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WORLD ACW Digital is sponsored by AIRPORTS.COM FREIGHTERS.COM

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The weekly newspaper for air cargo professionals No. 1,137

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21 JUNE 2021

The voice of British freight

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EXCLUSIVE: LANDMARK IN COVID TREATMENT tin Drew, senior vice president sales and cargo, Etihad Aviation Group (left); Rashed Al Qubaisi, CEO, Rafed; and Jeffrey Kemprecos, head, communications, government affairs and market access, GSK about the logistics behind this new medicine.

An innovative treatment

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otrovimab, a landmark treatment for COVID-19, may have seemed a distant dream a year ago but Abu Dhabi Department of Health, Rafed, GSK, and Etihad Cargo made this dream a reality with the first arrival last Wednesday. This expedited landmark shipment made the world’s newest anti-viral treatment for COVID-19, Sotrovimab, available for early treatment of COVID-19 patients in the Middle Eastern country. ACW exclusively interviewed Mar-

“In adult patients meeting certain criteria, Sotrovimab has been shown in interim trials to reduce the risk of hospitalisation for more than 24 hours or death by 85% compared to placebo,” explained Kemprecos. Although the UAE has performed exceptionally well in achieving high levels of immunisation, reducing the number of new COVID-19 cases, there are still cases being recorded. “This is why health authorities insisted on expediting deliveries, to ensure that newly emerging, innovative treatments are available to the patients in need,” Kemprecos added. “It is a long journey from medicines and vaccines discovery and development to manufacturing and delivery to the nearly 150 markets where GSK operate today. “Ensuring delivery is even more of a challenge when trying to meet an accelerated delivery timeline, demanding creative thinking, flexibility and innovative solutions.

“We’ve enjoyed a very close partnership with Etihad Cargo as we worked against very demanding timelines to meet the needs of health authorities and the population here in the UAE,” said Kemprecos. After the USA, which authorised emergency use of Sotrovimab, the UAE has been the first country in the world to issue a marketing approval for the new drug. Once agreement was reached between the Department of Health – Abu Dhabi, Rafed, and GSK, the planning for the first consignment took only three weeks from production to delivery as GSK expedited the process, cutting the delivery time by an impressive 60%.

Medication in motion This first shipment of Sotrovimab is the first of a series of three batches destined for Abu Dhabi. “This shipment consisted of thousands of individual doses with two more to follow within the coming few weeks to maintain a steady flow of the treatment into the UAE,” explained Drew. “The shipment required a strict 2-8°C environment in order to maintain the product integrity across the whole supply chain from origin plant through to being delivered to the final consignee warehouse. We

worked with Envirotainer utilising a RAP E2 electrical active container which has the capability to control the required temperature throughout the journey. “Etihad Cargo’s IATA CEIV certified PharmaLife product provides a strict protocol with all pharmaceutical shipments which provides top priority to vaccines and medicines, while maintaining product integrity throughout the supply chain.”

A landmark milestone Rafed’s Al Qubaisi noted that this was made possible as Abu Dhabi has invested significantly in innovative solutions to handle the increased demand in pharmaceuticals and biologics during the past year. This has included the establishment of the Rafed Distribution Centre, which provides cold storage technology to cater for all temperature bands. “Abu Dhabi has illustrated its success as a logistics hub throughout the pandemic and cemented its position as a pharmaceutical and biologics hub,” added Drew. “Through various private-public partnerships, we have already carried millions of vaccines across our network This shipment represents a landmark milestone and supports Abu Dhabi’s role in the fight against COVID-19.”

INSIDE

EMIRATES TO RESUME MALTA

EMIRATES will resume three weekly services to Malta via Larnaca, Cyprus, from July 14 2021. Flights to/from Malta will operate three ... PAGE 2

RESTART OF TRAVEL AND AIR TRAFFIC

ACROSS Europe, the national airline associations, the Boards of Airline Representatives (BARs), are advocating a fast and consistent ... PAGE 2 FORWARDERS - WATCH OUT

THE recent diversion of a passenger flight by Belarusian authorities and the arrest of a journalist, Raman Pratasevich, has resulted in several ... PAGE 4

PROFILE: PAC

POSTE Air Cargo (PAC) has provided cargo services since its birth about 40 years ago. For a while, the Posteitaliane-owned business ... PAGE 4

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RESTART OF TRAVEL AND AIR TRAFFIC ACROSS Europe, the national airline associations, the Boards of Airline Representatives (BARs), are advocating a fast and consistent approach regarding the restart of travel and air traffic within the EU and with third countries. The BARs involved are criticising the current unco-ordinated situation and point out that, from a technical point of view, the prerequisites for the necessary harmonisation are already in place. Michael Hoppe, secretary general of the Board of Airline Representatives in Germany (BARIG): “People have a right to mobility and freedom to travel. In view of the positive developments of vaccination campaigns and the enduring decrease of infection rates, basic rights and freedoms must now be returned to citizens on the basis of the EU Council of Ministers’ decision of May 27, 2021. However,

the apparently unco-ordinated and constantly changing approach of EU states

with regard to travel regulations is once again leading to great dissatisfaction and

uncertainty among European citizens. “We call on politicians to implement harmonised, practicable regulations now. Mere words are insufficient. “Action must be taken; the technology is ready. My colleagues from the European BARs and I therefore appeal to national politicians, the EU Council, and the EU Commission to implement harmonised procedures and regulations as quickly as possible. “This will allow people to plan their long-awaited trips to see their families and friends or to go on vacation, and business travellers will be able to resume international meetings and appointments.” The BARs advocating these demands include associations in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal and Spain.

Finnair Cargo Emirates to chooses resume flight CargoAi to Malta FINNAIR Cargo’s worldwide cargo offering is now live on CargoAi. State-of-the-art digital booking services – e-quotes and e-booking – are available to forwarders via the leading SaaS platform. “We’re very proud to partner with Finnair Cargo, which is a pioneering cargo carrier in the field of digitalisation and was one of the first to put APIs in place. The airline’s network and its product expertise fully meet the needs of our forwarder clients – so this is excellent news,” said Matthieu Petot, CEO of CargoAi.

Investment Finnair Cargo has invested heavily in digital and technology. Specialising in flying high-value items via the short northern route between Europe and Asia, the carrier covers 19 major cities in Asia, eight in North and Central America and over 100 in Europe. “With CargoAi, we have been moving fast with the integration and we are very happy to be able to provide this service to our customers. We speak the same language and the cargo challenges we face are fully understood and integrated into the tool,” said Karri Kauppi, head of revenue and pricing, Finnair Cargo.

EMIRATES will resume three weekly services to Malta via Larnaca, Cyprus, from July 14 2021. Flights to/from Malta will operate three times weekly through the airline’s existing Larnaca service on its Boeing 777-200LR.

Emirates flight EK 109 will depart Dubai (DXB) every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday at 0800hrs, arriving in Larnaca (LCA) at 1110hrs. The flight will leave Larnaca at 1220hrs, arriving in Malta (MLA) at 1405hrs. The return flight, EK 110 leaves Malta at 1535hrs, arriving in Larnaca at 1900hrs. The flight will leave Larnaca at 2010hrs, arriving 0105hrs in Dubai the next day.

AA Cargo launches two Israel services

AMERICAN Airlines Cargo has launched flights from John. F Kennedy International Airport (JFK) and Miami International Airport (MIA) to Ben Gurion Airport (TLV). Daily, year-round service between New York and the coastal city of Tel Aviv will be operated on a B777-200 aircraft, and the three-times weekly route between Miami and Tel Aviv will also be flown using a B777-200 aircraft. Flights will initially carry around 15 tonnes of freight.

AGI opens new ORD import centre

ALLIANCE Ground International (AGI) has opened up a new 25,300 sq m warehouse operation at Chicago O’Hare International Airport. The new AGI-West Import Facility is located at 1717 Busse Road in Elk Grove village on the western boundary of the Chicago Airport and is along major roads that will allow easy access to the facility. This new facility will serve many of the multiple airlines handled by AGI in Chicago. The facility has 57 dock doors and 34 trailer parking positions.

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NEWS

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FIATA: Forwarders watch out for Belarus

THE recent diversion of a passenger flight by Belarusian authorities and the arrest of a journalist, Raman Pratasevich, has resulted in several measures taken by the international community in condemnation of these events. Freight forwarders should be mindful of the significant risks this poses to freight transport, which may result in disruption to air and possibly land transport between Europe and China.

On May 23, Ryanair flight FR4978 from Athens to Vilnius was intercepted over Belarusian airspace and made to land in Minsk by Belarusian authorities. Substantial measures have been taken by several countries and sanctions have been imposed.

ICAO The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) has been called upon to impar-

tially investigate the situation. On June 4, the European Union (EU) imposed a ban on Belarusian airlines from using EU airspace and called for EU-based carriers to avoid overflight to Belarus. Sanctions on senior Belarus officials are currently being contemplated, targeting key members of Lukashenko’s regime and several stateowned companies. Reports suggest that the UK and the US may adopt similar measures.

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COVID-19 effects Has COVID-19 given PAC any opportunities for cargo traffic as the world adjusts to the new normal? Fava says: “The difficulties caused by the pandemic have certainly led to a sudden expansion of the parcels market, linked to growth in online shopping and the resulting changes in consumer behaviour in Italy.

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Profile: PAC ON WAY TO CEIV

oste Air Cargo (PAC) has provided cargo services since its birth about 40 years ago. For a while, the Posteitaliane-owned business offered passenger transport, That period of operations came to an end in 2018 and is something the company will not repeat. PAC CEO Rosario Fava currently heads up an operation of five Boeing 737-400 freighters and two ATR 72-500 freighters. The aircraft are leased. Fava says: “Jet technology is the priority area for investment.” PAC currently flies to a number of destinations in the Middle East and North Africa; the longest route flown is that between Rome Fiumicino International Airport and Ben Gurion International, Tel Aviv. Fava says: “PAC forms part of Poste Italiane’s logistics infrastructure supporting our operations in the parcels market. As regards cargo transport, PAC can be considered a neutral freight operator. At the moment we have about 40 pilots and 60 operational, technical and administrative personnel.”

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PAC has met this increase in demand by adding capacity and new connections within our national network, guaranteeing operational continuity despite the challenges we faced in terms of safety and restrictions on movement. PAC has also enabled certain logistics chains, such as automotive, to continue to operate in a number of geographical areas by operating “customs-critical” transport services. “Above all, we were able to ensure operational continuity thanks to the professionalism of our personnel and partner companies, adopting all possible measures to protect the health of our employees and safely carry out operations. “We provided PPE and other equipment to both administrative staff and pilots, and we introduced specific procedures to reduce the risk of infection, which were constantly updated to keep pace with changing guidance from scientific experts. We also re-organised pilots’ shifts to reduce overnight stays away from home, invested in technology platforms to facilitate remote working and cleaned and sanitised our premises and aircraft. We also worked closely with our wet lease flight partners to address and resolve emerging global issues. This allowed us to successfully respond to the increase in demand for transport whilst ensuring the reliability, operational flexibility and forward planning capabilities needed to resolve problems as soon as possible, or to mitigate the negative effects of a scenario with which we were not familiar.” Fava considers that PAC is currently competing with the main narrow-body freight operators in the charter market: “At the same time, we are a neutral operator on scheduled flights supplying point-to-point capacity in our domestic market,” he says. “We are working to develop vertical markets, tailoring our processes and procedures to enable us to carry specific commodities, such as pharmaceuticals, perishable goods and DGR. “We have begun the process of obtaining IATA CEIV certification, demonstrating our commitment to supplying logistics services for special products.”

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Ground Handling dnata: there’s a revolution going on in the supply chain Bernd Struck, senior vice president, UAE cargo and airline services, dnata spoke to ACW ACW: dnata announced the launching of the next-generation e-Commerce platform for the cargo community in the UAE. Bernd Struck: We’ve had community system in Dubai for a while, we started this back in 2008 to streamline our processes in the community, from forwarders to third party logistics to ground handlers and logistic providers. We needed to update this system and over the last two years we have been developing the follow-up programme with Kale Logistics. Kale is a specialised small software provider in India and they fully bought in to our vision of how we want develop in the next decade with this new platform. The old system is 13 years old and it doesn’t have the potential to give all the necessary information, like reporting possibilities, technical allowances, SLA controlling and appointment systems in the way the new system can. ACW: Will this be implemented in other locations?

Struck: It’s our intention with our new partner Kale to bring this in to other parts of the world. Our experience matched with the technical abilities of the software is an ideal tool to bring into other areas. There are many places like in the USA, where this could make life for freight forwarders and all parties involved a lot easier. ACW: dnata has already rolled out the Appointment Dock Management system by Calogi. How have customers responded to these digitalisations? Struck: Statistics show that 90% of customers are happy with our new ADM system for booking appointments and 86% of customers are happy with the operational cost and time saving benefits.

Asia and they come here completely prepared. Much of young people’s lives are on their mobile phone! For us it’s then quite easy to get the tech centric mind-set over to our workforce. ACW: With the success of digital advancements so far, what more is in store at dnata? Struck: We are very active in innovations, not only at Dubai but many other dnata stations. We’re working on a number of projects. For example, we are making advancements in cargo measuring and dimensioning. We have tri-

als in place in Dallas, Singapore and Amsterdam on how to do this and once this proof of concept goes through, we are planning on implementing this across our system. We also recently joined IATA Dangerous Goods Order Check System. We will be the first in Dubai to integrate this into our cargo management system, where we will have the complete transparency of dangerous goods for our customers according to their agreed measures with IATA. This is a really big step forward which we will be implementing across the world.

ACW: How have staff responded? Struck: Staff are keen to learn new process and technology. We have a lot of young people come to work in Dubai from Africa and South

STAYING AHEAD OF THE GAME

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avas is a truly Turkish company. Founded in 1958, but with roots dating back to 1933, it was the first company to provide ground-handling services in Turkey. Today, Havas renders ground handling services at 28 airports in the country and two airports abroad, which include Riga Airport in Latvia and Madinah Airport in Saudi Arabia. Staying ahead of the game in 2021, Mete Erna, general manager, explains how Havas is making significant investments in special cargo capabilities: “We want to ensure the highest service quality for this cargo,” he explained to ACW. “We provide services at international standards in all our warehouses at Ankara, Izmir and Antalya airports, particularly at our Istanbul Airport warehouse which has been equipped with state-of-the-art technologies with an investment of €11 million. “With reefer trucks, we provide cargo transfers from warehouse to warehouse including the perishable cargo delivery through our scheduled road feeder services from Istanbul to Antalya, Ankara

and Izmir as part of our customs-bonded transportation services.” Last month, Havas were awarded European Union Good Distribution Practices (GDP) certification for its pharma and perishable cargos, which require cold storage. “This ensures the quality standards of the storage and transportation processes of pharmaceuticals and products that require cold storage at our warehouse at Istanbul Airport,” said Erna.

Vaccine ready Erna explained that Havas is fully equipped for vaccine transportation, with special freezer units that can cool the cargo to minus 18 degrees. “Our facility also includes special areas with capacities of simultaneously working 18 RKN or 9 RKN and 3 RAP containers to be able to store and preserve containers that contain active freezers to transport vaccines. “We will continue to integrate new technologies and applications to our services in this area,” he added.

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UK & IRELAND

CARGO DOES LIKE TO BE BESIDE THE SEASIDE Matharoo: Bournemouth is a viable alternative to the busy London hubs

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The voice of British freight

Robert Keen, The British International Freight Association, director general ACW: The spotlight has been on the logistics sector during the pandemic. How has the sector coped with the challenges?

BEHIND the Californian-style beach promenade, the sandcastles and cafes and bars, sits Bournemouth Airport, riding the waves and proudly announcing its arrival in the air cargo market. For many years a gateway for holidaymakers, it is now successfully crafting a parallel identity to become an air cargo hub of choice in the South. Heading up the cargo ambitions is the newly appointed Bob Matharoo, as head of cargo development. Matharoo (right) has joined Bournemouth Airport from APG Cargo, where he assumed the role of cargo director. Within his 30 years in the airfreight industry he has also worked with Global Airline Services, bmi Cargo and Lufthansa. “Our cargo business is a critical part of our long-term growth plan at Bournemouth Airport and Bob’s appointment as head of cargo development recognises this,” said Steve Gill, managing director, Bournemouth Airport. “Bob is responsible for the development of our cargo business building upon the excellent progress we have made recently. We’re thrilled to have him on board to take the cargo helm and steer our operation forward. His

to further unlock the Airport’s vast and as yet, untapped, potential as a key southern cargo hub.” “I am very excited to be appointed. Cargo plays an increasingly important role at Bournemouth Airport, and ironically the pandemic has created cargo opportunities for the Airport,” Matharoo explained.

A viable alternative to London

knowledge, experience and know-how are already proving invaluable – to ourselves and to our clients. “This is truly the opportune time to join Bournemouth Airport and Matharoo is keen

Irish airfreight on up despite passenger falls

THE Irish Central Statistics Office (CSO) has published Aviation Statistics for Quarter 1 2021. which show a positive uptick for airfreight amid the continuing carnage of passenger traffic levels. The amount of air freight handled by the main airports increased by 3% to 38,347 tonnes in the first three months of 2021 when compared with the same period in 2020. Passenger numbers are received for the five main airports: Dublin, Cork, Shannon, Knock and Kerry. Commenting on the release, Dr Nele van der Wielen, statistician, said: “The figures show a substantial decline in international travel during Q1 2021. There were decreases in passenger numbers for January, February and March. “Data for February 2021 shows a drop of 96% compared to the same month in 2020. These decreases are associated with restrictions imposed due to COVID-19. In Q1 2021, almost 209,000 passengers travelled to Ireland and 210,000 passengers departed from Ireland. These numbers represent a fall of 93% in the number of passengers arriving to or

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departing from Ireland, when compared to the same period in 2020. Exports to Great Britain in April 2021 were €1,031 million, an increase of €306m (+42%) compared with April 2020. The largest increases were in the exports of chemicals and related products and machinery and transport equipment. Exports to Great Britain accounted for 8% of total exports. The value of goods exports to Great Britain in the first four months of 2021 was €4,107m, an increase of €267 million (+7%) on the first four months of 2020. Imports from Great Britain decreased by €229m (-20%) to €920m compared with April 2020. The largest decreases were in the imports of food and live animals and chemicals and related products. Imports from Great Britain were 11% of the value of total imports in April 2021. The value of goods imports from Great Britain for January to April 2021 was €3,277m, a decrease of €2,078m (-39%) compared with January to April 2020. n” From January 1 2021 all trade in goods with Great Britain (excluding Northern Ireland) is treated as non-EU trade

Strategically located on the UK’s south coast, the Airport is a hidden cargo gem. It has the benefits of an uncongested airfield and airspace, short taxi times and no ground holding delays. “Bournemouth is a viable alternative to the busy London hubs,” said Matharoo. It offers easy road accessibility to the 15 largest cities in Southern England, with an average drive time of 90 minutes to London. On average, busy London cargo hubs can have a three to six-hour aircraft to landside processing time, compared to an average of an hour at Bournemouth Airport. The airport retains control of the end-to-end processes on site to ensure this efficiency. The “one stop shop” solution on offer includes air traffic and airfield services, all airside aircraft and cargo handling services, all ancillary handling services and operation of cargo terminal and customers facilities. “Customer service is at the heart of our differentiated offer, made easier by managing all components of the operation,” said Matharoo.

Cargo opportunities Although the pandemic has caused widespread disruption to the air cargo industry, demand is high and valuable opportunities have arisen. “European Aviation is based at BOH and has 15 AB340/600 aircrafts of which six have been converted into freighters. European is operating daily flights from China, which is supporting the nation with PPE and COVID test kits. “Since last year we have also operated three to five weekly BOH-JFK-BOH flights operated by European Aviation. BOH has the ability to support freighter operations into the south of UK, which can feed the whole of UK,” noted Matharoo. “My role is to ensure I put BOH Airport on the map ensuring carriers, integrators, charter brokers, cargo agents and all links in our wonderful logistical chain are aware of our valued services, creating a customer-focused southern air cargo hub.”

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Keen: Logistics businesses have shown impressive resilience throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, adapting their operations swiftly and efficiently in the face of extreme pressures to keep the nation stocked with the goods it needs. There has been significant growth in the warehousing sector, which has seen a trend towards bigger warehouses, and a radical change in the occupier profile of warehouses. ACW: How have warehouse occupiers changed? Keen: Back in 2015, high street retailers were the dominant occupiers, now the leading occupier group is 3PLs, and online retailers, with the global pandemic and Brexit driving and amplifying these core changes. As retailers move from high street premises to online channels to serve consumer demand for home delivery, more fulfilment and distribution facilities will be needed. ACW: What impact has Brexit had on British forwarders? Keen: Since 2021 started, the impact of Brexit has had an effect on every stage of the logistics process, from transport fees and new limitations to restrictions on imported goods. At the start of the year, there were some issues in terms of delays in the ports and administrative challenges that affected lead-times. Today, after almost six months, the routines and processes now are in place and our members have adapted to the new situation with many investing in facilities as well as customs staff, for example. ACW: How have BIFA members reacted? Keen: The experience of our members since January 1 2021 has clearly shown that large sections of the trading community have not been prepared for the changes in processes brought in by phase one of the Border Operating Model. As the trade association that truly represents the UK’s freight forwarding businesses that manage a large proportion of the UK’s visible trade, we continue to express significant concerns regarding phases two and three of the Border Operating Model; and various Government departments have been unable to provide satisfactory answers to many of these. Actions speak louder than words. With yet another deadline looming, June 25 for importers that have taken advantage of HMRC’s Delayed Declaration Scheme from the beginning of the year, BIFA issued a stern warning advising its freight forwarding members to be very careful with any business that they are offered from traders that have utilised the scheme.

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MENZIES: PROUD TO BE ONE OF SCOTLAND’S OLDEST BUSINESSES Menzies Aviation has come a long way to be the company it is today, with more than 200 locations in more than 35 countries, across six continents. Not bad for a part of a company founded in 1833.

We’re proud of our heritage as one of Scotland’s long-standing and well-known businesses which has constantly evolved throughout its 188 year history and now we are investing in our digital capabilities in order to future-proof our business,” said Robert Fordree, executive vice president, cargo.

“More recently, we’ve been guided by our airline partners and their growth strategies, which has meant that we have entered into markets in the Americas to offer services to our partners there. “We will continue to work very closely with our partners to identify further opportunities for their businesses and ours alike as we progress further into the post-pandemic recovery period,” he added.

Bolstering tech solutions Fordree notes that Menzies dedicated vice president is driving the development of the company’s digital strategy and is bolstering tech solutions worldwide. “Some of our current focus areas include looking at how to engage with forwarders for deliveries, which is particularly important at present given the necessity for a reduction in human interaction and touch-points,” said Fordree. “We are also exploring new-generation autonomous vehicles, such as driverless forklifts, to ensure the highest levels of efficiency and safety for both our operations and people.”

Journey to carbon neutrality The Scottish company has committed to becoming carbon neutral by 2033. This ambitious target is 17 years ahead of the UK Government’s goal of being net-zero by 2050. “We’re starting to engage with airport authorities about the use of electric ground handling equipment, as we’re looking to increasingly implement modern technology across our global operations to accelerate our journey towards carbon neutrality. “A key focus area is the integration of electric charging points across our stations, but this needs to be done in close collaboration with the airport authorities. We’re moving towards an all-electric fleet, however some technological developments still need to take place in order to support this transition, such as the capabilities of airport grids. “Elsewhere, we’re supporting initiatives such as paperless systems, to streamline our work and further reduce our business’ impact on the environment. In our warehouses, we’ve installed LED lighting systems to ensure that our carbon emissions are reduced across all aspects of our operations. “We are also looking into offsetting projects and how this could play a part in our sustainability efforts. It is important that we engage with our airline partners to ensure that these initiatives can have maximum impact and form part of the wider industry move towards carbon neutrality.”

From Scotland to the world Fordree explained how Menzies are focusing on emerging markets like Pakistan and Iraq to look at how the company can expand operations, as some of the more traditional markets have become quite saturated. “Through acquisitions, organic growth and strategic partnerships, we have successfully expanded our operations from 36 stations to 53 across our cargo network. We see great potential for further growth in the Middle East, Asia and Latin America. “Our ventures in these markets present exciting opportunities to accelerate the growth of burgeoning aviation sectors. In Iraq and Pakistan we are playing a key role in training-up the local workforce to ensure world-class safety standards and customer experience for our cargo handling operations.

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Profile for Azura International

ACW 21st June 2021  

ACW 21st June 2021  

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