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College 2010


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!"!!!" magazine

Issue No. 4 Vol. 4 College 2010

editorial Publisher Deb Rochford Editor-in-Chief Michelle Burgess mburgess@azteenmagazine.com Associate Creative Director Veronica Sherbina

creative Art Direction SW!TCH s t u d i o Design Chaidi Lobato Erin Loukili

Webmaster Tony Subia Photography Andrew Faulds Cilento Photography

Be you a Sun Devil, a Wolverine, a Wildcat or a Tarheel, a Bruin, a Jayhawk, a Lumberjack, an Artichoke or a Volunteer, there’s something we can all agree on:

College is pretty awesome.

At the very least, it presents the best of both worlds for teens stressed out by the rigors and routine of high school, offering the autonomy of adulthood without the responsibility. Throw in the opportunity to follow your academic passion, meet new people and grow into a legit adult and we’re talking about a pretty amazing four-year period. Our goal with this issue is to offer up some insight about all aspects of college life, from choosing where to go to making the most of it once you get there. At the heart of our coverage are revelations from current collegians who have been where you are right now. Whether you are a high school freshman just beginning to imagine your future college journey, an incoming senior toiling over your apps or a recent graduate poised to pack your bags and make for the dorms, we’ve got your covered.

Hook ‘em, Fork ‘em, Bear Down and Roll Tide, Michelle Burgess Editor-in-Chief

styling Wardrobe Amy Cooperstein

hair and make-up

Featured Contributors

We asked our special College Issue staffers what SURPRISED them the most about college.

Stylists Maren Pew Darby Armstrong Erin Cleland Jenn Ryback Kayla Celinske Sarah Deleo Kohler Academy

“I was shocked to find a major in which my passion continues to grow. Beginning college I just wanted to graduate and get out as soon as possible, but now I cannot get enough of it. Along with that, I have met lifelong friends – students and teachers – that share my passion and have guided and encouraged me along the way.”

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Deb Rochford drochford@azteenmagazine.com 602-363-2139

interns Brittany Alloway Zac Atherton Arizona State University Arizona State University Wayne Unger Assistant to the Editor

mascots Cody and Roxy

AZTEEN WORLD HEADQUARTERS 3219 E. Camelback Rd., Suite 363 Phoenix, Arizona 85018 azteenmagazine.com MySpace.com/azteen_magazine Facebook: azTeen Magazine

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For home delivery, subscribe on-line at azteenmagazine.com. If requesting delivery to your school or business, email drochford@azteenmagazine.com. To order extra copies, send a check for $3 per copy to the address above and indicate which issue you are requesting along with your phone number.

+%"(/&"

– LEANDRA HUFFER ACTED AS ASSISTANT EDITOR FOR THIS ISSUE. SHE GRADUATED FROM SAGUARO IN ’05 AND STUDIES JOURNALISM AT SCOTTSDALE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, WHERE SHE IS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER.

“When I moved away to college, I expected to miss home a lot more than I do. I still miss my family and I love visiting California, but I was surprised at how quickly Tempe came to feel like home. My friends become like a second family, and that’s what made the adjustment so much easier than I ever expected.” – San Jose native Kylie Gifford graduated from high school in ’07 and studies public relations at ASU. The thing that surprised me the most about college is how quickly it forced me to define myself. I thought in high school that I wouldn’t really change, but going to college 3,000 miles away from my home, in a place where I knew absolutely (')*+% no one, really allowed me to revel in my new independence and become the person I truly want to be. – Washington, D.C., native Nicole Lavella studies public relations at ASU.

azTeen Magazine is published 7 times a year and is selectively distributed throughout Arizona. The entire contents of this publication is © copyright azTeen, all rights reserved, and may not be reproduced in any manner, in whole or in part, without written permission from the publishers.

“It’s surprising when you realize how many different kinds of people you meet within

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your first year and the fact that they are from all over the world. East coast, west coast, Europe, doesn’t matter. In high school a lot of people think ‘this is it, these are all my friends,’ but there’s a whole world out there filled with new and exciting people just waiting for you to meet and experience.” – Katherine Landingin graduated from Copper Canyon in ’09 and studies public relations at ASU. “This may sound cliche, but I was surprised by how much I enjoyed learning. In high school it was more of a job than ,*-$." anything, but in college learning is the goal and the pursuit of it has proved just as valuable as the silly piece of paper I’ll get when it is all over.” – Joshua Bishop graduated from Paradise Valley in ’04 and studies journalism at Mesa Community College. He also writes for The Mesa Republic.

azTeenmagazine.com

,%(('0%& “I was surprised by how quickly I became close to people – complete strangers. I think it was because we were constantly around each other in a new setting and we had to become friends so fast. It was amazing at how quickly I became friends with some people who are now the best friends I have.” – Jennifer Crane graduated from Corona del Sol in ’09 and now studies public relations at ASU. ADDITIONAL STAFF: Photographers: Will Schoenfeld, Scottsdale Community College, and Yousin Smith, Rio Salado College; writer Taylor Turkeltaub, Chaparral ’11.

college 2010

5


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Features on the big screen: Can’t-miss campus 08 College themed movies roomie v. bad roomie 10 Good food doesn’t always make the grade 11 Cheap

30

It’s our College Issue

25

12 want my mommy! homesickness 12 IHandling Greek dilemma: Is fraternity/sorority life right 14 The for you cool for school: Arizona colleges offer fun and 18 Too unique courses 101: Collegiate The cheesiest college19 Lifetime themed made-for-TV movies 34 You’re baaa-aaack! summer and the 24 Surviving holidays with the fam the %$#& did I end up here? Students 26 How Last Word tell how they made their Once upon a time, in a land far, far away... What it’s like the first week away from home

twenty G o tow ards t h e light! Consider This! blu rbs for

off selecting - and ada er tips pting to the best college fo r you.

The Insiders Our 2010-2011 panelists talk about their first day of

classes

Follow the Freshmen Meet the six students whose campus journeys we’ll chronicle over the next school year

college choices

35

“I love college because…” 38

from the nest: How far from home do you 28 Leaping want to go? What college is all about 22 Shout-Outs The best thing to happen to teenagers since puberty. azTeenmagazine.com

Wardrobe and accessories provided by 42 Saint at Kierland Commons. Photos by Cilento Photography, CilentoPhotography.com

college 2010

7


COLLEGE

consider this!

on the big screen

ASU and UofA each get a C-minus; NAU, Harvard and Yale, a C. The University of Colorado posts a C-plus, tiny Colby College a respectable B-plus and Baylor University a B-minus. In CollegeProwler.com’s ranking system, in which schools are graded in categories such as nightlife, academics and housing, PARKING grades are often the harshest. The relative inconvenience of a particular college’s parking situation should be a factor in your decision, even if it’s just whether or not to bring your car to campus.deal. It is.

Here, in no particular order, are azTeen’s picks for the definitive comedies capturing life on campus. If any are unfamiliar, get thee to a Blockbuster, stat!

8

1. 2. 3.

Dead Man on Campus Orange County Campus Man

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Slackers Van Wilder The House Bunny Sorority Boys Accepted PCU Legally Blonde Animal House Back to School Revenge of the Nerds

[ this movie was filmed on asu campus]

college 2010

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consider this! Feeling nervous about FITTING IN on campus? You are not alone. After all, when you were 5, your mom signed you up for piano lessons or soccer or art classes, and if you liked it, you stuck with it for the next 13 years. Now you’re on your own. The plethora of ways to get involved on campus can be both intimidating and overwhelming. Intramural swing dancing? Libertarian Nurses Association? Jewish Vegetarians? Social, political, professional and recreational opportunities abound, including many for niche groups you never even imagine existed. They are a great way to meet new people, get involved on campus and keep loneliness at bay. They key is to find just one thing to try – that’s one and only one, at least to start with – and go for it.

Photo: Will Schoenfeld, Scottsdale Community College

...He views projectile vomiting on the walls while drunk a valid technique for interior decorating.

Your roommate is an

/*0#') if...

...She not only doesn’t leave her dirty dishes in the sink, she ...His happily washes girlfriend lives yours too. alone in a FABULOUS APARTMENT where the two of them prefer to spend all of their time. He only comes home to leave checks on the counter for his half of rent and utilities. ...She

is the same size as you and likes to share her clothes, especially the BRANDNEW ones.

10

college 2010

...She knows that the reason there is only one DING-DONG left is because you were saving it and eats it anyway.

Your roommate is a

$#%&' if...

...He doesn’t see any reason to close the bathroom door, ever.

$#%&'

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HOW TO TELL A GOOD ROOMIE FROM A BAD ONE azTeenmagazine.com


cheap

food?

YOU’LL PAY THE PRICE ONE WAY OR ANOTHER Attempting to survive college without a diet that includes Top Ramen is downright un-American. But, as with late nights and parties, the key to eating cheap is moderation. Here some of the most common staples in a student’s pantry are graded based on the 3 Cs: cost, convenience and contribution to the dreaded Freshman Fifteen.

Ramen ($1.82/12-pack). Filling and offered in a variety of flavors, it is the king of dorm and apartment food. Low in fat but high in sodium. Grade: B Microwave popcorn ($3.69/6-pack). Air-popped, butterfree popcorn is high in fiber and one of the best choices for snack-seeking students. But seriously, who amongst us has the discipline to completely shun the butter and salt? Grade: APeanut butter and jelly sandwich (about 30 cents). The ultimate comfort food, pb&j is high in protein and, if you use whole-wheat bread, pretty healthy. The danger comes in seeking this comfort too often. Grade: C+ (with wheat bread: B+!) Easy Mac ($2.94/4-pack). If the 9-year-old in the commercial can make it, so can you. It’s got a little calcium, some protein‌ and another whopping dose of sodium. Plus, we both know that it takes about six 4-packs to make a meal for one hungry collegian. Grade: C-

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Michaelangelo’s, Kid Cuisine and Banquet frozen dinners (10 for $10 during a good sale). Some frozen dinners are healthy. Many others (think Hungry Man, Claim Jumper, et al) are not. Don’t just look at the price – read the label too. Grade: B to D

Bananas and apples (39 cents/pound up to a couple of dollars). Portable, tasty, cheap and healthy. Fruit is where it’s at! Grade: A Instant oatmeal ($2.49/10-pack). Once you get the water-to-oatmeal ratio down, nothing could be simpler. The low-sugar varieties will fill you up without weighing you down. Grade: B+. Cut up a banana or throw some blueberries in there and it’s a solid A Kool-Aid (10 cents/gallon). This is sugar and food coloring and has absolutely no health benefits‌ but you already knew that, we hope. Otherwise, you have no business being in college. Easy to make, though! Grade: F+ Otter Pops ($3.10/100pack). Chemical-laden and sugarsaturated, these make Kool-Aid look like health food. But in a few years, your taste buds will mature to the point that you won’t be able to look at one without shuddering, so enjoy them while you can. Grade: F

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azTeenmagazine.com

college 2010

11


I want my mommy! HOMESICKNESS IS NATURAL, BUT YOU CAN DEAL

O

n a map, Missouri doesn’t quite touch Texas, but it’s in the same general vicinity. For Show Me State native Mason Miller, though, The University of Texas in Austin was a journey of more than miles. “It was difficult leaving everybody and everything around me for something new,” he says. “Most of the time I was just hoping and praying that everything would fall into place.” The Kinesiology major says that though it took awhile, things have finally fallen into place. While he admits that every now and then he still experiences some serious loneliness and yearning for the family and life he left behind, Mason says he now thrives off his newfound independence. This fall hundreds of thousands of high school graduates from all over the United States will prepare to leave the nest and attend colleges and universities away from home. They will enter a national student body that, according to reports by the Pew Research Center, is estimated to have reached just under 11.5 million strong. But of this 39.6 percent of students ages 18 to 24, nearly one in every four is expected to drop out of school by the end of their first year, according to research from the CBS Business Network. The most common culprits for these numbers are a general lack of preparation by the student and the often underestimated, but potentially debilitating circumstance of homesickness. “Of course I get homesick,” says Arizona native Westley Eldredge. Eldredge just graduated from the Brooks Institute in Ventura, California, with a

– Joshua Bishop

e, m i t a n o p O nce u ar away…

that the insecurities they have are the same insecurities that every incoming freshman has. They’re also the same insecurities that every upperclassman had a few years ago. A lot of students get past the first few weeks and think that it was a mistake they were admitted, but almost all the students feel that way or have felt that way at some point. With hard work, you can only go up from the first week of school and ultimately become someone really world-changing.”

JAE CHEON, DUKE UNIVERSITY ‘13 “My trip to campus was pretty uneventful. My parents flew into Durham with me to help me move in. I couldn’t bring too many things on the plane with me, so we ended up buying a lot of things once I had dropped off my bags in the dorm. The first week in college was freshman orientation, and Duke freshmen are all housed on East Campus, separately from the upperclassmen, who are mostly housed on West and Central Campus. During orientation, we didn’t have class, so we pretty much spent time meeting people, going to events, or partying. Freshmen are desperate to make friends when they first get to college, so a lot of friend groups are established during orientation week. After this first week, the first week of class officially starts. I don’t remember much about class that first week except that i had a lot of reading and maybe a paper assigned. I had spent time away from home before, so I wasn’t too homesick for the first few weeks. I was just excited to

JENNY HOUSH, ASU ‘12 “Throughout the years I have overcome many fears. My first week officially at college was the one of the biggest events of my life. Being on your own for the first time is scary, exciting and nerve-wracking. I can recall my parents as I drove away, not a tear in their eyes. It was disappointing to me, because I was the youngest. I recall thinking my mom should have made a bigger scene watching her last daughter venture off into the real world. I made the eight-hour drive from Albuquerque and arrived in a much hotter, lonelier and overwhelming state. I can remember the first day of classes at ASU. It was the most intimidating obstacle that I had to endure, and being such a young college student (17), I was ill-prepared. My classes all had more than 100 students, all lectures, and my teachers did not seem to be the caring and friendly guides that we had at my old high school. Homework the first week was overwhelming; chapter after chapter I was becoming more aware of how much work I was getting into. The biggest change overall the first week in the college dorms was the fact that I was on my own, making my own decisions, my own person. It was a fun, exciting adventure that became an amazing learning experience. I cannot say that I would have changed anything in the first week on my own, in a new place, with new people, but I feel that this

r, f in a land fa

M HOME O FR AY W A K E E W T S R FI E WHAT IT’S LIKE TH

12

bachelor’s degree in Film and Video Production. Despite his frequent urges to return home, Eldredge says he has no intention of coming back to Arizona now that he’s earned his degree. “It’s all about the experience,” he says of striking out on his own. “You have to make your own home, and it helps if you’re doing something you love.” Eldredge says that for him there is really no remedy for homesickness and that he deals with it off and on throughout his week. He admits that the things he misses the most are surprising even to him. “Believe it or not I miss the desert the most,” he says sheepishly. “Can you believe that?” Kelsey Avers, originally from Orange County, California, is studying Journalism at San Francisco State University. For Avers, the transition from hometown to new town was much different. “I like going to school away from home and I find it pretty easy,” she says. For Avers, leaving home was all part of the experience. “I got to go somewhere new where no one knew me and I didn’t know them.” Avers admits that going to school away from home was not all smooth sailing, however. Having never been to San Francisco before, Avers found adjusting to the new terrain difficult and getting use to new people even more so, especially when it came to having strangers for roommates and dealing with cliques in some of her classes. But despite the rough spots, Avers says that all she really misses from home is the nice beach weather.

college 2010

be in college because I felt like it was a new chapter in my life. I didn’t really start missing home until about two or three months into the year. At that point, there had been a few exams, many all-nighters, and exhaustion all around. When fall break and Thanksgiving break arrived, many students went home, but home was farther away for me, so I ended up staying on campus and doing schoolwork. Overall, I think college makes you grow up really quickly. You have to make your own choices and take responsibility for them. It’s terrifying sometimes, but it’s also an incredible experience. You can really test your intellectual limits in college. You can make the best friends you’ll ever have. You can also start to figure out what you want to do with your life or change your mind about what you thought you wanted to do. There are opportunities everywhere, and it’s so easy to get involved in many things you care about; however, you learn that you can’t do it all, so you need to make priorities. I think the most important thing that incoming freshmen should know is azTeenmagazine.com


w

hether it’s your mom’s cookies that you miss the most or, yes, even the Valley’s unique Brown Christmas, feeling homesick is as natural as… well, as natural as going off to college. How you deal with separation anxiety will be a process as individual as the rest of your college experience, but there are a few ways to tackle the issue:

See it coming. Anticipating homesickness can help you head it off. Realize that what you are feeling is normal, no matter how weird it seems. You might miss the obvious: friends, local foods, your dad telling you goodnight each evening. Or, you might curse streets that aren’t in a grid pattern like they are in the Valley. Stay connected. Duh! Today’s college students have texting, Facebook, Twitter, Skype, e-mail and the good ol’ telephone and snail mail. Use them!

Make new connections. The hard, cold truth is this: You are an adult. Your best friend goes to college somewhere else, and your family’s lives are going on without you. That’s as it should be! Instead of pining for what you left behind, meet new people and build new relationships. Bloom where you are planted. Make a concentrated effort to embrace your new town and your new life. It will distract you from what you miss and give you something to talk about when you come back for Winter Break.

experience is something that every individual should go through in their lifetime.” JULIE MACK, NAU “I moved up to Flagstaff during the third week of August, escaping the scorching summer heat and entering into one of the most incredible times in my life. I had just turned 18 and was heading off to Northern Arizona University. I recall feeling very apprehensive throughout my first week up there. I felt out of my element and missed my friends from home, but I had this amazing sense of independence and excitement. Everything was so new and unfamiliar. It was strange leaving my family, but I found immediate comfort in the new friends I was meeting around the dorms. At the time, four years seemed like forever! Throughout that week, I experienced a number of ups and downs. I was excited and nervous for what was to come, but I was still hanging on to high school. I was eager to be in a college classroom, but worried the workload would be too much. My teachers felt distant and did not seem to want to offer the one-on-one attention my high school teachers did, and my new professors expected so much more. The first week was the beginning of an adjustment period for me. It was about adapting to my new environment and creating relationships that would eventually shape my college experience. I suppose the first week of college is a lot like the first week of any new beginning – you must embrace the unfamiliar and prepare yourself for a wild ride.” – Compiled by Leandra Huffer

azTeenmagazine.com

college 2010

13


The Greek Dilemma

Is a frat/sorority right for you?

S

ome college students simply can’t imagine campus life without the insta-sisters or -brothers they gained when they joined the Greek system. Others have nothing but disdain for what they see as an elitist society that encourages a loss of independence. For incoming freshman who aren’t yet in either camp, here are some things to consider when deciding whether or not to go through Rush.

sou Rush blastnds like a do th to me, a e s for meetin mixemals and gs, part ros that are fG life. reek

d I neee mor s. friend

ity or a fratern Joining provides an ty ri ip soro friendsh of instant nd sense a p u ro g ing. belong

At my college, it seems like everyone is Greek. The larger and more visible the Greek system, the more appealing it becomes to be a part of it.

I understand and am excited that being Greek is a lifestyle, not just a club or extracurricular activity.

signp! me u

I am a social person who loves being surrounded by others most of the time.

I value my independence A LOT.

Rejection devastates me. You’ll work hard during Rush and you may not get into your top picks.

don’t I have any m to spa oney r way y e. Any ou s Gr lice it, orgs aeek r cheapen’t .

I’ve got aeavy r-h superseload/ cou /other . job itments k comim Gree Be ngs a lot of e tak time.

just rush on by!

Sure, Greeks are individuals, but you can’t escape the allfor-one vibe in which bros and sisters start to dress and act alike.

drink I don’tn’t like to o e and d und peopl, not o e r s a r e b ou in a o. Of c is who dyone who rority ever nity or so r, but frater ard partie is a is a h erally that eek gen of the Gr part scene.

“My instructors at SCC

applied their real-world experiences in the classroom – which was always more intriguing than straight from a text book.”

~Naomi Hamilton, Reservations Manager The Sanctuary Resort & Spa, Paradise Valley SCC-NAU “2+2” bachelor’s degree program graduate, 2007 Hotel & Restaurant Management

Create YOUR future today at Scottsdale Community College! www.scottsdalecc.edu/myfuture 14

college 2010

azTeenmagazine.com


The college of you.

English 101

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Emphasis on rhetoric and composition with a focus on expository writing and understanding writing as a process. Estab writing strategies through four or more writing projects comprising at least 3,000 words in total. Note: Through four or mor at least 3,000 words. Class #

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Thinking of attending a university? Then think about attending a Maricopa Community College your first two years. You can get the same general required courses for a lot less money. Add that to flexible schedules, online classes, and hundreds of program options, and you’ll discover how the Maricopa Community Colleges give you an opportunity to create the college experience that’s just right for you. Visit maricopa.edu/you to see how you can get the most out of your college experience. Class #

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Chandler-Gilbert | Estrella Mountain | GateWay | Glendale | Mesa | Paradise Valley | Phoenix Rio Salado | Scottsdale | South Mountain | Maricopa Skill Center | SouthWest Skill Center

Psychology 101

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To acquaint the student with basic principles, methods and fields of psychology such as learning, memory, emotion, perce physiological, developmental, intelligence, social and abnormal. Prerequisites: None.


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By Leandra Huffer, with additional reporting by Taylor Turkeltaub

D FUN ARE UNIQUE, CUTTING EDGE AN AT TH S SE UR CO FER OF S GE ARIZONA COLLE

!

group of college students swarm around acclaimed DJ Akshen as he manipulates beats on a turntable, giving birth to a new, unique track. They are not dancing. Instead, they observe scrupulously, taking note on his technique while in a classroom at Scottsdale Community College. As founder of the only accredited DJ program in the nation, Rob Wegner, along with his SCC colleagues, presents three classes: Live Performance Disc Jockey Techniques, Turntablism: The Art of the Scratch and Digital DJ Performance Techniques. “I firmly believe that DJs are the future of musicians,” says Wegner, who hopes to ultimately launch a DJ degree program at SCC. “For this reason, I believe having these classes at a college music department is bringing the DJ profession a step closer to that reality.” These classes give students the invaluable experience of hands-on learning that in the past would have taken aspiring DJs “10 years to learn on the streets,” Wegner said. At SCC that same knowledge can now be acquired in one semester. “Typically, new DJs learn by knowing the right people. We’re changing that because now anyone has an opportunity to learn this.” DJ courses only scratch the surface of the wave of innovative classes that stray from the humdrum of a student’s typical prerequisites. Also livening up course catalogs:

SUSTAINABLE FOODS SYSTEMS RIO SALADO COMMUNITY COLLEGE

"

o accompany the growing “real food” movement, Rio Salado Community College now offers the only Sustainable Foods Systems program in Arizona, allowing many of the courses to be taken online and giving students the option of earning either a one-year certificate or two-year associate’s degree. As part of their studies, students intern at the new Café @ Rio, which utilizes locally raised – and, in some cases, grown-oncampus – produce, meat, olive oil and cheese.

18

college 2010

“Sustainable foods are foods that meet the needs of the present generation while also taking care of future generations,” says Michael Hodgins, director of the program. “Most college programs that study foods look at food form a traditional view. Our new program is unique in that it looks at food from a sustainable perspective.”

EMERGING LEADERS PROGRAM

MESA, PARADISE VALLEY AND SCOTTSDALE COMMUNITY COLLEGES

!

s the number of college-educated job seekers expands, employers are increasingly looking for well- rounded graduates. The Emerging Leaders Program at MCC, PVCC and SCC endeavor to mold students into active members of the community that possess a strong sense of self and can take part in positive social change. “We dissected the qualities that a powerful leader possesses and then had the opportunity to implement those traits into our very own service project,” says Mark Johnson, a graduate of the program. The course takes students out of the classroom and into the real world with field trips to a local food bank and women and children’s shelter, and guest speakers share their experiences in making a real difference for a cause they are passionate about. Johnson and three other students created a project to raise awareness about the benefits of bike riding on multiple levels in which they volunteered at a local bike shop, petitioned for safer bike lanes and organized group bike rides to school. “I learned so much about myself in the class,” he says. “I discovered what my strengths and weaknesses are and how one person truly can make a difference in the community.”

azTeenmagazine.com

GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY Police Function Music Appreciation

CHANDLER-GILBERT COMMUNITY COLLEGE Police Photography Magic, Witchcraft, and Healing: An Introduction to Comparative Religion Aromatherapy

NAU Gaming and Casino Management

ASU History of Anime The Psychology of Happiness Manhood and Masculinity in the United States

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA SOPHIA Project (for the study of “entity communications” – aka, ghosts!)


ROCK BAND

SCOTTSDALE COMMUNITY COLLEGE “I’ve been playing guitar for eight years now and have played in several bands, and it was a two-credit class, so I figured ‘why not?’� says Aaron Gillespie of his decision to sign up for MUP158 Rockband at CGCC. In class, the students are divided up and challenged with working together to face off at the end of the semester in a Battle of the Bands. “What I got out of it was friendship,� Aaron adds. “I was forced to interact with students who I shared no common goals with outside of class but had musical interests like mine. My major is criminal justice – I want to become a police officer – and taking this class was definitely a breath of fresh air after all my other classes.�

Let’s talk about who you are and what you love to do. We can help answer your college questions! Q: Which College is Right for Me? A: If you’re an artistic individual with a passion to succeed, you’re most likely a perfect fit for our creative campus. Q: What Program Should I Pursue? A: With 16 degree programs in the areas of design, fashion, media arts and culinary arts, we’ll help you explore all your career options. Q: When Can I Start Classes? A: We have rolling start dates which means you can start classes in July, August, October, or November this year. We’re ready when you are. Q: What’s Next? A: Set up a college answer session with our admissions specialists and tour the school. Call us now at 1.800.474.2479 or log on to www.artinstitutes.edu/phoenix.

See For Yourself at Open House Saturday, August 7, 2010. RSVP at www.aiopen.com/phoenix

consider this! Ready to trade in the desert’s dry heat for four seasons of varied weather? Excited about attending a huge college after four years at a tiny private high school? If BIG CHANGES are potentially on the horizon for you, visiting your potential new campus home is even more vital. Certain factors such as weather and enrollment size should be given immense consideration – know what you are getting into and be certain you are ready to embrace a lifestyle that is radically far out of your current comfort zone. azTeenmagazine.com

$% & " ' &,! ) #+!   www.artinstitutes.edu/phoenix college 2010

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2

3

4

5

Wardrobe and accessories provided by 42 Saint at Kierland Commons. Photos by Cilento Photography, CilentoPhotography.com Shot on location in Superstition Mountains, Mesa.

JENNA ANDERSON, NOTRE DAME ’10 1 AND USC ‘14 Psyched for college? “I’m excited for the freedom that college offers. I’ll finally get a chance to see what it feels like to be an adult, and it’ll be a blast getting to experience it all in Los Angeles. I love musical theater and singing, which is part of the reason why I chose USC – it offers a great minor program that fits with my accounting major. What am most excited for is that I could potentially get ‘noticed’ in the L.A. area!” KRYSTIN COLBY, MOUNTAIN VIEW ‘11 2 Crazy secret fear/talent/wish? “My secret fear would have to be.... anything happening to my teeth! I have dreams about them falling out and stuff all the time and it freaks me out, but it’s weird because I floss twice a day. Hmm … a secret talent. I can tie

20

college 2010

cherry stems with my tongue. And let’s see … a secret wish of mine would definitely hands-down have to be to freeze time. I mean, who wouldn’t want another shot at that perfect moment to dump a plate of spaghetti down that pervert’s shirt?”

I am really excited to decorate my dorm room and create my new ‘home.’ But I am equally thrilled for the opportunity of getting to know so many new people.” Secret talent? “Cake decorating!” Wish? “To become a competitive salsa dancer.”

COLIN BRESNEHAN, DESERT VISTA ‘11 AMANDA OLIVER, MILLENNIUM ’10 AND ARIZONA 3 5 Post-grad plans? “I’m a competitive hockey player SCHOOL OF MASSAGE THERAPY AND NAU and will be on the Phoenix Polar Bears Junior A team Looking forward to college? “The best thing about next year. I’d really love to play college hockey for a Division 1 team after Junior hockey. Once I get to college, I think I’d be good at inventing things … so maybe a business (or engineering) degree would be good.” GABRIELA RODILES, XAVIER ’10 AND ASU 4 BARRETT HONORS COLLEGE ‘14 As someone who hasn’t been to college, what looks like the best thing about the experience? “Honestly, azTeenmagazine.com

the college experience for me, I think, will be meeting new people and learning from them and their culture.” Looking ahead: “Success is my biggest wish when it comes to college, at the same time it is my greatest fear. Whatever life brings me, I hope I am happy and successful.”


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HE'&:#,BB$C$:(+:'BB:'D,!&? “A B$'%"("C:,WBB$C$:(+:'BB:'D,!& HA a"*:D$("C T ’S RIGHT FROM WRO $FG$%($"# :'DB$:&,:C'&E$ NG FUTURE #E$,+:&,:E$BG:),!:(":)%,: (#$+:'+:' ":'*!B&.”!%: -CHELSIE GA LLAGHER, A SU ‘12

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finding your ving “College is about r family’s Thanksgi good ei th to u yo ke ta The ones that will e is too expensive. The ones that m because a flight ho u have told them. The ones that l yo news isn’t real unti hen a boy breaks your heart. The w s ga lp Ve will fly you to in your wedding, he ds ai m es id br e th u when you ones that will be play bingo with yo d an n, re ild ch n choose, ur raise yo g the family you ca ng in nd fi r fo is ge lle ro are 80. Co ,GB$’ and buildinugghathste rest of $ :G % ,! ) ‘ g in er ov sc di ro at will carry you th supportive circle th S, ASU ‘11 GG your life.” ERIKA BA azTeenmagazine.com

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ALISON GOULDER, ASU '13

EDITOR'S NOTE: The Shout-Outs in this issue come from college students. azTeen does not endorse underage drinking or other illegal activity. college 2010

23


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SURVIVING SUMMER AND THE HOLIDAYS WITH THE FAM

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HANDLING NEW FREEDOM

ithout a doubt, going to college is one of the most exciting experiences an 18-year-old can undergo. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a whole new world with one huge change from high school that most college freshman say is oh-so-sweet: No nagging, hovering, everpresent parents to monitor your every breath. College is like the menu at California Pizza Kitchen: Chock-full of choices, choices, choices. Your friends are going out the night before your first big paper is due. Do you go with them or stay in to work? The only alcohol youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever tasted was Champagne at your cousinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wedding, but now your dorm floor is Party Central, and boy, do they sound like theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having fun. Do you join them? In high school, you were sure of your commitment to remain a virgin, but the campus health center passes out free condoms that part of your reasoning mind says absolutely should not go to waste. group-think when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re surrounded by WHAT TO DO, WHAT TO DO. a mass of people who all see things a Along with philosophy, economics and poli certain way. Make sure your group is one sci, in college you will learn the fundamenthat truly represents who you are. tals of decision making. The transition will be easier for some, but remembering a few guidelines will help you learn to embrace ! Remember, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to party to enjoy a party. Sure, drinking, drugs and college life without becoming a Girl (or sex are a pretty common part of the Guy) Gone Wild. college experience, but they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be. Volunteerism, professional devel! Use common sense. Has Wednesday opment and networking, recreational ever been the start of the weekend? You sports and niche clubs are also a big lived your first 18 years without partying part of college life and have the added in the middle of the week, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll advantage of leaving you with no regrets survive the next four without doing it as the next day. well. You worked hard to get here and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to blow it, which brings us to our next tipâ&#x20AC;Ś ! Keep your eye on the prize. Being the Loud and Crazy Guy might be a badge of honor now, but what about in five years, ! Strive for balance. No one flunks out of when everyone else is in grad school or school because they made new friends, launching their careers? Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let them kicked back on occasion and realized leave you behind. that they could take things a wee bit less seriously sometimes. But plenty of kids who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know when enough ! Know that you will make mistakes, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be afraid to do so or convinced is enough do flunk out, every year and that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recover. Mistakes are from every college weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever heard of. encouraged! Not learning from them? Not so much. ! Pay for play. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t automatically get to go out with everyone for Half-Price Wing Night just because. No, you have ! Finally, be true to yourself. Opening your mind to new ideas, experiences and to earn it. Have the discipline to work points of view is a magnificent, vital part first and play later. Rewarding yourself of the college experience. But at the end will feel so much sweeter when you know of the year, you should still be recognizyouâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve earned it. able to yourself. ! Cleave to the like-minded. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll know pretty early on what your roommateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; KATHERINE LANDINGIN value system is. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to slip into

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fter the SATs have been taken, the college applications filled out and transcripts submitted, the sigh of relief breathed by a high school senior must be followed by a deep breath. As the schools send out their decision letters, many teens about to embark on their undergraduate journey face their own major decision: where to spend the next four years of their lives. Whether the choice comes down to two local junior colleges, three state universities or six schools scattered across the country, figuring out the best place for you and making the long-term commitment can be daunting.

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college 2010

1

hen my senior year started, I went through the difficult process of narrowing down my hefty list of 25 potential schools to 13. Then, I checked out the Common Application and figured out how many college essays I would have to write. I ended up writing nine essays in total, including the personal statement, which, upon reflection, seems ludicrous. I didn’t think the application process would ever endbut once Christmas break had come, most of my applications were getting checked over by my writing instructor and college guidance counselor. I was relieved to finally hit the “submit” button right before the New Year began. Then, the waiting period came. I loathed this time. Every other weekend I had interviews for schools, so I made sure I knew information about the school and about my own goals before I went in. I anxiously waited for April 1 – D-Day, as in Decision Day – to arrive. When it did, I was surprised and excited to learn that I had gotten into all of my top schools, including Princeton, Columbia, the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell in the Ivy League. Deciding between these great schools was not easy, but I knew that I was not as excited about Penn and Cornell, so I crossed those two off. The summer before my senior year I had attended a seven-week academic program at Princeton that promoted ethical leadership and the matriculation of underprivileged students into top universities, and I had kept in touch with several people there. I knew it would be a great place to study public relations, my chosen field, and while I loved visiting Columbia, it didn’t feel as “right” as Princeton. After going back for another visit, I also felt comfortable, happy and at home on the campus. I knew that I definitely wanted to spend my next four years there. azTeenmagazine.com

Some soon-to-be high school graduates are ready to take a risk and try something new, distant and unexpected. Others know they want to stay close to home. So how do you figure out where you belong? For starters, current college students say, trust your instincts. Amanda Sullivan knew early on that she wanted to go to a big school. “I don’t like being around the same few people all the time,” says the Wisconsin native. When she was waitlisted at her first-choice school, the University of Wisconsin—Madison, she started considering the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, a sixhour drive from her hometown. But then she got a scholarship offer from ASU, and the three-hour flight to the desert began to look much more appealing, she says. She committed to ASU as a kinesiology major and made her first trip out for summer orientation. “I had never even visited ASU,” Amanda says. “I just decided it was worth the risk. I figured I needed to give it a shot and see if it worked out, and I realized I could always transfer if it didn’t.”

The college application process was very trying, but in the end, I learned that it was worth my efforts and the efforts of those who had supported me. I will be attending Princeton in the fall, and the best advice I would give any upcoming senior is to fight senioritis and to keep your eye on the prize. —BRITTANY C. HARDY, NORTH ’10 AND PRINCETON

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n the fall of my senior year of high school, I filled out applications for 12 colleges and universities. Only two of them were for schools I’d actually visited, and three of them were for schools outside of my home state of California. There was no method to my madness in selecting the schools I applied to – I didn’t know what I wanted to study, so I did a bit of online research and stuck with schools I had heard good things about. I reasoned that I didn’t want to get my hopes up unnecessarily, so in the months I spent awaiting the decision letters, I opted not to visit any of the schools just in case I didn’t get in. I fully expected to get into at least half of the schools I applied to, as I had gone above and beyond in high school to ensure that I would be a well-qualified applicant. So when I received only four acceptance letters (and one wait-list notification), I didn’t quite know what to do. After my final decision letter informed me I would not be attending UCLA – my first


For Amanda, leaving the option of transferring open made the bold step a bit easier to take. Fortunately, she says, it didn’t take her long to realize she had made a great choice. “I didn’t know what would happen when I got there,” the junior says, “but it turned out better than I ever could have expected. I’ve had the time of my life, and it was definitely a risk worth taking.” Scottsdale Community College student Regina Whitehead took a different kind of risk. Raised on an Indian Reservation on the outskirts of Gallup, NM, Regina researched colleges across the United States but decided on the SCC school because “I wanted to try something new in my life, but I also wanted to attend a college that wouldn’t be too far away from my family and friends back in New Mexico.” Regina feels at home at her new school and says it has helped her learn new coping skills. “A challenge that I continue to face here in Phoenix is my ethnicity,” she says. “I am half black and half Navajo, and by living in predominately white city I feel insecure at times because of my skin color.” She says that SCC is a perfect match for her for an array of reasons such as low tuition costs, the close (but not too close) proximity to her family, small class sizes and its status as the only community college that is located on an Indian Reservation. Justin Hull, a senior in ASU’s engineering department, has been a Sun Devil since before he can remember. Born and raised in Tempe, his ASU experience started early on, as both of his parents went to the university. For him, there was never really any other choice. “At one point, I thought a little bit about schools in San Diego,” Justin says. “I really like California, and the beach would have been fun. But I never seriously considered it. I’ve always loved ASU – the weather, the people, the cam-

pus…there was never any question that it was the right place for me.” While she didn’t grow up in a Wildcat-crazed family, Samantha Schwartz had her heart set on the UofA early in her college-app process. “I have always wanted to go there,” says Samantha, a Physiology major who plans to attend medical school. “UofA is close enough to where my family lives but far enough away to experience living on my own. I also applied to ASU, but I knew I’d be headed to Tucson.” For Kylan Savage, an ’08 high school graduate from Arkansas who wanted to attend a Christian college, his decision seemed pretty clearcut when he considered his options. “I knew I wanted a degree in Music Business, which is offered at Belmont in Nashville and several other colleges I looked at,” says Kylan, an accomplished musician who has fronted bands in his hometown for several years. “I chose Dallas Baptist University because one, Dallas has a great music scene, two, I was familiar with Dallas, and three, I think Texas is just awesome.” Unfortunately, DBU didn’t offer Kylan the experience he had hoped for. He felt patronized by many of his professors and administrators and ultimately decided that for him, learning discipline and responsibility was the real goal. “I do believe that college is a wonderful opportunity for people to grow and realize who they truly want to be, but the atmosphere and so-called ‘college experience’ just wasn’t for me,” he says. “I am currently attending Liberty University Online and finishing at a faster, more comfortable pace.” Like Kylan, Katianna Bear thought she had her college situation all figured out as she approached high school graduation. The northern California native had enrolled in the nursing program at the University of San Francisco soon after she was accepted, but at the last minute,

she changed her mind and decided that USF wasn’t quite far enough from home. Katianna took a trip to Tempe with a friend who was thinking about going to ASU, and she was sold. She switched her plans up to become a Sun Devil as a double major in communication and broadcast journalism. “I decided I wanted to get as far away from California as I could, and ASU was the farthest school I’d applied to,” Katianna says. “Then when I visited, I fell in love with everything about it. For some reason, I just knew I would be happy here.” In her two years at ASU, Katianna says, she has never looked back, and she knows that following her intuition and changing her plans was the best move she could have made. Similarly, ASU broadcast journalism major Paul Bruch took a bit longer to find the right place for him in college. He decided to start out at Northern Arizona University, but after spending his freshman year in Flagstaff, Paul was lured back to the Phoenix area, where he grew up, by ASU’s journalism program. Now a senior, Paul says that the move has turned out well for him, as ASU has been a great fit academically. “I’ve been able to make the most of my opportunities here, and I’ve had a great time doing it,” he says. As the prospect of freedom and the reality of the responsibility that comes with it create a range of emotions and expectations about college, choosing a school can be tough. Exploring the academic, social and geographical aspects of a school will help determine how your life there would be structured. Still, as plenty of college students can attest, sometimes what seems to be a perfect fit just isn’t. The lesson at that point? Flexibility can make all the difference.

choice – I was back at square one. I had been accepted to four great schools, but I felt ill equipped to decide which would be a good fit for me for the next four years. I quickly decided against Cal Poly in San Louis Obispo, as the prestige of its business program was not quite enough to make me forget that more than 20 people from my high school graduating class had committed to the university. I knew I wanted a new experience, and that certainly was not it. So I narrowed my decision down to two of the four: USC, a private university in Los Angeles where I would only know one other person, and UCSB, a public university in Santa Barbara where my sister and my two best friends went to school. I had been to UCSB dozens of times and knew that I loved it, but I was hesitant to follow my sister to college. When I finally visited USC, I fell in love with the campus and its big-time-university feel, but the thought of not knowing anyone was terrifying. Still, I couldn’t decide, and I spent every day of the last two months of my senior year of high school agonizing over the gigantic decision looming over my head. I waited until the commitment deadline – and said yes to both. I sent in deposits to both schools to buy myself time. After all, I reasoned, this was the biggest decision of my life, and I needed to be absolutely certain. Two weeks later, I went with my gut. I told UCSB I would not be joining them in the fall after all and filled out my housing forms for USC. When August rolled around, I was excited about the choice I had made to be independent. I needed to forge my own path and get out of my comfort zone, and I would be far enough from home to do so. But after the excitement of the first couple of weeks wore off, so did my confidence. I wasn’t sure I meshed well with the crowd in my new home, and I started to question whether I had done

enough research before I made my decision. I maintained my optimism, however, forcing myself to give it a chance and not let my doubts interfere. After my month-long Christmas break, it took only about two weeks of the spring semester for me to decide that USC and I were not compatible. The thought of transferring had never been an option in my mind, but I knew I had to reevaluate if I wanted to find the experience I was looking for. Since starting college, I had decided I wanted to pursue a degree in the field of journalism, so that was my starting point in looking for alternatives. I filled out transfer applications for the University of Arizona and Arizona State, thinking it might be nice to get out of California for a while. I still wasn’t resigned to the idea of transferring, but I wanted to have options. When I was accepted into both schools, I knew that ASU’s Cronkite School would be my best bet, as it had a great reputation, plus I’d already visited a few times and fallen in love with the university as a whole. The agonizing process began again, as I went back and forth between sticking it out in Los Angeles or throwing in the towel and heading to the desert. I enrolled in classes at both schools and signed leases on apartments in both states. I changed my mind every day until mid-July, when I woke up one day and knew I needed to have the courage to do what I knew would be the better choice. Transferring was not easy, but I approached it with the same optimism I’d had when I started college as a freshman. It was exciting and terrifying, but I knew I had to make the most of it to make it work. And it has worked for me; ASU is definitely where I belong. Deciding where to go to college is a daunting task. For me, it was one that took two years and a whole lot of transferring, but it was worth it to know that I finally found

a place I loved. It is hard to determine if you’ll fit in with a student body or if you’ll feel at home on a campus, but doing your research can definitely help. College visits are important, and talking to students at the schools you are interested in can give you a better perspective on what life might be like. The most important thing is to follow your intuition – research can only get you so far. Listen to your instincts, be optimistic and have an open mind.

azTeenmagazine.com

– Kylie Gifford, with additional reporting by Leandra Huffer

–Kylie Gifford

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Leaping from the nest HOW FAR FROM HOME DO YOU WANT TO GO?

Monique Zatcoff graduated from Higley in 2009 and left that August for the University of Portland. After one semester in Oregon, Zatcoff transferred to ASU for two reasons: she wanted to major in journalism and it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t offered at UP, and she was homesick being over 1,300 miles from home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think distance is a really important factor to consider when choosing a college,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wish I would have thought about it a little more before I went out of state, but I guess I never would have known how homesick I would be until I experienced being away.â&#x20AC;? Monique watched her two older brothers as they went out of state for college. Neither of them became too homesick, but Monique says she is happier to be close to home. In her â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mom U.â&#x20AC;? blog on the New York Times website earlier this year, Caren Osten Gerszberg wondered whether kids should stay close enough to home so that moms could bring them chicken soup when they get sick. Her essay prompted a flurry of responses, both from readers who thought that to restrict a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college choice based

on geography alone when finances arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a factor keeps the apron strings tied too tightly and those who believed that kids are already indulged too much and that staying close to home never hurt anyone. Katie Chen, an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;09 Corona grad, is firmly in the first camp. She looked at many colleges across the country before settling on Wellesley College in Massachusetts and says that while at first it was really difficult to be so far from her parents, talking on the phone helped. The hardest part for her about being so far away was keeping in touch with friends from Arizona. Katie is aware that what worked in her situation wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily be right for someone else. Distance is always something to consider when looking at schools, she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For some it is a big deal and for others it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t,â&#x20AC;? Katie says . â&#x20AC;&#x153;Especially with the transition from high school to college, it can be a lot to handle all at once. You just need to be prepared for all of the changes.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jennifer Crane

    s WWWEMPIREEDU

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Lifetime 101 THE 6 CHEESIEST COLLEGE-THEMED MADE-FOR-TV MOVIES

Preparing to go to college? Don’t even think about embarking on that new life without learning the life lessons that only made-for-TV movies can impart. Here are some classics:

1

Mother, May I Sleep With Danger? This 1996 Tori Spelling classic sets the standard for like films. Theme: Charming BF is not what he seems.

2

Beyond comforters and marker boards... Are you sure your what-to-taketo-college checklist is complete? Dorm Co has all the stuff you didn’t even know you needed, from blackout curtains to lipstickcase pepper spray. Prices are comparable to retailers such as Target, but the real value is in the convenience of one-stop shopping. Check it out at DormCo.com.

Silencing Mary A 1998 Melissa Joan Hart thriller in which Hart plays a campus reporter who uncovers the truth about a date-raping Big Man On Campus.

3

Murder in a College Town (aka, What Happened to Bobby Earl?) Small-town boy makes good, then falls under the svengali-like influence of his suave roomie. Chaos ensues in this 1997 treasure.

4

Co-ed Call Girl It’s Queen Tori again in this 1996 gem in which a bookish college student gets tricked into joining a Malibu escort service. The glamorous lifestyle is intoxicating, but the sleaze factor makes her feel oh-so-dirty, in a bad way.

5

Dying to Belong Before Hilary Swank won an Oscar for Million Dollar Baby, she starred in this 1997 rippedfrom-the-headlines drama about sorority hazing gone too far.

6

Freshman Fall: She Cried No We have the USA network to thank for this tale of a college freshman date-raped by her brother’s fraternity bro and her quest for revenge.

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consider this! Just like every high school, every college has a own VIBE, its own specific personality that is unique and unlike that of every other college community. Some are obvious; no one will be confusing UC-Berkeley with BYU, for example, and most students who are drawn to one of these schools will not be considering the other. Other traits are more subtle, though. The difference between ASU, NAU and UofA is more than size and geography; the same is true for USC and Oregon State, Texas Tech and LSU or Miami and NYU. The bottom line? Don’t forget to look at the intangibles, and don’t think that feeling “at home” on a campus is not a big deal. It is.


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college 2010

33


the

insiders

Compiled by Collegiate Editor Carolina Lopez, Horizon ‘11

Welcome an all-new panel of collegians who over the next school year will give the lowdown on campus life

s the “In college, what’k li e, and first day of school to class?” what did you take

EMILY RADER

NAU ’12; is Majoring in Political Science and Journalism

HUNTER SCHWARTZ Brigham Young University ‘12; is Majoring in Communications

“My first day of college was a surreal experience because I couldn’t believe I was actually out of high school, out of the house, and on my own in college. I brought a notebook and pencil, but all I can remember is reading through the syllabus.”

“My first day of college was long and exciting. I had classes from 9 in the morning until 7 at night! My classes were a mile from my dorm, and I decided to walk to them. I had severely underestimated the amount of time needed to get to my classes, so I was late for my first one. There were no more seats available and I had to stand awkwardly in the front of the room for 50 minutes. Because of my long walk, I decided to bring everything I might possibly need, including coffee, snacks, and my computer – all shoved into my backpack. When I got back to my room at the end of the day, I discovered that my coffee had mixed with all of the contents of my backpack to form an awful stew of school supplies and electronics that had spilled onto my bed. I spent the rest of the evening in the laundry room attempting to clean the coffee out of everything. It was there that I met some of my still very good friends. What caught me most off guard that first day was the weather. In the morning it was sunny and warm, but by mid-afternoon it had begun to hail. I did not have a jacket, so I decided to visit the bookstore and get one. That sweatshirt has been with me from the very beginning of my college education. Every time I wear it, I remember that first day of school and how it was full of coincidences, both good and bad, and how every little step can lead you to a completely unexpected outcome.”

LULU CONTRERAS

Scottsdale Community College ’13, is Majoring in Business

“My first day of college as a student was lonely! In community college everyone is in their own little world getting things done for themselves and then off campus they go – very independent – so I remember I didn’t say much either. Since the professors go off on the syllabus, some may have done some introductory ac

ROB STANFORD University of Redlands ‘12; is a Philosophy

Major with an Asian Studies minor and an emphasis on Pre-Law

“My first day of college was filled with a bunch of anxiety, but that went away quickly. My school had a freshman week that really took off a lot of the pressure. We had theme parties, dances, a festival and a ton of other stuff that helped me meet my classmates before classes even started. That way, by the time I moved in I knew basically my whole class and so was able to be myself from the get-go, which really alleviated a bunch of pressure. So on the first day of classes I already felt at home and came prepared to class the same way I had in high school. I had my notebook, a pencil and my class syllabus.”

MARCEA DECKER UofA ‘13; is Majoring in Economics and minoring in Geography and the Japanese Language

“The first day of college wasn’t anything too special, now that I look back. I hadn’t gotten a syllabus from any of my classes yet, so I just came with a backpack with pens, paper and my laptop in it. I think I brought my book to class, which was a rookie mistake. You almost never bring your textbooks to class in 500-person lectures. The professor quickly introduced themselves, and course content was covered immediately, from the first day, in each of my classes. It wasn’t scary or unlike anything I had ever experienced before – it was class, and I learned some things and had work assigned that I had to do by next class time. The academics of college was a smooth transition for me, because I had already been doing the same routine throughout high school.”

EMMANUELL MALDONADO

LINDSAY JAKOWS Pepperdine ‘12; is double-Majoring in

“First day of college? Well, I started in high school. So my first day of college was during my senior year, at Paradise Valley Community College. It wasn’t that big, so it was reasonably easy to navigate around; however, the classes might be small, but they make up for it in toughness. I had forgotten to go to the orientation, so I was lost the first three periods. I did eventually find my classes and it was the start of my climb of the collegiate circuit!”

“All I brought on the first day of school was my laptop and a pen to write notes to myself on the syllabus. You might want a planner if you’re like me...I can never remember dates on my laptop’s or phone’s calendars. The profs just told us how the class was run and gave us an intro and reading assignments for the next class. The most important thing is to make sure you know exactly where your classes are. Don’t assume that room numbers will be easy to find if you know where the building is.”

International Studies and Political Science

ASU ’12; is Majoring in Business

SAMANTHA SCHWARTZ UofA ‘12; is Majoring in Physiology

“I was a little nervous the first day of school. Though it was not as scary as I thought it would be, it was not a good experience. It was pouring rain the first day the entire time I walked to classes, and of course, I didn’t have an umbrella. When I finally got to my class I looked like I had taken a shower with all my clothes on. My dorm was the farthest one from campus, so I was completely soaked by the time I got to class. I wasn’t embarrassed since most everyone was soaked, but it definitely was not fun. I only took a notebook and a pen and pencil since it was pouring. The school was packed with people fighting their way to class. I never realized how many people went to the school until that first day. I was more nervous the day before when a friend and I walked around campus trying to find our way around. But after the first week it slowed down and it wasn’t intimidating.”

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college 2010

CORINNE SOLHEID University of Minnesota ’13; is Majoring in Biochemistry/Pre-Med and minoring in Spanish

“What I brought on my first day of college depends on what you consider my first day of college, I guess. On move-in day, which was my first day on campus, I brought TONS of stuff – my family’s car was packed full! I brought clothes, appliances, decorations, cleaning supplies, etc. It was super-busy that day, and I met a bunch of new people. We had ‘Welcome Week’ activities for most of that day to help us meet other people and to get used to campus before school started. On my first day of actual school, I basically just went to class and afterwards went to some club and organization meetings. To class, I brought my backpack and some notebooks, folders and writing utensils.”

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follow the

EMILY PISKULICK, Gonzaga University

“When I got off the plane in Spokane, Washington, I almost had a heart attack. I’m used to big cities that have 365 days of sun, and Spokane is the exact opposite of everything I know; however, I could not be more excited about going to Gonzaga University next year. I’m living in the biggest freshman dorm on campus to get that ‘true college experience,’ and I plan on studying either English Literature or Business, or maybe even both. I hope to be avidly involved with the school newspaper and to continue to write all throughout college, and who could forget about attending Gonzaga basketball games?! As for fears, I don’t really have any. I’m ecstatic about moving to a different place and being thrown into all of the experiences that come with college, and even though leaving my friends and family behind is going to be tough, meeting new friends is something I love doing. Wish me luck!

HILLARY BURGESS,

The University of Texas

“I’m kind of scared the work will be overwhelming and that I’ll get overtired because of how much will be going on. I have chronic Epstein-Barr, which is like having mono all the time and means that I need to get enough sleep; I have to nap every day. I’m excited about meeting new people and taking classes that I’m interested in instead of just required to take. I am going to be living in an apartment very near campus with my boyfriend, Matt, which I’m excited about. It’s a huge step, but he is my best friend and I think that sharing this experience will bring us even closer. I am studying corporate communication but plan to switch to the business school after my first year. I want to join Spirits, a social organization that does local service projects and stuff for the football games and mixers with other groups. I think that a lot of people will go crazy with the freedom they suddenly have, drinking every night and doing all the stuff they weren’t allowed to do in high school. I had a lot of freedom in high school, so I think I’ll be fine. I’m excited about meeting new people in a place where we’re all new. I hope at the end of the year I will have gotten my 3.7 GPA so I can go into the business school, that I’ve had a very active social life and great year with Matt. “

freshman

Over the next school year, azTeen will follow six Valley teens throughout their first year of college. In this issue, our six scholars talk about the hopes, fears, plans and predictions they have as they start all over again as freshmen. BRITTANY HARDY, Princeton University

“My first year, I expect to work a lot. So I’m going to start first semester with a light workload until I get a feel for my courses. I’m not sure which residential college I’ll be in, but I know I’ll be living on campus. I don’t really have many fears since I already have a few friends coming to Princeton with me. I think I’m mostly just nervous about how challenging my courseload could be. But on a lighter note, it’s a huge relief to come along with some great friends, and hopefully, I’ll be roomies with a few of them. If not, I’m still looking forward to many memories with them all. I want to join several clubs, from Black Student Union to a caricature group called Stella. I’m also very interested in several of the student publications and media groups as well. One year from now, I hope to be an active student at Princeton.”

VIVIAN PADILLA, ASU

“I can absolutely say that I loved my entire high school career; all of the events that led up to my final year at Arcadia filled me with extreme joy and nonstop entertainment. Graduation night was bittersweet, but I’m exceptionally thrilled to begin my next four years as a Sun Devil at ASU! I chose to attend the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, located in the heart of downtown Phoenix, because it’s one of the nation’s best j-schools with an outstandingly rigorous program for its students. I’m hoping that in the next four years I will gain all of the necessary skills that a journalist needs in order to succeed in the field. I hope to further my passion of journalism by studying broadcast media, public relations, photography, radio broadcast and magazine production. I do, however, have a slight fear that I won’t achieve my goal of becoming the Latina Oprah. I wish I could know how the future plays out, but what I do know is that on my first day of college I will be like a lost puppy who has no clue where to go.”

ZACHARY GASTONY,

Texas A&M University

“WOOT! GO AGGIES!! Overall, the pre-college planning has been the most overwhelming so far. Everything from choosing my dorm to taking placement tests to picking my classes. With every day spent working and saving up for college spending money, I find myself growing more and more anxious of the school year to come. I will know almost no one as I transition myself over 1,000 miles away. How will I make friends? How will I be able to party when my scholarship requires me to keep a 3.5 GPA? What will my roommate be like? Can I handle 18 credit hours? All of these questions run through my head. Despite my precollege angst, I do find excitement in the future. After all, I’ll be around 40,000 other undergrad students on a 5,200acre campus (to put it into perspective, ASU’s main campus is 642 acres). I’ll be a thousand miles away, yes, but it’ll be a thousand miles of independence. Obviously, I’ll miss my family and my friends here, but I know that this is the first step to making many new friends and eventually starting my own family. At this point I look forward to the change in lifestyle that A&M will bring.”

COREY EDWARDS, UofA “I chose to attend the University of Arizona next fall not only because I was offered a lot of scholarship money, but because the UofA is a very diverse school with many opportunities and they have biomedical engineering as a major. UofA is still close to my home in Gilbert, but not too close. I’m extremely psyched to go away to college next semester and finally be on my own with my friends. I am excited for the freedom, and though I am still nervous about going out into the world alone, without parents, my twin brother, Kyle, will be there too, taking almost all of the same classes as me. I have been involved in band for many years, but now I want to explore some other things and activities. Maybe I’ll get a job too, but I don’t want to overload myself my first year. I know I will have a great time and some amazing experiences.” azTeenmagazine.com

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Why do you

college? “I love college because of the relationships that are formed between the diverse, large base of students.” – VAUGHN HILLYARD, ASU sophomore

I love college because... I have total independence but very little responsibility.”

“I love college because it is fun and a great way to meet new people.” — SARAH BOCK, UofA sophomore

“I love that I am improving myself and working towards a better future by going to college.” – LOUISE ELBERFELD,

Thomas Nelson Community College (VA) junior

– BECKY BARBER,

“I love the fact that college is free. I get free tuition since I am an employee.”

ASU junior

“I love college because I can be more independent and don’t have to worry about being home on time.” — SERENA LING, UofA

“I love college because of the freedom. I have the ability to do my own thing and not be constrained by a bell.” – TOM ZIEGMANN, ASU sophomore

“I love college because of the radical

deracination that

it imposes upon the individual. When placed into the world of academia, you learn a lot more than

just physics and Kierkegaard.

It is a self-reliant evolution.”

– AIMEE GABBARD, Ohio University senior 38

college 2010

–BRANDON HOLK,

University of Phoenix junior

“I

love college

because freedom is finally in my hands. I can do what I want, when I want, but I also have to be responsible and organized, which makes me feel like I have finally become an adult.” – CHRISTIANA STEWART, ASU senior

“I love college because of the freedom and the opportunity to learn so much about yourself.” – VIANETT MENA, UofA junior azTeenmagazine.com

“The freedom! It doesn’t feel like you’re being babysat like in high school, and school officials aren’t watching your every move. College is also nice because most of the professors treat you like adults and not as children.” – KELSEY AVERS,

San Francisco State University junior

“Other than the gradual knowledge and overall wisdom of being in college during some of the most important parts of your life, (I like) the networking. I got to meet a lot of people and do a lot of random traveling. It was really a positive experience.” – WESTLEY ELDREDGE, Brooks Institute ’10 “I love college because it affords me the opportunity to actually enjoy learning. I can take a broad selection of classes or focus on individual subjects. Most importantly, it is a gateway towards living a happy life; doing what I love instead of simply working to make money.I love college because it affords me the opportunity to actually enjoy learning. I can take a broad selection of classes or focus on individual subjects. Most importantly, it is a gateway to living a happy life – doing what I love instead of simply working to make money.” Talk to azTeena and your Last Word quote could appear in an upcoming issue! Email her by Aug. 10 at azTeena@azTeenMagazine.com and answer this question: What fashion trend do you wish would die already? Include your school and grad year, plus a pic.


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