ACW 8th August 22

Page 1

GLOBAL A

I

R

C

A

R

G

O

W

E

E

K

MANAGEMENT

A

I

R

C

A

R

G

O

W

E

E

K

WORLD AIRPORTS .COM ACW Digital is sponsored by FREIGHTERS.COM

FREIGH

FRE


Tabloid page trim.indd 1

27/04/2022 15:33


The weekly newspaper for air cargo professionals No. 1,192

8 August 2022

::

JALCARGO debutes distribution partnership with CARGO.ONE ...

Page 8

INSIDE

ETIHAD CARGO OVERCOMES 2022 CHALLENGES TO POST RECORD MIDYEAR REVENUE

CARGOTECH TO CAPITALISE...

CEDRIC Millet, the President of CargoTech, is looking to build on the growing demand for digitisation among airlines, as they look to boost investment ... PAGE 2

TRANS.EU LAUNCHES NEW ...

LOGISTICS platform Trans.eu has developed a new haulage freight exchange, called Private Freight Exchange ... PAGE 3

E

tihad Cargo’s Vice President Commercial Tim Isik has welcomed record-breaking results for the first half of 2022. “2022 has presented a fresh set of challenges, including restrictions in China resulting from the country’s zero-COVID policy, which caused disruptions to the global supply chain, and the ongoing Russia-Ukraine conflict,” Isik told Air Cargo Week. “Despite these challenges, we are pleased to announce that we have posted a 6 percent increase in revenue compared to H1 2021, achieving the best mid-year revenue results in Etihad Cargo’s history.” Etihad Cargo’s contribution to Etihad Aviation Group’s revenue was 35 per cent and “cargo remains a key pillar in the group’s success for the remainder of the year,” Isik highlighted, with the airline having already carried 295,000 tonnes of freight in the first half of 2022. The company has also witnessed growth across several of its premium products, having

SUSTAINABILITY IS THE KEY ...

introduced a set of new features and solutions, enabling Etihad Cargo to provide safe and efficient transportation of cargo. Compared to H1 2021, Etihad Cargo’s dedicated pharmaceutical shipment solution, PharmaLife, increased by 46 percent in the first six months of 2022. Etihad cargo has achieved a 52 percent increase in the movement of live animals, and the performance of SkyStables increased by 137 percent. Revenue from FlyCulture, Etihad’s tailored service for the transportation of valuable paintings, sculptures and musical instruments, increased by 128 percent. In the first half of 2022, Etihad maintained a Delivered as Promised rate of 86 percent, a 2 percent increase compared to our 2021 full-year results, and an 83 percent freighter On Time Performance (OTP) rate. However, despite these positive results, Isik was clear that the company will not rest, looking “to identify opportunities for growth and enhance service delivery.”

With the return of passenger flows, Etihad Cargo reconfigured the last Boing 777 with cargo-in-cabin back to their original state at the end of July 2022. “The five cargo-in-cabin aircraft contributed greatly to supporting our customers, providing the necessary capacity on key trade lanes,” Isik said. Over the past 18 months, the five reconfigured aircraft carried over 70,000 tonnes of cargo and generating a total revenue of over US$300 million. To meet the increased demand and ensure customers’ capacity requirements are met, Etihad Cargo has signed a letter of intent with Airbus for five A350s, a new addition to its existing fleet, which currently comprises five Boeing 777 freighters, seven Boeing 777s, 40 Boeing 787s, 14 Airbus A320s and five Airbus A350s, with more 787s joining the fleet in 2022. Additional capacity through the complete conversion of Boeing 777s is another opportunity that Etihad Cargo is exploring in partnership with Etihad Engineering.

WHEN Airbus unveiled the A350F, branding it as the next generation freighter, it put sustainability front and centre ... PAGE 5

DRONES: THE NEXT TRANSPORT ...

The future of transportation technology lies in drones. At least, that’s what aviation technology company Altitude Angel believes ... PAGE 6

Follow Us:

aircargoweek.com


NEWS

A

CargoTech to capitalise on post-pandemic push for digitisation

CEDRIC Millet, the President of CargoTech, is looking to build on the growing demand for digitisation among airlines, as they look to boost investment in their cargo division. Having recently welcomed CargoAI, ECS Group’s Cargo Digital Factory and Wiremind Cargo under its umbrella, CargoTech is working to provide a one-stop-shop to connect the cargo business with experts in the technology field to fast track the digitalisation of the industry. With the industry emerging from Covid, Millet sees this as the time to push forward with embracing technology that can make the industry more efficient and resilient in the face of potential challenges. “What the pandemic brought was the awareness, because digitisation started before the pandemic but at the very slow pace,” Millet told Air Cargo Week, highlighting how it became clear quickly over the past two years that the cargo sector was behind the curve on technology. “Since the airlines stopped flying [during the pandemic] and then there was some redeployment of capacity according to the needs of the different trade lanes, nobody knew who was flying where and what capacity was available in each and every trade lane.”

“On top of awareness, the pandemic made the leadership teams of the airlines realise that air cargo was not just a side business…but actually cargo was useful as well to generate cash flow that keep airlines flying,” Millet stated, citing how that realisation has sparked a flurry of investment into the cargo sector. With the move towards digitisation though, CargoTech understands that there is fear which has to be dispelled, as people believe the increased use of tech will lead to fewer jobs. But CargoTech doesn’t want to make that happen. On the contrary, it hopes digitisation will simply address areas where airlines might struggle and streamline their systems. “A lot of people associate digitisation to productivity increase and cost reduction, and therefore people will be losing their job… People forget that digitisation is also there for revenue optimisation purposes,” Millet said, adding that it not only boosts the top line and efficiency but brings innovation and new services to the sector. In Millet’s eyes, digitisation could even be the solution to the problem of labour shortages in some parts of the air cargo sector, as it can fill the roles where there are simply not enough people in the workforce available. When pitching to potential clients, CargoTech has found those two factors, boosting efficiency and plugging labour gaps, paired with a more sustainable approach, has piqued interest in digitisation. Particularly in the wake of Covid, air lines want to generate more revenue from their cargo business without compromising on their commitment to green energy goals. Looking forward, while many might think the future holds substantial changes, as technology is integrated into companies, it’s not as complex as that. CargoTech believes that for the majority of medium and small airlines it’s simply implementing existing solutions that are ready and waiting with the goal of making life simpler and more profitable for businesses. “The future for cargo is bringing in technologies that are already existing on other kinds of businesses, related to more artificial intelligence and cognitive intelligence. It’s not a revolution. There are things that are existing outside the industry already that we want to bring into the industry,” Millet said.

STILL reading a printed copy of Air Cargo Week?

Consider switching to the digital version.

Contact subs@azurainternational.com and say you would rather read the weekly publication online.

2

ACW 8 AUGUST 2022

I

R

C

A

R

G

O

W

E

E

Cargo IQ increases transparency on air cargo road trucking AMSTERDAM-based software innovator CargoHub, together with Emirates Airlines, and road feeder service provider, Jan de Rijk, are collaborating in a Cargo iQ sub-working group to improve communication between road feeder services and airlines on road segments of an air cargo shipment journey.

messages need to be sent by the RFS provider. Ultimately, the RFS specification will be integrated into the Cargo iQ Master Operating Plan and the potential IT service solutions will be standardised to meet Cargo iQ requirements. Members may then choose one of the potential providers.

In a first pilot scheme, various scenarios will be carried out with live air cargo shipments on truck routes. A second pilot will include more trial participants. The aim is to test Cargo iQ’s new Road Feeder Services messaging standards and interaction, via messaging or API, between CargoHub’s Collaborative Decision Making (CDM) platform and the individual systems of airlines and trucking companies. Cargo iQ is setting milestone requirements for shipment updates and defining which

CargoHub provides a single window solution for trucking, handlers and airlines to improve planning processes by providing movement, capacity, and cargo availability information. “The goal is to minimise loading and unloading times, thus increasing the speed of air cargo transportation by road,” said Raoul Paul, Chief Executive Officer, CargoHub. “At the same time, airlines will benefit from end-to-end supply chain visibility of air cargo shipments subjected to road transport.”

CharterSync celebrates three years of “disruptive digitisation” in air cargo charter DIGITAL air cargo charter business CharterSync has marked three years of operations. Since launching in 2019, UK-based CharterSync has carved itself a share of the UK and European air cargo charter market through its “disruptive, technology-forward approach” to air cargo charter. “CharterSync is growing fast, but we are scaling efficiently,” says Simon Watson, director and co-founder of CharterSync. “After achieving a six-figure turnover in year one of trading, our turnover has consistently risen by 84% year on year.” “When we launched, digital transformation was long overdue in the air cargo charter market. Up to 2019, the air cargo charter booking process was 100% manual, and laborious for both freight forwarders and operators,” com-

ments Watson. “Digitisation has transformed so many industries, and with experience of both commercial flying and charter brokerage, we realised how technology could be harnessed to do the same for air cargo charter. Technology is the key that is unlocking the full potential of air cargo charter, and that has made both operators and freight forwarders profoundly rethink their air cargo strategies.” Explains Watson: “Efficiency, price transparency and our focus on end-to-end logistics have kept freight forwarders and operators coming back to CharterSync... Since 93% of our air cargo charters are delivered on time, we can remove unwarranted uncertainty and stress from the supply chain process.”

K


A

I

R

C

A

R

G

O

W

E

E

K

NEWS

Trans.EU launches new private freight exchange for forwarders and their preferred hauliers LOGISTICS platform Trans.eu has developed a new haulage freight exchange, called Private Freight Exchange, which enables freight forwarders to invite hauliers to their own secure and private digital space, communicating directly with their trusted transport service providers. “With our new Private Freight Exchange platform, we are closing the gap between the contract and spot markets,” said Aleksandra Marszałek, Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Western Europe, Trans.eu. “With the solution, freight forwarders and shippers can quickly and easily set up a private freight exchange with their individual haulier network and use our proven tools for efficient cooperation.” Hauliers registered on the Trans.eu platform can also use its Loads2Go mobile app, which improves communication by providing easy access to freight offers and the ability to respond rapidly from any location. Trans.eu can expand a client’s Private Freight Exchange data-

base to include any number of trusted hauliers. Trans.eu developed Private Freight Exchange in reaction to the increasing demand from forwarders for greater security, digitisation and the need to be able to conduct freight offer processes in a non-public arena. Trans.eu also identified that hauliers were more willing to do business with a forwarder they already know. “Private Freight Exchange is a solution that we developed after a thorough analysis of our customers’ needs,” said Marcin Haładuda, Global Business Development Manager, Trans.eu. “We are convinced that the private freight exchange can not only solve problems such as working with unknown contractors and slow email/telephone based communication but also boost the ability of European haulage to operate in a far more sustainable way.”

Rhenus Logistics introduces carbon neutral air consolidation service from Frankfurt to São Paulo

RHENUS Logistics is introducing a carbon-neutral air freight option as part of the sustainable initiatives offering customers a carbon-neutral consolidation service from Frankfurt, Germany (FRA) to São Paulo, Brazil (SAO). The process of the carbon-neutral air consolidation activates when the service is booked. The emission data of the shipment’s main haul is calculated by Rhenus partner, with the methodology that complies with the International Air Transport Association (IATA), International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), and Global Logistics Emissions Council (GLEC) frameworks. Afterwards, a third-party company will verify and ensure the reliability of the calculation process and data. Rhenus will offset the total emissions from the trade lane through the third party to achieve carbon neutrality via projects which are verified and audited according to internationally accepted standards such as Gold Standards (GS) or verified carbon standard (VCS). Customers will then be able to download the certification of carbon-neutral activity under the Rhenus name and receive a verified emission report for main haul FRASAO shipments from Rhenus. “Providing a carbon-neutral airfreight solution from our European Gateway in Frankfurt, Germany to São Paulo, Brazil is the first step to develop and transform our current and future services into more sustainable options for customers. Along with improving our airfreight services, we take further measures to make our gateway operations more environment-friendly as well as partner up with carriers to elaborate opportunities on more sustainable airfreight. Carbon offset programme is an initial act while awaiting carrier side’s development to shift to a more sustainable operation, which will have a direct influence over the emission. Our commitment as a company is to do our part to protect the environment and for clients to partner with us to promote more and more sustainable actions in the logistics industry,” said Chris Bode, Global Product Strategy Manager – Air at Rhenus Air & Ocean.

ACW 8 AUGUST 2022

3


NEWS

A

I

R

C

A

R

G

O

W

E

E

Asia Airfreight Terminal launches AAT COOLPORT ASIA Airfreight Terminal Co. Ltd (AAT) has offered a cool respite by officially launching AAT COOLPORT. This first on-airport cold chain facility provides a complete temperature-controlled environment at Hong Kong International Airport, and complements a similar facility operated by AAT’s parent company, SATS Ltd, in Singapore. AAT COOLPORT represents AAT’s ongoing commitment to providing unique solutions to meet the growing demand for safe air transportation of time and temperature-sensitive cargo. COOLPORT is expected to increase AAT’s handling capacity for such cargo by 50%, which will further uphold the status of Hong Kong International Airport as the world’s hub for perishables and pharmaceuticals. It offers a dedicated temperature-controlled zone, covering the entire cargo handling process, including acceptance and delivery, build-up and breakdown, security screening and storage. New features include one-of-a-kind temperature-controlled truck docks with dock shelters that prevent potential disruptions to the cold chain during acceptance or delivery, and the location of the x-ray screening machine inside COOLPORT with CCTV surveillance so that cargo can be screened at the correct ambient temperature.

Swissport launches test of automated guided vehicle in Frankfurt

SWISSPORT has launched a pilot with an unmanned, automated guided vehicle at its new cargo centre at Frankfurt Airport, as part of a long-term test, replacing the manual transport of cargo. Swissport’s 17,000 sq m air cargo centre in Frankfurt, complete with an integrated CEIV certified Swissport Pharma Center, is equipped with cargo logistics and handling innovations. Taking the automatisation and digitisation drive one step further, Swissport is now testing an automated guided vehicle, or AGV in short, together with Loedige industries. “The automated guided vehicle at our Frankfurt air cargo centre is an important next step in a long line of air cargo innovations that we have

4

ACW 8 AUGUST 2022

been implementing across the globe.” says Dirk Goovaerts, Global Cargo Chair at Swissport. “The AGV has the potential to increase the efficiency, flexibility, and safety of Swissport’s air cargo handling services and to take our service delivery to the next level.” With a load capacity of 6,800 kg, the 10-foot automated guided vehicle is designed to independently transport a variety of unit load devices (ULD’s), including 15ft containers, inside the air cargo centre. It reduces the need for manual handling and frees up staff for more complex and value creating tasks. The AGV communicates with gates and other automated equipment, can cover large distances and is fully compatible with Swissport’s material handling system.

K


A

I

R

C

A

R

G

O

W

E

E

K

Sustainability is the key for the Airbus A350F WHEN Airbus unveiled the A350F, branding it as the next generation freighter, it put sustainability front and centre, announcing that it will demonstrate “unbeatable fuel efficiency,” with a 40% lower fuel burn and CO2 emissions than its competitor. This was a point that Crawford Hamilton, the Head of Freighter Marketing at Airbus, was keen to stress during an interview with Air Cargo Week at Farnborough International Airshow. “What we hear from everyone is that they all have environmental control systems strategies. They all have goals that they have to meet. And what easier way is there than replacing an old 747 with something that burns 40% less fuel. That is the easiest way to get sustainability,” Hamilton said. Adopting a more sustainable aircraft for cargo transport doesn’t just help companies in their mission to cut their carbon footprint, it has the added benefit of cutting costs by reducing fuel consumption. Between the start of 2022 and July, the price of jet fuel rose approximately 90 percent, costing around 120 percent more than it did a year earlier. So, with fuel prices having soared international instability in recent months, this is something that isn’t going unnoticed. “There’s two parts of sustainability: the environmental sustainability and the busi-

thing that burns less fuel is good...When you start to look at how much fuel is burnt over the lifetime of an aircraft, you can save vast amounts of money, while also lowering your environmental footprint.” These were all factors that were considered in the development of the A350F, creating an aircraft that is 35 tonnes lighter in its operating weight than a 747 and with two fewer engines. “You put all these things together, it mounts up. You put in the fact that we’ve got advanced aerodynamics and the most advanced engine that is in service today, You come up with a good package that’s really economic,” Hamilton outlined. With sustainability elements providing “outstanding savings,” the A350F achieves “unbeatable economics,” according to Airbus, through its increased payload, higher volume and greater range compared with its competitor. Airbus estimates that the aircraft’s features will add up to $21 million extra revenue and result in lower maintenance costs totalling $16 million. The interest in the core selling points of the A350F is shown in the steady stream of demand for the aircraft since its unveiling. As of August, Airbus has recorded 31 orders for the A350F, including 4 aircraft from CMA-CGM, 7 aircraft from Air Lease Corporation, 7 aircraft from Singapore Airlines, 4 from Air France, 2 from Silk Way West Airlines and 7 from Etihad

NEWS Virgin Atlantic Cargo and Airbase GSE agreement VIRGIN Atlantic Cargo has extended its long-standing partnership with Airbase GSE in a new five-year contract, continuing the

200% on 2019 and up 40% on 2020, as the carrier continues to support vital supply chains across the globe.

successful operation of ULD Cargo. The partnership will include ULD management systems, procurement planning and digitalisation, as well as assist in creating a sustainable future with environmental management systems. As Virgin Atlantic Cargo continues to strive toward a greener cargo operation, the partnership extension will see Airbase GSE support the airline’s move toward its 2050 sustainability target, by recycling all Virgin Atlantic cargo nets, saving 200 tonnes in landfill waste. Additionally, Virgin Atlantic Cargo has committed to using metal units, which took effect as of 1 July 2022. All units purchased on behalf of the airline will be aluminium, which is a recyclable material. The new agreement follows Virgin Atlantic Cargo’s record 2021 performance, where it achieved a revenue of £448m, up more than

Lee Connolly, manager, ULD Control at Virgin Atlantic Cargo commented: “This deal not only enhances our already strong relationship with Airbase, it moves us a step closer to our 2050 sustainability target by saving landfill waste and committing to metal units exclusively. I look forward to the next five years, having no doubt that Airbase will keep up their high levels of service and continue to deliver.” Nick Payne, CEO, Airbase GSE, added: “I’m delighted that Virgin have decided to maintain our working partnership within ULD Cargo for a further five years. The relationship has gone from strength to strength, and our team will be focusing on ULD management systems procurement planning and digitalisation. We are also very excited about building a more sustainable future with environmental management systems.”

Etihad Airways scales up its cargo operations with Airbus’ new generation A350F freighter ETIHAD Airways has firmed up its order with Airbus for seven new generation A350F freighters, following its earlier commitment announced at the Singapore Airshow. This order of the A350F sees the national carrier of the UAE expanding its relationship with Airbus, and adding to its existing order of the largest passenger version of A3501000s, five of which have been delivered. Tony Douglas, Group Chief Executive Officer, Etihad Aviation Group, said: “In building one of the world’s youngest and most sustainable fleets, we are delighted to extend our long-term partnership with Airbus to add the A350 Freighter to our fleet. This additional cargo capacity will support the unprecedented growth we are experiencing in the Etihad Cargo division. Airbus has developed a remarkable fuel-efficient aircraft that, in tandem with the A350-1000 in our passenger fleet, supports our commitment to reaching net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.” “Airbus is delighted to extend its long standing partnership with Etihad Airways, who recently introduced the A350 passen-

ness sustainability,” Hamilton highlighted. “If you’re suddenly taking 40% out of your fuel costs, your business starts to look good as well.” “There are sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) goals now and it does cost more than normal fuel. There’s also potential carbon taxes. Any-

ger services and is continuing to build on the family with the game-changing freighter version, the A350F,” said Christian Scherer, Chief Commercial Officer and Head of Airbus International. “This new generation large freighter brings unprecedented and unmatched benefits in terms of range, fuel efficiency and CO₂ savings.” Etihad has also firmed up a long term agreement for Airbus’ Flight Hour Services (FHS) to support its entire A350 fleet, to maintain aircraft performance and optimise reliability. This marks the first agreement for an Airbus FHS contract for an A350-fleet in the Middle East. Separately, Etihad has also opted for Airbus’ Skywise Health Monitoring, allowing the airline to access real-time management of aircraft events and troubleshooting, saving time and decreasing the cost of unscheduled maintenance. As part of the world’s most modern longrange family, the A350F provides a high level of commonality with the A350 passenger versions. With a 109 tonne payload capability, the A350F can serve all cargo markets.

Airways. “It’s two, nearly three generations of aircraft in one goal and that’s unprecedented,” Hamilton said, adding that “it appeals to their Chief Financial Officer and their Chief Environmental Officer as well.”

ACW 8 AUGUST 2022

5


A

I

R

C

A

R

G

O

W

E

E

K

NEW TECHNOLOGY

DRONES: THE NEXT TRANSPORT REVOLUTION

T

he future of transportation technology lies in drones. At least, that’s what aviation technology company Altitude Angel believes, as they look towards the development and construction of the 165-mile long superhighway for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), called ‘Project Skyway’. The government-backed project is seeking to transform the way that cargo and, eventually one day, people are moved around the country, and potentially abroad. “Skyway can revolutionise the way we transport goods and travel in a way not experienced since the advent of the railways did in the 18th century,” Altitude Angel’s CEO and founder Richard Parker believes.

Integrating into existing networks Although some people might think that the rollout of drone networks will mean the complete replacement of traditional forms of delivery services, that’s not the aim of Altitude Angel here. Instead, they see the drone network fitting neatly into the existing options available to companies, providing them with a new way to meet the growing demand for cargo transportation. One key area the company has noticed over the last few years that can benefit particularly from UAVs is the medical industry, with Covid

6

ACW 8 AUGUST 2022

having shown how drones can provide support to remote areas, Phil Banks, Head of Air Traffic Management at Altitude Angel explained. Pathology samples, blood for transfusions, time critical deliveries and medical supplies can all be transported in a more reliable manner via drones. If medicine can only survive 30 minutes or one hour outside of a laboratory, Banks argued it makes sense to use a drone that “can get to your hospital within 20 minutes,” instead of taking “that risk on a road and getting stuck in traffic.” “It’s another method of transport to enhance the delivery services and transportation services. We are not suddenly going to see all trucks leave the road, everything’s going by air. That just isn’t going to happen,” Banks explained. “How they’re used will be part of an existing mosaic of transport.”

Cutting costs and boosting sustainability While drone technology has been previously limited in its rollout by the need to constantly see the UAV, Project Skyway and Altitude Angel is “enabling this beyond visual line of sight (VLOS) operations and at a cost effective level as well,” Banks highlighted. This project, putting down a 165-mile network, is costing approximately £12 million,


FEATURE

making it “orders of magnitude cheaper than anything that’s being explored today.” The drone superhighway has achieved this cost by integrating with existing technology, partnering with BT to use its tower technology. That compared with the cheaper running costs for the drone corridor, compared with current air traffic management, looks to provide companies with a more affordable method of transporting cargo, while not compromising their other needs. In fact, they believe it adds additional benefits for delivery companies, particularly in the form of cutting their carbon footprint. Transportation currently accounts for 34% of the UK’s net domestic CO2 emissions and heavy goods vehicles make up 17% of domestic transport emissions. As companies target sustainable practices in a way that doesn’t compromise delivery times, drones offer a potentially speedy alternative that takes cargo off heavy goods vehicles and into a non-fossil fuel mode of transport.

When it comes to potential limitations or safety concerns regarding how large a drone’s payload can be, that all comes down to the type of UAV and its design, “it’s really ‘how long is a piece of string?’” There are drones that can travel long distances, carrying hundreds of kilos of weight, with one company they’re working with looking to design an airframe capable of holding 300 kilos. Theoretically, there is no limit to the type of cargo that could be moved by drone but Altitude Angel is realistic that there is a public perception to consider. Banks acknowledges, for example, that seeing a drone 400 feet above you, with a 30 tonne payload is “going to be quite scary for anybody on the ground.” That’s why there’s still work to do, establishing the balance between the convenience of drones and what people are comfortable with being transported above them. It’s all part of the process that links to the company’s mission of maintaining an active conversation with people, as the industry explores the type of payloads it makes sense to move via drones. Altitude Angel sees itself as the “enabler for those conversations,” recognising the industry will have to adapt to maximise its potential without compromising the public’s wishes.

“Skyway can revolutionise the way we transport goods and travel in a way not experienced since the advent of the railways did in the 18th century”

Aviation is evolving at home and abroad

The importance of messaging “People have always feared technology and change,” Banks recognises, pointing to plans to ensure public consultations form a big part of ‘Project Skyway’. While sensational headlines might make drones whizzing around seem a scary concept, the company sees huge potential for the technology to tackle the existing challenges companies face, such as traversing difficult terrain. Through effective PR campaigns, Altitude Angel hopes to show that “drones are good,” with the earlier mentioned impact on the NHS being a key message to secure people’s support. “We’re saving lives because we’re getting children’s meningitis tests from a hospital to a lab in under half an hour, when it would take two hours by road,” Banks said, “that will undoubtedly play a massive part in this.”

While the project has received the green light from the government, Altitude Angel expects it to take around two years for it to be fully up and running. “This is new technology. We’re asking questions of the Civil Aviation Authority that have never been asked and they are responsible for keeping the UK’s air space safe,” Banks recognised. Despite there still being hurdles to clear, Altitude Angel is optimistic that its technology will be certified within the next 24 months. “We spoke to the CEO of the CAA and he was very excited about this. He just said ‘this is what we need in the UK. This is fantastic. This is what we need to support’, so right from the highest levels of the CAA they recognise how exciting this project is.” While each country’s interest differs, if the CAA certifies the technology, Altitude Angel is ready to set its sights beyond the horizons of the UK. At the Farnborough Air Show, the company revealed it had spoken to a number of US states, Middle Eastern countries and other nations who want to replicate the project. “Third world countries could easily adopt this technology, as they have mobile phone masks all over the place, Banks explained, suggesting it could “quickly support remote areas of Africa.” “It’s aviation evolving but it’s a revolutionary new industry. It’s just aviation moving forward and looking at aviation in a slightly different way,” Banks concluded.

ACW 8 AUGUST 2022

7


VIEW FROM THE MAINDECK Air cargo demand and rates continue to slide

JALCARGO DEBUTS DISTRIBUTION PARTNERSHIP WITH CARGO.ONE

J

ALCARGO, the cargo division of Japan Airlines Company (JAL), and cargo.one today announced an international partnership that brings the airline’s capacities to the leading global marketplace for digital air cargo bookings. JALCARGO has appointed cargo.one as its partner to advance its digital business and footprint. This month, cargo. one became available to Japanese freight forwarders, offering them a seamless digital booking experience, and the chance to improve their efficiency and competitiveness. Air cargo volumes into Japan are globally significant, with Tokyo’s airports consistently performing within the world’s top air cargo hubs by freight tonnes. As the flag carrier of Japan, JALCARGO delivered over 740,000 tonnes of air cargo during 2021, and offers impressive flexibility in its domestic network. Many thousands of freight forwarders using cargo.one will soon be able to instantly search, book, amend and track JALCARGO capacities in real time within a few clicks. In a move to broaden its digital footprint, JALCARGO has partnered with cargo.one based on its technological and commercial achievements for many of the world’s leading airlines, and its ability to deliver forwarders reliable and joyful digital booking experiences. Hiroo Iwakoshi, Executive Officer, Cargo and Mail at Japan Airlines, comments, “Delivering an outstanding customer experience is an important element of our business strategy. cargo. one shares both our high regard for customer focus and service level, but also our ambition and entrepreneurial spirit to satis-

fy the market. With a presence on cargo.one, JALCARGO is now even more strongly placed to differentiate online and scale new heights of digital success”. To win digital sales globally, airlines today must ensure that visibility of their best offers and customer centricity are at the heart of their strategy. cargo.one will enable JALCARGO teams to capitalise fully on market needs by optimising its offer quality and building industry-leading digital buying journeys. “We are honoured to have been chosen as the trusted partner of Japan’s flag carrier, and look forward to working hand in hand with their teams to advance their digital strategy”, says Moritz Claussen, Founder and Co-CEO of cargo.one. “The partnership will further strengthen our leading position in the Asia Pacific region and deliver a unique and high quality digital offering to freight forwarders around the globe”, he adds. As the primary digital gateway for Japanese air cargo capacity, cargo.one expertly guides airlines including JALCARGO to satisfy the fullest spectrum of online customer needs. The airline will leverage dynamic, unbiased and compliant global insights from the data analysis platform cargo.one360. Furthermore, cargo. one’s Growth Managers will support JALCARGO to raise its digital performance, identify opportunities from the market, and feed learnings into revenue and capacity management. From this Summer, the rollout of JALCARGO capacities on cargo.one will begin with European markets. The partnership is a further step in cargo.one’s programme to expand its participation within the Asia Pacific air cargo market during 2022.

GLOBAL air cargo rates and volumes have continued their gradual overall decline in the last few weeks despite a broadly stable capacity environment, the latest figures from WorldACD Market Data reveal, as air and ocean freight demand experience a slack period after two relentlessly frenetic years. Looking at the week of July 18th to 24th in isolation, worldwide chargeable weight increased slightly, by 1% compared with the week before, and the average worldwide rate decreased slightly, based on the more than 350,000 weekly transactions covered by WorldACD’s data and analysis of the main international air cargo lanes. But comparing the last two weeks with the preceding two weeks, average worldwide rates decreased 2% and chargeable weight fell 6%, while overall capacity remained stable. Chargeable weight from Middle East & South Asia to Europe and Asia Pacific went down particularly strongly in the last two weeks, 19% and 17% respectively. But there were also substantial drops in outbound tonnages from the key Asia Pacific region to various markets, including a 9% drop to Middle East and South Asia, an 8% fall to North America, and a 4% decline to Europe in the two weeks to 24 July. Overall outbound chargeable weight from Asia Pacific dropped by 5%, compared with the previous two weeks, and is down 17% compared with the same two weeks last year. Outbound chargeable weight from Europe also dropped by 5%, compared with the previous two weeks, and Africa outbound volumes were down 14% in the same period. After several weeks of volume decline, outbound chargeable weight from North America appears to have stabilised, although it remains well below its levels this time last year. For the overall global market, compared with last year the last two weeks showed a worldwide rate increase of 14%, despite a weight decline of 9% and a capacity increase of 6%, as higher fuel surcharges continue to inflate overall air cargo prices relative to their levels last year. But that 14% rate differential compared with last year is also slowly diminishing, down from 19% just a month ago.

aircargoweek.com