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The New Consumer Guide to Cannabis: Breaking Down the Basics We get it. Cannabis can be confusing, and questions abound when you dive into the nitty gritty details. But as the popularity and awareness of cannabis increases—specifically surrounding two of its most talked about components, called cannabinoids, CBD and THC—so do misconceptions about what cannabis is, what it does and what all of the hype is about (well worth it, if you ask us!). Some of the most common questions we hear: Do all cannabis products get you high? (short answer: no) What is it used for? (the list keeps on growing) How does it taste? (Azuca was founded by a chef—you can trust us on this one) Why should I try it out? (how much time do you have?)


Like all good stories, we think it’s best to start at the beginning to help you nail down the basics. For the sake of brevity, we’ll hone in on THC and CBD only—though bear in mind, the cannabis plant contains more than one hundred unique cannabinoids.

Do all cannabis products get you high? Nope. A cannabis-infused product’s ability to provide a high is dependent on whether the product contains THC or is CBD only. Not sure what THC and CBD are? Read on.

THC and CBD—what’s the difference? CBD and THC, shorthand for cannabidiol and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, respectively, are cannabinoids derived from the cannabis plant. More simply, they are two of the most abundant active ingredients found in cannabis. A common difference cited between the two is that THC can get you high and CBD doesn’t. But it’s a little more sophisticated than that. Both THC and CBD are psychoactive—by definition, any substance that has an effect on the mind is psychoactive—but only THC is intoxicating, meaning that it can provide you with a euphoric high while CBD cannot. Why? It all has to do with cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors, which naturally occur within your body’s endocannabinoid system. Since THC is an ‘agonist’, it stimulates CB1 receptors in the brain. CBD on the other hand, is an ‘antagonist’ and inhibits activation of CB1 receptors. A 2001 study1 demonstrated that when an antagonist blocks the CB1 receptors, an individual cannot get high, therefore when the CB1 receptors are open to being stimulated by an agonist, an individual can get high.

What is cannabis used for? A growing body of literature indicates that cannabis has a variety of health benefits that can aid in the treatment and recovery of a range of ailments. Since the research on its medicinal applications is still in a nascent stage, its complete capabilities are not fully known. That being said, studies 2,3 have shown that cannabinoids can be an effective and well-tolerated pain reliever, with evidence suggesting that they are also helpful in the treatment of cancer,4, 5fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis,6 muscle spasticity,7 Tourette Syndrome,8schizophrenia,9 Parkinson’s Disease and Huntington’s Disease.2 Cannabis is also frequently used to treat the symptoms that accompany drug therapy for HIV infections,10 and synthetic cannabinoids have proven to be effective in relieving the side effects of cancer chemotherapy, like nausea and vomiting.11 CBD in particular is highly regarded for its calming effects, with individuals reporting that it relieves insomnia and anxiety, and can also help manage epilepsy.


What does it taste like? Historically, cannabis has gotten a bad rep for tasting ‘grassy’ and smelling ‘skunky’. But that doesn’t have to be the reality—today’s edibles have advanced to the point where the “weed” flavor that many find undesirable is virtually undetectable. Our mantra? You can have your cannabis, and enjoy it too! Our products range from CBD simple syrup to THC-infused chocolate coins, shortbread cookies, Pâte de Fruits (Azuca’s Head of Kitchen Crew, Quino, dubbed this as his favorite product) and more. We’re constantly coming up with new flavors—think Root Beer Pâte de Fruit and pomegranate simple syrup—and are expanding rapidly, so make sure to follow us on social (@azuca.co) to stay up-to-date! Warning: mouthwatering is a frequent side effect of looking at our Instagrampage.

How much should I consume? For novice consumers, it’s recommended to begin with a very small amount of cannabis—also known as a microdose—and gradually work your way up to the point when the desired effect is reached. For instance, with Azuca, this might mean using a half teaspoon of sugar or syrup in your drink. Fortunately, our products take effect within 30 minutes, so you won’t be waiting and wondering for hours as you would with many other edible products on the market. The bottom line: every person is different, so starting low and going slow is the key to finding the correct dose for your unique biology and needs— in fact, many people prefer to microdose because it allows them to benefit from the plant’s vast medical potential on a daily basis, without experiencing any unwanted lethargy or euphoria.

Alright, all of that sounds great. How can I get in on the action? Whether you’re looking to discover your Zen through CBD-only products or are desirous of finding balanced, THC-infused edibles and ingredients to incorporate into your lifestyle, Azuca promises to deliver fast-acting, precise and delicious edibles that you can count on. Our CBD products can be bought online here, and our THC-infused edibles are available at Mayflower Medicinals in Massachusetts.

Sources 1. Huestis MA., Gorelick DA., Heishman SJ., Preston KL., Nelson RA., Moolchan ET., Frank RA. Blockade of effects of smoked marijuana by the CB1selective cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2001;58:322–328. [PubMed] 2. Natalya M. Kogan, Raphael Mechoulam. Cannabinoids in health and disease. Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2007;9:413–430. [PMC]


3. Mary Barna Bridgeman, Daniel T. Abazia. Medicinal Cannabis: History, Pharmacology, And Implications for the Acute Care Setting. P T. 2017;42:180–188. [PMC] 4. Kogan NM. Cannabinoids and cancer. Mini Rev Med Chem.2005;5:941–952. [PubMed] 5. Bifulco M., Laezza C., Gazzerro P., Pentimalli F. Endocannabinoids as emerging suppressors of angiogenesis and tumor invasion (review). Oncol Rep. 2007;17:813–816. [PubMed] 6. Cabranes A., Pryce G., Baker D., Fernandez-Ruiz J. Changes in CB1 receptors in motor-related brain structures of chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice. Brain Res.2006;1107:199–205. [PubMed] 7. Brenneisen R., Egli A., Elsohly MA., Henn V., Spiess Y. The effect of orally and rectally administered delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity: a pilot study with 2 patients. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1996;34:446–452. [PubMed] 8. MulIer-Vahl KR. Cannabinoids reduce symptoms of Tourette’s syndrome. Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2003;4:1717–1725.[PubMed] 9. Zuardi AW., Crippa JA., Hallak JE., Moreira FA., Guimaraes FS. Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent, as an antipsychotic drug. Braz J Med Biol Res. 2006;39:421–429. [PubMed] 10. Woolridge E., Barton S., Samuel J., Osorio J., Dougherty A., Holdcroft A. Cannabis use in HIV for pain and other medical symptoms. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2005;29:358–67. [PubMed] 11. Berlach DM., Shir Y., Ware MA. Experience with the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone in chronic noncancer pain. Pain Med. 2006;7:25–29. [PubMed] Know more information AZUCA please visit https://www.azuca.co/the-new-consumer-guide-to-cannabis-breaking-down-the-basics/

The New Consumer Guide to Cannabis: Breaking Down the Basics  

We get it. Cannabis can be confusing, and questions abound when you dive into the nitty gritty details.

The New Consumer Guide to Cannabis: Breaking Down the Basics  

We get it. Cannabis can be confusing, and questions abound when you dive into the nitty gritty details.

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