ACW 19th September 22

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WORLD AIRPORTS .COM ACW Digital is sponsored by FREIGHTERS.COM

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The weekly newspaper for air cargo professionals No. 1,198

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19 September 2022

Turkey grows into a world logistics centre ...

WORLD’S AVIATION UNIONS UNVEIL PLAN TO END CHAOS

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INSIDE

STRONGER REGULATIONS FOR ...

COMING out of the pandemic, the aviation industry has been facing tough challenges. Slower than anticipated recovery has made ... PAGE 2

KALE TO DIGITALISE CARGO ...

KALE Info Solutions (Kale), the US subsidiary of Kale Logistics Solutions, has entered into a partnership with Chicago Rockford International Airport (RFD)...

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he world’s aviation unions have endorsed a framework designed to stop travel chaos becoming a permanent feature of the aviation industry, amid warnings that the industry is on course for a prolonged period of recurring crises. It comes as new polling of over 3,500 aviation workers across 86 countries found that 89% believe the quality of jobs in the aviation industry are on the decline, while only 23% said they felt respected by their employer. Furthermore, only 21% said that their government is doing a good job managing the aviation industry. The major pillars of the framework, titled the ‘New Deal for Aviation’, will be delivered to the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) Assembly later this month, calling for the immediate creation of national aviation bodies to address an industry that has “become environmentally, economically, and socially unsustainable.” Coordinated by the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) and endorsed by over 250 affiliated unions, representing over 1 million

workers, new aviation bodies would bring together governments, employers, unions and the public to create country specific national aviation plans. These aviation plans will allow transport departments, aviation authorities, employers and unions to address the structural causes of this crisis, with a focus on the significant impact that decades of deregulation and fragmentation has had on the aviation industry’s resilience. This action from unions comes as the aviation industry reaches breaking point, as a result of years of deregulation, privatisation, and the erosion of employee working conditions. “Decades of decline in workers’ wages and working conditions have led the aviation industry to the edge of perpetual chaos,” Stephen Cotton, general secretary of the ITF, commented. “Without a coordinated response that addresses both immediate and longer-term worker shortages, alongside structural transformation, aviation will continue to move from crisis to crisis. Governments have lost control of aviation in their

territories, and urgently need to get it back.” “Aviation needs to be recognised and treated as both a public good and global economic gateway. By coordinating on national aviation plans, employers, unions, and governments, will protect aviation in the short term, while building an industry that is fit for purpose, resilient to future crises, that serves in workers’ and the public’s interest,” Cotton concluded. “We need to restore the checks and balances of global aviation,” Edgardo Llano, chair of the ITF Civil Aviation Section and general secretary of Argentine union Asociación del Personal Aeronáutico (APA), said. “In what was once a nationalised industry in countries around the world, the scale has moved too far towards serving the interests of CEOs and shareholders above those of workers and passengers.” ITF polling also found that only 11% of aviation workers believe that their employers act in their interest, while 89% believe that they act purely in the interests of the company’s shareholders.

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COOL CHAIN ASSOCIATION ...

THE Cool Chain Association (CCA) is celebrating its 20th anniversary and entering into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Perishable Products ... PAGE 6

DIGITALISATION CAN’T ...

WITH the airfreight sector embracing digitalisation, WebCargo is positioning itself as a company that connects the industry ... PAGE 10

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NEWS

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Stronger regulations for sustainable Unilode and OnAsset announce aviation push the industry to search deployment of the world’s first for innovative solutions airborne IoT network COMING out of the pandemic, the aviation industry has been facing tough challenges. Slower than anticipated recovery has made numerous businesses continue operating in a survival mode, while stronger regulations for sustainability are changing long-established processes. While achieving sustainability in certain areas of aviation can take longer, aircraft exterior cleaning, on the other hand, is ready to offer such solutions to ground handling, maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) service providers and airlines. What has been regarded as a standard for years, the traditional way of cleaning aircraft used up hundreds of litres of water, massive amounts of chemical cleaning liquids, large equipment, a lot of manpower and aircraft downtime. With the industry searching for innovation and more sustainable ways of washing aircraft exterior while saving time and hands needed, Jan Brunstedt, CEO of Nordic Dino Robotics AB and the creator of Nordic Dino, the leading aircraft exterior cleaning robot, stated that semi-automatic exterior cleaning robots are the alternative MROs and airlines looking for.

“The industry is frantically looking for the ‘perfect solution’ so to speak. The post-pandemic period hasn’t been kind to many and the interest in finding innovative, eco-friendly solutions is very high. That’s why lots of ground handling service providers, MROs and even airlines are taking part in a number of expos this year, like the GSE Expo Europe in Paris, for example. They’re searching for options that would tick all the necessary boxes. For the sustainable aircraft exterior cleaning conundrum, semi-automatic cleaning robots could be the answer they’re looking for.” Semi-automatic cleaning robots, according to Brunstedt, heavily reduce not only manual

work needed to properly wash the aircraft – together eliminating the possibility for human error – but also the aircraft downtime, which is a key moment for MROs and airlines that are striving for speedier industry recovery. “We see that the interest in semi-automatic solutions is growing,” Brunstedt noted. “Especially now, when sustainability is playing such a major role in shaping aviation in general. We have also taken a step further with the semi-automatic washing robots ourselves and will be launching the second generation electric robot at the GSE Europe Expo with a full demo as well. The need for greener solutions is higher than ever and making such solutions available is our top priority.” The new electric semi-automatic washing robot boasts simplified design and components, introducing one versatile chassis for all three aircraft body types – narrow-body (NB), wide-body (WB) and extra wide-body (XWB). The new version also has CAN bus electronic control systems with built-in and enhanced safety features, simplified electronic and hydraulic systems, option for remote access to CAN bus system data, improved access to

major components for easier maintenance, as well as enhanced user experience with new generation wireless portable control module and improved operating envelope. The working capacity of the electric robot pushes 4-5 hours without additional charging – enough for a one night’s operations. “Our hope is to offer that ‘perfect solution’ MROs, ground handlers and airlines are looking for, helping them introduce more sustainability to the aircraft maintenance processes like fuselage washing. Seeking innovation and offering cutting-edge solutions should be at the forefront for aviation in order to reach the set goals for reducing the carbo footprint.”

In memory of our late sovereign, who devoted her life to duty and the service of her people

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 21st April 1926 - 8th September 2022 2

ACW 19 SEPTEMBER 2022

UNILODE Aviation Solutions and OnAsset Intelligence have announced a massive network upgrade that now includes inflight tracking capabilities. “Everything in the supply chain is becoming connected, and Unilode is leading the charge” Adam Crossno, OnAsset Intelligence CEO, said. “We can now deliver

SENTRY 600 FlightSafe gateway is already underway. The SENTRY 600 is the world’s most powerful IoT gateway, including Bluetooth, cellular, Wi-Fi and LoRa connectivity, combined with GPS, a full sensor suite and an e-paper screen and keypad. The device has been designed to capture tens of thousands of sensor tags in a single scan cycle,

seamless location, status and chain-of-custody visibility across all aspects of the aviation supply chain, and that’s never been possible before. This is an evolution two decades in the making. The key to digital enablement is a great network, and that is what we’ve built in partnership with Unilode.” Continuing the successful multi-year project to digitally enable Unilode’s entire ULD fleet, the rollout of OnAsset’s patented

plowing the road for a future where all assets and shipments in the aviation supply chain are digitally connected. “We are excited to upgrade Unilode’s ULD reader network to the new SENTRY 600 gateway which will allow us to enhance our global network reach and reliability, and enable us and our customers to reap all benefits of our digital solutions in the years to come,” Ross Marino, Unilode Aviation Solutions CEO, said.

August air cargo data could signal a better-thanexpected peak season GLOBAL air cargo market performance data for August offered a glimmer of hope for volumes in the upcoming peak season as the decline in demand seen over the previous four months slowed, according to the latest analysis from CLIVE Data Services, part of Xeneta. After 8% and 9% year-on-year falls in demand in June and July 2022, August volumes were a more modest 5% adrift of the August 2021 level, and 4% compared to the pre-pandemic 2019. Despite continuing supply chain chaos, global air cargo capacity in August recovered 7% from the same period last year, thanks to

the surge of international summer travels in the northern hemisphere. Expectations of a muted Q4 peak season remain due to continued supply chain disruptions but Niall van de Wouw, chief airfreight officer at Xeneta, believes the unexpected deviation from previous months seen in August could signal a better-than-expected end to the year for the air cargo market. “If the fall in demand is easing, however, as August indicates, that capacity shift could see us return to a seller’s market again and load factors return to the mid 70% to 80% range. It is fair to assume volumes will be higher in November than in August.”

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NEWS Rhenus Air & Ocean named official logistics supplier for Team Belgium A

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RHENUS Air & Ocean will support the Belgian Olympic team on its way to the Summer Olympic Games in Paris in 2024 as the official supplier for all transport and logistics requirements. Rhenus Air & Ocean is taking on the responsibility of transporting all sports equipment for the Olympic team in Belgium ranging from bicycles and vaulting poles to sailing catamarans. The gear will be transported door-to-door for various competitions globally using road, air and ocean freight services. “The logistics needs of the Olympic Team Belgium delegation require customised transport solutions for the complex and time-sensitive character of Olympic competitions and training camps. Carefree logistics operations are paramount in the preparation and wellbeing of our athletes and delegation members,” Cédric Van Branteghem, the CEO of the Belgian Olympic and Interfederal Committee, said. “It’s an honour to support the Belgian Olympic team – so to speak, ‘Belgium’s best’ – by providing logistics services for the Olympic competitions so they are able to continuously deliver top performances,” Frank Roderkerk, CEO of Rhenus Air & Ocean North-West Europe, said.

Kale to digitalise cargo at Chicago Rockford Airport

KALE Info Solutions (Kale), the US subsidiary of Kale Logistics Solutions, has entered into a partnership with Chicago Rockford International Airport (RFD), USA, to implement its Airport Cargo Community System (ACS). Kale’s ACS implementation will reduce manual documentation and data entry time for cargo handlers at RFD, increasing process efficiency at the airport as well as reducing truck congestion and streamlining cargo flows. RFD has seen annual air cargo throughput triple over the last five years, with a 25% increase in volumes recorded in 2021. The airport also has increasingly become an important Midwest hub for e-commerce and international trade. “As the fastest growing cargo airport on the

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planet, we’ve partnered with Kale to provide the RFD cargo community with the most efficient, transparent cargo IT platform in the marketplace,” Mike Dunn, executive director of RFD, explained. “Kale will allow us to further streamline the digitisation and movement of cargo at RFD today and to keep up with the demands of our growing cargo operations in the future.” “This agreement marks another step forward in Kale’s strategy to expand its customer base in North America,” Amar More, president of Kale Info Solutions, said. “Our ACS is built on the principle of enabling a cohesive ecosystem and driving efficiencies in air cargo operations with the highest level of data accuracy, security, and compliance.

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NEWS Cool Chain Association celebrates 20th anniversary

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THE Cool Chain Association (CCA) is celebrating its 20th anniversary and entering into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Perishable Products Export Control Board (PPECB). CCA was established in 2002 to encourage collaboration in the temperature-controlled supply chain industry in order to reduce food loss and waste in the perishables sector as well as benefiting the pharma community. The MoU, signed at the CCA’s Airfreight Pharma Event, means that CCA and the PPECB will collaborate on analysing research initiatives into perishable exports by air from South Africa. “CCA is in a unique position to act as a neutral platform for all sectors in the temperature-controlled supply chain to collaborate on tangible initiatives,” Stavros Evangelakakis, chairman of CCA and head of global healthcare at Cargolux Airlines, said. “Our community is celebrating its 20th anniversary at a time when it is more vital than ever to come together to make a difference. “We are proud that our members continue to do just that and are driving new ideas that will have a lasting legacy.”

IAG Cargo trials first electric terminal tractor at London Heathrow airport

IAG Cargo, the cargo division of International Airlines Group (IAG) has begun to trial the first electric terminal tractor, known as a Terberg YT203EV, at London Heathrow airport. This is the first electric Terberg operating airside worldwide. By replacing an existing terminal tractor with an electric Terberg, approximately 30 tonnes of CO2 will be saved per vehicle per year. IAG Cargo is trialling the electric Terberg YT203EV for 12 months, with the ambition to transition its current diesel fleet to more sustainable alternatives, including electric. In the coming years the trial will help IAG Cargo and its partners understand the challenges the business may face when adopting an electric

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airside fleet, how future electric vehicles could be charged and what additional infrastructure will be needed to support a fleet of electric terminal tractors. “We’re delighted to be partnering with Terberg to trial the first electric Terberg at London Heathrow – this is an exciting advancement for IAG Cargo as we strive to lead on sustainability and be fit for future,” David Rose, chief transformation officer at IAG Cargo commented. “We are continuously looking at ways that reduce our impact on the environment whilst improving our customer offering. This trial is part of a wider effort supporting our commitment to making IAG Cargo, and the wider industry, more sustainable.”

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ADVERTORIAL

Solidarity Transport Hub set to integrate air, rail and road transport in Poland, boost people’s mobility and improve supply chains in Europe

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oland’s new transport development programme is expected to serve tens of millions of passengers from 2028, integrating air, rail, and road networks to improve the flow of passenger traffic and cargo transport through the region. The new greenfield airport named Solidarity Airport, the construction of which was initiated by the Polish government will be strategically located in the centre of the country between the capital city of Warsaw and Poland’s third largest city, Łódź. Boosting connectivity and ease of mobility STH rail investments include a total of 2,000 kilometres of new lines, in particular highspeed railway lines, to be built by the end od 2034. The STH Rail Programme consists of a total of 12 railway lines, including 10 “spokes” connecting various regions of Poland with Warsaw and the Solidarity Airport. The new network is expected to provide access within a maximum of 2.5 hours from most major Polish cities to the new airport and the country’s capital. What is more important, the construction of the Solidarity Transport Hub will provide much more convenience, saving travelers’ time and money. Planning a trip abroad will no longer require hours of searching for connections or using transfer hubs in nearby countries. Instead of that, travelers will be able to reach such destinations as Australia, South America or Africa directly from the center of Poland via an airport that will be connected by high-speed railway network to provinces and cities across the country. By 2060, the Solidarity Transport Hub is about to attract ca. 850 million additional passengers, according to air traffic forecasts by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). It is expected to reach 40 million passengers in 2035, 50 million in 2044 and 65 million in 2060.

STH moves forward Planning and preparatory work for the implementation of this largest infrastructure investment in Poland for over 70 years began in 2017. In the first half of this year alone, the investor’s variant of the Solidarity Airport was presented, along with the accompanying infrastructure. More than a dozen months ago the STH company has launched hydrogeological studies (drilling, water and soil sampling, laboratory tests) at the airport construction area. At the same time, the nature inventory was completed and the nature inventory report was finalised. Contractors have also been selected in the tender for preparatory/construction work at the airport construction site, and a number of other key tenders have been announced.. To respond to ahead needs, the STH company announced, among others, preliminary market consultations for the implementation of construction works for railway investments. Now, the STH company conducts preparatory works (e.g., feasibility studies) at 1300 km out of 2000 km new railway lines. The whole railway part of the STH project should be completed by 2034.

www.cpk.pl/en CPK doc.indd 1

Enhancing security Even though the Solidarity Transport Hub is dedicated to civil aviation, the investment has been recognised by former commander of US ground forces in Europe General Ben Hodges for capability and capacity that “no other transport hub in Poland or elsewhere in Eastern Europe can match”. This allows to increase the security of the region by providing it with the appropriate transport capabilities to enable the smooth and efficient transfer of military units, equipment, goods, or humanitarian aid when needed. A significant advantage of STH, compared with other similar projects, is the intermodality and excellent connection of the airport with every part of the country and key European destinations. Despite its “civilian nature”, STH is also of significant importance from the point of view of our country’s and Europe’s defence. Of course, it will not be a military base, but nevertheless an extremely important part of NATO’s eastern flank – If only because of significant increase of military mobility,” said Minister Marcin Horała Government Plenipotentiary for the Solidarity Transport Hub. Taking care of the environment Currently, air cargo usually arrives in Poland by landing and taking off from airports in nearby countries before making the final journey to the country by road. This means that goods reach Poland in the least eco-friendly way and customers are paying more for goods due to increased transport costs. The construction of STH will solve these problems, reducing the negative impact of transportation on the environment and reducing costs for domestic consumers. IATA forecasts that the Solidarity Airport could gain up to 20% of market share in Central and Eastern Europe in the short term. Without it, Poland risked missing out on 35 million tonnes of cargo by 2060. Instead, it has a potential to become one of the largest cargo hubs in the region, handling 1.76 tonnes per year by 2060, according to IATA. International cooperation At the beginning of the summer vacations, representatives of the boards of RB Rail AS and STH met in Riga to discuss the possibilities and forms of cooperation. As a result, the both parties signed an agreement aimed at coordinating of plans, activities, and the exchanging of expertise. Rail Baltica is a greenfield rail transport infrastructure project aimed at integrating the Baltic countries with the rest of the European rail network. It foresees the construction of a new 870 kilometre-long electrified double-track railway line through the three Baltic countries and connecting it to Poland and Finland. The width of the new railroad line will be 1435 mm (standard European gauge) and its route includes: Tallinn Parnava - Riga - Panevėžys - Kaunas, the Polish-Lithuanian border, and the KaunasVilnius connection. “The countries of the Central and Eastern European region can bring unique value to the entire EU. The Solidarity Transport Hub iscommitted to developing a common railway network for our region. Signed agreement is a major step towards cross-border integration leading better connections and greater cohesion”- said Mikołaj Wild, CEO of STH.

www.cpk.pl/en 13/09/2022 11:23


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WCS PREVIEW

FEATURE

IATA World Cargo Symposium to showcase the industry’s resilience

THE World Cargo Symposium (WCS) comes to London as the industry wrestles with a number of challenges, including the lingering impact of the pandemic and the ongoing disruption caused by transportation and supply chain issues. “We’ve had quite a lot of impact to the industry. We had Covid, and now that’s settling and under control in many places, but now we have geopolitical issues. So, the industry has really has this necessity to showcase how resilient it actually is,” Brendan Sullivan, IATA’s global head of cargo, said. “We want to make sure that we have the opportunity to highlight the value of air cargo and that there is still this strong desire to move things around by air.” In a rapidly changing world, where companies and industries need to be prepared to adapt, IATA looks to focus on agility and resilience as two of the key features throughout the symposium, showing the sector is continuing to become more agile and robust. Sullivan highlights how this was visible during the pandemic when the air cargo business “maintained international supply chains that were otherwise completely closed,” with WCS looking at the lessons learned from that period, as it’s probably that such a situation will happen again in one way, shape or form. “The business environment in general is quite challenging. The World Bank expects energy costs to soar, compared to last year. These are some economic and political realities that the airline business is facing.” Financially, the air cargo side of the industry helped to provide much needed revenue for airlines that had seen passenger numbers plummet during Covid, with the airfreight business reaching a third or more of airline revenues - a record revenue for the industry as a whole. “The lessons to learn there are: How do we continue to do that at scale and continue to adapt to the different changes that will come?” In times of trouble, opportunity knocks as the need to adapt encourages business to rethink their practices and look at how to become more efficient and effective. Digitalisation is now a at the forefront of people’s minds within the industry, having accelerated significantly in the last 18 months. “We look at digitalisation, there was huge effort made throughout the pandemic to maintain open communication and supply chains.... there’s opportunity for even more progress as we transition to much more digitally-focused

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businesses.” “It’s an imperative in air cargo. It’s not an option....If we want to be an agile, resistant industry these changes are absolutely necessary.” Another key development in the industry that WCS will be exploring is sustainability. “It’s a bit of a journey,” Sullivan admitted, highlighting how new aircraft technology that improves operational efficiencies and sustainable aviation fuel will play a “significant role.” “From a WCS perspective, we will bring the sustainable aviation fuel discussion into the cargo space.” The event comes to London after previous conferences in the United States, Singapore and elsewhere. While WCS moves from place

Taking the pulse of the industry THE airfreight industry’s attempts to recover from the pandemic have been rocked by supply chain challenges that have forced companies to adapt rapidly and ensure the entire supply chain is more efficient and transparent. “Our message will be loud and clear: Digitisation with cargo community systems is

tions, best practices, trends and business opportunities. We will be showcasing our next-gen digital Air Cargo solutions at the WCS 2022.” “This event will be an important ground for companies like us to promote digitisation and create awareness on sustainability through paperless operations in air cargo.

critical to change the way cargo is handled forever and for better. The industry needs to adopt digitisation to growth and technology in no longer just good to have but a must have,” Amar More, CEO and co-founder of Kale Logistics Solutions, said, looking ahead to the World Cargo Symposium (WCS). “Events like the IATA WCS have now transpired to be the industry voice where the industry gathers not just to network but discuss key industry challenges, innova-

These events are also the most efficient way to meet the customers and prospects together in one location.” Events, like WCS, “are very important because we meet the entire industry and the key decision makers at these conferences. They too come with a mindset to explore solutions and products which are future-ready. We get to take the pulse of the industry.”

Improving ULD care across the industry

to place each year, the UK was a perfect spot for the 2022 symposium, as it has opened up post-pandemic, is well connected and is a hub of interest and activity for the cargo sector. Sullivan reflected the views of many planning to attend the event, describing it as an “incredibly important opportunity to meet people, to network, to have a bit of fun and leave having learned something.” “We’ll have economic market insight from experts, different keynote addresses where we’re getting wide views, workshops on different areas and other summits as well, so it should be a really interesting week of discussions.”

Unit Load Devices (ULDs) are a crucial element of the airfreight sector, transporting cargo safely and securely to their destination. Jettainer reliably manages a fleet of approximately 100,000 ULDs for its customers, spread over 500 locations worldwide. One of the challenges impacting the industry, which Jettainer would like to address ahead of the World Cargo Symposium, is the mishandling of ULDs. With ULDs, the biggest issue for most self-handled companies globally, is managing their fleet to ensure availability and sufficient supply to meet customers demand. This task even becomes more difficult when ULDs are mishandled, which can result in damages that take them out of operation and lead to avoidable repair costs for airlines. Despite their optimised ULD management processes and its global network of independent repair stations,

Jettainer is also impacted, though to a relatively lesser extent. “ULDs are the most neglected, expensive asset at any airport,” Shailendar Kothari, the managing director of Jettainer Americas, said, “they are treated roughly, to say the least.” “If you look around, you will see unprotected ULDs at any airport. They are not stored correctly, storage infrastructure is often inadequate. At airports, there is often no one to take ownership of ULDs.” “A rough calculation tells me that the industry faces an inefficiency of about 25-30% in overall ULD handling due to the mistreatment of the assets, compounded by missing or bad data quality apart from other factors”, Kothari claimed. “If the industry can ensure the proper handling of ULDs, ULDs can become more productive, thereby each ULD flying more legs per month.”


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WCS PREVIEW

Digitalisation can’t happen in a vacuum

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WITH the airfreight sector embracing digitalisation, WebCargo is positioning itself as a company that connects the industry, having created the largest digital platform linking airlines and forwarders. Despite being a company that recognises the benefits of technological advancements, the company’s CEO Manuel Galindo stated that “one key insight I’ve had from the past three

creating the basis for digital connectivity across leading airlines and forwarders. A handshake comes long before the API connection. And a lot of handshakes happen at IATA’s World Cargo Symposium.” Having only been founded back in 2008, WebCargo is already connected to over 30 of the world’s largest airlines, “with many more on the way,” Galindo highlighted. “While the industry has made enormous strides in progress over the past few years, many of our contacts are still trying to figure out exactly how digitalisation fits into their plans. This is a prime event to sit down, grab a cup of coffee, and help work on joint roadmaps.” “We’re already supporting much more than one hundred thousand bookings every single quarter, while shifting from digitising airlines that represent 5% of global air cargo capacity in 2018 to well over 40% this year,” Galindo stated, “my key message to everyone participating is that it is a true privilege to take an active role in helping the industry digitise.” “Digitalisation can’t happen in a vacuum. Tech solutions need to solve for real-life industry challenges or they’ll be doomed to fail. I’m looking forward to meeting old friends, some new friends, and hearing front-line insights into the industry. This will help ensure that WebCargo’s solutions solve for today’s problems as well

years is that digital connectivity is not an alternative to in-person meetings; it’s more of an amplifier.” “Seeing people in person is incredible, especially after such a prolonged period away from face to face meetings,” Galindo said. “Human relationships remain at the heart of what we do,

as 2030’s obstacles.” “Air cargo has proven to be vital over the past three years; the plans we make at IATA will help ensure it remains up to the challenge,” Galindo said, hosting WCS “is another testament to the fantastic role that IATA is playing in bringing the industry together.”


FEATURE

European Cargo targets six A340 freighters by early 2023 from Bournemouth base EUROPEAN Cargo expects to have converted six Airbus A340 long-haul aircraft into full freighters by early 2023, as it works in partnership with Bournemouth Airport’s Cargo First operation to build a strategic air freight hub on England’s South coast. European Cargo’s managing director Iain Edwards said the first conversion of a former Virgin Atlantic A340 was undergoing flight tests this month, and subject to regulatory approval could enter service in a matter of weeks. “By the time we’ve done our third aircraft we think we can turn a conversion around every six weeks and that will be a game-changer for UK air freight. We expect to have six aircraft available by early 2023 with options on many more, and we already have customers waiting for them, particularly with the continued growth in e-commerce,” Edwards said

European’s growing capacity will be highlighted at IATA’s World Cargo Symposium this month by Cargo First, Bournemouth Airport’s dedicated cargo handling service. Bournemouth Airport has been working hand in hand with European since 2020 to develop a strategic air freight hub at Bournemouth. “European is fast becoming the biggest wide-bodied cargo operation in the UK,” Bob Matharoo, Bournemouth Airport’s head of cargo, said. “When we benchmarked our performance with a global logistics company for a period of 18 months we proved we can get consignments to London warehouses in half the time. “We think that’s an opportunity for significant growth in cargo operations from Bournemouth Airport and we look forward to discussing that opportunity with delegates at the World Cargo Symposium.”

Airbus is back

COMING off the back of a successful period for Airbus, the company is looking to continue securing orders for the world’s newest freighter - the A350F. “We want to reassure the community that Airbus is back and Airbus is taking everything very seriously,” Crawford Hamilton, the head of freighter marketing, at Airbus said, stating that the company is hoping to use the World Cargo Symposium (WCS) to ensure the industry recognises the key selling points of the A350F. “You’re going there to show the flag. We’re going there to show we’ve got good product and we’re going there to show people that there’s now choice now in the market,” Hamilton added, discussing the company’s main message ahead of the show. Airbus takes great pride in how the development of the A350F involved substantial feedback and discussions with customers to ensure the aircrafts they produce meet their needs. “We’ve been speaking to customers since about 2015. It’s very much a customer-driven aircraft. We have altered what we’ve been doing in the aircraft in light of customers comments...It is not taking the approach of ‘you can have any colour you want as long as it’s black.’ It is giving customers what they’ve asked for.” That’s why events like WCS provide an opportunity for the company to hear from a wide variety of experts and interest groups, as much as networking with colleagues, clients and potential customers. “It’s undoubtedly a listening and learning opportunity,” Hamilton said, citing how you’ve got panels of experts “digging into the detail,” giving Airbus an appreciation of what’s going on in the industry and allowing them to communicate that back to their own company. That’s why, for Airbus, events like WCS aren’t about making big announcements but are about being “part of this worldwide community that gathers together once a year.”

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ADVERTORIAL

CHENNAULT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT ON U.S. GULF COAST HAS NEW AIR CARGO FACILITY READY FOR LEASE Incentives, ground equipment support also announced

Chennault International Airport is ready to handle air cargo operations—and is seeking the ideal tenant partner to make it happen. Centrally located in Lake Charles, Louisiana, along the mid-U.S. Gulf Coast, Chennault International Airport is an emerging national aerospace hub that has kept military, corporate and personal aircraft in tip-top condition for more than three decades.

Chennault is served by an accredited air traffic control tower. FBO services are provided by Million Air. Even with all the development at Chennault, there’s still room to grow, with additional land available to expand the air cargo site. Much of the industry is already familiar with Chennault and the Lake Charles region because of its first-class tenant partners, including Northrop Grumman, Million Air, LandLocked Aviation Services and Citadel Completions.

Now it’s ready to enter the air cargo sector. Chennault International Airport—which will be an exhibitor at November’s Air Cargo Forum Miami and Transport Logistic Americas Conference—has just completed a $4 million air cargo pass-through facility that is now available for lease.

Chennault’s attractive competitive advantages include: l A new 10,000-square-foot air cargo facility, with room to expand. l Landing fee incentives / waived landing fees. l Significant ramp space with room for oversized cargo, equipment staging, and trucks. The facility includes a 1,000-square-foot office area and an expandable 9,000-square-foot warehouse.

l Uncongested airspace.

The adjacent aircraft parking apron is 127,000 square feet, able to accommodate both large and small cargo aircraft.

l Connected to deepwater port by adjacent rail service.

Chennault is offering a package of air cargo incentives with a potential value of $300,000-plus, including two years of free rent on the new air cargo facility with a five-year commitment. The airport will also waive landing fees for all commercial air cargo landings for two years, reflecting its strong commitment to collaboration. The airport also has approved the acquisition of more than $500,000 for specialized air cargo ground equipment to mitigate a capital expense that otherwise can be a barrier to start-up activity. “The airport will work closely with industry partners regarding specific equipment needs for their operation and then help secure that equipment,” said Kevin Melton, Chennault International Airport’s executive director. “We are leaving no stone unturned. The willingness to look for opportunities outside of the norm is critical to remaining relevant in our dynamic world today.” Chennault has a 10,701-foot-long runway, the longest at any airport between Houston, Texas, and Cape Canaveral, Florida. It’s capable of handling all aircraft flying today. There’s ample adjacent ramp space and uncongested airspace.

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l Experience in hosting air cargo operations. l Adjacent interstate highway. l South-central U.S. location. Chennault offers relief to airlines and freight forwarders who need space and attention. It offers value for companies to move goods through a brand-new facility built specifically for air cargo. Best of all, Chennault provides a low-cost alternative to the larger markets—where expense, ground delays and airspace delays limit the efficient flow of goods.

CONTACT:

Contact Chennault International Airport’s economic development team at ciaa@chennault.org or 1-800-272-2422.

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TURKEY GROWS INTO A WORLD LOGISTICS CENTRE

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trategically located at the crossroads of Africa, Asia and Europe, Turkey has served as a global trade hub for hundreds of years, presenting an attractive location for logistics companies to establish operations. This is what motivated sea and air freight logistics firm Fevzi Gandu to base itself at Istanbul Airport, recognising its goal to become a world logistics centre. “We were thinking in the same direction with them and immediately decided to invest in order to be a part of this valuable initiative,” Hasan Safak, general manager - sea and air freight at Fevzi Gandur, said. Being based in a connected location, with a buzzing collection of airlines, freight forwarders and cargo handlers, the Turkish company has found itself able to work with any destination that airlines departing from or transiting through the airport serve.

Integrating with airports Fevzi Gandur took the step to place its operations directly within Istanbul Airport, with the company’s non-bonded facility one of only four warehouses located at it’s cargo city. This move meant that they were able to avoid the challenges that had slowed down the cargo process at the old Istanbul airport, offering a reliable and flexible service. “In our Istanbul Airport warehouse, we are able to serve many different industries. From international companies engaged in e-commerce to the automotive industry that needs to dispatched its goods urgently, from healthcare industry to technology, we have a wide range of solutions for different business demands.” Fevzi Gandur has seen the importance of having the right location, security and conditions in its facilities, with companies having trusted them with “million dollars of high tech products” until the necessary delivery arrangements have been finalised. “It is correct that airports and the areas nearby them are expensive. It is totally same as air cargo. That is why our service has to be excellent and flexible.” “Our airport warehouse location presents big advantages in terms of security for expensive or delicate cargo, environmental impact and flexibility. We can work with ULDs in our warehouse and are able to repackage items at the last minute depending on the size of the aircraft’s hold,” Safak said. “We can proudly say that after basing our operations into airport, we are far away from

being a forwarder and can call ourselves full spectrum airfreight logisticians.”

e-commerce drives change In an inter-connected, ever developing world, it is not just important for logistics companies to be able to adapt quickly to changing events but also to seize opportunities to expand into new arenas when they emerge. With the online marketplace growing, Fevzi Gandur grabbed the moment to grow its e-commerce operations, describing that sector as its “favourite child.” “We started e-commerce operations by providing fulfilment service to local marketplace sellers for domestic customers. Later, as they started selling products overseas, we moved their parcels with courier companies. After increasing the number of customers, Fevzi Gandur secured its own courier licence and electronic customs declaration licence to start direct deliveries to some countries,” Safak said. “That has brought cost and lead time advantage to our customers and new ideas to us.” “The e-commerce environment is changing every day and they are altering traditional transportation methods and putting in their own rules. We see many of mature players are unable to move as fast as this challenging environment needs…We have to follow new developments closely and be in the middle of it not to miss great opportunities.” “With the help of machine learning, solving complex situations and developing a next-level algorithm,” the Turkish company has managed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its operations. “Although we have all necessary equipment in place, we do not hesitate to invest in new technologies and equipment when our customers need.”

“We started e-commerce operations by providing fulfilment service to local marketplace sellers for domestic customers”

There will always be a need for airfreight Before the Covid pandemic, people wouldn’t have imagined the need to urgently transport masks and vaccines around the world in the belly of aircraft. Ten years ago, the industry wouldn’t have imagined the scale of e-commerce cargo that is moved by plane. “There will be need for airfreight all the time,” Safak said. Even with the push towards sustainability and companies, including Fevzi Gandur, more conscious about their impact on the environment, the Turkish logistics firm is confident the door will remain open for airfreight. “We are in a sector that is constant-

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ly fluctuating and we think there will be always something happening. If you have the right business model, people, partners and, of course, customers, there is no reason not to be successful.” “We need to be agile, resilient, flexible and creative,” Safak added, “In an uncertain situation, we had to invest more, despite volumes dropping. Sometimes we have to take hard decisions in order to optimise our business and turn possible crises into opportunity.” For customers in the logistics sector, it is not a one-size fits all sector, as each company has different dynamics and requirements. That is why it is key for logistics firms to ensure that they have created the best environment possible to connect their

clients with the rest of the world, whatever their specific needs. “When you find the right customer, you become perfect couple,” Safak said, highlighting how, to create the perfect synergy, logistics firms have to be open to everyone and customers have to be open to them. “That way you can understand what you can do for the customer and what you can’t.”

The future is bright for Turkey With its beneficial location, up-to-date facilities at airports and a strong national airline that is ranked first among European air cargo companies, Fevzi Gandur is optimistic about the future for the region. “We have many and more future plans for the services from cold chain to X-ray scanning that has to be given before the goods arrive to the terminals. We believe these developments will make the airfreight industry much stronger.” Having already grown into one of the biggest hubs in the industry, Turkey’s importance to the air cargo sector is only expected to increase, as more cargo is transported through the region or via its companies. “We expect it to grow, with Turkish Airlines and other local operators expanding their cargo fleets, and the airport planning a ‘cargo village’ in the future,” Safak said.

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VISITOR REGISTRATIONS EXCEED EXPECTATIONS FOR AIR CARGO FORUM MIAMI AND TRANSPORT LOGISTIC AMERICAS TRADE SHOW

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IACA and Messe München have announced that visitor registrations for the air cargo forum Miami and transport logistic Americas trade show and conference have exceeded expectations. The conference and trade show will be held November 8-10, 2022, at the Miami Beach Convention Center. A total of 5,000 attendees and 200 exhibitors are expected to attend, with around two thirds decision-makers from the first and second management levels. TIACA’s air cargo forum is the most traditional meeting of the air cargo community in the world. After stops all over the world, it now finds a permanent home in Miami. In parallel transport logistic, the leading international exhibition for Logistics, Mobility, IT and Supply Chain Management now finds an additional home in the booming Florida metropolis in the south of the USA. transport logistic Americas and air cargo forum Miami thus compliments the worldwide coverage of the successful trade show concepts organised by Messe München.

In the three-day accompanying conference program, partners from science, business and the media currently occupy 22 slots with presentations and workshops. More are in the planning stage. Five logistics brands are sponsoring the program. Rhenus and FedEx are each taking over one of the first two conference days in full. UPS, ACL Airshop and Miami Airport are supporting individual sessions. “Education is key and the logistics event in Miami is a unique opportunity. Over all three days, attendees will be able to gain essential knowledge for our future and discuss with top-notch speakers on-site. We are pleased to help facilitate this world-class program.” Steve Townes, CEO at ACL Airshop, said. Sustainability, digitisation and resilience run through the conference, with people, trends, and innovations the focus of planned the sessions. From career opportunities in air freight and logistics to supply chains that save lives, presentations will show what people in the industry are accomplishing.

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