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Gold, Gold, Gold! Tucson Gem & Mineral Show Celebrates 50 Years O EX EX RDIN TRAHIB AR ITS Y

Skip the ordinary... and experience the extraordinary at the 50th anniversary of the Tucson Gem & Mineral Show, where the theme is Gold, Gold, Gold! The show will be held at the Tucson Convention Center from Feb 12-15, 2004. Glittering gold has fascinated mankind since Jason sailed forth to find the Golden Fleece. The lure and search for the “sun metal” has driven civilizations from ancient times to the present. Feast your eyes for four days only on a colossal exhibit of premier gold specimens, all under one roof... a once in a lifetime experience! Also on display is the original Gadsden Purchase Treaty, celebrating the 150th anniversary of its signing. Featured exhibits include: • Ship of Gold - Historic and beautiful gold bars and gold coins from the famous treasury ship the SS Central America, which sank during a hurricane

JAY’S OF TUCSON, INC. SINCE 1974

RETAIL • WHOLESALE BEADS & FINDINGS Jewelry • Southwestern Gifts • Beads • Findings • Supplies Classes Available

GREETINGS GEM SHOW & RODEO VISITORS

Month-Long Sale in February! 4627 E. Speedway Blvd.,Tucson Speedway & Swan in Mission Plaza

323-1123

TOLL FREE 1-800-736-6381 VISA • M/C • AMEX • DISCOVER • OPEN MON-SAT: 9AM-6PM

in 1857. See 20 million dollars worth of the recovered treasure, including the 80pound Eureka ingot. • The gold nugget that started the California Gold Rush! • Special exhibits of minerals from within the Gadsden Purchase Treaty area of Arizona, which held some of America’s richest mines such as those at Tombstone, Bisbee and Ajo. • House cat-sized gold nugget! • Two fantasy castles - 5 and 10 inches high, crafted from 18K gold, malachite, diamonds, agates, garnet and diopase. • TWO Dinosaurs - the Diplodocus (85 ft tall) and the Acrocanthosaurus (39 ft long). Special events for the 50th show include fireworks on “A” Mountain on Wednesday evening at 9:30 pm and the arrival of the Wells Fargo Stagecoach on Thursday at 10 am. Of course, one of the most enjoyable aspects of the show is the chance to “shop till you drop” for minerals, jewelry, gems, lapidary art, meteorites and fossils offered by over 200 dealers from around the world. Families will want to bring their children to the “maze of mineral fun.” There will be daily door prizes and a special drawing on Sunday at 3 pm. Gold denotes strength, beauty, uniqueness, durability, value... all adjectives that apply to the enduring TGMS Show. Fifty years ago a few members of the Tucson Gem & Mineral Society decided to have a mineral sale. From there it’s a Cinderella story - a little mineral show... way out west... became the premier and biggest Gem & Mineral Show in the World! Show hours are 10 am-6 pm ThursdaySaturday and 10 am-5 pm on Sunday. Daily admission is $5.50 with 14 and under free with paying adult. Tickets are available at all TCC outlets. For more information visit www.tgms.org.

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Tucson - Real. Natural. Arizona. A sophisticated city of 800,000 that feels like a sleepy desert town, Tucson has plenty to offer outdoor enthusiasts, history buffs, urban cowboys, and culture vultures alike. Spread out over a beautiful valley surrounded by five mountain ranges, Tucson is a fresh-air fan’s dream. Visitors enjoy hiking and horseback riding among towering saguaro cacti, and birdwatchers come in droves to find the Southeast Arizona specialty species. World-class observatories offer star-gazing programs and tours. Golf enthusiasts tee off on one of the area’s many fine courses designed by some of the world’s top golfers. Spa lovers are in heaven in Tucson, which is home to world class establishments including the famous Canyon Ranch, Miraval Life in Balance and Elizabeth Arden Red Door spas. Did we mention the weather? Over 300 days of sunshine a year - more than most cities in the world - allow visitors to play outside year round. It gets a bit toasty in summer but shaded getaways abound and (as the local mantra has it) it’s a dry heat. With its strong Spanish, Mexican, and Native American heritage, Tucson is home to attractions such as the Mission San Xavier del Bac, still serving the OV ER VIE W

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same Tohono O’Odham Indian community for whom it was established by the Franciscans two and a half centuries ago. Nor has the west been lost here. City slickers mingle with cowboys at guest ranches and country and western dance bars. Old Tucson Studios, where some of the west’s most famous legends were captured on celluloid, offers simulated shoot’em-ups and western entertainment shows. Civilized pleasures are plentiful, too. Tucson is one of only a few cities in the U.S. that have a resident symphony as well as opera, theater, and ballet companies. Palate-stimulating southwest cuisine and authentic Mexican food are among the city’s myriad dining options. Lively nightspots are easy to find. Those whose idea of a successful trip involves unique souvenirs will be delighted, too. Country western gear, Native American crafts, and southwestern gifts say it with salsa or cactus - can be found everywhere from mom-and-pop shops to air-conditioned malls. An hour’s drive south will bring you to Nogales, Mexico, where bargains and treasures mingle in arrays of colorful stalls. For more information go online to www.visittucson.org or call the Metropolitan Tucson CVB at 520-6241817/ 800-638-8350.

PAWSITIVELY AWESOME More than a museum! The Desert Museum is part zoo, part botanical garden and part natural history museum dedicated to fostering appreciation, knowledge and wise stewardship of the Sonoran Desert region.

2021 N. Kinney Rd. • Tucson, AZ 85743 (520) 883-2702 • www.desertmuseum.org

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