ACW 19th October 20

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WORLD AIRPORTS .COM ACW Digital is sponsored by FREIGHTERS.COM

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Tabloid page bled.indd 1

15/10/2020 11:01


The weekly newspaper for air cargo professionals No. 1,103

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19 October 2020

Why the female is higher than the male

DNATA DOWN UNDER d

nata has gone live with Hermes Logistics Technologies (HLT)’s Cargo Management System (CMS) Hermes 5 (H5) at six airports across Australia. H5 is a scalable CMS offered as a cloud-based Software as a Service, which streamlines cargo ground handling processes in the warehouse, and can be used with Artificial Intelligence

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INSIDE FCS RECEIVES CEIV CERTIFICATION

ON September 29, FCS Frankfurt Cargo Services successfully concluded the CEIV certification process, confirming that the company ... PAGE 2

KIRSTEN ANSWERS THE QUESTIONS

and machine learning algorithms to optimise business and handling processes. dnata now has H5 as part of HLT’s New Generation (NG) suite of cargo management applications across its facilities in Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide, Darwin, Perth and Brisbane. “H5 provides dnata with full performance control and removes infrastructure asset concerns,” said Yuval Baruch, chief executive officer, HLT (left). “All of dnata’s Cargo Management Systems at the six airports have been migrated into a single Hermes Digital Ecosystem, streamlining their services and unlocking opportunities for machine learning algorithms to provide insights on efficiencies, costs and new services as part of HLT’s NG Business Intelligence (BI).” As well as BI, HLT’s NG applications include machine learning, track and trace, and self-serve capabilities. dnata now has a full data lake infrastructure capturing all cargo vents alongside standard messaging such as SITA.

ACW caught up with Kirsten de Bruijn, senior vice president, cargo sales and network planning at Qatar Airways Cargo ... PAGE 3 FLYING ALONG THE SILK ROAD

Chief cargo officer, Turkish Airlines, Turhan Ozen is proud of where the airline is and where it is going.... PAGE 4

Extensive H5 generated events populate a massive data lake and can now be run through machine learning algorithms in the Hermes cloud to produce predictive models helping dnata to refine their cargo handling offering. “dnata is proud to be the first cargo handler to drive digitalisation at Australian airports with the latest Hermes version 5 (H5) Cloud Cargo Management System,” said Terence Yong, Regional Cargo Development Director, Asia Pacific, dnata.

“The Hermes H5 technology will allow for improved oversight and service excellence, elevate data sharing with all our stakeholders in the air cargo eco-system, and provide enhanced transparency across the cargo handling process.” Hermes NG’s modules can be used on a pay-as-you-go basis, and as a cloudbased system, no extra IT infrastructure is required to host them, allowing for maximum flexibility and savings on capital expenditure.

AEROMEXICO HONG KONG FIRST

LAST month, Aeromexico set a new record with the longest-range flight in the history of Mexican aviation. This was the first direct ... PAGE 6

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AFKLMP CARGO PRESENTS THE ‘CARGO TOOLBOX’ THE KLM Cargo Compliance Knowledge Centre (CKC) has developed an app for the airfreight industry, which can be used for co-loading segregation checks such as dangerous goods, based on IATA norms. The airline claims to be first airline to start using the Cargo Toolbox app and will make it available free of charge. Air France KLM Martinair Cargo claims to be setting trends in awareness, but also pioneering tools needed to address key compliance and safety themes in the airfreight industry. Based on the app-within-an-app approach, KLM Cargo’s CKC previously launched the ‘Mr. Beam’ app, a handy tool for pallet builders worldwide. The Cargo Toolbox app now also includes the co-loading instructions app, which makes use of machine learning, a form of artificial intelligence, to ensure that the app becomes increasingly adept at recognising symbols, as it is used more frequently. The Cargo Toolbox app has been specifically designed for airfreight employees worldwide, whose duties include segregating cargo. “In this way, KLM Cargo hopes to improve safety throughout the cargo chain, addressing key compliance and safety themes. This can only be achieved together with the entire cargo community, which means handling companies as well airlines. It doesn’t matter who you work for,” says Kester Meijer, director operational integrity, compliance and safety at KLM Cargo. “We believe it is important to get knowledge out onto the work floor as quickly and clearly as possible, without having to consult manuals that are often heavy and complex. “The manuals containing relevant information aren’t always in easy reach, which is why we came up with the app.”

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WFS launches Project Coldstream for COVID vaccine deliveries

WORLDWIDE Flight Services (WFS), the world’s largest air cargo handler, has launched Project Coldstream to co-ordinate its response to the anticipated global transportation of some 16 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccine, expected to commence in late 2020 and continue through 2021/2. According to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the industry expects this to be the largest airlift of a single commodity ever, requiring the equivalent capacity of 8,000 747 aircraft. Headed by taskforce leader Mike Duffy, WFS’ EVP Innovation (right), and supported by senior operations, commercial and communications specialists across WFS’ global network, Project Coldstream is working closely with airlines, forwarders and logistics providers, government agencies and industry organisations such as Pharma.Aero and The International Air Cargo Association (TIACA) to clearly understand temperature and handling requirements. The group will be responsible for developing in-house solutions to the challenge, ensuring the preparedness of WFS’ pharma handling capability, devising plans for additional capacity where needed, and working closely with WFS’ airline customers. WFS’ multi-million Euro in-

vestments in a network of temperature-controlled pharma handling facilities at strategic airport locations around the world over the past two years means it has already earned preferred partner status with many of the world’s biggest transporters of pharmaceuticals and medical devices. WFS currently operates 12 dedicated pharma facilities in Amsterdam, Barcelona, Brussels, Cape Town, Copenhagen, Frankfurt, Johannesburg, London, Madrid, Miami, New York JFK, and its €10 million state-of-theart Pharma Centre at Paris CDG. These facilities are all either IATA CEIV or Good Distribution Practice (GDP) certified or compliant. Barry Nassberg, WFS’ Group chief commercial officer, commented: “Since the start of the COVID pandemic, WFS has been at the forefront of the global re-

sponse, ensuring vital supplies of Personal Protective Equipment and other medical supplies arriving at airports for hospitals and medical centres around the world have been handled quickly and securely to help save the lives of patients recovering from the virus, and support front-line medical personnel. “We are extremely proud to be playing a key role in the international response to COVID and the next big stage of this will be the rapid and safe distribution of vaccines once they are approved.” As well as facilities dedicated to the safe storage, handling and transportation of pharma and medical devices, WFS has dedicated teams of specialists assigned to each location. They have either completed IATA CEIV training or the special Pharma Module cov-

ering handling, audits, quality and risk management for temperature-controlled cargoes developed by the WFS Academy, accredited by IATA as one of the world’s top 10 aviation training providers. Duffy said: “The world is waiting for a COVID-19 vaccine to save lives and to support economic recovery. “Over half of global vaccine doses are expected to be transported by air cargo because of its speed and reliability, dictated by global demand and the absence of local production.” According to the World Health Organization (WHO), some 140 COVID-19 vaccines are in the initial stages of development globally, with around two dozen being tested on people in clinical trials in accordance with demand.

Samuel N996FD takes to the skies

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edEx Express honours its workforce by naming its latest aircraft after a team member’s child. Samuel, 11 from Stockton on Tees in the Northeast of England, is the latest child to have a FedEx Express Boeing 757 named in his honour. Samuel was beyond excited at the news and said: “Getting a plane named after me is just out of this world!”

Frankfurt Cargo Services receives CEIV certification

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n September 29, FCS Frankfurt Cargo Services successfully concluded the CEIV certification process, confirming that the company officially meets the high standards that apply to transportation of pharmaceutical products. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) gives this certification to companies that can ensure high quality across the board for sensitive medical products. With vital deliveries of large quantities of vaccine for the novel coronavirus likely to be needed in the near future, these kinds of handling operations are becoming more important than ever before. “The requirements that apply to safe storage and transportation of pharmaceutical products have been evolving steadily in recent years. Pharmaceutical handling is very demanding. It requires clear and stable processes for product safety. Earning certification according to the IATA CEIV standard confirms to us and our customers the quality of FCS’s longstanding activities in this segment,” says Stefan Kassau, manager processes and pharma handling at FCS. He adds: “It is the basis and incentive for continuing and building on our successful work and guaranteeing our customers that their pharmaceutical consignments will be handled safely at Frankfurt Airport.”

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The certification adds value for FCS in terms of the company’s own competencies as well. The IATA audit found the internal training on handling pharmaceutical products that is incorporated into the FCS training concept according to IATA CEIV specifications to be good. A smooth and uninterrupted cold chain is vital to reliable pharmaceutical logistics. Many pharmaceutical products are very sensitive to even the slightest fluctuations in temperature, and some can even lose efficacy. This makes well-trained staff essential, alongside high-performance warehouses with stable refrigeration and cooling options. “In the course of the certification process, the FCS special warehouses were equipped with a state-of-the-art new temperature monitoring system and underwent an in-depth audit. Functionality and safety for the products was confirmed by the necessary temperature mapping activities,” says Christoph Cyranek, manager quality assurance and performance improvement at FCS. “As part of our preparations for the logistics involving Covid-19 vaccines that is presumably coming up, this certification comes at just the right time, of course. As the first step, we already decided to expand our existing infrastructure so even more handling space can be provided for active refrigerated containers,” he notes.


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Kirsten answers the questions ACW caught up with Kirsten de Bruijn, senior vice president, cargo sales and network planning. Qatar Airways Cargo You are described as ‘an air cargo veteran with 13 years of management’. What did you do before 2007? I have a degree from the Hoge Hotelschool in Maastricht. I graduated and immediately left to live and work in Florida in the United States. There I held several positions in hotel operations, management and finance. Where were you raised? I grew up in a small town in Holland in the Brabant province, and studied in Maastricht. At the age of 21, I left the Netherlands to work in Florida. I have lived and travelled to many different parts of the world and that international exposure has really prepared me for a global environment that is part of the everyday business in the air cargo Industry.

I think it’s clear that whatever the “new normal” turns out to be one thing we know it will be dynamic and subject to change at a moment’s notice.The key is customer-focused flexibility in terms of network planning and pricing. What business do you see in COVID-19 vaccines for Qatar Airways Cargo? I will leave the timing to Big Pharma and the relevant certification authorities but we have plans that we are perfecting to permit us to work with countries around the world to ensure we partner with them in the most efficient and effective way possible. Are you ready to handle COVID-19 vaccines? As one of the largest air cargo airlines in the world we have extraordinary strategic capacity to deliver vaccine and high value medical equipment in an unparalleled way. There are challenges and complexities and we look forward to stepping up to meet those and be a reliable strategic partner for the global distribution of the vaccines as soon as they come to market.

How do you hope to “build a sense of team spirit and collective purpose” at Qatar Airways Cargo? It is about alignment of strategic priorities and buying into a vision of where we want to be in the future and ensuring that our teams are inspired around that shared vision. Part of that will involve enabling performance through technology and empowerment and part will be around continuing to lead the air cargo world by example. You will be responsible for “cargo sales and network planning.” Which of these two functions is your favourite? Well they are flip sides of the same coin and tie into each other and in a perfect environment they do so seamlessly when we apply dedicated customer focus ensuring our route networks are mapped onto customer requirements and priorities. What would you describe as ‘the cutting edge of change in the global air cargo market’? It is digitisation as the only real defence against commoditisation. That means integrating the customer experience into a platform that increases efficiency while reducing time and cost burdens. Do you have any family connections to the airfreight/aviation world or are you a pioneer for the family? None of my family has worked in this industry. However, I am from the Netherlands and trading and cargo is part of our DNA and has been since humans started sailing the seas. Air cargo is just a more immediate form of what our ancestors have been doing for centuries. You are quite bold for a manager: “I like to hire people that are better at what they do than I am.” Isn’t this risky? Quite the opposite. We want the best people on our team who play as a team as there is too great a challenge before us to think otherwise. Air cargo is an ever-increasing revenue and profit driver in the airline space and we need the best talent to maximise on that opportunity. How are you finding recruiting Millennials and hipsters to Qatar Airways Cargo? If you are referring to age rather than attitude, I would say that it’s all about skills and relevant experience. People are attracted to dynamic growth centres and Doha is one of those leading cities and Qatar Airways Cargo is a choice opportunity for young talent seeking development. You comment that “You have to find ways to avoid being commoditised.” What way do you think you will find? Air Cargo is very different to what it used to be because it is such a competitive and complex space. It’s not simply about moving product around the world, it is about solving customers’ supply chains challenges and working hand in hand with their logistics infrastructure. Every time we solve a customer problem, we reduce the risk of commoditisation. Have you any sense what the ‘new normal’ might be after COVID-19 and how are you preparing for it?

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Turkish Cargo: Flying a Chief cargo officer, Turkish Airlines, Turhan Ozen is proud of where the airline is and where it is going.

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he Silk Road was the historic system of caravan trails that snaked through Turkey, Persia, India and China that for centuries allowed trade to prosper and cultures to come in contact with each other. As the gateway between Europe and Asia, Turkey cemented its place as a key player in world trade and cargo on that route. The Byzantines loved the luxuries of the orient and did what they could to keep them coming. In the 21st century, Turkish Cargo, the

cargo arm of national carrier Turkish Airlines, is continuing this tradition of supplying the luxuries and everyday commodities to Turkey and beyond. While the caravan path has long been covered by asphalt, Turkish Cargo can be considered to be continuing the Silk Road at 40,000 feet. Founded almost 90 years ago, Turkish Airlines is one of the most established airlines in the world. This is reflected in the fact that the airline counts for one tonne in every 20 flown

of airfreight. This means that 5% of world airfreight cargo in the air at any moment is in the care of Turkish Cargo. Chief cargo officer, Turkish Airlines, Turhan Ozen is proud of where the airline is and where it is going. He says: “Turkish Cargo aims to adapt rapidly to the new market dynamics by acting proactively in order to take the right position in the industry. While aiming to become one of the top three air bridges of the world, we will continue to enlarge our network and fleet, and we will be continuing to raise the quality of the service we have been offering to our customers. Our target is to become one of the top five global air cargo brands.” This was a target the airline had in the pre-pandemic era and is still very much alive and behind Turkish Cargo’s plans.

occurred in March, and the global air cargo market suffered some shrinkage by 19% on year-on-year basis in respect of the ratio of the cargo transported. “Nevertheless, we can say that the recov-

Pandemic disruption As a global air cargo brand offering service to 127 countries around the world, the airline employs individuals from many countries. During the course of the continuing pandemic, the airline carried out “business processes meticulously” by “taking all measures for the purpose of avoiding the disruption of the operational processes,” says Ozen. Management switched to the remote working model and included a major portion of office staff into the business processes in such manner. He says: “Maintaining the employment and protecting the health of the staff that remained was our first priority during such period where the aviation industry, which is one of the areas affected the most by the pandemic, suffered a shrinkage and challenge. We will be progressing by taking all protective and preventive measures for the purpose of being able to manage the subsequent process in a more effective manner and also to achieve our objectives.” Economic stability and positive developments were adversely affected during 2019 by political and economic distresses suffered globally. Q1 2020 became an extraordinary period for the world trade and thus for the air cargo market due to the pandemic with global effects. “COVID-19 leaves marks almost in every aspect of life. While the global air cargo industry suffered a decrease by 3% during the first two months of 2020, the actual breakage

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ery is in progress on monthly basis even if the decline on yearly basis continues in Q3, and also that the air cargo market became more stabilised in July. It is possible to project that the recovery in the air cargo shipments will continue upon the increase of the global economic activity, during the “new normal” period.”

Capacity limitations Ozen’s predictions is that belly capacity


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g along the Silk Road limitations will continue until 2021 as based on the decline in passenger flights resulting from the pandemic being suffered at the present. Meanwhile, Turkish Cargo aims to adapt rapidly to new market dynamics by acting proactively in order to take the right position in the industry. Ozen says: “The network and fleet of Turkish Cargo will continue to grow also in the upcoming period and we will continue to increase our overall service and network coverage that we offer to our customers. Our target to become one of the top five global air cargo brands, which we determined in the preCOVID-19 period, is still valid, and we continue to carry out our activities towards this target at full steam despite the new conditions that arise. “For the purpose of accomplishing such a target, we are planning to switch to the SmartIST, Turkish Cargo’s mega-cargo facility that is being constructed at the Istanbul Airport, which is set to be fully operational as of 2021 and be a major air cargo centre to enhance the brand’s activities for the years to come. Turkish Cargo’s SmartIST facility, which will provide a capacity opportunity of 2,000,000 tonnes on annual basis at the first phase, will have achieved a capacity of 4,000,000 tonnes on annual basis at an area of 340,000 sq m upon completion of the second phase.” He adds: “Turkish Cargo aims to improve operational speed and quality following use and integration of several smart technologies, such as Augmented Reality, Automatic Storage Systems, Robotic Process Automation and Unmanned Ground Vehicles, into the processes to become one of the leading airlines worldwide in terms of capacity and service quality as well as offering fast transfer advantages to our customers.”

ever-increasing urgency. We, as Turkish Cargo, continue to provide the entire infrastructure that would adapt our staff members, who possess the eagerness and competence to learn about the advancing technology, with the latest technology. “Accordingly, we provided customers involved in our global network with the opportunity to enquire the current status of their cargo on a 7/24 basis by making CARGY, our AI-based robot that is our new digital solution partner, go live recently. “Further, we are automating the processes and tasks by making our artificial intelligence robots, called “Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta”, go live too, as part of our business processes. Thanks to our robots that constitute the virtual workforce, we are enhancing in particular the employee productivity and the speed of the operation, and saving time by reducing the error rates and costs.

“SmartIST, our new facility equipped with digital technology, loads the future. “We, as Turkish Cargo, will have the capacity to carry 4 million tonnes of cargo on yearly basis by making use of the state-ofthe-art technology at the business processes we will carry out at our digitally equipped SmartIST facility, being constructed at the Istanbul Airport. “SmartIST is being designed so as to be dominated by the industry4.0, artificial intelligence technologies and digitalised processes.” Those who moved along the Silk Road centuries ago, might not recognise the technology that Ozen and his team have at their disposal but would understand the commercial drive that sees Turkish Cargo handle one in 20 tonnes or airfreight on any day.

Coronavirus months What lessons has Ozen and his team learned from the Coronavirus months? He considers: “The global pandemic has created vulnerability over the world economy and trade. During the period we have been getting through, Turkish Cargo has rapidly adapted to the changing circumstances to maintain continuity of logistics and supply chain was of vital importance indeed, through experience. “Technological infrastructure investments made by Turkish Cargo towards digitalisation and initiatives focused on e-Commerce, which we started long before COVID-19, have been crucial in practice during the pandemic period. “The brand will go further enhancing service quality to meet the needs of our customers and sector partners, involved in our global network, with conveniences thanks to our digitalisation-related activities. “The change, transformation, impairment or reshaping of the business manners do not constitute a new fact indeed, but the all-time highest level of the speed of change of the required skills and the occurrence of the change at an unprecedented pace constitute the most significant difference for today. He adds: “The innovation technology embraces extensive and significant applications more than ever in terms of especially air cargo transportation, because the industry demands

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THE AMERICAS

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AEROMEXICO LANDS IN HONG KONG FOR THE FIRST TIME

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ast month, Aeromexico set a new record with the longest-range flight in the history of Mexican aviation. This was the first direct operation of a service by the company between Hong Kong International Airport and Mexico City, a distance of 14,170 kilometres, 55 more than its recent flight between Shenzhen, China, and Mexico’s capital. One of the airline's 19 Boeing 787 aircraft was used as a private charter operation to transport cargo, including in the passenger cabin. This aircraft is one of the most modern, efficient and least polluting in the world. It produces 57% less noise pollution on takeoff and landing, and 20% less carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, compared to other aircraft. The plane took off from Mexico City International Airport on September 9 to Seoul, South Korea, where it made a technical stopover to land on September 10 in Hong Kong. Later, it departed to Mexico City and landed after more than 15 hours of flight. “I remain convinced that challenges represent new opportunities. Thanks to our customers, the Hong Kong Government, and the airport authorities, we reach a new goal in our 86-year history. Hong Kong becomes the sixth destination we have operated in the Asian continent and the longest flight we have served. I thank the Aeromexico family for continuing to take the name of Mexico to the top”, said Andres Conesa, CEO Aeromexico. Stephen Phillips, director-general of investment promotion at Invest Hong Kong, said: “It is very exciting to see Aeromexico’s new direct freight route between Hong Kong and Mexico come into operation.

“This is a testament to Hong Kong's status as the premium international aviation hub in Asia. With its strategic location and unrivalled proximity to Mainland China and many important markets in Asia, Hong Kong offers the best connectivity to airliners that

United Airlines resumes nonstop San Francisco and Shanghai

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nited Airlines will start non-stop service to China four-times weekly between San Francisco and Shanghai’s Pudong International Airport. Beginning October 21, 2020, United will operate four weekly non-stop flights with Boeing 777-300ER aircraft from San Francisco to Shanghai on Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Customers travelling from Shanghai will return to San Francisco on Mondays, Tuesdays, Fridays and Sundays. United will continue operating four weekly flights between the two cities and beginning October 21, will no longer be required to stop in Seoul. United offered more flights to China than any other US carrier prior to suspending service

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in February due to COVID-19. In 2019, United operated five daily flights between Shanghai and its hubs in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and New York/Newark. “United continues playing a critical role in keeping people and global supply chains connected to Shanghai and to cities around the world,” said Patrick Quayle, United’s vice president of international network and alliances. “We look forward to resuming nonstop service and offering our customers greater convenience and shorter flight times between San Francisco and Shanghai.” Meanwhile, United Airlines plans to resume service on nearly 30 international routes in November, including flights to

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cities in Asia, Europe, and South America. Additionally, the airline continues to strategically rebuild its domestic and international network by offering destinations in the Caribbean, Hawaii, Central America and Mexico. Even with these additions, United’s November schedule is still less than half of what it was this time last year. The airline plans to fly 44% of its schedule in November compared to 2019, and a 4-point increase compared to October 2020. “For the month of November, we have adjusted our capacity to add flying for leisure travel to warm weather and beach destinations in Florida, Mexico and the Caribbean, along with ‘visiting friends and relatives’ travel across the globe,” said Quayle.

want to have a solid foothold in this part of the world. I wish Aeromexico business every success in Hong Kong and beyond." Aeromexico Cargo operates in more than 40 airports in Mexico and multiple international destinations in the US and Canada.

Bee cargo creates an online buzz AIR Canada Cargo routinely flies boxes of live bees in the spring to support the agriculture industry. Bees play an essential role in the pollination of flowering crops such as blueberries, cranberries, canola, tree fruits and certain vegetables. Each year, 250,000 queens and 40,000 small bee colonies are imported into Canada on behalf of farmers throughout the country. In mid-April, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC) was concerned that restricted global flight capacity might contribute to shortages for the coming season. Fortunately, the first queen bees of the season

Aerolíneas Argentinas’s retro look ON the occasion of its 70th anniversary, Aerolíneas Argentinas presented its retro designed and coloured aircraft in a new institutional video. The aircraft, a Boeing 737 NG, was painted in the workshops of FADEA (Argentine Aircraft Factory), located in the Province of Córdoba. At the beginning of 2020, the airline launched a commemorative logo for its 70th anniversary.

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were flown in from California on an Air Canada flight. AAFC even tweeted their appreciation for the Cargo #BeeTeam! Bees are also, of course, industrious honey producers, and in another shipment that was featured on LinkedIn, several colonies travelled from Auckland to Vancouver and onward to news homes in Canada and the United States. It may seem unlikely but bees actually produce a tremendous amount of heat. Mark Sheeler, cargo service manager, noted that the temperature in the cargo hold was set to keep the bees as comfortable as possible during flight, and that dry ice can also be used to keep them cool.


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PANALPINA EXPAND ITS PERISHABLES NETWORK IN SOUTH AMERICA BY ACQUIRING CARGOMASTER PANALPINA continues to expand its perishables network in South America through the acquisition of CargoMaster S.A. in Colombia, and its subsidiary, Laseair, in Ecuador. CargoMaster is one of Latin America’s largest companies specialised in the airfreight export of perishables, mostly flowers to the US. Panalpina will acquire the Colombian company CargoMaster S.A. and Laseair in Ecuador subject to conditions. The companies reached a respective agreement on April 23, 2019. From Colombia and Ecuador, the two companies predominantly export to the US, but also to Europe and Asia. “The acquisition will make us the undisputed perishables market leader in Colombia and Latin America, and strengthen our position in Ecuador. We are adding significant volumes and know-how to our already impressive perishables footprint in Latin America, which will allow us to further deepen our well-established relationships with the airlines and producers in the region,” explains Stefan Karlen, CEO of Panalpina. “As we continue to expand the perishables business in this part of the world, we also see great development opportunities for our charter network with its gateway in Huntsville, Alabama.” CargoMaster exports flowers and fruits by air. It was founded in 1987 and today employs 134 staff in Colombia (Bogota, Medellin), and, through its subsidiary, 32 in Ecuador (Quito). “In the last 32 years, we have catapulted ourselves to the top of the Colombian air freight market and built a very strong brand in the region and our industry. I am very proud of these achievements and the employees that made it all possible,” says Felipe Sanchez, founder, CEO and majority shareholder of CargoMaster. “By going together with Panalpina with its strong heritage in Latin America, we have the opportunity to become part of an even bigger success story in the perishables industry.” Panalpina’s perishables activities originated in Latin America, which is one of the world’s high-production regions for fresh produce. With the latest acquisition, Panalpina is not only further developing its perishables business in the entire region, but also strengthening the company’s global end-to-end supply chain capabilities for perishables.

FRUIT LOGISTICA shifts the date and adapts FRUIT LOGISTICA will take place in 2021 as a ‘Special Edition’ and is rescheduling to 18 to 20 May 2021 to host its trade show in Berlin. With the slogan “Meet onsite. Connect online” the adapted concept focuses on business meetings and turn-key exhibition packages to maximise exhibitors’ flexibility and business opportunities. “Covid-19 confronts us with challenges none of us can eliminate. So we’ve asked ourselves what do our clients need and what are the factors that we can control for them,” explains Madlen Miserius, senior product manager at FRUIT LOGISTICA.

“Our approach is to enable our customers to better manage their risks and further increase business opportunities. This is the guiding principle of FRUIT LOGISTICA SPECIAL EDITION 2021 in Berlin.” With the event to be held in May it is thought likely by organisers that a higher number of buyers from many parts of the world will be able to attend. “With our adapted concept, we want to enable the global fresh fruit and vegetable industry to meet and reconnect in Berlin in 2021 in a safe environment,” Miserius comments.

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Cargo in the blood Audrey Serdjebi

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his week I met a truly global young woman with unbridled talent. Elena Volkova represents the future. Instead of simply believing in a better world, she is building one. That’s her job. Transforming our world to make it simpler and bring it all within our reach. Elena is passionate. I’ve never met anyone so capable of boosting your spirits. Her drive, curiosity and ambition make her one of the leaders of the future. Elena is intercultural: “I’ve lived and worked in Russia, the US and Singapore, I’ve built various projects alongside a range of countries and I’ve travelled numerous places around the world – it couldn’t not shape who I am today. I care about people and the challenges we all face rather than which flag is on our passports.” “I believe in change and I believe that it’s up to us to shape that change.” And it’s that mindset that makes her the person you call when you need to move things forward. It’s because Elena isn’t simply content with being gifted with a formidable determination, but above all, it’s because she’s an expert in digital transformation that she has made CEOs’ ambitions into reality. “I’ve been through all the software development and business layers and worked with multiple startups and enterprises. For over 10 years I’ve been working with ambi-

tious CEOs and founders, transforming their vision and ideas into software solutions.” Elena doesn’t believe in fairytales or happy endings – she makes them real and reliable:

“If you have a dream, it most probably can be achieved with technology and I can make that dream come true.” The good news is that Elena has joined our industry, and as was the case for the majority of us, it was a match made in heaven. It’s incredible to hear these stories of falling in love with “our” industry that emerge day after

Cargo and Other Stories by Lemon Queen day, regardless of when they’re from. She sees air cargo as a changing world, and a world in which she has a real part to play: “It is a major global industry and it is yet to go through a full digitalisation. To do so, it needs support from tech experts to boost the efficiency and service level that air cargo customers are looking for.” While Elena is aware of our own obstacles and the time that it could take, she is radical when she talks about change: “I believe that changes to the way we live and do business are needed. For over a dozen years, I’ve been involved in the digital transformation of the manufacturing, retail and hospitality industries – none of these transformations came easily, but in time you could see the benefit of all the work that was done.” The crisis we have been going through in recent months is a daily reminder of the extent to which it is our choice whether or not to be at the mercy of these changes. The world hasn’t stopped turning. In fact, it has been turning much faster. “We were pushed into isolation, but life couldn’t be put on hold. Industries that adopted automation earlier are having an easier crisis than those that didn’t. Now it’s up to us – to act on new findings or be crushed by the ‘new normal’.” Elena has joined a company whose entire

In logistics, the female is higher than the male

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emale leaders are rated higher than their male counterparts in the logistics industry, according to a survey of over 1,800 supply chain professionals undertaken by organisational development company Novosensus. The unique research reveals that, while only 13% of senior leaders in logistics are female, women score higher on six out of seven leadership competencies.

“Female leadership is not soft, and not only about empathy,” said Henrik Kofod-Hansen, co-founder, Novosensus. “Female leaders offer a full range of competencies that bring their organisations forward and create results. “Gender equality is a strategic business issue, not a nice-to-have Corporate Social Responsibility project. We need to be concrete about accelerating female talent into leadership positions, not with quotas, but by realising the business opportunities in equality, diversity of thought, and inclusive behaviours.” The findings, released in a new Novosensus White Paper on How Gender Balance Makes Business Better, also highlight the challenges faced by women in the logistics industry. Female respondents rated their employee experience 10% lower than men’s and felt they are not treated equally, rating their experience of their leaders 19% lower than men. “The research is clear – gender equality makes

business activity is focused on facilitating access to tomorrow’s world. Tomorrow is already here – today. We have all become aware of this – and for most of us, this realisation was sudden. I can’t tell you what company she works for. But I know that she’ll play a crucial role in how we see our day-to-day lives and in the way in which we reclaim the new practices of this incredible industry. And clearly Elena knows this: “Another trend is AI, blockchain and robotics – go digital or go home. These are trends which are being picked up by many industries, and I am very happy that air cargo is looking in that direction. There’s still a long way to go but it’s an exciting journey ahead.” It is still a question of resilience. As we know, only the most agile and the most daring will emerge unscathed. The new normal is brutal, but fortunately, Elena isn’t working alone – she is part of a small army of people who are ready to help us make the leap. I can’t wait to share what I know about this company with you. Like Elena, they are young and optimistic and they like people. But above all, they believe in change, and that’s what makes them strong: “Now is the right time for air cargo to set out on a path of uncomfortable change and to come out stronger for the next decade.

organisations and businesses better,” said Kofod-Hansen. Cultures become more open, creativity flourishes, collaboration is better and performance is higher. “But most organisations are far from having a balance and they struggle with absurdly imbalanced workforces. “We need to make equality, diversity and inclusion the new normal.” Novosensus quizzed over 1,800 leaders from the supply chain, shipping, logistics and forwarding industries, asking them to rate experiences about leadership, experience at work and experience of their leaders. Singapore-based Novosensus works with companies to drive organisational change, team development, and leadership growth through training, coaching and business consultancy. Novosensus’ White Paper on How Gender Balance Makes Business Better: download at novosensus.org/ research.

Lemon Queen is an airfreight industry public relations and communications agency in Paris, France

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