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Filter Strip POLLUTANTS ADDRESSED: Heavy Metals, Nutrients and Organics, Pathogens, Salinity, Sediment

DESCRIPTION: A filter strip is a vegetation barrier between different types of land, such as crop lands, grazing lands, forested lands, and disturbed lands. The most common BMP for urban lakes in Arizona.

POTENTIAL TREATMENT AREAS: Agricultural lands Developed lands ALTERNATIVE MANAGEMENT MEASURES: Exotic removal Fencing Seeding

LOAD REDUCTION MECHANISM: Metal Reduction – Metals are absorbed by vegetation and microorganisms living in the filter strip. Nutrients/Organics Management – Nutrients are taken up by organisms living in the filter strip. Pathogen Reduction – Pathogens are filtered out of the water passing across the filter strip. Sediment Reduction – Filter strips stabilize sediments, preventing them from washing into streams. Salinity Reduction – Vegetation can take up dissolved salts.

PERMITTING REQUIREMENTS: Contact county regional flood control district.

LAND USE CLASSIFICATION: Agricultural lands Construction sites Mining areas Recreation areas ADDITIONAL BENEFITS: Vegetation provides a habitat for wildlife.

Arid Southwest BMP

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Filter Strip POLLUTANTS ADDRESSED: Heavy Metals, Nutrients and Organics, Pathogens, Salinity, Sediments

Level 200: ACTIVE MANAGEMENT LOAD REDUCTION POTENTIAL: LOW

MEDIUM

5. Consider using this practice to protect National Register listed or eligible (significant) archaeological and traditional cultural properties from potential damaging contaminants. 6. Filter strip size should be adjusted to a greater flow length to accommodate harvest and maintenance equipment. Riparian Planting Zone: Upland Zone and Flood flows.

HIGH

ESTIMATED TIME FOR LOAD REDUCTION: IMMEDIATE

MONTHS2 YEARS

> 2 YEARS

EXPECTED MAINTENANCE: LOW

MEDIUM

HIGH

ESTIMATED COST: LOW

MEDIUM

HIGH

PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION:

Photo courtesy Of ADEQ Streambank Stabilization Plan

1. Filter strips should be strategically located to reduce runoff, and increase infiltration and ground water recharge throughout the watershed. 2. Filter strips for the single purposes of wildlife/beneficial insect habitat or to enhance watershed function should be strategically located to intercept contaminants thereby enhancing the water quality of the watershed. 3. To avoid damage to the filter strip consider using vegetation that is somewhat tolerant to herbicides used in the upslope crop rotation. 4. Consider using this practice to enhance the conservation of declining species of wildlife, including those that are threatened or endangered.

Photo courtesy Of ADEQ Streambank Stabilization Plan

Arid Southwest BMP

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Filter Strip