport continues to be severely impacted by the pandemic, the volume of air cargo handled by Cologne/Bonn has seen steady growth rates in double figures since August of last year. During the first quarter of 2021, cargo volume at Cologne Bonn Airport rose by 25% to a figure of 235,580 tonnes, achieving the highest increase in the last ten years. In the month of March alone, the record high of last December was topped with a volume of more than 87,800 tonnes of air cargo, setting a new historical record.

Compared to the same month in the previous year, express cargo companies UPS, FedEx and DHL transported around a quarter more goods and the general cargo airlines almost fifty percent more.

Worldwide hub

“Cologne Bonn Airport is one of the largest and most important hubs worldwide when it comes to express shipments and international deliveries,” said Johan Vanneste, president and CEO of Flughafen Köln/Bonn. “We are pleased to be able to play our part in these difficult times by ensur-

ing that people are supplied with the goods they need, and fast, whether it be coronavirus tests, vaccines or any other items.” “The increase in tonnage is due, on the one hand, to the role that air cargo is playing in the worldwide transport of medical goods, protective equipment and vaccines and, on the other, to the increasing importance of e-Commerce. “In addition to this, due to the reduced number of passenger flights, there is a corresponding deficit in terms of the capacity for cargo which is normally provided by passenger aircraft,” he added.

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ettainer is forging ahead with the creation of digital counterparts for every Unit Load Device (ULD) within its fleet, which numbers around 100,000 units. Each one of these digital twins is an exact virtual image of the respective physical ULD. The gathering and smart combination of comprehensive lifecycle data yields valuable insights and enables Jettainer to optimise the use of ULDs economically as well as environmentally. Complementing its physical fleet of around 100,000 ULDs, Jettainer is gradually enhancing its fleet of digital twins for each of its units. These virtual images pool data about every single step within the lifetime of the respective ULD. They provide access to all relevant information at a glance, are the base for automated decision-making and allow Jettainer to further optimise the use of each ULD within its total lifecycle. Each digital twin processes data from three main sources: JettWare – Jettainer’s steering and tracking system, Jettainer’s asset database and its repair flow management. The smart solution clusters all ULD-specific information, starting with the unique identifier, the exact type and specifications, the manufacturer, the date of manufacturing and purchasing. It processes all past steering and repair events, repair specifics and processes real-time information on condition, status and location.

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PHARMACEUTICA The key to successo in vaccine transport is a 360 approach AIRBRIDGECARGO, part of the Volga-Dnepr Group, is IATA CEIV certified, having had the certificate reconfirmed in 2019. However, Celetaria explained: “We are also taking additional steps through a 360-degree approach to embrace all the areas of our business.” These include:

Yulia Celetaria, global healthcare director, Volga-Dnepr Group, explained to ACW the key to success with temperature sensitive and time critical vaccine transportation.

• Temperature mapping of all freighters within the Group fleet to understand which parts of cargo compartments work best for vaccines • Special solutions for logistics of temp-controlled containers after completion of vaccine transportation (as part of the AC equipment, through charter options, etc) • Working under various options for vaccine delivery on board all types of the Group freighters (Boeing 747F, Boeing 737F, Boeing 777F, An-124-100/150, Il76TD-90VD) • Regular shipments of other vaccines, as well as vaccine-related shipments equipment, phials, injections, etcetera which are essential for vaccine production • Station profile across its temperature-sensitive facilities and capabilities • Risk assessment of the airports within and outside of the existing network • Workshops with vaccine manufacturers, freight forwarders, ground handling agents, airports, container leasing providers and other stakeholders • Regular dialogue with governmental,

global healthcare organisations and other legal entities • Industry association – Pharma.Aero • Validaide risk assessment • Internal training of sales, marketing, operations and procurement personnel. “As of last year, amid the pandemic, we strengthened our Global Healthcare Team to respond to our customers’ requirements in the most effective manner, we renewed all master lease agreements with the leading container providers to have an access to a pool of temperature-controlled ULDs, we approached OEM to expand dry ice limits as some vaccines might require dry ice transportations,” said Celetaria. “These are just a few initiatives and actions we have taken, as this is a complex process which unites a lot of stakeholders and we have co-operated with all of them accordingly to guarantee vaccine integrity during air freight.”

Fewer deliveries than expected “We are working with a number of freight forwarders, manufacturers and authorised vaccine distributors with respect to stable transportations. So far, we have operated a number of charters from China, Europe and Russia with different types of vaccines aboard delivering almost 100 tonnes of vital

The changing pharma logistics landscape

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prefer not to be in the hospital. That statement is likely not a huge surprise. For a host of reasons, hospitals are a necessary, but not a preferred, part of life. Apparently, I’m not alone. Numerous studies outline recent trends — and anticipated increases — in both outpatient treatment and home healthcare markets. Outpatient facility visits and appointments are rising, and many acute care hospitals are even closing. While home healthcare market size estimates vary, growth rates average near 8% annually. These trends are also having an observable impact on healthcare logistics, an industry that often uses airfreight to transport cargo from medical devices to diagnostic equipment to pharma and bio-pharma products. From realtime tracking to last-mile solutions, healthcare and pharmaceutical customers are asking different questions from logistics providers. As healthcare, and by extension, healthcare logistics continues its patient-centric evolution, the logistics industry will need to consider things likely never imagined, like compliance require6

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medicines (CanSino, Sputnik and others) and are processing more requests at the moment,” Celetaria explained. But, despite being ready to transport the vaccine across the world, Celetaria said there have actually been fewer deliveries than expected. “This was firstly explained by prioritisation of national vaccination programmes with each country focusing on its population with no need for airfreight as vaccines are delivered by land, some problems with vaccines of certain manufacturers, and slower production rates. “Another tendency, which has not been taken into account previously is the socalled localisation of production as the countries want to guarantee stable vaccine production rate with enough shots for the whole population and build local production sites. “That said, we have seen an increased demand for transportation of production line equipment, which will scale up local vaccine manufacturing across various countries. “As such filling lines are mostly outsized and heavy, we use our dedicated An124 fleet for it. With the resurgence of COVID19 and increasing number of new cases in various countries we have also seen stable demand for test kits in Europe and oxygen tanks with the recent outbreak and devastating situation in India.”

By Niels Van Namen, EVP Global Healthcare, CEVA Logistics ments (e.g, HIPAA) around sensitive patient data. In short, the patient will need to be at the centre of not only the healthcare system but also the healthcare supply chain. At CEVA Logistics, our commitment to responsive logistics solutions for healthcare and pharmaceutical customers follows this trend of being patient-centric. All CEVA healthcare logistics now fall under a suite of solutions we call FORPATIENTS. This commitment includes numerous and continuous upgrades to our technology infrastructure and customer-facing systems to deliver tracking and data transparency. More generally in the industry, this level of real-time visibility will be paramount for products in transit — especially those products scheduled to be delivered at home or in a nearby location for diagnostic, clinical or surgical procedures. The resulting global supply chain would be able to support patients wherever they are, helping make healthcare more accessible and affordable across the planet. Logistics providers will also need to revise network models and inventory holding

locations to minimise supply chain capital costs. An integrated approach will be needed starting from the patients and their products or services — likely from multiple suppliers — and going all the way back upstream through the supply chain. At CEVA, we believe that ordering multiple products and services from many different suppliers creates unnecessary complexity for patients and their care teams. Organising the deliveries around the patient would vastly improve the patient experience. In addition, creating treatment kits for certain types of diagnostic, clinical or surgical procedures could improve delivery flows, reduce inventory costs, improve product traceability and simplify the management of HIPAA requirements. In particular, patients with long-term, consistent treatment requirements would benefit most from a patient-centric, demand-driven supply chain. This trend would impact the air cargo industry, requiring the transport of fewer bulk order shipments and more groups of kits destined for distribution hubs and then

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as individual shipments to the patient’s home or nearby clinic. This efficiency would result in greater healthcare accessibility, lower cost to the patient, improved patient satisfaction and a reduced impact on the environment — fewer final shipments, less cardboard and less carbon. The time is right for holistic patient care to drive the next generation of healthcare supply chain innovations, placing the patient firmly at the centre of everything we do.


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CALS: TEMPERATURE SENSITIVE CATHAY PACIFIC HAS THE SOLUTION Rajesh Menon, Cathay Pacific regional head of cargo, South Asia, Middle East and Africa spoke to ACW about the airline’s pharma operations.

ACW: Can you tell me a bit about Cathay Pacific’s ‘Vaccine Solution’ and how this promotes effective and efficient transportation? Rajesh Menon: Cathay Pacific Cargo has been a pioneer when transporting pharmaceutical products. Over the years, we have built on our pharmaceutical expertise and handling capabilities to develop a dedicated Vaccine Solution that caters to fast and effective distribution of COVID-19 vaccines across the globe. Coupled with our extensive network and fleet of freighters, we have formulated a specialised solution that brings together two of our existing cargo products – PharmaLIFT and PriorityLIFT. Both these products have formed our dedicated vaccine taskforce allowing us to carry and handle vaccine shipments to countries such as Mexico, Malaysia and Indonesia, in the recent past. We understand the unique specifications for each vaccine and continue to provide our partners with tailor-made solutions that include the recently rolled out Ultra Track- a next-generation track-and-trace system, enabling our teams and forwarders to monitor the condition of the vaccine shipments in real-time. The service offered is free of charge for any COVID-19 vaccine shipments. To further ensure the necessary requirements of the vaccines are fulfilled, we have also established a 24/7 Operations Control Centre in Hong Kong.

ACW: In your opinion, how will the industry change post-COVID? Menon: The pandemic has forced airlines to study and be prepared for multiple unprecedented situations not knowing the uncertainty ahead. Major players in the indus-

try have careful implementing solutions that effectively accommodate the market demand, utilise the current cargo capacity to the maximum as well as innovate their offerings, especially when catering to the extreme temperature range of vaccines.

ACW: Cathay Pacific reported cargo capacity dropped 25% in March as a result of crew quarantine measures. How has this affected pharma operations and vaccine transportation? Menon: The recent changes have enabled us to increase our cargo operations and we will gradually restore our full freighter schedule to meet the market demand. Throughout this period, we have continued to build on the momentum in moving vaccines both to Hong Kong and across our network. In fact, in March we successfully passed a significant milestone by transporting 15 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines.

Pharma at Brussels Airport ACW spoke to Geert Aerts, Brussels Airport’s new cargo director and Piet Demunter, the airport’s chief business development officer. Aerts: One of our specialisations is pharma, an investment which has really paid off in the past year. To date, over 30 million vaccines have been imported to and through Brussels Airport. Demunter: Success in this field is due to our specialisations but also the great relations we have as an airport and community with the shippers, manufaturers and other supply chain players. These relationships have been tremendously important in order to prepare for the logistical challenges. We have been able to work with them and then they have been able to implement some of our measures at other airports. Belgium is an important research and development centre for vaccines, so we have a lot of experience in pharmaceuticals. Aerts: Our strong collaboration as a community and with other airports through Pharma.Aero, of which we are a driving member of, has helped us take a 360o approach to the end-to-end journey from shippers to forwarder, handlers, airlines and the next airport. ACW 10 MAY 2021

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COVERING AIR CARGO EUROPE EVEN THOUGH WE WEREN’T THERE

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here is no escaping that the unprecendated times we are currently in have changed many of the things we used to take for granted. Attending trade fairs in the airfreight industry, for example, has been one thing no-one has been able to do for over a year. However, the clever folk at Messe München, who for years have staged air cargo Europe in Munich, decided a little matter of a global pandemic would not prevent them from holding some sort of event on-line. Last week, as hundreds of industry players gathered around mobile telephones, desktop computers and tablets to tune into the event, key topics of great relevance to airfreight executives and players, one thing was missing - Air

Cargo Week’s air cargo Europe Daily News. Who hasn’t attended the event in the past in the Bavarian capital and not picked up the famous Daily News? This year should be no different! Just go to our website www.aircargoweek.com and click on the link for the air cargo Europe dailies.

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Profile for Azura International

ACW Digital 10th May 2021  

ACW Digital 10th May 2021  

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