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WORLD ACW Digital is sponsored by AIRPORTS.COM FREIGHTERS.COM

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01/06/2021 14:48


The weekly newspaper for air cargo professionals No. 1,136

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14 JUNE 2021

A PARTNER IN CLIMATE PROTECTION

Air One Aviation grabs second all-cargo GSA contract in 10 months

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INSIDE

OMAN AIR TBILISI LAUNCH

OMAN Air has launched seasonal service between Muscat and Tbilisi, Georgia, with direct flight, Wednesdays and Sundays, operated ... PAGE 2

ETIHAD: SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE MOU

ETIHAD Airways has become the first airline to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the United Nations Volunteers (UNV) ... PAGE 2 AIR CHINA EXTENDS WITH WFS

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viation Horizon has signed a global cargo general sales agency contract with Air One Aviation to support its launch venture into the all-cargo market for regional 737 freighter services. The Saudi-based private jet operator has taken delivery of its first Boeing 737-400SF conversion and two more are due to join its fleet in the next three months. Each aircraft will offer 18,500 kilos of cargo capacity, utilising 11 ULD positions. Air One expects the 737-400s to be in high demand for regular regional

AIR China has extended its cargo handling agreements with Worldwide Flight Services (WFS) at London Heathrow and Frankfurt. In the ... contracts, especially in the Middle and Far East. From their base in Sharjah, the aircraft are ideal for high volume, e-Commerce trade lanes and are available for both long-term contracts and ad hoc charters. This is the second all-cargo GSA contract awarded to Air One Aviation in the past 10 months. In 2020, it was also awarded exclusive sales and marketing rights across all territories by Aerotranscargo (ATC) Moldova. Marketing Aerotranscargo’s growing fleet of six Boeing 747-400 freighters – one of the largest privately-owned 747F

fleets - Air One offers short and long-term charter solutions as well as ACMI programmes. Paul Bennett, CEO of Air One Aviation, said: “Having been a client of Aviation Horizon’s private jet services, we are proud to have been awarded this opportunity to successfully launch the Aviation Horizon brand in the cargo market with its first newly-converted 737-400SF. “This is a perfect aircraft for regional e-Commerce and parcels operations and comes to the market at a time when demand for capacity in this sector has never been greater.

“The arrival of Aviation Horizon’s second and third 737-400 freighters will ensure we have the back-up aircraft required to support high frequency e-Commerce flights. “It will also give us additional capacity to satisfy ad hoc charter demand for this very popular aircraft.” Air One Aviation will also explore hub and spoke opportunities to connect Aviation Horizon’s regional 737-400 all-cargo operations with Aerotranscargo’s feeder services from Hong Kong and China to Europe.

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EMIRATES SKYCARGO COOL ROOM

EMIRATES SkyCargo is extending its fully automated cool room with 94 airline pallet positions at its GDP certified pharma facility at ... PAGE 4

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ETIHAD SIGNS SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE MOU ETIHAD Airways has become the first airline to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme. The MOU was signed by Dr Nadia Bastaki, vice president medical services, corporate social responsibility, Etihad Aviation Group, and Toily Kurbanov, executive co-ordinator, UNV, remotely in Abu Dhabi. The collaboration between the two entities will strengthen volunteering globally and expand the reach to customers of Etihad. UNV supports volunteering globally and in the Arab countries and aims to engage Etihad volunteers in advocacy events, increase awareness of volunteering opportunities, and accelerate the Sustainable Development Goals in the “Leave no one behind” agenda. In addition, Etihad will promote UNV

and activities across Etihad’s own channels, including Etihad Guest loyalty programme to encourage members to donate their Etihad Guest Miles in support of UNV. Dr Nadia Bastaki, vice president medical services and corporate social responsibility, Etihad Aviation Group, said: “Etihad is proud to be the first airline to partner with UN Volunteers, to support their talent pool and global initiatives. Etihad volunteers will have the chance to participate in the programme offering their unique skills and experience and

further extend Etihad’s humanitarian footprint across the world. Furthermore, we’re pleased to be able to offer our loyal Etihad Guest members the opportunity to make a significant contribution by donating their Etihad Guest Miles.”

Iberia Maintenance and DHL deepen their relationship

DHL Supply Chain Iberia and Iberia Maintenance announce the signing of a contract through which DHL will manage the internal logistics of spare parts and components for Iberia Maintenance at its La Muñoza hub in Madrid and also at the Madrid-Barajas Adolfo Suarez and Josep Tarradellas Barcelona-El Prat airports. In addition to this contract, DHL provides Iberia Maintenance with global distribution of these spare parts when the need arises at any of the customer airline’s destinations around the world. This contract with DHL also includes the logistics of Iberia’s IT and aircraft supply warehouses.

DHL fleet The agreement also continues the relationship that Iberia and DHL have maintained for years, with Iberia Maintenance providing maintenance, repair and overhaul services for DHL’s fleet of engines since 2008. Specifically, Iberia Maintenance has serviced more than 113 RB-211 engines used in the Boeing B757s of DHL’s subsidiaries DHL Air UK and Blue Dart at its engine workshop in Madrid. In the new contract signed by Iberia Maintenance and DHL, DHL Supply Chain’s mission will be to ensure the

supply of material on demand for Iberia Maintenance technicians, and to reinforce the logistical design to ensure the reliability and visibility that this supply chain requires to optimise planning and improve the availability of the aircraft. According to Iván González Vallejo, maintenance strategy and supply chain director, “this strengthened partnership will guarantee real-time traceability of parts moving through our system, complete inventory accuracy and the integration of the freight forwarding activity that DHL has been developing for the last three years for Iberia Maintenance. “ As Matilde Torquemada, business development director of DHL Supply Chain in Spain explains: “it is an honour and a source of pride that a company like Iberia Maintenance, a benchmark in quality and customer commitment, has placed its trust in DHL to guarantee its spare parts logistics, a critical area in which DHL Supply Chain can provide enormous experience. This is a long-term agreement in which DHL provides rapid implementation with seamless transition and business continuity in these value-added services for the airline’s MRO operations, providing agile execution and centralised logistics decision making.”

Oman Air launches service to Tbilisi

OMAN Air has launched seasonal service between Muscat and Tbilisi, Georgia, with direct flights, Wednesdays and Sundays, operated with B737 aircraft. Flights will operate from June 16 to September 16. The Wednesday flight from Muscat departs at 20:15 and arrives in Tbilisi at 00:15. The flight from Tbilisi departs Thursday at 01:15 and arrives in Muscat at 05:00. The Sunday flight from Muscat departs at 03:30 and arrives in Tbilisi at 07:30. The flight from Tbilisi departs at 08:55 and arrives at 12:40.

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NEWS

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Air China extends contracts with WFS

AIR China has extended its cargo handling agreements with Worldwide Flight Services (WFS) at London Heathrow and Frankfurt. In the UK, the airline has renewed its cargo handling contract at Heathrow by a further three years, while, in Frankfurt, Air China has signed a 12-month extension. Both airports are key hubs for the airline in Europe, connecting customers with several Chinese airports. Flights from London are

operated by both Boeing 777 and Airbus A330 aircraft. Ex Frankfurt, Air China offers both B777 passenger and freighter services.

Handling contracts The new agreements further extend WFS’ partnership with Air China, which also includes handling contracts in London, Paris CDG, Madrid, Frankfurt, Copenhagen, New York JFK and Dallas Fort Worth.

Clare Liu, vice-president of WFS in China, commented: “We are honoured that Air China has renewed its handling agreements with WFS at two of its biggest hubs in Europe. “We have a dynamic team managing the airline’s requirements and through WFS’ stability of service and customer focus, we will continue to support Air China’s growth on the highly important trade lane connecting Europe and China.”

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hicago Rockford International Airport (RFD) is celebrating numerous initiatives that have positively impacted jobs, enhanced the region’s reputation and further driven the area’s economic development efforts. Among the many projects the Airport and its partners have announced and/or achieved in just the past few months include the construction of the new $50 million international cargo centre, the AAR/United Airlines partnership and the $19 million UPS ramp expansion. RFD is a major economic engine for the Rock River Valley, and Northern Illinois, creating skilled jobs in aviation, transportation, logistics and construction. Over the past year, RFD and its partners have created over 1,000 new jobs bringing the total jobs on the airport campus to over 8,000.

In February, RFD announced the construction of the new international cargo centre designed to accommodate daily multiple aircraft landings and departures containing international destination freight. The estimated total construction budget for the new facility is $50 million dollars. This figure includes the construction of two buildings, a new ramp for airplane parking and a new road. In October 2020, RFD announced the construction of a 9,000 sq m cargo facility. This

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building is now a part of a new international cargo centre. In addition to the first 9,000 sq m building, the airport also will construct a 10,000 sq m building, a new ramp to accommodate six 747 aircraft, and a new road that will extend off Baxter Road to accommodate tractor/trailer traffic to and from the facility. RFD is home to a continually growing air cargo industry and is ranked as the 19th largest airport in the United States for air cargo with more than 1.2 million tonnes of landed weight in 2020. The Airport is the second largest UPS hub in North America and a base of operations for Amazon Air. In 2019, RFD was named the fastest-growing cargo airport in the world. The airport campus also encompasses an aviation maintenance repair facility capable of servicing next-generation aircraft, as well as an aviation maintenance programme that is turning out a well-trained and skilled workforce.

$16 million ramp expansion RFD recently announced that the existing UPS ramp will be expanded to accommodate aircraft parking. The apron expansion will provide parking positions for six 747 aircrafts. Local companies William Charles Construction Company and Sjostrom & Sons will oversee the ramp construction.

Emirates SkyCargo extends automated cool room EMIRATES SkyCargo is extending its fully automated cool room with 94 airline pallet positions at its GDP certified pharma facility at Dubai International Airport. The extended cool room will provide an additional 2600 sq m of temperature controlled environment (2-25 degrees Celsius) for the storage and handling of vaccines and other pharmaceuticals. The new extension can hold an estimated 60-90 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine at one time. “Emirates SkyCargo is proud to have flown over 350 tonnes of COVID-19 vaccines around the world, delivering much needed

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RFD CELEBRATES NEW CARGO CENTRE

International Cargo Centre

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support to communities that are still heavily impacted by the current wave of the pandemic. However, we are always looking ahead and we anticipate that there will be an increase in demand to transport vaccines to developing nations during the second half of the year. “Already, we have seen a ramping up of COVID-19 vaccine volumes that were transported over the last few weeks in line with increased manufacturing. “We expect to reach the 100 million doses milestone well before the end of this month,” said Nabil Sultan, Emirates divisional senior vice president, cargo.

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NORTH AMERICA

NEWS

Brandon Fried: In my opinion… Delta’s zero-impact JUST when I think the e-Commerce boom is subsiding, another package ordered online shows up at my door! E-Commerce is expected to be a significant driver in airfreight market growth of over $170 billion and a 4.26% increase this year, so there appear to be no signs of this momentum waning, making our industry more essential than ever. The most significant challenge freight forwarders continue to face with the e-Commerce boom is the lack of available air capacity. This reduction in cargo space is primarily due to the absence of available flights, especially on international routes. During the pandemic, almost 80% of the world’s passenger airline fleet idled, and while many carriers are resuming operations, there are pockets of reduced space due to planes still being parked. Freight forwarders are creative problem solvers, and that creativity continues to benefit shippers, with forwarders providing routing alternatives to other airports and seaports. Many of our members of The Airforwarders Association are arranging aircraft charter options for their customers with freighter planes and passenger flights flown with just cargo and no people on board. The most significant recommendation to prepare long term for an increase in e-Commerce is for shippers to ensure they have an established relationship with their freight forwarders. Also, shippers should frequently communicate their specific needs so that the forwarder understands the nature and time-sensitive requirements of the particular cargo shipped. While time may be an essential consideration, customs requirements and security regulations play an

aviation vision

important role that the forwarder can navigate to avoid delays and unnecessary expenses. Forwarders should be using this time to stay close to their customers, being adaptable and staying informed of available shipping options. While the pandemic had a disruptive affect on the world, recovery is underway, making our services more vital than ever.

AS passenger flights slowly begin to increase again, the industry is preparing for a post-COVID world. TIACA highlighted sustainability as key to adapting to the world the other side of the pandemic. Rob Walpole, vice president, Delta Cargo explained to ACW how Delta is responding to this call. He said that from paperless operations to SAF programmes, advancement in this important sector are imperative for longterm viability. “From being the first and only US airline to voluntarily cap greenhouse gas emissions at 2012 levels to last year’s commitment to be the first carbon-neutral airline globally, Delta has a longstanding commitment to sustainable air travel,” explained Walpole. “As a company with a vision toward net-zero aviation, we are working within our industry and beyond to help build a new future for aviation where travel and sustainability are not mutually exclusive.” Delta’s vision is zero-impact

aviation: air travel that does not damage the environment directly or indirectly via greenhouse gas emissions, noise, waste generation or other environmental impacts. Achieving this ambitious goal will require significant capital investment, support from government partners, research and development from manufacturers and evolution of some of the world’s largest industries. “As Delta works to solve its largest impact on the environment - carbon dioxide emissions - it plans to invest in innovative solutions, like carbon capture and storage and sustainable aviation fuels (SAF). “SAF and other advanced technologies are not available on a large enough scale to meet today’s industry demands. “The market is so underdeveloped that all SAF produced in 2020 would only power Delta’s fleet for one day pre-COVID. “This is why investments, guided by a strong long-term vision, are so critical.”

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NEWS

GSSAs

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Added value is the key T

he agility and quick thinking of GSAs has kept cargo moving through uncertain and turbulent times. Stephen Dawkins, CEO, Air Logistics Group; Zafer Aggunduz chief marketing officer, Global GSA Group; and Ingo Zimmer, CEO, ATC Aviation Services spoke to ACW about how the unsung heroes of the past year have ensured goods got from A to B.

Stephen Dawkins With uncertainty surrounding capacity, routes and staff, how have GSAs had to adapt throughout the pandemic? Dawkins: The last year has been challenging for everyone in the industry and for GSSAs it has highlighted the requirement for us to continually evolve. Air Logistics has continued to invest during these challenging times, by adding value where we can and easing the pressure on our airline principals by assisting our forwarding clients with especially demanding service levels. In the current climate capacity is scarce and GSSAs need to provide high quality solutions for their forwarding clients. The pandemic highlighted the importance of our continuous investment in our network, IT infrastructure and digitalising our processes to provide faster quotations to our client base of over

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16,000 freight forwarders worldwide. Around the world the impact of COVID-19 was swift, Air Logistics teams had the tools and systems (communications/financial/operations/business intelligence) in place to work directly from home immediately, ensuring swift and efficient communication with our forwarding and airline clients. Aggunduz: The air cargo industry is already a fast-paced industry. Every day is different so our teams already have the experience to cope with challenges and are able to act fast. For Global, the most important thing was the safety of our people, so we took measures in each country to see what we needed to do to keep our staff safe and abide my each country’s rules and regulations. Every day was an uncertainty. We were not able to plan ahead in regard to rates and capacity. The main solution for us was to have daily communication with airlines and agents. When you have this kind of uncertainty, there is also a lot of opportunity that arises. We had to be creative to take advantage of opportunities. Zimmer: As a consequence of the pandemic the capacities on passenger flights dropped significantly. In order to cater for the demand we decided to offer charter services in addition to the GSSA segment. At the beginning of the pandemic the focus of the new department was on pax freighter charters exporting masks, gloves and ancillary equipment from China into destinations everywhere in the world. About 100 charters had been handled to Europe, Africa and South America.

aircargoweek.com

At the same time a COVID19 Task force was put together. Thomas Baumert, a veteran in the Pharma business, and his team analysed the situation, talked to the concerned stakeholders in the logistic chain and offered solutions to our customers. Beside pax charters the solution team started to sell unused capacities from agent charters. Our group set-up our own charter chains into the USA.

Ingo Zimmer

Do you think the role of the GSSA has changed during this time? Why? Dawkins: During the pandemic airlines have downsized or parked fleets and reduced the number of flights. With this reduced activity, airlines are having to make the difficult decisions to furlough or reduce head count and as such working with an outsourced cargo provider makes sense until the market returns, we all anticipate, in 2022. Aggunduz: I think going forward it will definitely change. In this period all the carriers who had offices outside their own country had difficulty complying with the differing regulations. As a GSA we have 20 or 30 years experience and with that

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GSSAs

comes strong relationships. We know the agents by heart and we have personal relations with them as well as knowledge and expertise of the market. Zimmer: During COVID, we changed slightly into the role of a capacity provider and were forced to offer solutions; not only selling scheduled carriers’ capacities because these capacities were insufficient for airfreight demand. What is the key to being a successful GSSA? Dawkins: The key to being a successful GSSA (not just a GSA) is adding value. A GSSA is about so much more than just selling space. Airlines are looking to maximise revenue and a competent GSSA can deliver on this - be it administrative efficiencies, liaising with handlers or using its network to find feeder opportunities into an airline’s hub. We must continue to provide the highest level of service to both our airline and forwarding clients. Aggunduz: GSAs worldwide are doing the same thing. But you can do it in a passive way, you can simply execute the tasks, or you can be more proactive and create business and find solutions. That’s our motto, create business and find solutions, and that’s the key to success. With us, we’re dedicated and solution-minded and have a proactive approach for sales. In this kind of period you need to have trust to steer the airlines in the right direction. I think that’s when you can really make a difference. It’s based on trust though and that comes with time. Zimmer: The key is still the network and market and product knowledge. So to have the best sales team in front and a well-organised back-up team is very important. All our managers are hand selected, the best in the industry. We have specialists for pharma, live animals, charter, automotive and even for the OBC business. The back office has got to be lean and cost efficient in order to make us competitive in pricing. Here it’s the grade of digitalisation, which makes the difference. At ATC we work with bots transferring e-mails in bookings and copying data from our system to the airline system. No more double entries. We are all working with windows 365, a cloud-based system. Our reservations software COS is brand-new and state-of-the-art and has been successfully rolled out in 2020 to all our global offices. The e-booking platform has been started recently for bookings and ad hoc requests.

How do you hope your GSA will develop and grow going forward in to a post-COVID world? Dawkins: Enhancing our digital tools and platforms has been a key element of our strategy during the pandemic and in 2021 we will be realising a significant value-added platform tool allowing airlines to revenue manage their business on a shipment-by-shipment basis if required. Alongside its digital developments, Air Logistics understands that every shipment is different whether its high value or temperature-controlled pharmaceuticals, and we need to take a booking and ‘own it’ until it gets to its final destination. In addition, we still have local people at the end of the phone to support our forwarding and airline clients throughout the process. Aggunduz: During this time we have really shown the market the value of GSAs and the positive effect they can have on business. If you look back to the statistics, the carriers have per-

NEWS

formed against all odds. In many countries some of the airlines that have performed best are represented by us, so that gives us the confidence to say that we really made a difference. Post-COVID-19 the need for data, communication and efficient tools is becoming a big trend in the cargo industry. But everything cannot be digital, there will always be some personal influence. The air cargo industry is still a people business and still requires tailor-made solutions. We’re investing in IT to find tools that are effective but we are still able to apply our bespoke solutions, our knowledge, our expertise and personal influence. Zimmer: We see a lot of potential for GSSAs because the airlines learned during the pandemic that it is good to be lean and outsourcing business at fixed costs to a GSSA is a good solution. We expect that the rates will drop a bit when capacities come back but will stay at a healthy level for the next years.

RECORD-BREAKING FLIGHT FROM BOH TO JFK

NEW York-based airline general sales and service agency, Aviacargo, celebrated a series of record-breaking flights between Bournemouth in the UK and New York, JFK. Operating the bellies of European Cargo’s Airbus A340-600 freighters the company carried 55 tonnes on a series of flights at the end of May and the start of June. President Michael Cox said:

“The loss of transatlantic capacity has a result of the pandemic as seen an urgent requirement for reliable service between Europe and the USA. Our aim has been to give freight and logistics companies a service they could rely on. “We have proven that this route delivers exactly that and is combined with our exceptional customer service.”

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AVIATION INDUSTRY IS A PARTNER IN CLIMATE PROTECTION

BARIG at the Air Cargo Industry Meeting 2021 Constructive collaboration between the industry, economy, and politics is in demand Bans or higher taxes on air transport are leading to distortions of competition that do more harm than good to the environment Innovations in the aviation industry support climate protection

Climate protection in aviation can only be achieved sustainably and efficiently if the industry, economy, and politics work together constructively. In addition, measures must be co-ordinated and implemented at an international level.” This was emphasised by Michael Hoppe, secretary general of the Board of Airline Representatives in Germany (BARIG), at this year’s air cargo industry meeting, which was held as a virtual event at Cologne Bonn Airport at the invitation of the German Air Transport Association (BDL), the Federation of German Industries (BDI), and the German Freight Forwarding and Logistics Association (DSLV). The reason therefore is that, only recently, several politicians called for unilateral measures that would, however, lead to massive distortions of competition. Accordingly, the German economy, and the environment as well, were to suffer. Hence, instead of working with bans or fiscal adjustments, BARIG and the aviation industry rather advocate constructive, goal-oriented solutions to protect the climate. These include emissions trading, among other things. In addition, technical innovations and further developments in the

From left: Michael Hoppe, secretary general of the Board of Airline Representatives in Germany (BARIG); Johan Vanneste, president & ceo of Cologne Bonn Airport; Matthias von Randow, executive director of the German Aviation Association (BDL); Dr Pierre Dominique Pruemm, member of the executive board and executive director aviation and infrastructure at Fraport

field of alternative fuels are also required. Moreover, intermodality must be further developed as well. Only recently, the aviation industry pledged its support for shifting passenger traffic to rail wherever it is possible and makes sense. However, numerous other investments urgently need to follow here to achieve this, including, for example, the expansion of existing routes and the construction of new ones, as well as the connection of the airports in Munich and other cities to the high-speed rail network.

In September last year, BARIG expressively endorsed the European Commission’s plans to reform the European airspace as announced that month. The “Single European Sky,” an endeavour that has long been advocated by BARIG and other international aviation associations, as well as a more efficient, uniform air traffic control in Europe may finally be achieved with this reform.

In the current practice, aircraft in Europe usually cannot fly a direct and straight route; due to an inefficient system, they have to Hoppe said: “Air traffic and clitake unnecessary detours to reach mate protection are by no means their destination. The envisaged mutually exclusive. On the constandardisation will eliminate such trary, the aviation industry appears excessive zig-zag courses ­– with positive consequences in various as a partner for a shared, sustainareas. Experts assume that the able future. shorter flight routes will reduce CO2 emissions by several million “It is a driver of economic prostonnes. In addition to that, flight perity and, thus, helps to finance durations are lowered and systhe basic prerequisite for investtem-related unnecessary delays, ments and further research in nature, climate, and environmental as well as waiting loops can be avoided. protection.”

BARIG secretary general Hoppe, commented: “We welcome the project of EU Transport Commissioner Adina Vălean as it revives the dynamics of this important topic for climate protection and efficiency. The course has been set, now the EU member states must finally take the actual steps to follow these announcements. “Today’s anachronistic system of a ‘patchwork quilt in the sky’ must be replaced as soon as possible by a Single European Sky and the respective enhancement of air traffic control – for the sake of climate protection, as well as for the efficiency and cost reduction that are more urgently needed than ever in the air transport industry.” BARIG (Board of Airline Representatives in Germany) represents the interests of more than 100 national and international airlines in scheduled, charter, low cost, and air cargo business. Since the foundation in 1951, the airline association works for the improvement of frame conditions in the aviation industry in Germany. aircargoweek.com

Profile for Azura International

ACW 14th June 21  

ACW 14th June 21  

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