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WORLD ACW Digital is sponsored by AIRPORTS.COM FREIGHTERS.COM

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The weekly newspaper for air cargo professionals No. 1,035

Who won?

10 June 2019

Find out inside

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When success took to the stage

INSIDE LUFTHANSA FOUNDS HEYWORLD

LUFTHANSA Cargo has founded heyworld to meet the requirements of online retailers, offering them a single source and focusing on the ... PAGE 2

SECURING LONG TERM GROWTH

TO secure long-term growth of cargo at the Paris airports, Groupe ADP has a cargo strategy based on four axes, according to Marc Houalla ... PAGE 4 MAINTAINING ITS POSITION

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n a major break from tradition, last week’s ACW World Air Cargo Award’s gala night of the airfreight stars saw the announcement of the winners of the ECS Group’s ground-breaking #NexGen Leaders industry initiative. In a second change to the proceedings, more than 10,000 voters worldwide had cast their votes in a new format where a shortlist was developed and then voted on. In a packed ballroom at the four-star downtown Munich hotel The Grand Westin, award winners, supporters and the elite of the global airfreight industry watched as winner after winner took to the stage to pick up a trophy for winning a hotly contested category. The audience of the awards had left the sweltering heat of the Messe Muenchen venue of air cargo Europe to enjoy the air-con of the ballroom at the hotel to take part in the evening on the middle day of the four-day event.

William Carr, chairman of AZura International, publisher of Air Cargo Week and host of the ACW World Air Cargo Award gala night, took to the stage just before the last category was announced to thank sponsors and voters for making the event the success it was. He said: “I want to thank the sponsors who have donated so generously to the event and made it all possible. I also thank the voters around the world for taking the time to vote.” Another tradition is that the evening’s results were placed in the last ACW Daily News issue by production manager Alex Brown and the editorial team, who worked tirelessly with the official photographer well past midnight. The rest of the publication had been laid out earlier by the editorial and productionn teams, leaving Brown to conclude production of the Daily News by dropping in the winners’ photos as soon as they were downloaded.

Doing the double

Paris-based GSA ECS Group managed the double by picking up awards for Air Cargo General Sales Agent and the Industry Marketing & Promotional Campaign Award as well as introducing the winners of its global search for new airfreight talent to the industry. Adrien Thominet, CEO of ECS Group, took to the stage to introduce a short film that encompassed the world-wide interest in the competition. Three projects picked up a substantial award: Guests at the event, winners and runner-ups alike, enjoyed first class entertainment organised by Kim Smith, operations director of AZura International, including an Abba tribute band, and a three-course dinner accompanied by fine wine. Sponsors of the awards were Air Asia, Saudia Cargo, SAVE Group, Turkish Cargo, Dunleavy White and ECS Group.

BOLLORE Logistics has been working hard to retain its market leading position in France, says vice president airfreight Europe Philippe de Crecy ... PAGE 5

WHAT WILL 2037 LOOK LIKE?

ACCOUNTING for Boeing 737, Boeing 757 and MD-80 family freighters, the current number of in-service freighters totals circa 620 aircraft ... PAGE 6

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Lufthansa Cargo establishes heyworld

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ufthansa Cargo has founded heyworld to meet the requirements of online retailers, offering them a single source and focusing on the needs of the e-commerce industry. The Frankfurt am Main-based subsidiary will offer its services in the form of a configurable, transparent and reliable transport solution specifically designed for online retailers, digital marketplaces, online shop operators and forwarders. Stefan Frankenhauser, head of product and service development at Lufthansa Cargo says: “We have clearly identified the new customer requirements and developed an additional transport offering for online retailers.” heyworld will offer convenient access, fast transport times, a high level of reliability, simple customs clearance, end-to-end shipment tracking and pricing at package level. It will embed Lufthansa Cargo’s airport-to-airport air cargo services into its transport solutions and integrate optional services such as first and last mile transfers and handling add-ons. Peter Gerber, CEO and chairman of the executive board at Lufthansa Cargo says: “By establishing heyworld, we are creating a simple and reliable transport solution for the e-commerce sector.”

Timo Schamber, managing director of heyworld adds: “With our dynamic team of experienced logisticians and retail experts, we will be able to create the best transport solutions for cross-border online trade.”

Rhenus opens up at Leipzig/Halle Airport

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henus has opened its own air and sea freight site at Leipzig/Halle Airport, expanding its network in Eastern and Central Germany. The branch, which opened on 1 June has a direct link to the Rhenus Group’s international network through the groupage and airfreight gateways in Hilden and Frankfurt/ Main. In Leipzig, Rhenus Air & Ocean will not only handle international air transport shipments but also the import and export customs formalities. Customers can also book services in

the sea freight sector and combined transport operations. The Leipzig site will focus on connections to the Americas, Asia-Pacific and South Africa. Stefan Schwind, managing director of Rhenus Air & Ocean Germany says that Leipzig/Halle’s 7% growth in 2018 was a major reason why Rhenus set up operations at the airport. He says: “Because of its central location, it’s also an ideal addition to our network within Germany. The site is strategically important for us, thanks to the good international connections too.”

ikko Tainio will take over as managing director of Finnair Cargo, succeeding Janne Tarvainen who is joining Nordic Regional Airlines at the end of July. Tainio is currently the managing director of Finnair Kitchen and has experience of different Finnair functions, having held positions in finance and ground operations.

Tainio says: “I am happy to see the great work that’s been done by the Finnair Cargo team in recent years, particularly the ambitious transformation of working practices and successful expansion of COOL terminal operations. I look forward to continuing the journey with the team towards achieving one million daily cargo kilos and sharpening the competitive edge that new technologies and processes give us.”

Tainio to succed Tarvainen at Finnair

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As seen in Munich ...

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ob Matharoo, chairman of the United Kingdom Air Cargo Club (UKACC), visited the ACW stand at air cargo Europe last week. He was in Munich to promote UKACC’s goal to bring in new members and keep the momentum of the UKACC philosophy alive. From next month, Matharoo, who owns business consultancy Y2 Solutions, will provide monthly updates of UKACC activities.

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AND THE WINNERS ARE ... A

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nce again, the readers of Air Cargo Week have cast their votes in the world’s foremost air cargo industry awards to mark those organisations that are truly the crème de la crème of the global airfreight industry.

These highly-sought after Awards attracted more than 10,000 votes from all over the world and were preseneted on Wednesday 5 June at the prestigious and glamourous Westin Grand Hotel in city centre Munich by repersentatives of the award sponsor.

For the first time, the Awards were decided in two stages – a nomination stage and a voting stage. Nominations for any air cargo sector organisation around the world were made by any person or organisation.

These were only accepted using the official nomination form on a special section of the Air Cargo Week website. Companies could also nominate themselves, however, they were not able to vote for themselves.

Airfreight Forwarder of the Air Cargo Handling Agent of Year 2019 the Year 2019

Winner: Palpina Sponsor: Air Asia

Winner: HACTL Sponsor: Saudia Cargo

Shortlist: DHL Global Forwarding; Dimerco; Expeditors; Kerry Logistics; Panalpina

Shortlist: Alha Group; Asia Airfreight Terminal (AAT); dnata; Hong Kong Air Cargo Terminal (HACTL) Shanghai Pudong International Airport Cargo Terminal (PACTL)

Air Cargo Charter Broker of the Year 2019 Winner: Air Charter Service Sponsor: SAVE Group

Airport of the Year 2019 Winner: Amsterdam Airport Schiphol Sponsior: Saudia Cargo Shortlist: Amsterdam Airport Schiphol; Changi Airport Singapore; London Heathrow Airport; Miami International Airport; Milan Malpensa Airport

Shortlist: Air Charter Service; Air Partner; Global Airlift Solutions; Hunt & Palmer

Air Cargo GSA of the Year 2019

Air Cargo Industry Customer Care Award 2019

Winner: ECS Group Sponsor: Turkish Cargo

Winner: Cargolux

Shortlist: Air Logistics Group; ATC Aviation; ECS Group; Global GSA Group; Kales Airline Services

Shortlist: Air Asia; Cargolux; ECS Group; Swiss WorldCargo Webcargo

Air Cargo Industry Achievement Award 2019

IT for the Air Cargo Industry Award 2019

Winner: Air France/KLM/Martinair Sponsor: Dunleavy White

Winner: Webcargo

Shortlist: Air Asia; Air Charter Service; Air France/KLM/Martinair; ECS Group; Turkish Cargo

Shortlist: Accenture; BRUcloud; Cargoguide; Kale Logistics; Webcargo

Marketing & Promotional Campaign Award 2019

Cargo Airline of the Year 2019

Winner: ECS Group Sponsor: AZura International Shortlist: Air Charter Service; Air France/KLM/Martinair; ECS Group; Ethiopian Cargo; Saudia Cargo

Winner: Air France/KLM/Martinair Sponsor: ECS Group Shortlist: Air France/KLM/Martinair; AirBridgeCargo; American Airlines Cargo; Avianca Cargo; Emirates SkyCargo; Etihad Cargo; Qatar Airways Cargo; Saudia Cargo; Swiss WorldCargo; Turkish Cargo

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Four axes to secure long term growth in Paris

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o secure long-term growth of cargo at the Paris airports, Groupe ADP has a cargo strategy based on four axes, Marc Houalla, executive director and director of Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport tells Air Cargo Week. The four axes are recovering traffic, commitment to better quality of service and a more attractive cargo zone, promotion of air cargo transport and plan the development of the cargo business over the long term. Houalla says the fourth axe is important to attract pharmaceutical flows with high added value and “as true growth drivers for the cargo business”. Houalla says: “In summer 2016, Groupe ADP, working with IATA, launched an initiative that enables the Paris- Charles de Gaulle cargo community to obtain CEIV Pharma certification; this has become the standard certification in response to increasing demand from the pharmaceutical industry.” The first phase, co-financed by Groupe ADP was launched on 27 January 2017 included 10 cargo partners representing the cargo chain. Two additional partners obtained certification in 2018. Houalla says: “Similarly, work has been undertaken to create labels or initiate certification of other French sectors of excellence in order to develop flows around these high value-added products.” In 2018, exports from Parisian airports, covering Charles de Gaulle and Orly were over 1.2 million tonnes and imports were over one million. Perishables have an important place in French foreign trade, while other products are also important such as pharmaceuticals, agri-

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foods. Houalla cites consulting firm Utopies’ study, which said most exports from Paris-Orly are machinery and equipment, chemicals, metallurgy, fashion and textiles, with imports of cardboard, printing and machinery. At Charles de Gaulle (CDG), the main products are AOG, aeronautical parts and pharmaceuticals. Houalla comments: “We observe also a clear raise in e-commerce parcels to which we adapt our infrastructures.” In 2018, the Paris airports handled 2.25 million tonnes of cargo, down 1.9% on 2018. Cargo at CDG was up 1.8% to 2.16 million tonnes while Orly was down 4.8% to 95,000 tonnes. Houalla says that 2018 was the first year since 2011 when there was a decrease in the proportion of cargo on passenger aircraft with an increase in freighter traffic. 56% of cargo was carried in passenger aircraft in 2018, down from 60% in 2017 while cargo aircraft carried 44%, up from 40%. Houalla says: “The explanation is no doubt the combination of three factors: 1) an +2.3% increase in all-cargo movements and therefore the related hold capacities (compared to stability over the previous years); 2) an +2% increase in passenger luggage on wide-bodied aircraft, reducing the residual hold capacities for Cargo transport and 3) an overall -1.8% decrease in cargo tonnage.” Cargo volumes on passenger aircraft still exceeds that transported on freighter flights. Houalla says: “The strategy of the major cargo transporters, consisting of taking advantage of the significant hold capacities in passenger aircraft in order to optimize the revenue/cost mix, is not called into question.” He adds: “This strategy of using “passenger”

holds rather than all-cargo aircraft holds is also made possible by the change in aircraft and the high frequencies and connections offered by the Paris-Charles de Gaulle hub.” Another area of focus for Groupe ADP is partnerships with other major cargo airports to develop trade flows, by setting up corridors for strategic segments. Groupe ADP signed two cooperation agreements in 2018, firstly with Hong Kong in June, followed by a second one with Dallas Fort Worth at the TIACA Air Cargo Forum in Toronto in October. Edouard Mathieu, development director for Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport tells Air Cargo Week: “The aim is to build a world, premium quality, end-to end services network with the partner airports, for specific goods. This objective also requires working with other airport partners in the logistics chain, such as air transporters, customs services, etc.” As the coordinator of a cargo community with more than 200 companies in addition to government services, Groupe ADP is supporting initiatives to facilitate processing and handling operations. One project is the electronic data exchange platform Cargo Community System, developed by Cargo Information Network France and Group GDP to trace cargo operations at the airport. Mathieu says: “The success of the deployment is evidenced by the fact that 115 airlines and 80 cargo forwarding agents are already using it. This exchange platform pertains to the logic of e-freight.” He adds: “This project, conducted with the Roissy Interregional Customs Service, will reduce the number of paper documents that accompany each shipment.”

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An airside equipment geolocation system has also been launched, along with a quarantined export animal station. This year will see the first “innovation challenge” for start-ups and SMEs to invent and design new solutions to be deployed at the Paris airports. One more project is worth a mention, Mathieu says: “Groupe ADP is a member of the “Roissy Carex” association, which was created to study the economic and technical feasibility of a highspeed cargo rail connection to the Paris-Charles de Gaulle platform.” Houalla says as an airport operator, Groupe ADP unites the cargo ecosystem to foster growth for all members. The group has invested in rebuilding a professional air cargo association, ACFA (Air Cargo France Association) to help promote France’s air cargo and highlight the economy, geographical position, infrastructure and technological innovation. Houalla says: “Moreover, by coordinating air-cargo-community studies that bring together airline companies, handling agents, forwarding agents and all the players involved in the logistics chain, ACFA aims to contribute to improving the service provided to air-cargo customers in France.” He says that an IATA study on French attractiveness identified five key areas of the ease of doing business being identified including cargo facilitation. Houalla says: “These measures enhance shippers’ experience by enabling the seamless cross-border movement of goods. While France scores below the European average for overall Cargo Facilitation all the recent initiatives on facilitation of cargo movement will increase the scores and overall air transport regulatory competitiveness of France in the future.”


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Bollore works hard to maintain market leading position

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ollore Logistics has been working hard to retain its market leading position in France, vice president airfreight Europe Philippe de Crecy tells Air Cargo Week. Speaking to ACW at transport logistic in Munich on 4 June, de Crecy said that Bollore has close to 20% of the market share in France, with no other company coming close. He says this gives Bollore a lot of responsibility and pressure. For this year, de Crecy says: “This year the market has decreased a bit but not dropping because we are not exposed [in France] like in Germany to the drop in the automotive industry.” The main markets out of France are luxury goods for wellknown brands such as Chanel and Louis Vuitton, which de Crecy

says is still booming. The aerospace industry is also very important, and is not falling either. De Crecy says: “We have fewer industrial accounts in France than we do in Germany, that’s why the slowdown of the market is not impacting us so much.” Import wise, he says the pressure is not the same, with a decrease being noted, possibly linked to China. India and Bangladesh are increasing, while Vietnam and the Philippines are booming. Bollore has also retained its number one slot out of France to the French West Indies, an important market with good yields, but it is mainly lower deck capacity on Air France’s network out

of Charles de Gaulle airport. In France, Charles de Gaulle is where the vast majority of air cargo is handled. Bollore has a large hub at the airport covering 30,000 sq m with direct access to the tarmac. De Crecy says: “We did that because of the luxury goods request for security. It’s important to have direct access for luxury goods.” De Crecy is optimistic about the French market, saying the cosmetics and luxury goods industries will continue to boom, having a strong impact on the market. He adds: “The fact that Africa is important for France and for us it is the continent of the future. We are convinced that the growth will come through Africa in the coming years.”

New routes open up opportunities for French imports and exports

WITH new routes to Russia and Africa from Marseille Provence Airport, new markets will be opened up to French importers and exporters. Cargo manager Jean-Marc Boutigny says the airport will develop volumes with five weekly flights to Moscow operated by Aeroflot starting this month, and three flights a week Addis Ababa by Ethiopian Airlines from July. He tells Air Cargo Week: “These two brand new routes show that Southern France is a logistic friendly area to promote and develop new business. Thanks to its international airport and harbour, Marseille benefits the best place to act as a logistic hub in the western Mediterranean and southern European markets.” In 2018, Marseille Province broke its freight record by handling 56,695 tonnes, up 1%. So far in 2019, cargo volumes are up 5.4% to 19,619

tonnes from January to April. The busiest trade lanes continue to be North Africa, Texas and the Far East. Boutigny says: “We mainly import tonnes of fresh fishes, aromatic herbs, fruits and vegetables from Mediterranean countries, (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Israel, Turkey), and we export drilling parts coming from Texas, Scotland and Far East to Algerian oil fields in Hassi Messaoud.” With the new routes, Boutigny is confident that Marseille will continue to act as an important logistics hub for the Mediterranean and southern Europe. There are challenges, he says: “The main challenges are that we always have to balance our new developments with our green policy and that we always have to pay attention to what happens in this crazy world…’’

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What will 2037’s narrowbody freighter landscape look like? Jon Whaley of UK-based IBA Group, explores fleet composition, market share and growth opportunities for the P2F market

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ccounting for Boeing 737, Boeing 757 and MD-80 family freighters, the current number of in-service freighters totals circa 620 aircraft. Both Airbus and Boeing have released their 2018 to 2037 market forecasts. Airbus forecast that there will be a requirement for approximately 950 narrowbody or midsize payload freighter aircraft, which Airbus classify as being up to 40 tonnes, of which 480 are aircraft which will be converted. Boeing forecasts a slightly larger increase in narrowbody freighters between 2018 and 2037, with 1,280 aircraft forecast to be in service by 2037. It is IBA’s opinion that by December 2037 the number of narrowbody freighter aircraft will increase to 1,086 aircraft. The majority of the future freighter fleet will be located in Asia Pacific and North America, with Asia Pacific seeing the largest growth. The composition of the fleet will be significantly different in 2037 compared to how it is today. Currently the narrowbody market is dominated by Boeing types, with a small amount of McDonnell Douglas MD-80 family aircraft being used as freighters. Going forward, Boeing will maintain its position as being the dominant player within the narrowbody freighter market as the number of Boeing 737NGs, predominantly 737-800s, increases over the period. Additionally, there will be interest in the 737700, though not to the extent of the 737-800. There will also be a substantial Boeing 757-200 freighter fleet for a number of years as we are still seeing conversions occurring for some aircraft, whilst some of the older converted 757-200 are being retired. There will be a gradual decline in the number of converted Boeing 737 Classics in freighter service as the years progress due to the age of the aircraft. The Airbus A320 Family aircraft will also occupy a portion of the market, it is expected that the Airbus A321P2F will be the more popular choice. Airbus’ market share will grow over time, in particular for the A321P2F, as the types enter service and feedstock becomes suitable. Feedstock suitability is a particular factor for the A321-200, a type which did not flourish until quite late into its production run and therefore most examples are still on lease and much sought after. Additionally, a lot of the Boeing freighters currently in operation are quite old with the average age of the current in service fleet being 25.81 years. It is expected that the Airbus A321P2F will be well suited to replace a portion of the older Boeing 757-200 fleet, which will help Airbus gain a larger foothold in the market. The difficulty Airbus will have is drawing customers away from the

Boeing products they have been accustomed to for many years. Plus, with the first production-converted Airbus A321 not expected to roll out until the end of 2019 at the earliest, and with the initial conversion slot availability being restricted, inroads into Boeing’s market share will take time. The future market share between Airbus and Boeing between 2018 and 2039 is anticipated to converge with a market share ratio of 69:31, expected by 2040.

Airbus feedstock

Outlined below is IBA’s forecast of the availability of Airbus A320200ceo which are suitable for P2F conversion. Aircraft under eleven years old are deemed too young to be considered for P2F conversion as the residual value of these aircraft is too high, additionally competition from the passenger market will be intense for such young aircraft. At the opposite end of the scale there are some aircraft which are classified as being too old, this applies to aircraft which are 20 years old and above. Older aircraft have been discounted as it does not make economic sense to place the aircraft through a P2F conversion based on the remaining service life of the aircraft. From the above chart it is clear to see that between now and 2026 there is ample feedstock of P2F suitable Airbus A320-200ceos. In some instances, there will be competition from the passenger market for those aircraft which are of good specification and have a good operator history, in this case it is likely that the aircraft will see further passenger use before potentially being converted. Unlike the Airbus A320-200ceo feedstock which sees a high number of aircraft becoming available in the immediate near future, the A321-200 sees a gradual increase in the number of aircraft becoming available, with a peak occurring in 2033. The difference in trends is a result of the Airbus A321-200ceo becoming popular at a relatively late stage of its production run and therefore most examples are still too young to be considered for P2F conversion.

In conclusion

Regardless of whether one takes the slightly more conservative Airbus view, the opportune view of Boeing, or IBA’s view, it is probably fair to say that the narrowbody – P2F fleet will grow by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 (IBA predict it will be around 1.75 – 1.8) over the next 20 years. Regardless of which forecast is taken, all are fairly reasoned in IBA’s view. Much of this increase will be fed by the Boeing 737-800SF/BCF due to the successful launch of its programme. There are still numbers of Boeing 757-200 passenger aircraft out there that will fuel some of the growth, along with reducing numbers of Boeing 737-300s and 737-400s, as well as some Boeing 737-700s. However, it is evident that there is a window of opportunity in this market sector for Airbus products to penetrate with both the Airbus A320-200 and Airbus A321-200 aircraft.

Qantas Freight gains an extra 747 main deck capacity for free

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he upgrade to Qantas Freight’s current fleet as the airline leases two next-generation Boeing 747-8F freighter aircraft, replacing the current two Atlas Air Boeing 747-400Fs in operation, has brought 20% more freight capacity with space for seven extra pallets. According to Tom Skolarikis, marketing and communications adviser, Qantas Freight: “This equates to almost as much space as an extra 747 main deck as the 747-8F features a longer fuselage than the Boeing 747-400F,” he says. The newer aircraft also offer: four additional  main deck pallets than the 747-400F (total 34 main deck pallets); three additional  lower deck pallets than the 747400F (total 12 lower deck pallets); four frequencies per week, equating to 28 extra pallet spaces per week; over 132 tonnes total payload (20

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tonnes more than the 747-400F); and over 842 cu m total space (119 cu m more than the 747-400F). Skolarikis says: “Qantas Freight pilots are dedicated to operating freighter aircraft. The new 747-8F are wet-leased from Atlas Air. “Qantas Freight operates regular scheduled services on both domestic and international routes, as well as ad hoc services as required.” The airline’s freight and passenger networks complement each other domestically and on lanes including Australia to China,

trans-Pacific and across the Tasman sea. “Retaining the flexibility to independently deploy specialist freighter capacity allows Qantas to participate in global markets where demand doesn’t support passenger services. “The unique attributes of our freighter aircraft, including the B747-800F’s nose loading capability, also allow us to attract segments of the market that could not otherwise utilise our passenger network,” he says.

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The two new aircraft will operate the triangular route that connects Australia with China and the USA across ten key cargo hubs. Andrew David, CEO of Qantas Domestic and Freight, has said that the new aircraft will allow Qantas Freight to meet demand for freight capacity around the world. “We are seeing strong growth in demand driven by e-commerce, fresh produce, electronics and mining equipment across our international freight network,” said David. “The newer, more efficient 7478F will allow us to provide a better service for our customers with additional freight capacity and even greater reliability for time-sensitive shipments.” “Our investment in wet-leasing these aircraft gives us a more competitive offering in the Australia-China-US freight markets and more operational efficiency.”

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Will a flying ‘Elephant’ replace the AN-124?

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REPORTS in the Russian media are that work on designing and producing an aircraft to replace the aging AN-124 has moved beyond the drawing board and is set to become reality. To add interest, the Ukrainian giant might be replaced by a Russian aircraft, significant as the two countries remain in a contentious relationship. The AN-124, which first flew in the Cold War-era Soviet Union in 1982, is coming to the end of its operational life. The aircraft is used by, among others, Russia’s Volga-Dnepr Group and the Russian military. The aircraft is still very reliable but Antonov is said to be working very hard on a new giant freighter. However, rival manufacture Ilyushin may have beaten them to the post. The Ilyushin IL-96 is a large passenger aircraft that will form the base for a heavyweight freighter version able to transport loads of up to 150 tonnes over more than 7,000km after a widening of the body and an increase in the length of the body. The project, dubbed the IL-96-500T Elephant, shows the aircraft as having a similar design as the Airbus Beluga transporter. Reports in Russia’s Tass news agency quoted in the media suggest delivery should start during 2026.

The End of an Era


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Int’l Logistics

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Profile for Azura International

ACW 10th June 19  

ACW 10th June 19