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The weekly newspaper for air cargo professionals Volume: 20

Issue: 6 13 February 2017

Pharma investments continue across supply chain

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he air cargo pharmaceutical sector grew strongly in 2016 and is forecast to expand by a similar figure in 2017 as the industry continues to increase its market share. The pharma industry is growing at around four to five per cent per annum while carriers are seeing double digit pharma growth, some by as much as 30 per cent. Investments in pharma facilities, handling standards, routes and trade lanes are top of the pile for operators across the supply chain and this has continued into this year. Last week, Qatar Airways Cargo launched additional Pharma Express flights from the pharma hubs of Basel (EuroAirport) and Brussels Airport to Doha as it targets gateways near to the home of major pharma companies. These newly added frequencies take the carrier’s the total Pharma Express flights to nine per week. They also include to Mumbai, Ahmedabad and Hyderabad. Airbus A330 Freighters serve routes with 65 to 68 tonnes of capacity each way. Qatar moves more than 30,000 tonnes of pharma a year.

And last week Kuwaiti freight forwarder Agility opened a specialist facility for pharma at Hyderabad International Airport in India. It has a footprint of 6,000 square metres and will serve pharma manufacturers in Hyderabad, Goa, Pune, Vizag and Bengaluru. Agility South Asia chief executive officer, Detley Janik notes pharma is one of the “cornerstones of the Indian economy” with exports set to grow 60 per cent in 2017. Over in the US, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) is to increase perishable cargo capacity with the opening of a cold chain facility operated by AirLogistix USA, to be

operational this summer. DFW says the facility will control warehousing temperatures for shipments of cool chain cargo including pharma. These announcements come a week after Mumbai International Airport (MIAL) joined the Pharma.Aero organisation set up by Brussels Airport and Miami International Airport last year, which aims to improve pharma handling and quality in the air cargo industry. MIAL will work towards gaining IATA’s CEIV Pharma certification, one of the prerequisites for Pharma.Aero membership. MIAL joins the likes of Changi Airport, Sharjah International Airport, Brussels Airlines, Singapore Airlines, Brinks Life Sciences and Johnson & Johnson as members. Other companies across the supply chain have announced in 2017 they have gained CEIV, or are working towards it including Bolloré Logistics in Paris, while the Kuehne + Nagel KN PharmaChain network became fully CEIV certified, Singapore Airlines Cargo gained it along with Rio Airport and the Paris CDG Airport air cargo community is working towards it.

and is now the fourth biggest cargo hub in China after Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, and is the hub city of Western China. The show will take place at the Chengdu Century City New International Convention and Exhibition Center with 35,000 square metres of exhibition space. It is 10 kilometres from the city centre and 12 kilometres from the international airport. AZura International, the publisher of Air Cargo Week, is the official sales partner of Messe Muenchen.

Settlements reaching 29.6 million Canadian dollars ($22.5 million) have been approved for distribution as part of the Canadian Air Cargo Shipping Services Class Action. Courts in Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec approved the settlements and the protocol to distribute funds against alleged price-fixing in the air cargo shipping market on shipments to and from Canada between January 2000 and September 2006. The class counsel consisted of law firms Siskinds, Camp Fiorante Matthews Mogerman, and Liebman Legal. Linda Visser of Siskinds says: “We are proud of what we have recovered thus far on behalf of class members. The court-approved protocol we are announcing today is an invitation to eligible businesses and consumers to recover expenses that should not have been billed in the first place.” The class action is continuing against Air Canada and British Airways, and Visser says Siskinds will continue to pursue them.

CITLE in Chengdu to be bigger than ever Chengdu will be the place to be when the 17th China International transportation & logistics Expo (CITLE) takes place from 28 to 30 June 2017. The Messe Muenchen show focuses on the important Western China region, complementing transport logistic China in Shanghai, which focuses on the East of the country, and will be dedicated to production logistics, hinterland traffic, logistics value-added services and operations connected to Europe and the world. Exhibitors at CITLE will include companies from the air cargo, logistics service, cold chain management, logistics finance sectors to name a few. The show organiser expects at least 400 exhibitors across the three exhibition halls. Chengdu is the capital of Sichuan Province in Southwest China, which is home to more than 250 million residents and branches of all major companies and is a focal point of important production networks. Chengdu Shuangliu International Airport has developed rapidly over the past 10 years

Price-fixing pay-outs

new smart data portal for cargo iq Spain competitive but iag remains at forefront MANY ISSUES TO BE DISCUSSED IN JOHANNESBURG clark steps in to secure wfs

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CHEP rebranded to Unilode Aviation CHEP Aerospace Solutions has been rebranded Unilode Aviation Solutions following its acquisition by EQT Infrastructure in November 2016. Unilode owns and manages approximately 100,000 outsourced unit load devices for more than 40 airline customers across 450 airports and 48 repair and service centres. Unilode president and chief executive officer, Dr Ludwig Bertsch says: “This is an incredibly exciting time for the business and our new brand will encapsulate the positive energy across our global team. “Accessible, memorable and true to our core values, Unilode is a name we are proud to stand behind as we continue to consolidate our position as the world’s leading provider for outsourced ULD and inflight equipment solutions.” The brand will be officially unveiled at the International Air Transport Association World Cargo Symposium in Abu Dhabi from 14 to 16 March. The name Unilode was created from the first letters of ‘unit load device’ and ‘lode’ is an old English word meaning rich source. CHEP was previously owned by Brambles who sold it to infrastructure fund company, EQT Infrastructure in November 2016 as part of a $130 million Australian dollar deal.

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NEWSWEEK

New smart data portal for Cargo iQ

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argo iQ is partnering with iRIX Software Engineering and Information Builders to further develop its Smart Data program. The three-stage Smart Data project will generate a broader scope of measurements, more information on specific milestones and self-service member access to the group’s reporting platform, and Module One covering airport-to-airport data collection is underway and due for completion in the spring of 2017. Swiss IT service provider iRIX will implement Module Two, an online portal that members can access to tap into Cargo iQ data for customised reports on milestones covering individual routes, timeframes and performance of partners. Full access to the portal will be launched in autumn of this year. Cargo iQ executive director, Ariaen Zimmerman (pictured) says: “The Smart Data project will enable members to look at the data in a lot more detail and analyse it more easily so that they can reallocate resources to the areas where it is most needed to improve their processes, and consequently,

their quality.” He adds: “We are providing them with enhanced milestone data transparency to drive innovation along the whole Door to Door airfreight supply chain, whilst supporting individual and industry quality and process improvement.” The Smart Data program is one of aseries of initiatives aimed at upping the value Cargo iQ delivers to members and the industry. iRIX Software Engineering managing partner and chief executive officer, Thierry Bosshart says the company is looking forward to seeing in practice how its software supports bringing further quality to the air cargo industry.

20.8% tonnage surge at HIA

HAMAD International Airport (HIA) saw airfreight (cargo and mail) grow significantly in 2016 by 20.8 per cent compared to 2015 reaching a new high of 1.7 million tonnes. During 2016, HIA says it invested in increasing the Doha gateway’s capacity, improving its product offering and redesigning its operational processes to efficiently accommodate the increasing traffic over the coming years. On the operations side, 15 new aircraft parking stands have been constructed to support the hub operation of Qatar Airways. During 2016, HIA says it also witnessed a growth in its network with Qatar Airways connecting Doha directly to 14 new routes.

Qatar goes for Siginon at JKIA

SIGINON Aviation has been appointed as the ground and ramp handler for Qatar Airways Cargo at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in Nairobi. Among cargo handled will be perishables such as flowers, fruits, vegetables and meat that are the top exports from Nairobi destined mainly for Europe and Middle Eastern countries. Qatar Airways Cargo operates freighters to seven destinations in Africa to Accra, Djibouti, Entebbe, Johannesburg, Khartoum, Lagos and Nairobi and bellyhold cargo capacity to 23 cities on the continent.

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Accelya and Mercator merge

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ccelya and Mercator are to join forces - which they say will a create a global technology-enabled services provider to airlines, travel agents and freight forwarders. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed and the merger is expected to close in the first quarter of 2017. Both say they will offer a product portfolio with complementary offerings including revenue accounting, revenue management and revenue assurance, cargo management, payment solutions, data analytics, cost management and commercial solutions. Warburg Pincus, a private equity firm will be the main shareholder following its acquisition of Accelya from Chequers Capital.


Saudia renews organ logistics agreement

NEWS WEEK WorldNews LEIPZIG/Halle Airport started 2017 as it ended last year as its cargo tonnage surged by 6.9 per cent in January. Germany’s second busiest air cargo gateway and Europe’s fifth busiest – handled 84,782 tonnes, as it continued the strong growth it achieved in 2016. Last year, Leipzig/Halle handled more than one million tonnes for the first time over a 12 month period as it finished the calendar year handling 1.05 million tonnes boosted by express, belly and freighter freight.

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audia Cargo has renewed an agreement to transport human organs with the Saudi Centre for Organ Transplantation. The carrier’s chief executive officer, Nabil Khojah and the centre’s director general, Dr. Faisal Shaheen signed the new agreement (pictured above). The renewal complements the cooperation established by the two in January 2014. Saudia Cargo says Khojah ensured all logistics support is available for dealing with human organ transportation. In 2016, Saudia

handled 217 organ shipments from the centre. He also states Saudia Cargo seeks to enhance the role of its social responsibility through different activities and it prides itself on being a supporter of the centre’s activities. Khojah adds shipments have been handled according to required standards, and priority given to shipments in terms of receipt and delivery at all cargo terminals in Saudi Arabia’s airports. The 2017 agreement also includes providing cargo services in the Arabian Gulf countries.

QATAR Airways operated the longest commercial aviation flight in the world when it started its Doha – Auckland service last week. It covered a distance of 14,535 kilometres in 17 hours 30 minutes. The daily Boeing 777 flight offered 116 tonnes of bellyhold capacity every week to support growing imports of raw, industrial and consumer materials into New Zealand. Dairy produce, meat and fruits from Auckland are set to fly into the Middle East and on to major European cities.

Emirates picks Swissport SWISSPORT Cargo Services France has won a contract to handle cargo at Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport, Lyon Airport and Nice Côte d’Azur Airport for Emirates SkyCargo. The agreement will be effective from 1 April 2017. It covers the complete scope of cargo handling services including full freighter and warehouse handling. Swissport International senior vice president (SVP), Simon Messner says: “Swissport is in the right position to meet the daily needs of Emirates SkyCargo in France and will be a reliable local partner for this outstanding cargo carrier. Emirates SkyCargo SVP cargo operations worldwide, Henrik Ambak says: “We are confident that Swissport’s expertise combined with our shared values and our focus on quality, safety and excellence in customer service will support us in delivering industry leading air cargo solutions to our cargo customers in France and around the world.” Emirates SkyCargo offers bellyhold cargo capacity to French customers on its passenger flights to Paris, Lyon and Nice and also operates scheduled weekly freighter flights to Paris and Lyon facilitating trade between France and the rest of the world via its vast network.

Flat volumes for Etihad Cargo

ETIHAD Cargo volumes remained flat in 2016 at 592,700 tonnes despite passenger traffic growing eight per cent. The airline expanded its freighter network to 15 destinations including flights to Columbus Rickenbacker, East Midlands, London Stansted, Copenhagen and Brussels, Addis Ababa and Casablanca, Colombo, Zhengzhou and Muscat. In 2017, Etihad will add nine 787s, two A380s and one Airbus A330-200 Freighter to its fleet.

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ULD change for Brussels Airlines

ettainer has taken over the management and maintenance of Brussels Airlines’ unit load devices (ULD) with a specially designed unit being handed over to mark the occasion and travel as an ambassador. Brussels Airlines now has a brand-new fleet of about 1,000 ULDs, many of them AKEs, following the change of management provider that came into force on 5 February. The lightweight AKE units are lighter with the same robustness, reducing fuel consumption.

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NEWSWEEK

UKACC members have a ball and raise cash for cancer charity

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he United Kingdom Air Cargo Club’s (UKACC) 56th Annual Charity Gala Ball on Saturday, 28 January at the Tower Hotel in London raised £7,740 for the charity Prostate Cancer UK. Hundreds of guests enjoyed a three-course

meal, networked, enjoyed the entertainment and took part in a silent auction and prize draw. This year’s chairman Richard Miller of United Airlines Cargo nominated Prostate Cancer UK and the money raised added to other events held by UKACC and means more than £10,000

will be donated to the charity this year. Sponsors were Air Cargo Week, United Airlines Cargo, Air Canada Cargo, Toll Global Forwarding, HAE Group, Goldstar Transport, TSA, Qatar Airways, Etihad Airlines, ECX Global Logistics and International

Airline Manager. UKACC organises events through the year and is calling on more members to join. Numbers have dwindled and this year’s ball was the lowest ever attendance it has had. Membership is free. Visit www.ukacc2000.co.uk for details.

1st Ocean-to-air shipment from MIA MIAMI International Airport (MIA) has welcomed Florida’s first ever ocean-to-air perishables transhipment, including 10 tonnes of peas from Guatemala that flew to Amsterdam. The shipment arrived aboard the Crowley Maritime vessel Tucana J at Port Everglades on 30 January. The payload was then trucked to MIA before departing to Amsterdam Airport Schiphol via Centurion Cargo on 2 February. Crowley subsidiary, Customized Brokers partnered with MIA to win approval for the programme and can now coordinate ocean

shipments of perishables from Latin America to Port Everglades, transport them to MIA where they will depart for Europe, Asia and the Middle East. Miami-Dade Aviation director, Emilio Gonzalez says: “We greatly appreciate our cargo and federal agency partners for collaborating with us in this exciting new chapter of MIA’s growth.” “We continue to explore innovative concepts like the Ocean-to-Air program, which have immense potential to generate new revenue and business ties around the world.”

LAX to AKL American flight doing nicely

AMERICAN Airlines Cargo is targeting more growth on its daily Auckland (AKL) to Los Angeles (LAX) service started six months ago using a Boeing 787. The carrier says it has seen consistent, rapid expansion and sales agent GSA Cargo’s country manager for Australasia, Carolyn Evans explains: “Customers across New Zealand are benefiting from the tremendous scope of American’s global network. “Conversely, the onwards connections

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from the Los Angeles gateway to both Europe and South America are proving particularly popular because of the number of industries that need to airfreight goods out of New Zealand. Today, more than 50 per cent of what we export is bound for destinations beyond Los Angeles.” Typical LAX-AKL flights contain both general freight and perishable cargo with items such as medical equipment, locks and printed matter, alongside meat, fish and fresh fruit products from New Zealand. Evans adds: “We are currently gearing up for another big fruit and flower season in 2017,” who notes bad weather including snow on the south island has impacted exports, which have delayed the season. She adds: “Sub-tropicals, like passion fruit, will soon be coming on stream and in the meantime, we are busy with wine, shoes, wool products and band equipment.”


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SPAIN

AENA airports post 11.2% air cargo growth in 2016

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pain was one of the fastest growing European air cargo country markets in 2016 as many gateways had a bumper year with most of the top airports posting strong growth numbers. This was due to a range of reasons including

an improving Spanish economy boosting both imports and exports, increasing bellyhold and freighter capacity through new routes being run and a focus on infrastructure. Spain’s favourable geographic position to Africa and as the link to the rest of Europe and

the range of commodities from perishables to pharma are also boosting its performance Spain’s airport operator AENA explains that 2016 was a massive success air cargo wise and Spanish airports saw combined air cargo growth of 11.2 per cent, as the entire airport system handled 795,575 tonnes, which was its highest ever total tonnage in a calendar year. And 2017 it is forecasting a similar strong performance and feels it will only continue to grow its freight levels, while last year’s increase it explains was “aligned to the most optimistic forecasts” that it made. In 2016, air cargo growth was recorded by the country’s four main airports of Adolfo Suárez Madrid-Barajas Airport (pictured top left), Barcelona-El Prat Airport, Zaragoza Airport (pictured bottom right) and Vitoria Airport, which saw a nine per cent, 13.3 per cent, 29 per cent and 12.4 per cent uplift, respectively.

Textiles and pharma

The likes of UPS, FedEx and DHL have also ramped up their operations and continue to see strong growth at locations in Spain. AENA notes that looking at the direct flows to and from its gateways in Spain, the main geographical areas in descendant order were, Europe, the Americas and Middle and Far East. As for the strongest sectors last year, in terms of value in exports garments and pharmaceuticals were the best performing commodities and freight types as both are growing areas in Spain, the home of Zara and where a range of pharma firms are located. But AENA is certainly not resting on its laurels and it is planning on making air cargo investments at its airprts this year and beyond, and increasing tonnage and operations do prove challenging as the right facilities need to be in place to handle the freight to the highest standards. The airport explains: “The increases in the cargo operations require consequently the need of new infrastructure for cargo, especially in Madrid where the Cargo Center is more mature. “Because of this reason AENA has been work-

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ing on the urbanization of new plots in the first line of the airport with direct access to the apron, some of them are going to be dedicated to cargo handlers and couriers. The plots have a net area for cargo of about 72,000 square metres. The urbanization is now finishing.” One of the driving forces behind the growth was the wide array of new routes being operated into and out of Spain as new bellyhold and all-cargo services were started from across a wide network, especially into Madrid and Barcelona, the country’s two main hubs. The region where the most were started to and from was the Far East with new connections to China and Japan mainly, but also to the India.

Far East growth

All these markets are driving cargo volumes as more flights, which only mean more tonnage and Spain is tapping into airfreight’s biggest region Asia Pacific. This is likely to continue as many carriers see Spain as a perfect route to reach other markets through road feeder services, interline carrier agreements and to also take advantage of perishable commodities, the range of textile manufacturers and pharma opportunities. Last month, Cathay Pacific Airways launched a new four-times weekly seasonal service between the world’s busiest air cargo hub Hong Kong and Barcelona from 2 July 2017 (subject to government approval). This will mean Cathay will have more non-stop flights from Spain to Asia that any other carrier. But how does AENA summarise the Spanish air cargo market at present and in 2017? The operator explains: “We are improving our relative position among our competitors in Western Europe assuming that we are far from the figures of the major hubs, by improving the services and competing in fares to become a relevant actor in the cargo flows between Middle and Far East and the Americas. “In 2017, we are expecting a moderate, but steady, growth.” The future of Spain’s air cargo market is looking bright and primed for growth.


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Spanish market competitive but IAG remains at the forefront

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AG Cargo is one of the main players in the Spanish market and says it had a “buoyant” 2016 meeting anticipated volumes for the year. There have been challenges in Spain this winter such as the poor harvest of vegetables, which have impacted supply chains and created pressure doing business in the region. IAG moves freight into and out of Spain through primarily Iberia, but also British Airways, Aer Lingus and low-cost carrier (LCC) Vueling – all part of the Group. Regional commercial manager for Spain, Idoia Martinez (pictured below) believes much of its performance comes down to the strength of its premium product portfolio, of Prioritise, Constant Climate and Constant Fresh. She explains: “The latter supported what was a particularly strong second and third quarter for perishables flows; with shipments of fresh fish and vegetables on the US and domestic routes proving popular.” Martinez says from IAG’s perspective, the key trading routes from Spain are now to the high-growth Asian markets and it was why last year it expanded its network into the region. IAG became one of the only bellyhold cargo carriers to offer direct flights between Madrid and Shanghai and Madrid and Tokyo in 2016, giving businesses a faster way to get their goods to the important Asian markets. Martinez notes in addition to the new opportunities on offer through Asian trade routes, it continues to support the mainstays of the Spanish business, such as the US export route, which continues to be hugely important for IAG and is one of the most robust sources of growth.

Customers can use Vueling and our other short-haul European routes to ship goods under 300kg to any of our European stations within either 24 or 48 hours, depending on the service option they select.” Martinez is optimistic for 2017 and says IAG has started the year feeling quietly confident and while 2016 may have got off

to a slightly slow start, it saw a strong recovery towards the end of the year finishing in good shape. “We’ve built up some nice momentum coming into 2017, and I anticipate we’ll continue to do well in the fresh fish and perishables market while making further inroads on the promising pharma sector,” she observes.

All about Asia and the US

But what commodities are proving strongest in the Spanish marketplace? “2016 was particularly strong for shipments of fresh fish and other perishables, with significant demand coming from Asia and the US. Pharmaceuticals is another key sector for the Spanish market, which we service with our industry leading Constant Climate product,” Martinez says. She says IAG is seeing good demand for pharma shipments, and expects this to grow as businesses in the region seek to enjoy the benefits of shipping time and temperature-sensitive drugs by air. Spain being the hub for Iberia, remains integral to IAG and is a hugely important market and network hub for its business. Martinez says thanks to its connectivity through its Madrid, Heathrow and Dublin hubs, it is able to connect businesses from every continent to 350 destinations within 24 to 48 hours. She adds: “For businesses in Spain, the Madrid hub delivers a truly global service across a wide range of routes. Madrid offers businesses a gateway to almost any market in the world, enabling connectivity to Latin America through Iberia; the east coast of America through Aer Lingus; or Asia, the Middle East, North America and Africa on British Airways. “The breadth of our network is a core competitive differentiator and one that wouldn’t be possible without our Madrid hub.” Direct cargo flows to and from Spain are important to IAG, and it sees a strong direct business on key routes such as Spain to Mexico. But Martinez says the function of Madrid as a hub means much of the cargo carried on Iberia supports other global trade flows and thanks to its Madrid-Heathrow-Madrid airbridge, IAG is able to connect cargo from stations in Asia and the UK with Iberia stations in Latin America. She notes: “For example, as direct shipments from Spain to Montevideo and San José are fairly weak, we fill this capacity with demand from across the wider IAG Cargo network.” Vueling is of growing importance to IAG since its 26 stations were added in December 2015 and Martinez says the LCC represents an important, strategic element of its cargo network. She explains: “Of course, when it comes to Vueling, we’re less focused on bringing in significant capacity volumes. Where the Vueling routes are important is in supporting businesses that have an urgent need to ship low-weight goods around to European cities. “Businesses can use our EuroConnector Service: a time-definite freight offering for global shipments connecting with Europe.

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AIR CARGO AFRICA PREVIEW

Industry returns to South Africa

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he air cargo industry will be returning to Johannesburg for the fourth edition of Air Cargo Africa from 21 to 23 February 2017. The African continent covers 20 per cent of the world’s surface area and holds 15 per cent of the global population, presenting phenomenal opportunities. According to the International Monetary Fund, Sub-Saharan Africa has grown at an annual rate of 4.8 per cent over the past five years, beating other emerging markets such as Latin America. Africa provides tremendous opportunities as it is a rich source of minerals and oil resources, and the continent needs economic growth to sustain itself. It still suffers from inadequate or very poor infrastructure, but the necessity of economic growth will spur nations to find ways and means to overcome challenges and become economically strong countries. Air Cargo Africa 2017 will bring manufacturers, shippers, airlines, airports, freight forwarders, charter providers, cargo handlers, IT companies and others together to display

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their products and services, and discuss the opportunities Africa presents. The event will take place at the Casino Convention Resort, Emperors Palace in the City of Ekurhuleni, home to O.R. Tambo International Airport, which services Johannesburg and is the busiest airport in Africa. O.R. Tambo Airport is envisioned as an aerotropolis defining the future of aviation in Africa. The 2015 show was attended by 80 exhibitors from 32 global countries and 29 African nations, with 2915 trade visitors and 527 delegates. This year will open on Tuesday, 21 February with a welcome address by STAT Media Group editor-in-chief, RK Patra, followed by an inaugural address and a keynote address by South African Airways acting chief executive officer, Musa Zwane. There will be five round tables discussing issues such as overcapacity, trade agreements and innovation. There will also be forums on Tuesday and Wednesday, discussing issues surrounding pharmaceuticals, perishables, automotive and humanitarian relief cargo’.

Pharma, perishables, automotive and humanitarian talking points

In addition to networking and round tables, there will be four forum events discussing pharmaceuticals, perishables and flowers, automotive cargo and humanitarian logistics. Brussels Airport will host the “Pharma Air Shippers’ Forum” at 14.00h on 21 February, looking at leveraging synergies in trade between Europe and Africa. The African pharmaceutical market is expected to be worth $65 billion by 2020 and 70 per cent is imported. The forum aims to get Belgian pharmaceutical exporters on board and offer them a platform to discuss the challenges and opportunities in the export and supply chain in Africa. Brussels Airport was the first airport in the world where stakeholders became fully International Air Transport Association Center of Excellence for Independent Validators in Pharmaceutical Logistics, and was a founding member of Pharma.Aero, an organisation to create certified routes. This will be followed by ‘Air Shippers’ Forum – Flowers and Perishables’ at 15.15h hosted by Saudia Cargo. Perishables such as flowers, fruit and vegetables are a very

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important export for a number of African nations. Frankfurt Airport will be hosting the ‘Automotive Shippers’ Forum’ at 14.30h on 22 February. Airfreight is essential for the automotive industry for just-in-deliveries and lean inventories, providing opportunities including moving components for production lines, aftermarket spare parts and even complete new cars. The Air Shippers’ Forum will be ‘Humanitarian Relief Cargo’ hosted by Liege Airport at 15.45h on 22 February. According to a United Nations report, at least $40 billion in humanitarian aid is needed annually to help victims of natural disasters and conflicts worldwide but the world only spends $25 billion a year on securing and getting food, water, shelter, medical supplies and other emergency resources to far flung regions. Liege Airport plays an important role in providing relief cargo, for example, in December 2016 it waived 50 per cent of the landing fee for Panalpina’s relief flight to Chad, when more than 80 tonnes of UNICEF aid flew to N’Djamena.


AIR CARGO AFRICA PREVIEW

Many issues to be discussed in Johannesburg

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here will be much to talk about in Johannesburg, with five round tables discussing Africa’s potential, overcapacity, the future of freight forwarders, trade agreements and innovations. The discussions will follow the keynote address by South African Airways acting chief executive officer (CEO), Musa Zwane entitled ‘Air freight in Africa – Building tomorrow’s market today’ at 11.15h on 21 February. At the first round table, ‘Unlocking Africa’s civil aviation potential: the time is now to set the rules for tomorrow’, International Air Transport Association (IATA) global head of cargo, Glyn Hughes (pictured left) will join Ethiopian Airlines Group CEO, Tewolde GebreMariam, Atlas Worldwide executive vice president and chief commercial officer, Michael Steen, Swissport International head of cargo, Nils Pries Knudsen, and Saudia Cargo vice president commercial, Rainer Mueller at 11.30h. African cargo growth has been strong in recent months, with freight tonne kilometres (FTK) growing 13.6 per cent in December according to IATA’s Air Freight Market Analysis December 2016, but overcapacity is an issue. According to IATA, capacity in available FTK increased 25.5 per cent in 2016 across Africa, pushing load factors down 4.8 percentage points to 22.2 per cent. The next round table will focus on overcapacity and yields at 10.00h on 22 February, in the session ‘Overcapacity and

declining yield in a very volatile market: what is industry’s strategy to strike a balance?’. This session is set to feature a lively discussion from Chapman Freeborn chief operating officer, Shahe Ouzounion, National Air Cargo president Middle East & Pacific Rim, Jacob Matthew, Delta Cargo president, Gareth Joyce (pictured below left), Kenya Airways acting general manager cargo, Peter Musola, OR Tambo International Airport general manager Bongwie Pityi, Panalpina World Transport (Dubai) DWC regional head of airfreight (MEAC), Slavey Djhaov and Siginon Aviation managing director, Meshak Kipturgo.

at 10.30h will hear from Boeing Commercial Airplanes regional director airline market analysis, marketing & development, Tom Crabtree, South African Airways Cargo general manager, Tleli Makhetha (pictured below), Turkish Airlines chief cargo officer, Turhan Ozen, World Bank trade specialist, Daniel Saslavsky and Air Charter Service global cargo director, Dan Morgan-Evans. The final round table will start at 12.00h and hear from Matternet head of global business development, Oliver Evans, Astral Aviation founder and chief executive officer, Sanjeev Gadhia (pictured right), Hybrid

Enterprises chief commercial officer, Brian Bauer, BeCon Projects CEO, Uwe Beck, and Dronamics CEO, Svilen Rangelov. Delivering health products is a challenge in much of Africa with remote communities with poor infrastructure so companies are experimenting with drones. In October, UPS started a partnership with Zipline and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance to deliver blood throughout Rwanda’s Muhanga district using drones. With all this and more, the esteemed and knowledgeable speakers will undoubtably have lively discussions.

The future of freight forwarders

After a coffee break, Kuehne + Nagel senior vice president (product & services) air logistics, Marcel Fujike, Cargolux Airlines International regional director Africa, Jonathan Clark, Fraport senior vice president cargo, Dirk Schusdziara, The International Air Cargo Association’s new secretary general, Vladimir Zubkov, DHL Global Forwarding vice president airfreight Middle East & Africa, Ivin George, Kale Logistics Solution director, Vineet Malhotra and AirBridgeCargo Airlines vice president Europe, Middle East & Africa, Georges Biwer (pictured below right), will discuss the future of freight forwarders in the session ‘Freight forwarders, the critical link in the air cargo supply chain: Will the current model continue to work in the future?’ at 11.45h. The final day will feature two round tables, ‘Trade Agreements: what’s there in them for the African air cargo industry’ and ‘Innovations in cargo delivery: from drones to UAVs to airships’. The first session

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AIR CARGO SECURITY

San Juan changes for DHL Clark steps in to secure WFS

DHL Global Forwarding has invested at its Life Science Competency Center in San Juan, Puerto Rico by developing three separate cold chambers - as part of the Transport Security Administration’s Certified Cargo Screening Facilities program, alowing for on-site cargo

screening and compliance auditing. The chambers have a combined capacity of 480 pallets and each operte at 15 to 25 degrees Celsius. It also offers one chamber operating at two to eight degrees Celsius, with a combined capacity of 90 pallets. This year, DHL is opening four new temperature-controlled storage chambers in San Juan. DHL Global Forwarding’s head of business development for the Americas, Frank Cascante says: “Within the last decade, pharmaceutical companies have increasingly invested in Puerto Rico, and these companies need a strong network and cold chain infrastructure to handle their delicate medicines and pharmaceutical products.” In the second quarter of 2017, DHL’s San Juan facility will join the 30 DHL stations to be awarded the International Air Transport Association’s CEIV in Pharmaceutical Logistics certification.

X-ray scanner added by TSA to ACSTL

SMITHS Detection’s (SDI) advanced dual-view X-ray cargo scanner - the HI-SCAN 180180-2is pro - has been accepted into the ‘qualified’ section of the US Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) Air Cargo Screening Technology List (ACSTL). The company says the HI-SCAN 1801802is pro delivers better security with faster, more accurate and reliable image evaluation, while its large tunnel dimensions allow goods on the largest TA-approved pallet size to be screened and its high penetration ca-

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ACW 13 february 2017

pabilities allow for screening of large-scale consolidated and palletized goods. It is 25 per cent smaller than earlier versions, which frees up floor space. SDI president, Dan Gelston says: “We continue to work with TSA to ensure our products help address evolving threats. SDI’s close customer relationships and ability to understand their needs are essential elements to maintaining the class-leading status of our products, further confirmed by this latest inclusion on the ACSTL.”

WORLDWIDE Flight Services (WFS) has apppointed David Clark (pictured) as global head of safety & security. He takes over on 27 February. Clark will report directly to WFS’ chief executive officer, Craig Smyth, and be based in Paris. He joins WFS after spending more than 17 years with British Airways where he has held various senior management roles in engineering and ground operations.

Most recently, Clark ran the ground operations safety, quality and training functions globally, working with the airline’s in-house ground handling teams, ground service providers, partner airlines and the International Air Transport Association to drive improvements in safety and security. Smyth says: “Safety and security is our number one priority. As such, David’s appointment brings not only a deep understanding of aviation safety and security risk and regulatory frameworks, but also a current perspective from a major international airline and WFS customer.” Clark adds: “I am delighted to be joining one of the world’s leading airport service organisations, especially at such an exciting time in the company’s history. “I’m looking forward to joining the team and making WFS best in class in this industry.”

Security and screening market set to grow THE air cargo security and screening systems market is forecasted to grow strongly by 2021, according to Persistence Market Research (PMR). PMR says the need for security and screening systems has become even more pronounced and new technologies reduce the potential threats from terrorist activities and ensure safety by tracking explosives inside air cargo shipments. PMR adds there is a “dire” need to in-

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crease security, which has been compelling the industry to include air cargo security and screening systems, while North America and Europe dominate the marketplace. Screening systems based on x-ray, explosives trace detection (ETD) and explosives detection systems technologies are growing in use. PMR says ETD the most popular used by the aviation industry and freight forwarders for screening air cargo and expects it to be a fast growing segment.


TRADEFINDER Airlines

Airports

Cargo Handling

Turkey

Lithuania

United Kingdom

Freight Forwarders Caribbean

Spain

Freight Forwarders Hong Kong

United Arab Emirates

USA

Industry Events

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ACW 13 FEBRUARY 2017

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