Issuu on Google+

PRESENTING SPONSOR


S RP

SUP PLI E R

D I V E RSI T Y

WE DON’T BELIEVE IN BUSINESS AS USUAL. We’re looking for partners who feel the same. For more than 100 years, SRP has kept diversity at the forefront of all aspects of our business. When our business partners reflect our diverse community, everyone benefits. To learn more about becoming an SRP partner, visit srpnet.com/about/procurement/supplierdiversity.aspx.


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

WELCOME TO DATOS 2016

“The 20th anniversary of the DATOS publication is a testament to the long-standing and growing influence of the Arizona’s Latino community. SRP is proud to support this effort and the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s commitment to the economic vitality of Arizona for all Arizonans.” —MARK BONSALL, General Manager & CEO, Salt River Project

AZHCC Celebrates 20th Anniversary of DATOS: The State of Arizona’s Hispanic Market The number of Arizona Latinos has nearly doubled in the past 20 years. The population is also expected to become the state’s majority by the end of the next generation and one-fourth of the U.S. population by 2060. On the economic front, Latino-owned businesses in Arizona doubled between 2007 and 2015 and women now own the majority of Hispanic businesses statewide—making Latinas the fastest growing segment of small businesses in the state. By almost any measure, these trends are already having a major impact on the socio-economic makeup of our state, even as Arizona leaders consider how best to develop our future economy. For the last 20 years, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has been committed to furthering the state’s economic development by documenting and interpreting the impact of these trends in our comprehensive annual report, DATOS: The State of Arizona’s Hispanic Market. Since its inception in 1996, the DATOS report has served as a comprehensive and reliable source of fact-based information. It was created so policy leaders statewide would have the best data available to shape Arizona’s economic agenda. We understand that while it’s important to talk about the value of an inclusive society, it is imperative that we make that argument grounded in the type of well-researched data we have proudly provided to you in DATOS for over two decades. In addition to this year’s DATOS conference in Phoenix, we invite you to attend our Sixth Annual DATOS event in Tucson on Oct. 27; the Fifth Annual Business Diversity Summit on Nov. 15, where we will gather to discuss global trade trends and opportunities; and our 25th Annual Bud Shootout Golf Tournament on Dec. 9 (proceeds fund our college scholarship program aimed at growing the pool of Latino business, STEM and public policy graduates). Through the DATOS reports, eight other research publications and more than 50 other annual networking and training events, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has committed to serve as the state’s leading advocate for Hispanic consumers and business owners, all as part of a wider effort to promote Arizona’s future economic development and global competitiveness. Thank you for your support and for joining us to celebrate the 20th anniversary of DATOS: The State of Arizona’s Hispanic Market. Respectfully,

Gonzalo A.

de la Melena, Jr. President & CEO Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

DATO S

Yolanda France

Director, Customer Contact Operations Salt River Project (SRP)

A Z 1

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

EDITOR’S LETTER

Welcome to the 20th anniversary edition of DATOS: The State of Arizona’s Hispanic Market. Since 1996, DATOS has demonstrated the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s commitment to the research and distribution of timely and reputable market intelligence on the economic impact of Arizona Latinos. Today, we are proud to say that DATOS is the single most comprehensive compilation of secondary research on Arizona’s Hispanic consumers. In recent years, the Chamber has also branched out to produce primary research reports. As of 2012, we have released eight other publications, including the Minority Business Enterprise Report and three supplements on women-owned, family-owned and Hispanic-owned businesses. In 2013, we launched a white paper series exploring best practices on a range of topics, such as supplier diversity, employee resource groups and environmental sustainability. The Chamber’s white paper on global trade will be released at our Business Diversity Summit in November. All of the research we conduct is designed to inform and educate public policy and private industry leaders, not through emotional argumentation, but by presenting verifiable facts that weave the important story about Latinos thriving in Arizona and the countless ways we contribute to the entire state’s prosperity. The Chamber envisions expanding this work to cities nationwide via our chamber affiliates. The true narrative we are building and living is that Latinos are a driving economic force that is reshaping the American mainstream. In the four years I have been honored to serve the Chamber, I have collaborated with our amazing staff, interns and DATOS Committee to bring you reliable data you can use to make better informed business decisions. Without the help of these talented subject matter experts and the time they volunteer for this project, DATOS would not be as detailed, robust and well regarded. Looking back, we know the legacy of DATOS is far greater than any one person or committee. So we thank the publication’s visionary founders for having had the foresight to understand the needs of the market required a careful and comprehensive documentation of our community’s ongoing economic impact. To our readers and supporters, I am inspired by your enthusiasm to embrace DATOS year after year, and I promise the Chamber will continue to provide the best research available so together, we can create the best Arizona ever! ¡VIVA DATOS! ¡VIVA ARIZONA! Abrazos,

Mónica S. Villalobos

Vice-President, AZ Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Editor, DATOS: The State of Arizona’s Hispanic Chamber

DATO S

A Z 2

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 2016

DATOS 2016 CONTENT COMMITTEE (LISTED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER BY COMPANY/ORGANIZATION)

Christina Tellez

Marjorie DeRubeis

Jorge Luna

Eduardo Esparza

Edyta Koscielniak

Susana Lopez

Jerry Romo

Victor Holland

Luis R. Soto

Ruth Soberanes

Laura Fullington

AAA ARIZONA

COLLEGE SUCCESS ARIZONA COX COMMUNICATIONS

APOLLO EDUCATION GROUP

GEOSCAPE

ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS ARIZONA-MEXICO TRADE COMMISSION

Susan Carlson

MARICOPA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS

ARIZONA MINORITY EDUCATION POLICY ANALYSIS CENTER

Kerry Mitchell

Alberto Reyes-Olivas

MARICOPA COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

ASU CONGRESSMAN ED PASTOR FOR POLITICS & PUBLIC SERVICE

Andrea Whitsett

Eric Diaz

ASU MORRISON INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC POLICY

AZHCC

Melena, Jr.

PHOENIX INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY

Jessica Gonzalez

PHOENIX PUBLIC LIBRARY

James E. Garcia

Michele Valdovinos

Carmen G. Martínez

Yolanda France

SALT RIVER PROJECT (SRP)

AZHCC

Dr. Raquel Gutierrez

Monica S. Villalobos

VITALYST HEALTH FOUNDATION

Dr. Maria R. Chavira

AZHCC

Catherin Vargas

BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ARIZONA

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF PHOENIX

Marla Bauer

Jaime Boyd

James Montoya

Kevin Norgaard

BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ARIZONA

UNIVISION

WESTGROUP RESEARCH

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY EDUCATION CASE STUDY LEAD BY -

Dr. David Garcia

Associate Professor Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College Director of Research Arizona School Boards Association Arizona School Business Officials

GENERAL DEMOGRAPHICS LEAD BY -

Dr. Loui Olivas

Emeritus Professor Adjunct Faculty School of Transborder Studies

STUDENT RESEARCHERS

Carolina Aguirre Accountancy Major

Felipe Corral

Communications Major

Axel Martinez

Communications Major

Flor Uribe

Accountancy Major

UNIVISION

PRODUCTION TEAM Monica S. Villalobos Editor James E. Garcia Associate Editor Carmen G. Martínez Creative Director K aren Murphy Copy Editor/Proofreader Aurelio Herrera Intern/Research Analyst

Glenn Iwata

REPUBLIC MEDIA

AZHCC

CITY OF PHOENIX

VANTAGE WEST CREDIT UNION

Greg Fresquez

ALL FORTE BRAND CONSULTANTS

de la

VALLEY OF THE SUN UNITED WAY

Anabel Aportela

OYE! INTELLIGENCE

Melissa Gamez Gonzalo A.

MACERICH

Alana Chavez Langdon

VALLEY METRO

TERMINOLOGY AND RESEARCH

Miguel Angel Lopez Gonzalez Intern/Research Analyst Lisa Martinez Lopez Intern, Executive Services Paul Padilla Intern, Journalism Eric R ascon Lead Intern/Research Analyst Esteban Rodriguez Intern, Events

DATO S

A Z 3

In DATOS 2016, the terms Hispanic and Latino are used synonymously, as are Native American and American Indian and African-American and Black. White, nonHispanic is sometimes referred to as non-Hispanic white. Hispanics may be of any race. The information presented here was selected from standard secondary sources. However, data changes quickly and is not always collected annually. Data often offers a static picture of an ever-changing situation. The numbers calculated for any statistic depend on the definitions and assumptions used to produce them.

2 0 1 6


POWER YOUR BRAND WITH TV, RADIO, DIGITAL, AND SOCIAL. ALL UNDER ONE ROOF.


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER

HIGHLIGHTS

PAGE

7

1 2 3 4 5 6

PURCHASING POWER CONSUMER TECHNOLOGY LANGUAGE & MEDIA HEALTH BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

8 35 81 108 135 167

SECTION II: CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

7 8 9 10 11

POPULATION EDUCATION HOUSING IMMIGRATION TRADE WITH MEXICO

191 215 229 241 256

SECTION III: POLITICS

12 POLITICS

SECTION I: CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

RESOURCES

NOTES: • THIS IS A COMPREHENSIVE COMPILATION OF SECONDARY RESEARCH MADE AVAILABLE TO THE AZHCC FROM VARIOUS SOURCES. IT IS EITHER PUBLIC INFORMATION OR USED WITH PERMISSION FROM THOSE SOURCES. •

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS A SEARCHABLE PDF AND BY CLICKING CTL-F, A SEARCH BOX WILL APPEAR TO LOCATE ANY WORD OR PHRASE.

DATO S

A Z 5

268

322

For more information or any questions, please contact the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (AZHCC) at info@azhcc.com or 602-279-1800.

2 0 1 6


Building on a legacy of service The Pastor Center honors Congressman Ed Pastor and his service to Arizona and the nation. The Center serves as a dynamic, studentcentric hub of activity that promotes political engagement and public service among ASU students and the broader community. Your financial support will help the Center develop a new generation of leaders to take on the challenges facing our communities. asufoundation.org/pastorcenter


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

DATOS AZ 2016 HIGHLIGHTS

• There are more than 2.1 million Hispanics in Arizona, 30.3 percent of the total population. • The Hispanic population in Arizona tripled between 1990 and 2015 and is predicted to reach majority status by the end of the next generation. • There are more than 56 million Hispanics in the United States, 17 percent of the population. That figure could grow to nearly 120 million nationwide by 2060. • In February 2016, there were more than 625,000 Latino registered voters in Arizona, and 433,000 Hispanics are expected to vote on November 8. • Nationally, more than 13 million Latinos are expected to cast a ballot in November. • Hispanic purchasing power in Arizona is an estimated to reach $42.5 billion in 2016. (Earlier estimates indicated that it would reach $50 billion last year but were revised downward by the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth based on the state’s economic crash and a dramatic drop in net immigration to the state, particularly between Arizona and Mexico.) • Hispanic purchasing power nationwide was estimated at $1.5 trillion in 2015, roughly equivalent to the GDP of Australia, and forecast to grow to $2 trillion by 2020. • The number of Hispanic-owned businesses soared 70 percent from 52,667 to 89,673 between 2007 and 2012. Based on the compounded growth trend for that period, there are now estimated to be more than 123,000 Hispanic-owned firms in Arizona. • A majority of Hispanic-owned businesses in Arizona today (more than 66,000) are owned by Hispanic women, who are the fastest growing segment of small businesses nationwide. • Hispanic children will be a majority of all K-12 students in Arizona by 2020. • 25 percent of all children in the United States today are Hispanic, and 92.7 percent of Hispanic children in the country U.S. citizens. • Research by the National Center for Health Statistics show Latinos live longer than any other population group in the country, 81.2 years. • The percentage of U.S. Hispanics who are uninsured dropped from nearly 39 percent to 28 percent from 2013 to 2016, due to the improving economy and the passage of the Affordable Care Act. • In 2015, the rate of Hispanic homeownership in the U.S. grew from 44.5 percent to 46.7 percent. • Trade between Arizona and Mexico reached $18 billion in 2015.

DATO S

A Z 7

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR “The first DATOS focused on the Hispanic Market from a macro and micro perspective. It was produced at a time when information about population groups was limited and dated. We do know, thanks to the U.S. Bureau of Census, that in 1996 the U.S. Hispanic population was 30 million, with a purchasing power of $300 billion. Thanks to technological improvements such as real-time data reports provided by the Census and the growth of research, reports featuring Hispanics are now much more common. A plethora of resources to include research centers, institutes and corporate-driven initiatives are providing in-depth information about the growing Hispanic market. For the past 19 years, I’ve had the privilege of working with the staff of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and presenting features of the annual DATOS Report. The array of talented speakers have shared their expertise, insights and value about the fastest growing market in America—Hispanics. Our annual DATOS breakfast audience has grown from about 75 in 1996 to well over 1,000 this year, with each DATOS report providing a richer database and more siloed and comprehensive features about the nuances of the Hispanic consumer. I congratulate the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce for its leadership, commitment and dedication to producing an incredible annual DATOS report. No other Hispanic Chamber in America and/or research unit—private or public—produces produces a singular report capturing the multiple facets of the Hispanic Market.” DR. LOUI OLIVAS Emeritus Professor W.P. Carey School of Business Arizona State University Co-Founder, DATOS

DATO S

A Z 8

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

SECTION I

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR Distinct Characteristics Of Latino Consumer Reveal Growing Shopping Potential Some call it the rise of the ‘Hispanic Super Consumer.’

Hispanics now account for 1 of 5 new businesses across the country—a percentage that exceeds their representation in the population.

Hispanic consumers in the U.S. exhibit distinct characteristics that speak to an enormous potential behind the community’s purchasing clout.

The Hispanic community also has become a workforce powerhouse, accounting for 66 percent of the growth in the labor force between 2000 and 2015. And, despite having faced double-digit unemployment rates at the peak of the last recession, the Hispanic unemployment rate nationwide has dropped to 5.4 percent. Experts say Hispanics will account for 11 million out of the 14 million new positions created in the U.S. economy between 2016 and 2034.

Much of this Super Consumer quality is driven by the sheer population growth among U.S. Hispanics. In Arizona, for instance, the number of Hispanics tripled between 1990 and 2015 from about 700,000 to more than 2.1 million people—or more than 30 percent of the state’s population. Nationally, the Hispanic population will grow by more than 85 percent between now and 2050, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates. At the same time, the number of non-Hispanic whites will drop by about 40 percent.

These trends seem to be feeding relative optimism in the Latino community about the future of our nation’s economy. One recent study found that 81 percent of Hispanics versus 61 percent of the general public were optimistic about the future of the economy.

Couple this rapid Hispanic population growth with increases in educational attainment, growing average incomes and the parallel growth of the Hispanic middle class and it should be no surprise that Hispanic buying power is growing by leaps and bounds.

The future is also looking brighter to Latinos between 18 and 29. Fully 48 percent of them in 2015 said their future looks excellent or good, as compared to 21 percent who felt the same way in 2009.

U.S. Hispanic buying power grew to $1.5 trillion in 2015, the largest of any major minority group in the U.S. and a figure that is roughly equivalent to the gross domestic product of Australia. The buying power of Hispanics is expected to grow another 33 percent by 2020.

One key characteristic of so-called Latino Super Consumers is their longevity in the marketplace. Research by the National Center for Health Statistics shows Latinos live longer than any other population group in the country, 81.2 years for Hispanics as compared to 78.8 for non-Hispanic Whites and 75.1 years for Blacks. This statistic is interesting, given the prevalence of chronic diseases like diabetes and comparatively lower rates of health insurance in the community.

In Arizona, Hispanic buying power is increasing by about 2.2 billion per year, reaching approximately $42.5 billion this year. The annual growth rate is expected to continue to increase as the economy continues to improve. Hispanic entrepreneurship has helped fuel Latino buying power as well. In Arizona, between 2007 and 2015, the number of Latino-owned new businesses more than doubled to about 123,000 companies, while the rate of growth for businesses overall was just 2 percent in that same period. The number of businesses owned by Hispanic women in Arizona between 2007 and 2015 tripled to more than 66,000 firms, meaning Latinas are now the majority of Hispanic business owners in the state.

Why are Hispanics living longer than any other population in the United States? Researchers suggest it may all be in the genes. According to Steve Horvath, lead author of the study published recently in the Genome Biology, the DNA molecules in Hispanics age appear to age more slowly. Simply stated, while the pool of Hispanic Super Consumers is growing fast, it seems they’ll also be around longer than pretty much anyone else.

Nationwide, the number of Hispanic-owned businesses has doubled to 4.1 million companies since 2002 and

How’s that for a future market indicator?!

DATO S

A Z 9

2 0 1 6


Trusted. Community Minded. Forward Thinking. AAA Arizona is proud to support

the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and its commitment to Arizona’s future.


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Since 1990, U.S. Hispanic Purchasing Power Grew Exponentially From $21 Billion to $1.5 Trillion in 2015 U.S. Hispanic Purchasing Power from 1990-2015 (In Trillions)

(IN TRILLIONS)

1.5

1

0.49 0.21

1990

2000

2010

2015

Source: Statista www.statista.com/statistics/251438/hispanics-buying-power-in-the-us/ Source: Statista

http://www.statista.com/statistics/251438/hispanics-buying-power-in-the-us/

Hispanic Purchasing Power Is Expected To Increase 33% Hispanic Purchasing Power Is Expected To Increase 50% In The Next Five Years In The Next Five Years (In Trillions) (IN TRILLIONS) 2 1.5

2015

2020

Source: Statista | IBTimes http://www.statista.com/statistics/251438/hispanics-buying-power-in-the-us/ http://www.ibtimes.com/hispanic-buying-power-2015-what-donald-trump-mexican-controversy-tells-us-about-1994584

Source: Statista | IBTimes www.statista.com/statistics/251438/hispanics-buying-power-in-the-us/ www.ibtimes.com/hispanic-buying-power-2015-what-donald-trump-mexican-controversy-tells-us-about-1994584

DATO S

A Z 11

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 1

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Hispanics Lead Minority Hispanics Lead Minority Purchasing Power In 2015 Purchasing Power In 2015 (In Trillions) (IN TRILLIONS)

13.5

1.5 Total U.S. Purchasing Power

1.2

Hispanic

African-American

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth www.terry.uga.edu/news/releases/asians-hispanics-driving-u.s.-economy-forward-according-to-uga-study

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth www.terry.uga.edu/news/releases/asians-hispanics-driving-u.s.-economy-forward-according-to-uga-study

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 12

2 0 1 6

0.825 Asian


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Income Ranges By Ethnicity Income Ranges By Ethnicity

4.6%

3.7%

8.7%

7.8%

17.7%

9.2%

10.6%

16.0%

18.5%

14.4%

13.2%

12.0%

16.8%

14.7%

10.4%

$150,000 or more $100,000 to $149,999

18.3%

$75,000 to $99,999 $50,000 to $74,999

15.8%

$35,000 to $49,999 $25,000 to $34,999

13.1%

13.8%

$15,000 to $24,999 Less Than $15,000

7.1% 6.8%

22.3%

15.2%

9.5%

Hispanic

Black

Asian

Axis Title

Source: Geoscape, American Marketscape DataStream, 2016 geoscape.com/downloads/AMDS_ExecutiveSummary_2016_Print_Secured.pdf

Source: Geoscape, American Marketscape DataStream, 2016 http://geoscape.com/downloads/AMDS_ExecutiveSummary_2016_Print_Secured.pdf

U.S. Hispanic Sub-Groups U.S. Hispanic Sub-Groups Purchasing Power in 2015 Purchasing Power In 2015 (In Billions) (IN BILLIONS) 751

70 Cubans

143

117

117

South Americans

Central Americans

Puerto Ricans

Source: Latin Post

Mexicans

Source: Latin Post www.latinpost.com/articles/82555/20150928/hispanic-consumers-will-spend-1-3-trillion-in-2015-prompting-overall-economic-growth.htm www.latinpost.com/articles/82555/20150928/hispanic-consumers-will-spend-1-3-trillion-in-2015-prompting-overall-economic-growth.htm

DATO S

A Z 13

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Hispanic Households Have High Spending Power Hispanic Households Have High Spending Power Remaining Average Household Cumulative Life Spending

REMAINING AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD CUMULATIVE LIFE SPENDING $2,564,115 $2,173,629 $1,625,694

$1,408,748

Hispanic

Asian

Black

Non-Hispanic White

Source: Geoscape, American Marketscape DataStream, 2016 geoscape.com/downloads/AMDS_ExecutiveSummary_2016_Print_Secured.pdf Source: Geoscape, American Marketscape DataStream, 2016

http://geoscape.com/downloads/AMDS_ExecutiveSummary_2016_Print_Secured.pdf

Median Household Income By Ethnicity Median Household Income By Ethnicity

$75,910

$58,750

$55,080

$43,970 $36,280

Hispanic

White

Black

Asian

Source: Geoscape, American Marketscape DataStream, 2016 geoscape.com/downloads/AMDS_ExecutiveSummary_2016_Print_Secured.pdf

Source: Geoscape, American Marketscape DataStream, 2016 http://geoscape.com/downloads/AMDS_ExecutiveSummary_2016_Print_Secured.pdf

DATO S

A Z 14

2 0 1 6

Total


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Hispanic Category Buyers (IN PERCENTAGE) Hispanic Category Buyers (In Percentage)

58

Shampoo/Conditioner

55

Household Cleaners

54

Yogurt

66

Fresh Produce

64

Fresh Meat

56

Juice/Drinks

41

Chips/Snacks

35

Candy

56

Cereal Source: Latin Post www.latinpost.com/articles/82555/20150928/hispanic-consumers-will-spend-1-3-trillion-in-2015-prompting-overall-economic-growth.htm

Source: Latin Post www.latinpost.com/articles/82555/20150928/hispanic-consumers-will-spend-1-3-trillion-in-2015-prompting-overall-economic-growth.htm

Top Hispanic Consumer Top Hispanic Consumer Spending Categories Spending Categories

136

Beef

136

Poultry

128

Rice

126

122

Apparel

Flour

117

115

Fresh Fruits

Fresh Vegetables

111

Seafood

*Expenditure index compared to average American household

*Expenditure index compared to average American household

Source: Geoscape, American Marketscape DataStream, 2016 http://geoscape.com/downloads/AMDS_ExecutiveSummary_2016_Print_Secured.pdf

Source: Geoscape, American Marketscape DataStream, 2016 geoscape.com/downloads/AMDS_ExecutiveSummary_2016_Print_Secured.pdf

Index is a measurement of a consumer’s likelihood to engage in the target category. An index of 100 is par with the national average. Anything above 100 is above average, and the index is always comparing the target percentage to the base.

DATO S

A Z 15

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 1

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

NOTES

Hispanics Confident In Financial Future Of Children Hispanics Confident In Financial Future of Children

% of Latinos who say, in their lifetime, their children will be...financially

% OF LATINOS WHO SAY, IN THEIR LIFETIME, THEIR CHILDREN WILL BE...FINANCIALLY 7% 5%

16%

72%

Better Off

About The Same

Less Well Off

Unspecified

Source: PEW Research Center, Latinos Increasingly Confident In Personal Finances, June 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/06/08/latinos-increasingly-confident-in-personal-finances-see-better-economic-times-ahead/ Source: PEW Research Center, Latinos Increasingly Confident In Personal Finances, June 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/06/08/latinos-increasingly-confident-in-personal-finances-see-better-economic-times-ahead/

DATO S

A Z 16

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

More Than Half Of Hispanics Say More Than Half Of Hispanics Say Income Is Falling Behind The Cost Of Living Income Is Falling Behind The Cost Of Living % who say their family's income is...the price of living % WHO SAY THEIR FAMILY’S INCOME IS...THE COST OF LIVING

10%

7%

7%

37%

43%

41%

53%

49%

51%

Hispanic

White

Black

Falling Behind

Staying About Even With

Going Up Faster Than

Source: PEW Research Center, Latinos Increasingly Confident In Personal Finances, June 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/06/08/latinos-increasingly-confident-in-personal-finances-see-better-economic-times-ahead/

Source: PEW Research Center, Latinos Increasingly Confident In Personal Finances, June 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/06/08/latinos-increasingly-confident-in-personal-finances-see-better-economic-times-ahead/

Latinos 18-29 Years Old Have Seen TheLatinos 18-29 Years Old Have Seen The Greatest Improvement In Personal Finance Greatest Improvement In Personal Finance % of Latinos who say their financial situation is in "excellent" or "good" shape

% OF LATINOS WHO SAY THEIR FINANCIAL SITUATION IS IN “EXCELLENT” OR “GOOD” SHAPE

48% 40%

36%

21%

18-29

28%

26%

22%

30-49

50-64

2008

2015

Source: PEW Research Center, Latinos Increasingly Confident In Personal Finances, June 2016 www.pewhispanic.org/2016/06/08/latinos-increasingly-confident-in-personal-finances-see-better-economic-times-ahead/

Source: PEW Research Center, Latinos Increasingly Confident In Personal Finances, June 2016 http://www.pewhispanic.org/2016/06/08/latinos-increasingly-confident-in-personal-finances-see-better-economic-times-ahead/

DATO S

A Z

17

37%

2 0 1 6

65 and Older


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Most Of U.S. Hispanic Have You Millennials Who Shop At Shopped At Hispanic Stores Speak A Hispanic ost of U.S. Hispanic Millennials Who Shop At Hispanic Stores Speak Spanish or are Bilingual Spanish Or Are Bilingual Supermarket? (In Percentage) Have You Shopped At A Hispanic Supermarket? TOTAL U.S. HISPANIC MILLENNIALS

(IN PERCENTAGE)

Total U.S. Hispanic Millennials Responding "YES"

RESPONDING "YES"

39

98% 83%

61 45%

Yes

No

Spanish-Dominant

Bilingual

English-Dominant

Source: Nielsen Source: Nielsen http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/hispanic-millennials-seek-a-cultural-connection-at-grocery.html www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/hispanic-millennials-seek-a-cultural-connection-at-grocery.html

en.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/hispanic-millennials-seek-a-cultural-connection-at-grocery.html

Hispanic Millennial Category Buyers (IN PERCENTAGE)

Hispanic Millennial Category Buyers (In Percentage)

57

Shampoo/Conditioner

61

Household Cleaners

54

Yogurt Fresh Produce

67

Fresh Meat

67 56

Juice/Drinks

45

Chips/Snacks

39

Candy

46

Cereal Source: Latin Post www.latinpost.com/articles/82555/20150928/hispanic-consumers-will-spend-1-3-trillion-in-2015-prompting-overall-economic-growth.htm

Source: Latin Post http://www.latinpost.com/articles/82555/20150928/hispanic-consumers-will-spend-1-3-trillion-in-2015-prompting-overall-economic-growth.htm

DATO S

A Z

18

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 1

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

In 2015 Bilingual Hispanics Spent 20% In 2015 Hispanics Spent 20% of Their Purchasing Power Online of Their Purchasing Power Online Percentage of Buying Power Spent Online PERCENTAGE OF BUYING POWER SPENT ONLINE

20 17

Bilingual Bilingual Hispanics Hispanics

16

Americans All Americans

Non-Hispanics Non-Hispanics

Source: PRWeb

www.prweb.com/releases/2015/08/prweb12890935.htm Source: PRWeb http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/08/prweb12890935.htm

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 19

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 1

H I S P A N I C

EXCERPT

Source: www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/us-hispanics-are-super-mobile-super-consumers.html

DATO S

A Z 20

2 0 1 6

M A R K E T


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 1

H I S P A N I C

EXCERPT

Source: www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/us-hispanics-are-super-mobile-super-consumers.html

DATO S

A Z 21

2 0 1 6

M A R K E T


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

From 2014 To 2019 Arizona’s Hispanic From  2014  To  2019  Arizona’s   Hispanic   urchasing  Power  ITo s  P rojected   To  GBy row  B28% y  28% Purchasing Power Is PProjected Grow Buying  Power  By  Race/Ethnicity  1990-­‐2019 (Billions   of  dollars) –1990-2019 BUYING POWER BY RACE/ETHNICITY (BILLIONS OF DOLLARS)

18% Increase

60 50 40 30

172% Increase

20 10

120% Increase

49.2 38.3

32.4

14.7 5.4 0.7

0

28% Increase

7.2

11.7

8.3 5.8

6.6 5.1

2.5

13.0

9.2

7.0

1990

2000

2010

2014

2019

Hispanic

5.4

14.7

32.4

38.3

49.2

Asian

0.7

2.5

7.2

9.2

13.0

Black

1.2

2.9

6.6

8.3

11.7

American Indian

1.1

2.5

5.1

5.8

7.0

Hispanic

Asian

Black

American Indian

The Selig Center had previously predicted that Hispanic purchasing power in Arizona would grow 48 percent from 2010 to 2015 and reach $50 billion. But in its June 2014 report, Selig revised its calculations downward and now puts Hispanic purchasing power in Arizona at about $40.3 billion, while estimating growth of 28 percent between 2014 and 2019.

Source:  S elig  Center  for  Economic  Growth,  Terry  College  of  Business,  The  University  of  Georgia,  J une  2014.  

Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, June 2014.

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 22

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

The Shopping Spending Powers of Hispanics

$1.3 Billion

$203

SPENT BY PHOENIX HISPANICS ON CLOTHING & FOOTWEAR IN 2014

SPENT BY TUCSON HISPANICS ON CLOTHING & FOOTWEAR IN 2014

26

36

Million

SPENDING % OF IN PHOENIX

SPENDING % OF IN TUCSON

Source: IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix & Tucson DMA

Courtesy of

Amount Spent per Household on Clothing & Amount Spent per Household on Clothing & Footwear in Phoenix & Tucson 2014 Footwear in Phoenix & Tucson 2014 Hispanic

Non-Hispanic $848

Mens & Boys Clothing

+37% $1,302

$1,140 $186 $114

+14%

MORE SPENDING

Children under 2 Clothing

MORE SPENDING

$693 $423

$1,258 $1,089 $179

+66%

Footwear

MORE SPENDING

$403

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA IHS Global Insight 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending: Clothing & Footwear Total consumer dollars spending : Clothing & Footwear

+66%

MORE SPENDING

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 23

2 0 1 6

+16%

MORE SPENDING

MORE SPENDING

$108

$669

+64%

+39%

MORE SPENDING

$589

Women & Girls Clothing

+63%

Footwear

Non-Hispanic $819

Mens & Boys Clothing

MORE SPENDING

$618

Women & Girls Clothing

Children under 2 Clothing

Hispanic


CAREFREE. THAT’S HOW YOU WANT HER TO STAY.

There’s a way to always be there for your family. Whole life insurance can help protect them in the future while providing living benefits. And, even in turbulent times, it’s guaranteed to build cash value, which you can borrow from when your family needs it most.1 To learn how your family can benefit from whole life insurance, contact us today.

Jeffrey C. Dollarhide, CFP®, CLU®, CLTC General Agent MassMutual Arizona 17550 N. Perimeter Drive, Suite 450 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 480-538-2997 jdollarhide@financialguide.com www.arizona.massmutual.com

LIFE INSURANCE + RETIREMENT/401(K) PLAN SERVICES + DISABILITY INCOME INSURANCE + LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE + ANNUITIES

MassMutual Financial Group refers to Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. (MassMutual), its affiliated companies and sales representatives. Local sales agencies are not subsidiaries of MassMutual or its affiliated companies. Insurance products issued by MassMutual (Springfield, MA 01111) and its subsidiaries, C.M. Life Insurance Co. and MML Bay State Life Insurance Co. (Enfield, CT 06082). 1Access to cash value through borrowing or partial surrenders will reduce the policy’s cash value and death benefit, increase the chance of policy lapse, and may result in a tax liability. CRN201612-166620


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Top Malls & Shopping Centers For Phoenix Adults RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS WHO VISITED IN THE PAST 3 MONTHS MALL/SHOPPING CENTER

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

Any mall/shopping center past 3 months Arizona Mills Desert Sky Mall Chandler Fashion Center Tempe Marketplace Arrowhead Towne Center Christown Spectrum Mall Other shopping center or area Tanger Outlets Phoenix/Glendale Metrocenter Scottsdale Fashion Square Fiesta Mall Westgate City Center Arizona Center SanTan Village Phoenix Premium Outlets

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

90.8% 41.9% 22.9% 22.0% 19.6% 17.5% 15.5% 14.8% 12.4% 12.0% 11.3% 9.9% 9.6% 8.8% 7.4% 7.3%

#1 #27 #4 #3 #5 #14 #2 #11 #13 #7 #12 #16 #25 #6 #24

79.7% 19.7% 3.2% 17.4% 17.6% 15.8% 7.2% 18.7% 8.2% 7.4% 12.8% 7.7% 6.7% 4.0% 13.7% 4.7% Courtesy of

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+.

Top Malls & Shopping Centers For Tucson Adults RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS WHO VISITED IN PAST 3 MONTHS MALL/SHOPPING CENTER

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

Any mall/shopping center past 3 months Tucson Mall Park Place El Con Center Tucson Spectrum Foothills Mall Other shopping center or area Arizona Mills La Encantada Any Macerich Mall Crossroads Festival St. Phillip’s Plaza VF Outlet Oro Valley Marketplace The Mall at Sierra Vista Casas Adobes Plaza

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #8 #10 #11 #11 #13 #14 #15

89.1% 51.6% 43.9% 41.8% 35.6% 27.5% 18.8% 9.0% 8.7% 8.7% 7.9% 7.7% 7.7% 5.6% 3.0% 1.5%

#1 #2 #3 #11 #4 #5 #14 #6 #6 #10 #13 #15 #8 #12 #9

85.7% 44.8% 33.3% 31.7% 7.7% 29.6% 26.3% 3.7% 17.1% 17.1% 7.8% 6.1% 2.8% 10.2% 7.1% 8.9%

Source: Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+.

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 25

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Top Department Stores in Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS WHO VISITED IN PAST 3 MONTHS DEPARTMENT STORES

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

Any mall/shopping center past 3 months Walmart Fry’s - Fry’s Marketplace Target 99 Cents Only Stores Dollar Tree Costco Ross Dress For Less Amazon Goodwill Family Dollar Dollar General Kohl’s Burlington JCPenney Sam’s Club

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

98.2% 83.0% 70.9% 48.2% 46.5% 45.6% 42.2% 37.6% 34.2% 32.6% 30.6% 28.4% 27.3% 25.7% 24.2% 23.5%

#1 #2 #4 #6 #7 #3 #9 #5 #10 #19 #16 #8 #25 #11 #14

97.7% 81.5% 66.5% 47.1% 37.5% 35.1% 47.3% 27.9% 44.7% 26.5% 13.9% 17.6% 32.0% 7.1% 24.4% 19.8%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+. Courtesy of

Top Department Stores in Tucson RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS WHO VISITED IN PAST 3 MONTHS DEPARTMENT STORES

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

Any mall/shopping center past 3 months Walmart 99 Cents Only Stores Family Dollar Dollar Tree Target Costco Dollar General Ross Dress For Less JCPenney Amazon Kmart Burlington Best Buy Kohl’s Sears

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

97.7% 86.4% 55.6% 54.2% 53.6% 51.7% 45.3% 41.4% 40.0% 37.8% 25.0% 24.8% 23.7% 20.6% 19.4% 18.5%

#1 #5 #8 #6 #2 #3 #13 #9 #11 #4 #18 #23 #10 #7 #12

97.5% 77.8% 31.6% 23.5% 28.9% 53.3% 45.1% 17.9% 23.1% 19.9% 39.7% 16.3% 6.9% 22.2% 26.3% 18.1%

Source: Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+.

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 26

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Top Clothing Stores in Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS WHO BOUGHT IN PAST 3 MONTHS CLOTHING STORES

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

Any clothing store bought Walmart Ross Dress For Less Target Costco Kohl’s Burlington JCPenney Other store Old Navy Sam’s Club Macy’s Kmart Marshalls Victoria’s Secret Dillard’s

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

78.0% 51.0% 24.5% 24.2% 19.6% 19.4% 18.6% 16.2% 11.6% 11.4% 11.3% 11.0% 10.2% 9.9% 8.4% 7.6%

#1 #5 #2 #4 #3 #18 #7 #6 #11 #12 #9 #8 #15 #13 #10

74.1% 44.8% 15.5% 22.0% 19.7% 20.9% 3.0% 14.5% 14.8% 5.9% 5.8% 8.8% 9.1% 4.1% 5.5% 7.3%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+. Courtesy of

Top Clothing Stores in Tucson RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS WHO BOUGHT IN PAST 3 MONTHS CLOTHING STORES

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

Any clothing store bought Walmart JCPenney Target Ross Dress For Less Any thrift store (Goodwill, etc.) Old Navy Burlington Kmart Dillard’s Victoria’s Secret Kohl’s Other store Forever 21/Forever XXI Macy’s H&M

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #9 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

82.3% 62.5% 27.9% 27.1% 25.9% 22.1% 17.6% 15.9% 14.4% 10.9% 10.9% 9.7% 9.1% 8.9% 7.6% 7.5%

#1 #7 #2 #5 #3 #10 #15 #11 #8 #16 #4 #6 #17 #9 #19

71.7% 37.5% 10.8% 27.3% 14.5% 21.5% 7.8% 4.8% 6.7% 10.0% 4.4% 17.9% 12.9% 3.8% 9.3% 2.9%

Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+.

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 27

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

21% Of Hispanics Are 'True Foodies' Experian Simmons definition of “true foodies” segmentation: Passionate about food and spend a lot of time cooking at home. They prefer to buy organic food, want their ingredients fresh and buy environmentally friendly products. True Foodies tend to eat a variety of food, love to experiment with different cuisines and at the same time have adopted a healthy eating lifestyle. They have the most culinary expertise and have a love relationship with food.”

“I prefer food that is presented as an art form.”

Hispanics are 14% more likely than Non-Hispanics

Hispanics are 21% more likely than Non-Hispanics

Hispanics are 19% more likely than Non-Hispanics

“I especially look for organic or natural foods.”

“I’m usually first among my friends to try new food products.”

“I try to eat gourmet food whenever I can.”

“The kitchen is the most important room in my home.”

Hispanics are 21% more likely than Non-Hispanics

Hispanics are 18% more likely than Non-Hispanics

Source: Simmons NHCS, Winter 2016 (Feb 2015 – Mar 2016); Base: U.S. Adults 18+ Index compares % of Hispanics who agree vs. Total Population

Courtesy of

Her Kids Are Her Focus, Even When Shopping “ANY AGREE” AMONG WOMEN 18+ Her Kids Are Her Focus, Even When Shopping “Any Agree” Among Women 18+

I enjoy

I enjoy shopping with my children. 42%

I find it hard to resist my children’s requests for non-essential purchases.

30%

30% 22%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

My kids have significant impact on brands I choose.

24%

20%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Projected Percentage Change in Total, Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Buying Power for U.S., 2012-2017 Courtesy of

Source: Simmons NHCS,, Winter 2016 (Feb 2015 – Mar 2016); Base: U.S. Women 18+

DATO S

A Z 28

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Latina Moms Now Is The Time to Grab Their Attention PERCENT HISPANIC MOMS WHO AGREE

30

Remember advertised products when shopping

40

Feel respected when a company advertises in Spanish

% %

Source: Simmons NHCS,, Winter 2016 (Feb 2015 – Mar 2016); Base: U.S. Women 18+ who are parents Courtesy of

Hispanics Account For Almost 25% Of All “Food At Home” Spending in Phoenix

$2.3 Billion

SPENT BY PHOENIX HISPANICS ON “FOOD AT HOME” IN 2014

22

% OF ALL “FOOD AT HOME” SPENDING IN PHOENIX

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending: Food at Home Courtesy of

Phoenix Hispanic Households Spend More

Than Non-Hispanics on Groceries AVERAGE AMOUNT HOUSEHOLD SPENT ON GROCERIES IN 2014

$5,641

Phoenix Hispanic Households Spend More Than Non-Hispanics on Groceries

$5,145

+10% MORE

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Global Insight - 2016 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending: Food at Home Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 6

Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

29


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Hispanic Share of Consumer Spending: Phoenix

Hispanic Share of Consumer Spending: Phoenix Food at Home Non-alcoholic

$2.3 Billion

or 22.2% of the Total

$267 Million

Cereals

Bakery Products

$146 Million

$237 Million

Beef

$143 Million

or 22.3% of the Total

or 23.1% of the Total

or 20.1% of the Total

Pork

Poultry & Eggs

Fish & Seafood

Dairy Products

$91 Million

$239 Million or 27.6% of the Total

or 25.1% of the Total

$46 Million

$211 Million

Processed Fruits & Vegetables

Sugar and Sweets

Fats and Oils

Other Food Products

Alcohol at Home

$54 Million

$422 Million

$306 Million

or 24.3% of the Total

$84 Million

or 22.4% of the Total

$106 Million or 18.3% of the Total

or 22.0% of the Total

or 23.5% of the Total

or 19.1% of the Total

or 26.7% of the Total

Fresh Fruits & Vegetables

$295 Million or 24.2% of the Total

or 17.2% of the Total

Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending: Food at Home

Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

Courtesy of

Top Grocery Stores in Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ THAT SHOPPED FROM EACH GROCERY STORE IN THE LAST 7 DAYS HISPANIC RANK #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #19

GROCERY STORE SHOPPED LAST 7 DAYS

% OF HISPANIC

Fry’s - Fry’s Marketplace Walmart Supercenter Food City Costco Safeway Walmart Neighborhood Market Target/SuperTarget Sprouts Los Altos Ranch Market Sam’s Club Albertsons Bashas’ Fresh & Easy Trader Joe’s Other grocery store Other Hispanic grocery store WinCo Foods Smart & Final AJ’s Fine Foods Whole Foods Market

% OF NON-HISPANICS

67.8% 55.3% 41.7% 27.7% 27.5% 23.8% 20.3% 17.2% 16.9% 15.5% 10.8% 9.8% 9.0% 7.9% 6.9% 6.5% 5.6% 4.9% 1.8% 1.8%

68.1% 52.0% 11.8% 34.5% 38.3% 17.3% 16.2% 20.5% 2.5% 11.7% 15.4% 17.9% 4.0% 11.6% 8.2% 1.1% 9.0% 2.9% 5.1% 5.8%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 – Jan 2016), Phoenix, Adults 18+ Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 30

2 0 1 6

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL) 100 105 222 84 77 127 119 87 290 123 75 61 175 73 87 273 69 146 42 38


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Top Food Products In Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ THAT USED FOOD PRODUCTS IN THE LAST 7 DAYS HISPANIC RANK

FOOD PRODUCTS USED LAST 7 DAYS

% OF HISPANIC

% OF NON-HISPANICS

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1

Fresh meat

76.4%

70.2%

107

#2

Coffee

70.1%

61.1%

111

#3

Tortillas

67.2%

39.9%

145

#4

Packaged meat (bacon, hot dogs, etc.)

61.7%

61.7%

100

#5

Candy

49.8%

45.6%

107

#6

Ice cream, frozen juice bars, frozen yogurt

49.5%

49.1%

101

#6

Yogurt (not frozen)

49.5%

40.2%

117

#8

Ready-to-eat cereal

47.7%

51.1%

95

#9

Pretzels, chips, popcorn

44.2%

58.1%

81

#10

Salsa

38.4%

35.0%

107

#11

Nuts

33.2%

41.7%

84

#12

Soup (canned or dry mix)

30.8%

36.9%

87

#13

Any store brand food

30.7%

32.2%

96

#14

Prepared foods (chicken, salad bars, etc.)

24.4%

29.4%

87

#15

Frozen pizza

21.5%

24.8%

89

Source: Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2014 – Jan 2016), Phoenix, Adults 18+ Courtesy of

Hispanics Account For Almost One Third of All 'Food At Home' Spending in Tucson

$757 31 Million

%

OF ALL “FOOD AT HOME” SPENDING IN

SPENT BY TUCSON HISPANICS ON “FOOD AT HOME” IN 2014

TUCSON

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending: Food at Home Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 31

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 1

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Tucson Hispanic Households Spend More Than Tucson Hispanic Households Spend More Than Non-Hispanics on Groceries Non-Hispanics On Groceries AVERAGE AMOUNT HOUSEHOLDS SPENT ON GROCERIES IN 2014

$5,451

$4,931

+11% MORE

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending: Food at Home

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

Hispanic Share of Consumer Spending: Tucson Hispanic Share of Consumer Spending: Tucson Food at Home Non-alcoholic

$757 Million or 31.3% of the Total

Pork

$30 Million

$86 Million

Cereals

$47 Million

Bakery Products

$77 Million

or 31.5% of the Total

or 32.4% of the Total

or 28.7% of the Total

Poultry & Eggs

Fish & Seafood

Dairy Products

$77 Million

$15 Million

$68 Million

or 33.9% of the Total

or 37.8% of the Total

or 34.9% of the Total

or 31.1% of the Total

Processed Fruits & Vegetables

Sugar and Sweets

Fats and Oils

Other Food Products

$18 Million

$136 Million

$27 Million

or 31.6% of the Total

$34 Million

or 26.3% of the Total

or 32.9% of the Total

or 27.4% of the Total

Beef

$46 Million

or 36.8% of the Total

Fresh Fruits & Vegetables

$95 Million

or 33.8% of the Total

Alcohol at Home

$99 Million

or 24.8% of the Total

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending: Food at Home IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Food at Home

DATO S

Courtesy of

A Z 32

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 1

M A R K E T

PURCHASING POWER

Top Grocery Stores In Tucson RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ THAT SHOPPED FROM EACH GROCERY STORE IN THE LAST 7 DAYS

HISPANIC RANK #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18

GROCERY STORE SHOPPED LAST 7 DAYS

% OF HISPANIC

Walmart Supercenter Fry’s Food City Costco Walmart Neighborhood Market Safeway El Super Target/SuperTarget Albertsons Sprouts Other grocery store Sam’s Club Bashas’ Whole Foods Market Trader Joe’s Other Hispanic grocery store AJ’s Fine Foods Rincon Market

% OF NON-HISPANICS

53.9% 53.6% 40.9% 34.0% 30.5% 29.6% 16.6% 13.5% 10.9% 9.3% 8.3% 7.1% 6.3% 5.8% 4.3% 1.6% 1.2% 0.1%

37.9% 62.9% 11.1% 28.8% 24.7% 46.4% 1.5% 19.7% 16.1% 20.9% 9.4% 4.4% 7.9% 6.9% 15.1% 1.8% 2.8% 0.7%

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL) 125 90 195 112 115 73 256 77 76 55 92 134 86 89 37 94 54 19

Source: Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 – Jan 2016), Tucson, Adults 18+ Courtesy of

Top Food Products In Tucson RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ THAT USED FOOD PRODUCTS IN THE LAST 7 DAYS HISPANIC RANK

FOOD PRODUCTS USED LAST 7 DAYS

% OF HISPANIC

% OF NON-HISPANICS

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1

Fresh meat

75.3%

65.8%

109

#2

Tortillas

67.2%

42.9%

132

#3

Packaged meat (bacon, hot dogs, etc.)

66.4%

59.0%

108

#4

Coffee

66.2%

65.8%

100

#5

Ice cream, frozen juice bars, etc.

52.5%

54.3%

98

#6

Ready-to-eat cereal

49.7%

50.0%

100

#7

Candy

49.0%

45.9%

104

#8

Pretzels, chips, popcorn

45.1%

53.2%

89

#9

Salsa

41.9%

39.4%

104

#10

Yogurt (not frozen)

37.2%

46.0%

86

#11

Nuts

36.8%

45.3%

87

#12

Soup (canned or dry mix)

34.9%

34.7%

100

#13

Any store brand food

34.8%

31.6%

107

#14

Prepared foods (chicken, salad bars, etc.)

31.0%

30.1%

102

#15

Frozen pizza

20.6%

24.1%

90

Source: Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2014 – Jan 2016), Phoenix, Adults 18+ Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 33

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics Will Experience The Most Growth Among Multicultural Consumers Hispanics Will Experience The Most Growth Amongst Multicultural Consumers Growth in Population By Ethnicity

GROWTH IN POPULATION BY ETHNICITY 62.1%

42.6% 29.3% 17.6%

12.7%

14.7% 8.2%

5.0% Hispanic

Non-Hispanic White

African-American

2014

8.2%

4.3%

Asian-American

Other/2+ Races

2016

Source: Nielsen, The Multicultural Edge: Rising Super Consumers, March 2015 Source: Nielsen, The Multicultural Edge: Rising Super Consumers, March 2015 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/the-multicultural-edge-rising-super-consumers-march-2015.pdf http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/the-multicultural-edge-rising-super-consumers-march-2015.pdf

Share Of Population By Age Living In Multigenerational Family Households Share Of Population By Age Living In Multigenerational Family Households 42%

40% 35% 30% 25%

29%

24%

18%

18%

19%

17%

0-17

18%

19%

21%

14%

14%

Total

23%

21%

18-24

25-29

30-34

Total Population

35-44

45-54

Total Hispanic

Source: Nielsen, The Source: Nielsen, The New American Vanguard, October 2015 New American Vanguard, October 2015 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/hispanic-consumer-report-oct-2015.pdf http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/hispanic-consumer-report-oct-2015.pdf

DATO S

A Z 35

2 0 1 6

55-64

65+


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics Are 10 Years Younger Than The General Population With A Median Age Of 27 Hispanics Are 10 Years Younger Than The General Population With A Median Age Of 27 Research Tip General U.S. Population Median vs Average: The medianTip Research All Hispanics is the true Median vs. middle Average (or value in a Cubans Mean): The median set of data. isTherefore, the true middle value a set of unlikeinthe Guatemalans data. Therefore, mean, the unlike theis mean, median notmedian skewed is not the Puerto Ricans by outliers skewed by in the data. outliers in the

data.

37 27 40 (Oldest Hispanics) 27

Median Age

27 25

Mexicans

(Youngest Hispanics)

Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2010 ACS (1% IPUMS) and the 2000 Census (5% IPUMS) Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2010 ACS (1% IPUMS) and the 2000 Census (5% IPUMS) www.pewresearch.org/daily-number/median-age-for-hispanics-is-lower-than-median-age-for-total-u-s-population/ http://www.pewresearch.org/daily-number/median-age-for-hispanics-is-lower-than-median-age-for-total-u-s-population/

13

Older Hispanics Are Health Older Hispanics Are Health Conscious Consumers Conscious Consumers 138 118

135

130

112

U.S. Born Hispanic Boomers 50-64 U.S. Born

Hispanic Boomers 50-64

101

Foreign Born Hispanic Foreign BornBoomers 50-64 Hispanic Boomers 50-64

108

U.S. Hispanic Greatest Generation U.S. Born Hispanic 65+ Greatest Generation 65+

I Don’t Allow Junk Food in My Home

132

Foreign Born Hispanic Foreign BornGreatest Generation 65+ 65+ Greatest Generation

I Regularly Eat Organic Foods *Hispanic Index versus WhiteAdults Adults *Hispanic Index versusNon-Hispanic non-Hispanic White

Source: Nielsen, Strong Influence and Cultural Ties Drive Older Hispanics’ Food Buying Behaviors, December 2015 Source: Nielsen, Strong Influence and Cultural Ties Drive Older Hispanics’ Food Buying Behaviors, December 2015 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/strong-influence-and-cultural-ties-drive-older-hispanics-food-buying-behaviors.html http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/strong-influence-and-cultural-ties-drive-older-hispanics-food-buying-behaviors.html

DATO S

A Z 36

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Aging Hispanics Have Preference For Name Brands Hispanics Have A Preference For Name Brands Annual Number of Category/Department Purchases

ANNUAL NUMBER OF CATEGORY/DEPARTMENT PURCHASES 141 106

106

60

Total Hispanics

121

118

75

63

Total Non-Hispanic White

Hispanic Greatest Generation

Brand

70

Non-Hispanic White Greatest Generation

67

Hispanic Boomers

Store Brand

Source: Nielsen, Strong Influence and Cultural Ties Drive Older Hispanics’ Food Buying Behaviors, December 2015 Source: Nielsen, Strong Influence and Cultural Ties Drive Older Hispanics’ Food Buying Behaviors, December 2015 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/strong-influence-and-cultural-ties-drive-older-hispanics-food-buying-behaviors.html http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/strong-influence-and-cultural-ties-drive-older-hispanics-food-buying-behaviors.html

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 37

116

2 0 1 6

67

Non-Hispanic White Boomers


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

EXCERPT

THE NEW AMERICAN VANGUARD L ATINOS 50+: HEALTHY, WEALTHY AND WISE 2015 REPORT

DIVERSE INTELLIGENCE SERIES Source: www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2015/the-new-american-vanguard-latinos-50-are-healthy-wealthy-and-wise.html

DATO S

A Z 38

2 0 1 6

M A R K E T


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

FOREWORD The New American Vanguard, Latinos 50+ report explores how the consumption habits of older Hispanics are poised to change the outlook on what it means to live in the “golden years.” Hispanic Baby Boomer (50-64) and Greatest Generation (65+) consumers are redefining retirement by living and working longer, establishing increased wealth potential and bearing the torch as the cultural matriarchs in their families and communities. While younger Hispanics are commanding wide-spread attention, it’s actually older Hispanics who are leading the way, extending a strong cultural influence over their families and their communities at large. At 11 million strong, Hispanics 50+ represent 10% of the total population and are expected to reach 42 million or 24% by 2060, according to the U.S. Census. As more than half of U.S. Hispanics 50+ are foreign born, a strong connection and affinity for Spanish- and Latino-influenced consumer behaviors will continue to drive purchasing behaviors well into the future, representing an opportunity for marketers to cultivate deep relationships with this growing segment. As the vanguard of their families, older Hispanics play a vital role in their multigenerational households—acclimating to their American identities, while also preserving their cultural heritage and traditions for future generations. Many older Hispanics today are experiencing a role-reversal of sorts. They are often the main decision makers in the home, exerting a heavy influence on the purchasing behaviors and media consumption of family members of all ages. They will also influence the outcome of the 2016 presidential election. In the 2012 election, 60% of eligible Latinos who were 65 and older voted—the highest voter turnout percentage of all Hispanic adults. The rise in the percentage of 50+ Hispanic voters, along with the increasing diversity of candidates representing both political parties, will ensure that race and ethnicity will continue to play a pivotal role in future U.S. elections. This report is part of Nielsen’s Diverse Intelligence Series—a collection of reports that focus solely on multicultural consumers’ unique consumption and purchasing habits. We would like to thank the members of Nielsen’s External Hispanic/Latino Advisory Council, and in particular the Report Subcommittee: Luis Miranda, Jr., President, The MirRam Group, LLC (Council co-chair); Lillian Rodriguez-Lopez, Director, Latin Affairs, The Coca-Cola Company; and Suzanna Valdez, Vice President, The Arsht Center Foundation. All made important contributions to this report. Additional insights on life reimagined after retirement and the role older Hispanics play as stewards of cultural sustainability were also graciously provided by Angela Houghton, Monica Cortes-Torres and Beth Finkel at AARP. We are also grateful to the Hispanic Federation for their aid in disseminating this report to leaders in Hispanic communities across the U.S. We believe this, our third report on Hispanic consumers in the U.S., offers a unique perspective on a growing segment of the population.

Mónica Gil Saul Rosenberg

SVP & General Manager, Multicultural Growth and Strategy

2

Chief Content Officer

THE NEW AMERICAN VANGUARD – LATINOS 50+: HEALTHY, WEALTHY AND WISE

Source: www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2015/the-new-american-vanguard-latinos-50-are-healthy-wealthy-and-wise.html

DATO S

A Z 39

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY True pioneers, Latinos 50+ were among the first Latinos to enroll in college, the forerunners of a diverse U.S. military, and laid the entrepreneurial groundwork for the booming economic force that the Latino consumer group represents in the U.S. today. Ganas, their drive, determination and commitment to building a better life in the U.S. and making a difference in their communities, serves as an inspiration across Latino generations. We frequently hear about Latino youth and Millennials, but the original innovators and unsung influencers of this immense marketplace are the 50+ age segment. Hispanics 50+ are a fast-growing group in an increasingly multicultural society. They continue to upend outdated stereotypes about aging and retirement while taking the lead in multi-ethnic families and U.S. society by embodying and sustaining Latino values in an increasingly diverse American mainstream. Hispanics 50+ are influential heads of extended families with significant consumer purchasing power, and they are poised to play an increasingly important role in shaping U.S. society.

3

Copyright Š 2015 The Nielsen Company Source: www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2015/the-new-american-vanguard-latinos-50-are-healthy-wealthy-and-wise.html

DATO S

A Z 40

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

'My Cultural/Ethnic Heritage Is “My Cultural/Ethnic Heritage Is An Important Part of Who I Am” An Important Part of Who I Am' 78% 71%

African-American

Hispanic

61%

60%

Asian-American

Non-Hispanic White

Source: Nielsen, The Multicultural Edge: Rising Super Consumers, March 2015 http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/the-multicultural-edge-rising-super-consumers-march-2015.pdf

Source: Nielsen, The Multicultural Edge: Rising Super Consumers, March 2015 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/the-multicultural-edge-rising-super-consumers-march-2015.pdf

'I Expect The Brands I Buy To Support Social Causes' “I Expect The Brands I Buy To Support Social Causes”

43% 39%

38% 34%

Hispanic

African-American

Asian-American

Non-Hispanic White

Source: Nielsen, The Multicultural Edge: Rising Super Consumers, March 2015 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/the-multicultural-edge-rising-super-consumers-march-2015.pdf Source: Nielsen, The Multicultural Edge: Rising Super Consumers, March 2015 http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/the-multicultural-edge-rising-super-consumers-march-2015.pdf

DATO S

A Z

41

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY

Henkel Consumer Goods, Inc. CASE STUDY SCHWARZKOPF AND GÖT2B: UNDERSTANDING AND ENGAGING THE DIGITAL HISPANIC CONSUMER BRIEF:

In July 2015, Henkel Consumer Goods, Inc. (Henkel) came to Nativa Multicultural Communications, their Hispanic Agency of Record, to create a robust Hispanic marketing strategy for several of their hair brands including Schwarzkopf and göt2b. Henkel Corporation, with their U.S. consumer goods division located in Scottsdale, AZ and a long and successful tenure marketing hair products and other personal care, laundry and home care brands, recognized that a strong commitment to the Hispanic community is important to the manufacturer’s continued growth and success. The global company wanted to avoid the typical Hispanic marketing missteps that consumer packaged goods (CPG) brands commonly take such as the ‘put a sombrero on it’ approach or assuming that all Hispanics speak Spanish. Instead, the savvy company insisted on a data-focused, authentic approach to engaging consumers in an organic and meaningful way.

APPROACH:

Henkel took a four pronged approach to engaging the Hispanic audience. 1. OYE! technology, which is a proprietary social listening platform offered through the Nativa agency, was used to set a benchmark at project kickoff so that each brand could find where they currently stood in regards to online conversation among consumers. These same parameters monitor Hispanic online conversation daily to see how Henkel Hispanic marketing activities influence overarching goals including Share of Voice, sentiment and more. 2. OYE!’s Nimble Response product was used to track daily Hispanic influencer interactions. The OYE! platform listened in English, Spanish and Spanglish through Instagram and Twitter to find opportunities to surprise and delight influential nationwide Latinos who took to social media to mention having a bad hair day, being bored with their hair, or having any general hair issue. This allowed the two brands to have a chance to brighten these consumers’ days by sending them a branded care package full of product and fun ideas for Schwarzkopf/göt2b inspired styles.

3. Henkel knew that communicating effectively with Hispanics meant that not all content needs to be in Spanish and that the emphasis should be on the culture. Henkel worked with Nativa to provide content that would be relevant to Hispanic consumers, no matter their language preference. 4. Finally, Henkel worked with their agency to create ads that would resonate with Hispanics who trend millennial as well as mobile primarily through Instagram and Facebook mobile ads.

RESULTS:

Based on the marketing data insights and observations that were found during the benchmark period of the online listening process, Nativa was able to make recommendations aimed at improving engagement between the online Hispanic community and Henkel hair brands. As a result, Henkel came up with a strategic Hispanic approach to create content that was relevant and interesting to its potential customers that focused on providing an authentic voice that everyday Hispanic consumers would relate with. The result is that Hispanics are able to engage with each brand, regardless of the language they speak. With efficiency in mind, it was also determined that there was no need to create a separate Spanish language digital channel as Hispanics could be effectively targeted using the existing general market channels. Content, including dark posts on a monthly basis, has been shared/liked heavily at low costs due to this strategy compared to similar general market campaigns. Results attained in first 2 months of the Henkel Hispanic initiative

1. In the first 60 days of the Nimble Response program, over 100 user-generated content (UGC) posts have been created by Henkel fans, accounting for 27,000+ consumer engagements and 150,000+ total possible impressions. 2. One user generated Instagram video post from a 19-yearold aspiring singer / college student from California has generated over 25,000 engagements on its own.

DATO S

A Z 42

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY

HENKEL CONSUMER GOODS, INC.

3. 49% of all social media users that have received branded care packages have created user generated content posts for the brand. Many consumers post multiple times for the brand which has led to an average of 1.5 posts per care package. 4. In the first 60 days of Hispanic focused content created on Henkel social channels, the brands have achieved

a reach of over 295,000 consumers at a low cost that is roughly 10% of the cost the brand experiences on general market content. 5. An English language post about visiting the beach which targeted acculturated U.S. Hispanics had a reach of nearly 30,000 Hispanic consumers and achieved the lowest cost per engagement experienced by the brand.

Figure 3: The importance of the hand-written note is a key factor in obtaining user generated posts for the global brand.

Figure 1: A product use video from this fan generated over 25,000 engagements in a two-day period.

Figure 4: This post on instagram was able to resonate with the Hispanic target market as evidenced by more than 6,000 engagements.

Figure 2: A Facebook Live ‘unboxing’ video is a typical user generated post from the social influencers that champion Henkel products online.

DATO S

A Z 43

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics In Phoenix Are Huge Sports Fans Hispanics in Phoenix Are Huge Sports Fans Men Ages 18-49 MEN AGES 18-49 % Interest Among Sports Fans* (sorted by Hispanic %) % INTEREST AMONG SPORTS FANS* (SORTED BY HISPANIC %)

62% 63%

NFL UFC

43%

21%

MLB

39%

23%

NBA LMX MLS

30% 26%

7%

25%

8% 12%

NHL

36%

Hispanic

17%

Non-Hispanic

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Men 18-49; *Base: Sports Fans defined by somewhat/very interested in MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, MLS

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Men 18-49; Base: Sports Fans defined by somewhat/very interested in MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, MLS

Courtesy of

Hispanics in Tucson Are Huge Sports Fans Hispanics In Tucson Are Huge Sports Fans

Men Ages 18-49

% Interest Among Sports Fans* (sorted by Hispanic %) MEN AGES 18-49

% INTEREST AMONG SPORTS FANS* (SORTED BY HISPANIC %)

53%

NFL

35% 37%

NBA UFC

21% 21%

MLB

NHL

34%

14% 11%

MLS LMX

27%

6%

13% 10%

15%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Tucson Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Men 18-49; *Base: Sports Fans defined by somewhat/very interested in MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, MLS Source: Tucson Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Men 18-49;

Base: Sports Fans defined by somewhat/very interested in MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, MLS

DATO S

A Z 45

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of

60%


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Live Sports Attendance Among Phoenix Hispanics MEN AGES 18-49 SPORTS: ATTENDED 1+ GAMES - PAST YEAR

SPORTS: ATTENDED IN THE PAST YEAR

% OF HISPANIC MEN 18-49 SPORTS FANS

Any professional sports event

47%

Major League Baseball (MLB) National Basketball Assoc (NBA)

34%

National Football League (NFL)

28%

Mexican League Soccer (LigaMX)

15%

National Hockey League (NHL)

15%

Major League Soccer (MLS)

14%

% OF HISPANIC MEN 18-49 SPORTS FANS

#1 - Arizona Diamondbacks baseball game #2 - Phoenix Suns basketball game #3 - Arizona Cardinals football game #4 - Phoenix Mercury women’s basketball game #5 - High school sports event #6 - Arizona State University football game #6 - WWE (pro wrestling) #6 - Arizona Coyotes hockey game

66% 38% 24% 13% 10% 8% 5% 5% 5%

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanic Men 18-49; Base: Sports Fans defined by somewhat/very interested in MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, MLS Courtesy of

Live Sports Attendance Among Tucson Hispanics MEN AGES 18-49 SPORTS: ATTENDED 1+ GAMES - PAST YEAR

SPORTS: ATTENDED IN THE PAST YEAR

% OF HISPANIC MEN 18-49 SPORTS FANS

% OF HISPANIC MEN 18-49 SPORTS FANS

National Football League (NFL)

27%

Any professional sports event

32%

Mexican League Soccer (LigaMX)

20%

#1 - High school sports event

25%

Major League Soccer (MLS)

17%

#2 - University of Arizona football game

17%

Major League Baseball (MLB)

16%

#3 - University of Arizona men’s basketball game

14%

National Hockey League (NHL)

13%

#4 - Arizona Diamondbacks baseball game

10%

National Basketball Assoc (NBA)

12%

#5 - University of Arizona baseball game

8%

Source: Tucson Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanic Men 18-49; Base: Sports Fans defined by somewhat/very interested in MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, MLS

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 46

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics Are Active Casino Visitors

379,000

Hispanic Adults 21+

148,000

Hispanic Adults 21+

VISITED A PHOENIX CASINO IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS

VISITED A TUCSON CASINO IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS Courtesy of

Hispanics In Phoenix Take Advantage Of Casino Entertainment Slot Machines

Stage Show/Concert

Bar/Nightclub

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

77

%

NON-HISPANICS 70%

20

%

27

%

NON-HISPANICS 24%

NON-HISPANICS 18%

Upscale Restaurant

Table Games

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

25

%

19

%

NON-HISPANICS 27%

NON-HISPANICS 25%

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Base: Adults 21+ who visited any casino in past year

DATO S

A Z 47

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics In Tucson Take Advantage Of Casino Entertainment Slot Machines

Stage Show/Concert

Bar/Nightclub

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

80

33

%

%

NON-HISPANICS 69%

32

%

NON-HISPANICS 23%

NON-HISPANICS 32%

Upscale Restaurant

Table Games

HISPANICS

HISPANICS

40

%

11

%

NON-HISPANICS 15%

NON-HISPANICS 23%

Source: Tucson Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Base: Adults 21+ who visited any casino in past year Courtesy of

Casinos Phoenix Casinos Visited in the Last Year Visited In The Last Year (Among Casino Patrons 21+, sorted by Hispanic % )

(AMONG CASINO PATRONS 21+, SORTED BY HISPANIC % ) 38%

31% 28% 25%

24%

22%

23%

22%

20%

18%

11%

19%

18%

16%

15%

13%

12%

12%

15% 12% 10% 6% 3%

Casino Arizona

Wild Horse Pass Casino

Lone Butte Casino

Vee Quiva Casino

Talking Stick Other casino Harrah's Ak- Other casino Fort McDowell Resort & in Arizona Chin Casino Casino Casino

Hispanic

1%

Cliff Castle Casino

Mazatzal Hotel & Casino

Non-Hispanic

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 21+ Who Visited Any Casino in the Past 12 Months Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 21+ Who Visited Any Casino in the Past 12 Months

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 48

2 0 1 6

Any Las Vegas Casino


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Tucson Casinos Visited In The Last Year Tucson Casinos Visited in the Last Year

(AMONG(Among Casino Patrons 21+, sorted by Hispanic % ) CASINO PATRONS 21+, SORTED BY HISPANIC % ) 76% 64% 57% 47%

52% 38% 24% 12% 1%

Casino Del Sol

Desert Diamond Casino (Tucson)

Desert Diamond Casino (Sahuarita)

Hispanic

Other casino

Apache Gold Casino

Non-Hispanic

Source: Tucson Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 21+ Who Visited Any Casino in the Past 12 Months

Courtesy of

Source: Tucson Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 21+ Who Visited Any Casino in the Past 12 Months

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 49

2 0 1 6

3%


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

TYPES OF LOTTERY TICKETS PURCHASED: (AMONG THOSE WHO HAVE BOUGHT ANY LOTTERY TICKET IN THE PAST 30 DAYS)

69

% SCRATCH-OFF TICKETS

42

%

(55% for NH)

74 % 43 %

OF PHOENIX HISPANICS PURCHASE LOTTERY TICKETS

Sources: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Phoenix DMA; Base: Adults 21+ and Adults 21+ who purchased a lottery ticket in the past 30 days

POWERBALL TICKETS (69% for NH)

OTHER TICKETS (44% for NH)

Courtesy of

TYPES OF LOTTERY TICKETS PURCHASED: (AMONG THOSE WHO HAVE BOUGHT ANY LOTTERY TICKET IN THE PAST 30 DAYS)

67

% SCRATCH-OFF TICKETS

52

%

73 % 27 %

OF TUCSON HISPANICS PURCHASE LOTTERY TICKETS

Sources: Tucson Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Tucson DMA; Base: Adults 21+ and Adults 21+ who purchased a lottery ticket in the past 30 days

(56% for NH)

POWERBALL TICKETS (74% for NH)

OTHER TICKETS (43% for NH)

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 50

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Phoenix Hispanics Fueling Theme Park Attendance Growth

43

%

OF PHOENIX HISPANIC ADULTS WITH KIDS VISITED A THEME PARK LAST YEAR (Compared to 38% of Non-Hispanics with Kids) Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Base: Adults 18-+ with 1+ kids under 18 Courtesy of

Tucson Hispanics Fueling Theme Park Attendance Growth

31

%

OF TUCSON HISPANIC ADULTS WITH KIDS VISITED A THEME PARK LAST YEAR (Compared to 20% of Non-Hispanics with Kids) Source: Tucson Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Base: Adults 18+ with 1+ kids under 18 Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 51

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Phoenix Hispanics Over-Index With Local Theme Park/Water Park Visitation THEME/WATERZ PARK VISITED IN THE PAST YEAR % PHOENIX HISPANICS

% PHOENIX NON-HISPANICS

Castles & Coasters

12.4%

6.9%

Wet ‘n’ Wild

10.3%

9.5%

Other Theme Park

14.5%

10.1%

THEME PARKS

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Base: Adults 18-+ with 1+ kids under 18 Courtesy of

Hispanics Are Big Fans of Cinema PHOENIX

TUCSON

HISPANICS SPENT

HISPANICS SPENT

49 Million

16 Million

$

$

ON MOTION PICTURE ADMISSIONS IN 2014 (That’s 22% of the total spent on Movie Admissions)

ON MOTION PICTURE ADMISSIONS IN 2014 (That’s 32% of the total spent on Movie Admissions)

Source: IHS Global Insight Hispanic Market Report, 2015, Phoenix & Tucson DMA

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 52

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Phoenix Hispanics Have Influence At The Movie Theater Cash Register

74

MORE LIKELY TO SEE A MOVIE OPENING WEEKEND

39

MORE LIKELY TO GO TO MOVIES 4+ TIMES/MONTH

%

(17.1% of Hispanics vs. 9.8% of Total)

%

(5.4% of Hispanics vs. 3.9% of Total)

Source: Phoenix Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Base: Adults 18+ Courtesy of

Tucson Hispanics Have Influence At The Movie Theater Cash Register

47

%

MORE LIKELY TO SEE A MOVIE OPENING WEEKEND

(17.7% of Hispanics vs. 9.8% of Total)

5

%

MORE LIKELY TO GO TO MOVIES 4+ TIMES/MONTH

(2.9% of Hispanics vs. 2.8% of Total) Source: Tucson Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Base: Adults 18+ Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 53

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics Accounted For 17% Of All New Vehicle Spending In Phoenix (1Q 2016) PHOENIX HISPANICS SPENT

$270.8M ON NEW AUTOMOBILE PURCHASES IN 1Q 2016

Source: Amount spent based on 2016 MSRP and new Hispanic unit sales; RL Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 1Q 2016 CYTD

Courtesy of

The Phoenix Consumer Is Viable And Dynamic

HISPANICS SPEND AT PAR

$27,900 AVERAGE MSRP PAID VS. $30,800 TOTAL MARKET

Source: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk New Vehicle Personal Retail Registrations (Sales and Leases), 1Q CY16, Phoenix. Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 54

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

68% of Vehicles Owned By Hispanics In Phoenix Are 2001 Models Or Newer 68% of Vehicles Owned By Hispanics In Phoenix Are 2001 Models Or Newer 3%

3%

18%

19%

29%

28% 81-'90 1981-1990

Hispanic

91-'00 1991-2000

Total

01-'10 2001-2010 11-'17 2011-2017

49% 50% Sources: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk, Vehicles In Operation (VIO), Personal Registrations, Enhanced Ethnic Data, VIN Years: 1981-2017; As of April 2016, Phoenix DMA

Courtesy of

Sources: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk, Vehicles In Operation (VIO), Personal Registrations, Enhanced Ethnic Data, VIN Years: 1981-2017; As of April 2016, Phoenix DMA

Phoenix Hispanics Are Rolling

1M

VEHICLES IN OPERATION ARE OWNED BY PHOENIX HISPANICS, REPRESENTING 27% OF TOTAL MARKET Sources: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk, Vehicles In Operation (VIO), Personal Registrations, Enhanced Ethnic Data, VIN Years: 1981-2017; As of April 2016, Phoenix DMA

DATO S

A Z 55

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Without Hispanics, Total New Auto Sales Would Be Down In Phoenix Without Hispanics, Total New Auto Sales Would Be Down In Phoenix % Change in New Vehicle Unit Sales Year over Year % CHANGE IN NEW VEHICLE UNIT SALES YEAR OVER YEAR Total

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

5.0%

1.0%

-1.0% Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, May 2016 CYTD (Jan-May16 & Jan-May15), Phoenix DMA

Courtesy of

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, May 2016 CYTD (Jan-May16 & Jan-May15), Phoenix DMA.

Since 2014, Share of New Total Car Sales To Since 2014, Share of New Total Car Sales To Hispanics Has Grown By 2.3 points Hispanics Has Grown By 2.3 points

16.6%

18.9%

17.9%

2014

2015

2016

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, MAY CYTD (Jan-May14, Jan-May15 & Jan-May16), Phoenix DMA

Courtesy of

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, MAY CYTD (Jan-May14, Jan-May15 & Jan-May16), Phoenix DMA.

DATO S

A Z 56

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

PHOENIX TOTAL

PHOENIX HISPANIC

BRAND RANKER

BRAND RANKER

RANK

BRAND

S0M

RANK

BRAND

S0M

#1

14.3%

#1

16.2%

#2

10.7%

#2

15.3%

#3

10.2%

#3

15.2%

#4

9.9%

#4

10.0%

#5

9.7%

#5

8.0%

#6

5.4%

#6

5.0%

#7

5.1%

#7t

4.7%

#8

5.0%

#7t

4.7%

#9

3.3%

#9

3.9%

#10

3.1%

#10

3.1%

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, May 2016 CYTD (Jan’16-May’16), Phoenix DMA

Courtesy of

CUV/SUV Consistently Top Segment Phoenix Hispanics CUV/SUV Consistently SEGMENT SHARE AMONG PHOENIX HISPANICS: 2014-2016 CYTD (MAY) Top Segment Phoenix Hispanics

25.1% 23.8% 21.3% 15.1%

29.2%

28.1% 23.2%

22.7%

20.5%

18.8% 16.8%

15.6%

COMPACT

COMPACT FULL/MIDSIZE FULL/MID-SIZE PICKUP PICK-UP

8.1%

6.4%

SUB-COMPACT SUBCOMPACT

6.1% 2014

CUV/SUV CUV/SUV

2015

2016

Source: Polk, New Vehicle Personal Registrations (Sales & Leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYTD (Jan-May); Phoenix (Prescott) DMA; Note: Segments include Non-Luxury and Luxury models

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of

Source: Polk, New Vehicle Personal Registrations (Sales & leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYTD (Jan-May); Phoenix (Prescott) DMA; Note segments include Non-Luxury and Luxury models

57


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Top 10 Models by Segment: 2016 CYTD RANKED BY MODEL SALES TO PHOENIX HISPANICS RANK

CUV/SUV

COMPACT

FULL/MIDSIZE

PICKUP

SUBCOMPACT

#1

NISSAN ROGUE

NISSAN SENTRA

NISSAN ALTIMA

CHEVY SILVERADO 150/1500

NISSAN VERSA

#2

TOYOTA RAV4

HONDA CIVIC

HONDA ACCORD

RAM 150/1500

TOYOTA SCION

#3

KIA SOUL

TOYOTA COROLLA

CHEVY MALIBU

FORD F-150

CHEVY SONIC

#4

JEEP PATRIOT

CHEVY CRUZE LIMITED

TOYOTA CAMRY

TOYOTA TACOMA

CHEVY SPARK

#5

DODGE JOURNEY

VW JETTA

KIA OPTIMA

TOYOTA TUNDRA

HYUNDAI ACCENT

#6

CHEVY EQUINOX

DODGE DART

HYUNDAI SONATA

NISSAN FRONTIER

HONDA FIT

#7

HONDA CRV

FORD FOCUS

FORD FUSION

CHEVY COLORADO

FORD FIESTA

#8

JEEP WRANGLER

HYUNDAI ELANTRA SEDAN

CHRYSLER 200

GMC SIERRA 150/1500

KIA RIO

#9

JEEP CHEROKEE

CHEVY CRUZE

DODGE CHARGER

RAM 250/2500

MITSUBISHI MIRAGE

#10

FORD EXPLORER

KIA FORTE

VW PASSAT

CHEVY SILVERADO 250/2500

FIAT 500

TOP 10 % SHARE OF SEGMENT

44%

84%

89%

95%

90%

Source: Polk, New Vehicle Personal Registrations (Sales & Leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYTD (JAN-MAY); Phoenix DMA; Note: Segments include Non-Luxury and Luxury models; *Nissan Rogue includes Rogue and Rogue Select

Courtesy of

Hispanics Accounted For 23% Of Total Used Vehicle Sales In Phoenix

PHOENIX HISPANICS SPENT

$386M

ON USED VEHICLES IN 2015 (23% OF THE TOTAL USED VEHICLE SALES IN PHOENIX) Source: IHS 2015 Global Insight Hispanic Market Monitor Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 58

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics Accounted For 28% of All New Vehicle Spending In Tucson (1Q 2016)

TUCSON HISPANICS SPENT

$75.6M ON NEW AUTOMOBILE PURCHASES IN 1Q 2016

Source: Amount spent based on 2016 MSRP and new Hispanic unit sales; RL Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, 1Q 2016 CYTD

Courtesy of

The Tucson Consumer Is Also Viable And Dynamic

HISPANICS SPEND AT PAR

$29,000 AVERAGE MSRP PAID VS. $30,000 TOTAL MARKET

Source: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk New Vehicle Personal Retail Registrations (Sales and Leases), 1Q CY16, Tucson Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 59

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

64% Of Vehicles Owned By Hispanics In64% of Vehicles Owned By Hispanics In Tucson Are 2001 Models Or Newer Tucson Are 2001 Models Or Newer 23%

31%

5%

4%

1981-1990 81-'90

Total

Hispanic

1991-2000 91-'00 01-'10 2001-2010 11-'17 2011-2017

16% 23%

48%

49%

Sources: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk, Vehicles In Operation (VIO), Personal Registrations, Enhanced Ethnic Data, VIN Years: 1981-2017; As of April 2016, Tucson DMA

Courtesy of 53

Sources: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk, Vehicles In Operation (VIO), Personal Registrations, Enhanced Ethnic Data, VIN Years: 1981-2017; As of April 2016, Tucson DMA

Tucson Hispanics Are Also Rolling

342K VEHICLES IN OPERATION OWNED BY TUCSON HISPANICS, REPRESENTING 39% OF TOTAL MARKET

Sources: IHS Automotive Driven by Polk, Vehicles In Operation (VIO), Personal Registrations, Enhanced Ethnic Data, VIN Years: 1981-2017; As of April 2016, Tucson DMA

DATO S

A Z 60

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Total NEW Auto Sales Are Down In Tucson, Total NEW Auto Sales Are Down In Tucson, But Hispanics Are Not The Reason But Hispanics Are Not The Reason % Change in New Vehicle Unit Sales Year over Year

% CHANGE IN NEW VEHICLE UNIT SALES YEAR OVER YEAR

Total

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

3.0%

-1.0% -2.0% Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, May 2016 CYTD (Jan-May16 & Jan-May15), Tucson DMA

Courtesy of

Since 2014, Share Of New Total Sales Since 2014, Share of New Total Sales to Tucson Hispanics Has Grown By 2.8 Points To Tucson Hispanics Has Grown By 2.8 Points

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, May 2016 CYTD (Jan-May16 & Jan-May15), Tucson DMA.

25.5%

28.3%

27.2%

2014

2015

2016

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, MAY CYTD (Jan-May14, Jan-May15 & Jan-May16), Tucson DMA

Courtesy of

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, MAY CYTD (Jan-May14, Jan-May15 & Jan-May16), Tucson DMA.

DATO S

A Z 61

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

TUCSON TOTAL

TUCSON HISPANIC

BRAND RANKER

BRAND RANKER

RANK

BRAND

S0M

RANK

BRAND

S0M

#1

13.6%

#1

14.8%

#2

11.9%

#2

14.1%

#3

10.1%

#3

12.0%

#4

9.1%

#4

11.3%

#5

8.6%

#5

7.7%

#6

6.6%

#6

7.4%

#7

5.1%

#7

6.5%

#8

4.5%

#8

4.1%

#9

4.2%

#9

3.9%

#10

4.1%

#10

3.3%

Source: R.L. Polk & Co. New Vehicle Personal Registrations (includes Leases), Enhanced Ethnic Data, MAY CYTD (Jan-May14, Jan-May15 & Jan-May16), Tucson DMA

Courtesy of

CUV/SUV Consistently Top Segment Tucson Hispanics

CUV/SUV Consistently Top Segment SEGMENT SHARE AMONG HISPANICS: 2014-2016 CYTD (MAY) Tucson Hispanics SEGMENT SHARE AMONG HISPANICS: 2014-2016 CYTD (MAY)

35%

33%

31%

22% 17% 17%

18%

CUV/SUV

18%

18% 18%

17%

15%

8%

6% 2014

7%

2015

2016

Source: Polk, New Vehicle Personal Registrations (Sales & leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYTD (JAN-MAY); Tucson DMA; Note segments include Non-Luxury and Luxury models

Source: Polk, New Vehicle Personal Registrations (Sales & leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYTD (JAN-MAY); Tucson DMA; Note segments include Non-Luxury and Luxury models

DATO S

A Z

62

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of

COMPACT PICKUP FULL/MIDSIZE

SUBCOMPACT


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Top 10 Models By Segment: 2016 CYTD RANKED BY MODEL SALES TO TUCSON HISPANICS RANK

CUV/SUV

COMPACT

FULL/MID SIZE

PICK-UP

SUBCOMPACT

#1

DODGE JOURNEY

NISSAN SENTRA

NISSAN ALTIMA

CHEVY SILVERADO 150/1500

NISSAN VERSA

#2

JEEP PATRIOT

TOYOTA COROLLA

CHEVY MALIBU

RAM 150/1500

TOYOTA SCION

#3

NISSAN ROGUE

HONDA CIVIC

FORD FUSION

FORD F-150

HYUNDAI ACCENT

#4

TOYOTA RAV4

DODGE DART

HONDA ACCORD

TOYOTA TACOMA

FORD FIESTA

#5

JEEP CHEROKEE

FORD FOCUS

TOYOTA CAMRY

TOYOTA TUNDRA

CHEVY SONIC

#6

FORD ESCAPE

CHEVY CRUZE LIMITED

KIA OPTIMA

NISSAN FRONTIER

FIAT 500

#7

FORD EXPLORER

VOLKSWAGEN JETTA

DODGE CHARGER

CHEVY COLORADO

HONDA FIT

#8

JEEP WRANGLER

HYUNDAI ELANTRA SEDAN

HYUNDAI SONATA

GMC SIERRA 150/1500

AUDI A3

#9

HONDA CR-V

BUICK VERANO

CHRYSLER 200

RAM 250/2500

KIA RIO

#10

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

MAZDA 3

NISSAN MAXIMA

CHEVY SILVERADO 250/2500

MINI COOPER

TOP 10 % SHARE OF SEGMENT

46%

83%

89%

97%

92%

Source: Polk, New Vehicle Personal Registrations (Sales & leases) Enhanced Ethnic Data, 2016 CYTD (JAN-MAY); Tucson DMA; Note: Segments include Non-Luxury and Luxury models; *Nissan Rogue includes Rogue and Rogue Select

Courtesy of

In 2015, Hispanics Accounted For 32% Of The Total Used Vehicle Sales In Tucson

TUCSON HISPANICS SPENT

$125M

ON USED VEHICLES IN 2015 (32% OF THE TOTAL USED VEHICLE SALES IN TUCSON) Source: IHS 2015 Global Insight Hispanic Market Monitor Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 63

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

A Big Opportunity… Doesn’t Go Unnoticed

“Hispanics are also another key demo for LSR Ethnic operators. This group is projected to grow 12% from 2013-18 and with that comes an increased desire for flavors from their home country, as well as a general 'adventurous' palate for ethnic flavors.” LSR: ETHNIC CONCEPTS NOTE: LSR = Limited-Service Restaurant Source: Mintel Oxygen Report, February 2015 Courtesy of

Hispanics Love Eating Out

$1.7BILLION Hispanics Love Eating Out!

SPENT BY PHOENIX HISPANICS ON 'FOOD AWAY FROM HOME' IN 2015

22% Of Spending In Phoenix Courtesy of

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Phoenix DMA

DATO S

A Z 64

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Valuable Consumers Per Household, Phoenix Hispanics Spend More on Eating Out Valuable Consumers Per Household, Phoenix Hispanics Spend More on Eating Out “Food Away from Home” “FOOD AWAY Amount Spent per Household in 2015

FROM HOME” AMOUNT SPENT PER HOUSEHOLD IN 2015

+10% More

Hispanic

$4,113

Than Non-Hispanics

$3,728

Non-Hispanic

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor Total consumer dollars spending: Quick Service Restaurants IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor Total consumer dollars spending : Quick Service Restaurants

Courtesy of

Hispanics Enjoy A Variety of Menu Choices Hispanics Enjoy A Variety of Menu Choices RESTAURANT TYPES VISITED IN THE PAST 30 DAYS BY PHOENIX HISPANICS

Restaurant types visited in the past 30 days by Phoenix Hispanics Index*

Any Mexican restaurant

116

Any Chinese restaurant

124

Any pizza restaurant

101

Any seafood restaurant

138

Any Italian restaurant

81

Any coffee house/coffee bar

107

Any ice cream/yogurt shop

92

Any steakhouse

84

Any sports bar

67

Any other Asian restaurant

77

Any upscale restaurant

65

47% 43% 32% 16% 15% 14% 12% 11% 10% 9% 8%

*Index compares Hispanics vs. the total market

Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Hispanic Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA

Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Hispanic Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 65

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Phoenix Hispanics Frequent Sit-Down Restaurants Primarily For Dinner

BREAKFAST

LUNCH

DINNER

37% 35% 79% vs. vs. vs. 31% FOR NH

51% FOR NH

76% FOR NH

Source: Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 – Jan 2016), Hispanic Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA; Base: Visited any sit-down restaurant in the past 30 days

Courtesy of

Phoenix Hispanics Over-Index On 4 Of The Top 5 Casual Dining Restaurants RANK #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

SIT-DOWN RESTAURANTS VISITED FOR ANY MEAL

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

Any Sit-Down Restaurant Denny’s IHOP Olive Garden Golden Corral Buffalo Wild Wings Applebee’s Chili’s Red Lobster Village Inn Oregano’s Pizza Bistro LongHorn Steakhouse P.F. Chang’s Macayo’s Z’Tejas Outback Steakhouse

81.0% 27.4% 20.5% 17.1% 17.1% 11.1% 10.7% 10.0% 7.2% 6.8% 5.0% 4.8% 4.7% 4.3% 4.3% 4.1%

79.0% 22.4% 14.5% 17.9% 8.3% 4.6% 15.5% 9.3% 8.9% 7.1% 4.0% 5.2% 3.7% 4.6% 1.7% 7.0%

102 116 129 97 165 181 75 106 84 96 118 95 122 95 183 65

Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA; Base: Visited any sit-down restaurant in the past 30 days

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 66

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Big Spending Power HISPANIC SPENDING ON “QUICK SERVICE RESTAURANTS” IN 2014

PHOENIX HISPANICS SPENT

$1.05BILLION ON QSR

25% OF PHOENIX SPENDING IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor Courtesy of

Valuable Consumers Valuable Consumers

Amount Spent per Household at QSR in 2014

AMOUNT SPENT PER HOUSEHOLD AT QSR IN 2014 Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

+31%

More Spending

$2,525

Phoenix

$1,932

69

IHS Global Insight IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic2015 Hispanic Market Monitor Total consumer dollars spending : Quick Service Restaurants Market Monitor Total consumer dollars spending: Quick Service Restaurants Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 67

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics Are Frequent Diners

NUMBER OF QSR VISITS IN THE LAST 30 DAYS

57

%

OF PHOENIX HISPANICS HAVE VISITED QSRs 5+ TIMES vs. 56% OF NON-HISPANICS

Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+ Base: Visited any QSR in past 30 days Courtesy of

Phoenix Hispanics Frequent QSRs For Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner

BREAKFAST

LUNCH

DINNER

46% 75% 74% 41% FOR NH

78% FOR NH

73% FOR NH

Phoenix Hispanics Frequent QSRs For Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 68

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Phoenix Hispanics Over-Index At 10 Of The Top 15 QSRs RANKED AMONG HISPANICS RANK

QSR VISITED FOR ANY MEAL IN PAST 30 DAYS

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

ANY QUICK SERVICE RESTAURANT

92.0%

87.0%

104

#1

McDonald’s

51.6%

40.0%

121

#2

Jack in the box

37.9%

18.7%

163

#3

Burger King

29.7%

22.9%

121

#4

Panda Express

28.8%

19.6%

132

#5

Little Caesar’s

23.7%

10.5%

173

#6

Taco Bell

23.4%

30.3%

82

#7

Subway

22.1%

24.9%

91

#8

Filiberto’s Mexican

19.3%

8.6%

173

#9

111

Starbucks

18.4%

16.0%

#10

In-N-Out Burger

17.9%

18.5%

98

#11

Pizza Hut

16.2%

11.9%

125

#12

KFC

15.2%

12.6%

115

#13

Carl’s Jr.

14.6%

11.6%

118

#13

Chipotle

14.0%

16.7%

87

#15

Sonic

13.1%

14.6%

92

Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA Base: Visited any QSR in the past 30 days Courtesy of

Restaurant Digital Engagement Extends to Online and Mobile Restaurant Digital Engagement Extends to Online and Mobile

38

%

OF HISPANICS VIEWED A 38% ofMENU ON RESTAURANT THEIR Hispanics SMARTPHONE Viewed a VS. Restaurant NH menu on their Smartphone vs. 31% NH

31%

23

23% of% Hispanics OF downloaded HISPANICSa DOWNLOADED restaurant’s A app on their RESTAURANT’S APP ON vs. THEIR Smartphone SMARTPHONE 10% NH

VS.

Searched for a Nearby Restaurant Using Smartphone

49%

33%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Used A Mobile Coupon At Any Restaurant

25%

12%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Methods of Digital Engagement Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

69

27% 21% 26%

Became a Facebook fan of any restaurant

Courtesy of

A Z

30% 27%

Used restaurant rating service to choose where to eat

Source: Burke, Casual Dining Restaurants Landscape Research 2014 Source: Burke, Casual Dining Restaurants Landscape Research 2014

DATO S

32%

Received digital messages or daily deals

Used a mobile phone app to "check in" at a restaurant

10% NH

34%

Purchased a restaurant gift card

2 0 1 6

18% 22% 11%


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanic Restaurant Visitation Based More On Food Quality, Hispanic Restaurant Visitation Based More On Food Quality, Service And A Family Friendly Experience Service And A Family Friendly Experience 66%

Food/Variety/Quality

57%

23%

Price/Value

28%

16%

Service

12%

14%

Kids/Family/Friends

Ambience

Location/Convenience

13%

9% 8%

8% 29%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanics

Source: Burke, Casual Dining Restaurants Landscape Research 2014 Courtesy of Source: Burke, Casual Dining Restaurants Landscape Research 2014

Hispanics Love Eating Out!

$552M Hispanics Love Eating Out!

SPENT BY TUCSON HISPANICS ON 'FOOD AWAY FROM HOME' IN 2015

32% Of Spending In Tucson IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 70

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Valuable Consumers Per Household, Valuable Consumers Per Household, Tucson Hispanics Spend More on Eating Out Tucson Hispanics Spend More On Eating Out “Food Away from Home” Amount Spent per Household in 2015

“FOOD AWAY FROM HOME” AMOUNT SPENT PER HOUSEHOLD IN 2015

+11% More

Hispanic

Than Non-Hispanics

$3,974

$3,572

Non-Hispanic

IIHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending: Quick Service Restaurants IIHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Quick Service Restaurants

CasualCasual Dining Category Growth Among Tucson Hispanics Out-Paces Non-Hispanics Dining Category Growth Among Tucson % Growth in sit-down restaurant Customers: 2011 vs. 2016 Hispanics Outpaces Non-Hispanics % GROWTH IN SIT-DOWN RESTAURANT CUSTOMERS: 2011 VS. 2016

+12% NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC

-7%

Scarborough 2011 Release 1 (Feb 2010 – Jan 2011) vs. 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 – Jan 2016), Adults 18+, Tucson DMA; Visited any sit-down restaurant in the last 30 days; Base: Total

DATO S

A Z

2 0 1 6

Scarborough 2011 Release 1 (Feb 2010 – Jan 2011) vs. 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 – Jan 2016), Adults 18+, Tucson DMA; Visited any sit-down restaurant in the last 30 days; Base: Total

71


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics Enjoy A Variety Of Menu Choices Hispanics Enjoy A Variety of Menu Choices Restaurant types visited in the past 30 days by Tucson Hispanics RESTAURANT TYPES VISITED IN THE PAST 30 DAYS BY TUCSON HISPANICS Index* Any Mexican restaurant

102

Any Chinese restaurant

116

46% 35% 14%

Any pizza restaurant

68

Any Italian restaurant

78

12%

Any Sports Bar

94

12%

Any seafood restaurant

11%

121

10%

Any steakhouse

74

Any coffee house/coffee bar

75

Any other Asian restaurant

73

6%

Any Japanese restaurant

87

6%

Any upscale restaurant

55

9%

5%

*Index compares Hispanics vs. the total market

Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Hispanic Adults 18+, Tucson DMA Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Hispanic Adults 18+, Tucson DMA

Courtesy of

Tucson Hispanics Frequent Sit-Down Restaurants For Breakfast, Lunch And Especially Dinner

BREAKFAST

LUNCH

DINNER

40% 44% 68% vs. vs. vs. 28% FOR NH

44% FOR NH

77% FOR NH

Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Adults 18+, Tucson DMA Based: Visited any sit-down restaurant in the past 30 days

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 72

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Tucson Hispanics Over-Index At 13 Of The Top 15 Casual Dining Restaurants RANK

SIT-DOWN RESTAURANTS VISITED FOR ANY MEAL

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15

Denny’s Golden Corral Olive Garden IHOP Buffalo Wild Wings Applebee’s Texas Roadhouse Red Lobster The Cheesecake Factory Chili’s Famous Sam's Hooters Sullivan’s Steakhouse Mama’s Famous Pizza & Heros Village Inn

33.2% 22.8% 22.7% 21.2% 15.2% 14.5% 13.2% 9.9% 9.1% 6.8% 6.7% 4.6% 4.5% 2.9% 2.8%

11.8% 10.7% 17.4% 14.8% 7.1% 9.9% 11.9% 7.7% 4.8% 6.5% 4.1% 1.2% 1.5% 3.8% 8.0%

177 156 119 126 156 127 107 117 148 103 136 197 182 82 44

Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Adults 18+, Tucson DMA Base: Visited any sit-down restaurant in the past 30 days

Courtesy of

Big Spending Power HISPANIC SPENDING ON “QUICK SERVICE RESTAURANTS” IN 2014

TUCSON HISPANICS SPENT

$339M ON QSR

35%

OF TUCSON SPENDING IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 73

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics Are Hispanics Are Valuable Consumers Valuable Consumers Amount Spent per Household at QSR in 2015

AMOUNT SPENT PER HOUSEHOLD AT QSRs IN 2015

+32%

More Spending

$2,438

Tucson

$1,851

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending: Quick Service Restaurants

IHS Global Insight - 2015 Hispanic Market Monitor, Tucson DMA Total consumer dollars spending : Quick Service Restaurants

Courtesy of

QSR QSR Category Growth Among Tucson Hispanics Out-Paces Non-Hispanics Category Growth Among Tucson Hispanics % Growth in QSR Customers: 2011 vs. 2016 Out-Paces Non-Hispanics % GROWTH IN QSR CUSTOMERS: 2011 VS. 2016

+12% NON-HISPANIC

-1%

HISPANIC

Scarborough 2011 Release 1 (Feb 2010 – Jan 2011) vs. 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 – Jan 2016), Adults 18+, Tucson DMA; Visited any QSR in the last 30 days; Base: Total

Courtesy of

Scarborough 2011 Release 1 (Feb 2010 – Jan 2011) vs. 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 – Jan 2016), Adults 18+, Tucson DMA; Visited any QSR in the last 30 days; Base: Total

DATO S

A Z 74

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Hispanics Are Frequent Diners

NUMBER OF QSR VISITS IN THE LAST 30 DAYS

66

%

OF TUCSON HISPANICS HAVE VISITED QSRs 5+ TIMES vs. 51% OF NON-HISPANICS

Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Tucson DMA, Adults 18+ Base: Visited any QSR in the past 30 days Courtesy of

Tucson Hispanics Frequent QSRs For Breakfast, Lunch And Dinner

BREAKFAST

LUNCH

DINNER

42% 83% 79% vs. vs. vs. 36% FOR NH

76% FOR NH

71% FOR NH

Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Adults 18+, Tucson DMA Base: Visited any QSR in the past 30 days

DATO S

A Z 75

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 2

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CONSUMER

Tucson Hispanics Over-Index At 14 Of The Top 15 Quick Service Restaurants RANKED AMONG HISPANICS QSR VISITED FOR ANY MEAL IN PAST 30 DAYS

HISPANIC

NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC INDEX (VS. TOTAL)

ANY QUICK SERVICE RESTAURANT

92.7%

85.4%

106

#1

McDonald’s

58.0%

39.9%

126

#2

Little Caesars

37.6%

11.0%

186

#3

eegee’s

33.3%

22.5%

127

#4

In-N-Out Burger

30.9%

15.7%

147

#5

Carl’s Jr.

27.7%

12.3%

157

#6

Burger King

27.0%

24.9%

105

#7

Taco Bell

24.6%

22.6%

106

#8

Jack in the Box

24.1%

18.3%

119

#9

Peter Piper Pizza

23.2%

3.5%

223 109

RANK

#10

Wendy’s

22.2%

19.3%

#11

Subway

20.5%

23.9%

90

#12

Pizza Hut

19.4%

13.2%

126

#13

Dairy Queen

18.0%

14.3%

116

#14

Lucky Wishbone

17.2%

5.8%

176

#15

Whataburger

17.0%

5.4%

179

Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb 2015 - Jan 2016), Adults 18+, Tucson DMA Base: Visited any QSR in the past 30 days Courtesy of

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 76

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY

Overview METHODOLOGY OF SOCIAL MEDIA RESEARCH TOOL OYE! is a business intelligence solution that listens to consumers in their own space where they talk and share decisions online. Our reports deliver insight on what English-speaking, Spanish-speaking and bilingual Hispanics have to say about well-known brands and topics of general interest. Understanding consumer attitudes toward brands, their products and their marketing efforts provides our clients and partners with insights that inform marketing campaigns across digital channels.

ACTIONABLE INSIGHTS

OYE! is a language-neutral solution that can analyze conversations in English, Spanglish and Spanish to derive meaning from unstructured social conversations among Hispanics. OYE!’s natural language-processing solution is designed not only to identify Hispanics, but to also derive insights marketers can use in planning campaign strategy, messaging and targeting.

DEMOGRAPHICS

PSYCHOGRAPHICS

KEYWORDS

BUILD KNOWLEDGE

KNOW WHAT THOSE WHO

UNDERSTAND THE TERMS

OF AUDIENCE AGE,

INTERACT WITH A BRAND

MOST FREQUENTLY USED

GEOGRAPHY AND

LIKE, FOLLOW AND SHARE

TO GUIDE MORE AUTHENTIC

GENDER THROUGH SOCIAL

FOR USE IN TARGETING AND

CONTENT CURATION AND

CONVERSATIONS.

CONTENT CURATION.

CONVERSATION.

CHANNEL INSIGHTS UNDERSTAND BOTH WHERE CONSUMERS MOST FAVORABLY INTERACT WITH YOUR BRAND AS WELL AS WHERE YOUR COMETITORS FOCUS THEIR EFFORTS.

THE SOLUTION

Insights derived from social conversations by OYE! can provide key details into Hispanic consumers through their own statements about brands and industry topics through online conversations. OYE! analyzes those conversations to allow brands to understand different aspects of where their most useful audience segments are. OYE! also provides insights into how to create campaigns tailored to those specific groups of people.

THE VALUE

Leveraging insights from OYE! drives conversations tailored for Hispanic consumers where they want it, when they want it and how they want it. The result: Better conversion, lift and engagement resulting from campaigns targeted to the Hispanics most influential over purchasing decisions for your brand.

METHODOLOGY

The enclosed analyses are based on verified U.S. Hispanic conversations. The data was gathered from Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, blogs, forums and the web at large. Analyzed data was gathered from a date range that is specified on each individual case study. Source: OYE! Intelligence www.oyeintelligence.com

DATO S

A Z 77

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY

Netflix Originals CASE STUDY BRIEF & APPROACH

2016 Comparative Analysis

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny NETFLIX Case Studythe highest positive sentiment (27%) conversations produced among Hispanics compared to the other top five drama titles during the analysis (Feb. 15 – Mar. 14), slightly overComparative AnalysisOverall Conversation Volume indexing from the industry2016average of 24%. Notably, Narcos and Gender Analysisamong the same dramas with 8%. ledSentiment negative sentiment

Over the past few years, Netflix has grown from originally only streaming movies and TV shows to creating their own original content beginning in 2013. Hit shows created by this digital channel include House of Cards and Orange Is the New Black.

House of Cards 12% 88% HISPANIC SENTIMENT PREFERENCE ANALYSIS Hispanic Sentiment Preference Analysis

OYE! technology conducted a digital analysis, via their Hispanic identification algorithm, to analyze the popularity of 13 Netflix Original dramas (shows and movies) among U.S Hispanics that include: Narcos (a show in Spanish that appeals to many Netflix Latino viewers), House of Cards, Marvel’s Daredevil, Crouching Tiger, Marco Polo, Bloodline, Marvel’s Jessica Jones, Atelier, Club de Cuervos, Sense8, Hemlock Grove, Orange Is the New Black and Beasts of No Nation.

22%

24%

Marvel's Daredevil Industry

25%

13%

87%

House of Cards

5%

Marvel’s Daredevil

Orange is the New Black

85%

73%

71%

71%

21%

27%

18%

Narcos

Orange Is the New Black

78%

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

8%

Narcos

5%

Crouching Tiger, Hidden 74% Dragon

This analysis covers over 10,000 Hispanic verified conversations gathered from over 80,000 posts gathered from Facebook, Twitter, blogs and the web at large about Netflix Originals in the drama section. The data was collected between Feb. 15 and March 14 in 2016.

4%

5%

2%

90%

71%

74%

Positive

-

5,000

Neutral

Negative

10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

Conversation among U.S. Hispanics peaked in New York Hispanic Non-Hispanic City where Marvel’s Daredevil and House of Cards trended equally. House of Cards also had the most mentions in Los Angeles.

30,000

Hispanic Geolocation

RESULTS

HISPANIC GEOLOCATION

House of Cards was the most mentioned in total volume but had a smaller proportion of Hispanic mentions (12%) while Narcos had 22% and Orange Is the New Black held 15% Hispanic mentions, respectively. This competitive analysis examined the top five 2016 shows among U.S. Hispanics out of Comparative Analysis the 13 Netflix Original Dramas reviewed.

Top Fiv New York, NY Los Angeles, CA Miami, FL 7

NETFLIX Case Study

Chicago, IL

OVERALL CONVERSATION VOLUME Overall Conversation Volume House of Cards

12%

Marvel's Daredevil

88%

13%

Orange is the New Black

Houston, TX

87%

TOP FIVE CITIES

85%

Narcos

78%

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

90% -

5,000

10,000 Hispanic

15,000

20,000

25,000

30,000

35,000

40,000

Non-Hispanic

NEW YORK

22%

LOS ANGELES

14%

MIAMI

5%

CHICAGO

4%

HOUSTON

4%

Hispanic Geolocation

Source: OYE! Intelligence www.oyeintelligence.com

Top Five Cities

DATO S New York, NY

22%

Los Angeles, CA

14%

A Z 78

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 2

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY 2016 Comparative Analysis

Beauty Brands U.S. Hispanics Top Ten Drugstore Brands Jordana Wet n' Wild

Hispanic Beauty Brand Preference Revlon

Rimmel London

Bourjois

CASE STUDY

Almay

Milani

Maybelline

BRIEF & APPROACH

L'Oreal the top 5 Hispanic brands, positive • Among

Male Over the past few years, the internet has revolutionized the NYC sentiment is highest towards L’Oreal and 55% way that brands gain additional exposure. It is now common 400 600 800negative 1,000 1,200 1,400 Maybelline .200Notably NYC led for an internet user to find a beauty brand advertisement on sentiment with 11%Hispanic Non-Hispanic search engine results that seem to follow the user around U.S. HISPANICS TOP FIVE DRUGSTORE BRAND SENTIMENT virtually through the different websites and forums they U.S. Hispanics Top Five Drugstore Brand Sentiment visit the rest of the day. Many of these ads lead to online Jordana purchases as well as social media conversations around the products' efficacy, price and other details. The OYE! Maybelline Intelligence platform recently was used to conduct a Hispanic beauty analysis of drugstore and high-end cosmetic brands, NYC examining which brands Hispanics prefer, along with which have the most foot traffic on social media and the web at Revlon large. This analysis was extrapolated from a sample of 36,045 online conversations, of which 2,421 were from verified2 U.S. Hispanics. These mentions of beauty brands came from Twitter, Facebook, blogs, forums and the web at large. All data was pulled from March 27 to April 9 in 2016. This analysis was done on 21 drugstore brands and 28 high-end brands.

L'Oreal

Female Female 45% 45%

2016 Comparative Analysis

0% 20% 40% 60% 80% | Conversation Volume and Sentiment

U.S. Hispanics Top Ten High-EndPositive Brands

Negative

100%

Neutral

• MAC Cosmetics commanded by far the greatest conversation volume among Hispanics compared to other high-end brands. This is also true for Non-Hispanics Makeup Forever Estee Lauder Cover FX

Kat Von D

RESULTS

Anastasia Beverly Hills Too Faced

• Jordana and Maybelline were the most popular drugstore brands among Hispanics, 2016 Comparative Analysis while Maybelline and NYC were most Beauty Brands popular among Non-Hispanics

• Although low in Hispanic conversation Female Female volume, Anastasia Beverly Hills had the 45% 45% Malethe highest positive sentiment. Too Faced had Shiseido

Dermablend Smashbox

MAC

2,000 4,000 sentiment 6,000 8,000 10,000 second highest positive Hispanic

U.S. Hispanics Top Ten Drugstore Brands

U.S. HISPANICS TOP TEN DRUGSTORE BRANDS

12,000

55% 14,000

Non-Hispanic

U.S. HISPANICS TOP FIVE HIGH-END BRAND SENTIMENT U.S. Hispanics Top Five High-End Brand Sentiment

Jordana Too Faced

Wet n' Wild Revlon

Estee Lauder

Rimmel London Bourjois

Makeup Forever

Almay Milani

L'Oreal NYC -

200

400

600

Hispanic

U.S. Hispanics Top www.oyeintelligence.com Five Drugstore Brand Source: OYE! Intelligence Jordana Maybelline

Female Female 45% 45%

Anastasia BH

Maybelline

800

1,000

Male 55%

1,200

MAC

1,400

0%

20%

40% Positive

Non-Hispanic

60% Negative

80%

100%

Neutral

Sentiment

DATO S

A Z 79

2 0 1 6 11


Get right to the good stuff

Johnny Lozada - TV Host

TV Latino Enjoy the new Contour® with more packages to choose from. 1-877-TU-AMIGO

New Immersive Guide with rich graphics and voice-activated remote so you can use voice commands to change channels and find shows. More than 265 of your favorite English and Spanish language channels with favorites like ESPN, Discovery®, History®, AMC, National Geographic, NBC Universo, beIN SPORTS, Univision Deportes Network, Cine Sony and more! All your local channels like ABC, NBC, Fox, CBS, CW, Telemundo and Univision, plus HD channels.

Cox Solutions Store®

cox.com

*Ends 10/31/16. Available to new residential customers in Cox service areas. See www.cox.com for current rates. Not all services and features available everywhere. A credit check and/or deposit may be required. A Cox digital receiver or Cox-provided CableCARDTM together with a certified compatible CableCARD retail device required for video service; prices and feature availability may vary. See CableCARD FAQs on cox.com for details. Other restrictions may apply. © 2016 Cox Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 3

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Latinos Still Leading Key Digital Technology User Trends By ROBERT SCHOON (R.SCHOON@LATINPOST.COM)

LATINOS SPEND MORE TIME ONLINE

A 2015 study of Latinos' digital habits confirms that U.S. Hispanic consumers are still leading key technology and digital trends.

Ad Age's Hispanic Fact Pack found that Hispanics overindex for spending time online, whether streaming digital entertainment, using the internet on mobile devices and even spending time online via home computers, which previous studies have found Latinos in general are less likely to own.

It was 2013 when Pew Research found that Latinos tended to own smartphones at a higher rate than the national average. Media researcher Nielsen called Latinos "Ahead of the Digital Curve" in 2014, after finding Hispanic consumers in the U.S. particularly tended to stream more online video and were more likely to use mobile devices as "second screens," among other key measures of digital habits that Latinos overindexed for.

Despite that counterbalance, Latinos tended to spend 3.5 hours per day on a home computer, compared to 3.3 hours per day for the rest of consumers. Meanwhile, mobile-first Latinos helped outpace smartphone use for Latinos, at 2.1 hours per day versus 1.7 hours per day for non-Hispanics.

Fast-forward to this month, when Ad Age released its 2015 Hispanic Fact Pack, a meta-study that confirms Latinos are still leading the technology trends and gaining influence as powerful consumers and tastemakers.

Online video continues to be hot for Latinos in particular, expanding the trend Nielsen noted last year, to a rate in 2015 of 2.7 hours per day that Latinos spend on average streaming online video. This widens the gap even more compared to the non-Hispanic population, which watches online videos about 1.6 hours per day.

While the fact pack is written for an audience mostly made up of advertisers, the statistics about Latinos' use of digital technology are quite telling. Many key findings from the 2015 Hispanic Fact Pack highlighted by MediaPost's Engage: Hispanics show that online Latinos continue to be "superusers" of mobile technology and digital entertainment.

LATINOS PURCHASE MORE ONLINE, ESPECIALLY ON MOBILE

Latinos were also found to be more likely to purchase technology online using a computer, though only slightly (54.1 percent of Latinos vs 53.5 percent of non-Latinos). The same goes for buying food using a computer, where 24.8 percent of Hispanics had done so, compare to 23 percent of general consumer.

In short, it looks like Latinos won't be giving up their place on the top of forward-thinking consumers of cutting edge technology any time soon. Here are some of the highlights.

LATINOS ARE HEAVY SMARTPHONE USERS

But everyday mobile purchasing is where Latinos clearly led non-Hispanic U.S. consumers in terms of being digitally forward. While only 10.8 percent of non-Latino consumers reported buying items you'd find at your local drugstore on mobile devices, over 18 percent of Latinos had done the same.

While previous studies have found that Latinos are more likely to own a smartphone and tend to plan on purchasing their next mobile device earlier than the general population, Ad Age's Hispanic Fact Pack expands on how Latinos use their smartphones.

SO WHAT?

The study says, for example, that according to the study, 66 percent of Latino smartphone users peruse their phone's app store every month, compared to about 60 percent of nonLatinos. They also over-index for using social media on their mobile devices each month: Nearly 80 percent of Latino smartphone owners will visit a social media network using mobile devices each month, compared to about 77 percent of the general population.

Advertisers clearly will use these figures to continue to tweak their marketing campaigns to reach as many Latinos as possible, but the findings from the 2015 Ad Age Fact Pack do more than inform salespeople. They point to a long-term trend, in which Latino consumers are already ahead of the technology game and will consistently stay on top of those indicators. Especially as digital technology, mobile internet and online entertainment continue to have an outsized effect on the broader U.S. economy­—and the young Hispanic population continues to lead both digital and demographic trends— Latino consumers' purchasing power and prestige are only likely to expand.

The most notable mobile trend Latino consumers are leading may be online video. Almost 66 percent watch online videos on smartphones each month, compared to less than 60 percent of non-Hispanics, the Ad Age Hispanic Fact Pack found.

www.latinpost.com/articles/72867/20150818/latinos-still-owning-key-digital-technology-user-trends.htm

DATO S

A Z 81

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Percentage Of Internet Users Percentage Of Internet Users Per Racial Group Per Racial Group Percentage of Internet Users

PERCENTAGE OF INTERNET USERS

97% 81%

85%

78%

Hispanic

African-American

White

Asian-American

Source: Pew Research Center, Americans’ Internet Access: 2000-2015, June 2015 www.pewinternet.org/2015/06/26/americans-internet-access-2000-2015/ Source: Pew Research Center, Americans’ Internet Access: 2000-2015, June 2015 http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/06/26/americans-internet-access-2000-2015/

Amount of Internet Users Among Hispanics HasAmount of Internet Users Among Hispanics Has Risen 35 Percentage Points Since 2000 Risen 35 Percentage Points Since 2000 PERCENTAGE USERS PercentageOF of INTERNET Internet Users 97% 85%

81%

78%

72% 53%

Asian

46%

White

38%

Hispanic

2000

2015

Source: Pew Research Center, Americans’ Internet Access: 2000-2015, June 2015 www.pewinternet.org/2015/06/26/americans-internet-access-2000-2015/ Source: Pew Research Center, Americans’ Internet Access: 2000-2015, June 2015

http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/06/26/americans-internet-access-2000-2015/

DATO S

A Z 82

2 0 1 6

Black


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 3

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Hispanic Media Consumption (Hours/Day) Hispanic Media Consumption (Hours/Day)

3.54

3.50

2.22

Watching TV

Using Internet on Home Computer

Listening to Music Online

1.92

1.87

Watching Videos Online

Reading e-books

Source: Alcance Media Group, US Hispanic Trends and Behaviors, 2015 Source: Alcance Media Group, US Hispanic Trends and Behaviors, 2015 http://www.alcancemg.com/download/media-kits/hispanic-101-eng.pdf www.alcancemg.com/download/media-kits/hispanic-101-eng.pdf

Entertainment Content Is Key To Hispanic Online Engagement Entertainment Content is Key to Hispanic Online Engagement 37%

37%

35% 30%

27%

26%

Internet Radio

Streaming Video

Hispanics

Download Music

Non-Hispanics

Source: Alcance Media Group, US Hispanic Trends and Behaviors, 2015 Source: Alcance Media Group, US Hispanic Trends and Behaviors, 2015 www.alcancemg.com/download/media-kits/hispanic-101-eng.pdf http://www.alcancemg.com/download/media-kits/hispanic-101-eng.pdf

DATO S

A Z 83

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Hispanics Are Efficient Online Shoppers Hispanics Are Efficient Online Shoppers 84%

80% 71%

70%

66%

20%

Search for Online Coupons

Download Online Coupons

Hispanics

Used Online Coupons

US General Population

Source: Alcance Media Group, US Hispanic Trends and Behaviors, 2015 www.alcancemg.com/download/media-kits/hispanic-101-eng.pdf Source: Alcance Media Group, US Hispanic Trends and Behaviors, 2015 http://www.alcancemg.com/download/media-kits/hispanic-101-eng.pdf

Latinos Purchase More Online Latinos Purchase More Online 54.1%

53.5%

24.8%

23.0% 18.0% 10.8%

Purchasing Technology Online Purchasing Technology Online Using a Computer Using A Computer

Buying Food Food Using Using A A Computer Computer Buying

Latinos

Non-Latinos

Source: Latin Post, Latinos Still Owning Key Digital Technology User Trends, August 2015

www.latinpost.com/articles/72867/20150818/latinos-still-owning-key-digital-technology-user-trends.htm Source: Latin Post, Latinos Still Owning Key Digital Technology User Trends, August 2015 http://www.latinpost.com/articles/72867/20150818/latinos-still-owning-key-digital-technology-user-trends.htm

DATO S

A Z 84

2 0 1 6

Everyday Mobile Mobile Purchasing Purchasing Everyday


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Time Latinos Spend Online Time Latinos Spend Online (Hours/Day) (Hours/Day) 3.5

3.3 2.7 2.1 1.7

Home Computer

1.6

Smartphone

Latinos

Online Video

Non-Latinos

Source: Latin Post, Latinos Still Owning Key Digital Technology User Trends, August 2015 Source: Latin Post, Latinos Still Owning Key Digital Technology User Trends, August 2015 www.latinpost.com/articles/72867/20150818/latinos-still-owning-key-digital-technology-user-trends.htm

http://www.latinpost.com/articles/72867/20150818/latinos-still-owning-key-digital-technology-user-trends.htm

Hispanics And African-Americans Rely Heavily On Smartphones Hispanics and African-Americans Rely Heavily on Smart Phones 73 67 58

57

61 55

55 55 43

47 46

45

45

43

38

37

32

31

26

26 12

InfoAbout AboutAAHealth Health Online OnlineBanking Banking Info Condition Condition

RealEstate EstateInfo Info Real

InfoAbout AboutAAJob Job Info

White

Black

Gov't Services Educational Gov't Services or Educational Content Info or Info Content

SubmitaaJob Job Submit Application Application

Hispanic

*% of US adult smartphone owners in each group who have used their phone in the past year Source: Pew Research Center, Racial and Ethnic Differences in How People Use Mobile Technology, April 2015 Source: Pew Research Center, Racial and Ethnic Differences in How People Use Mobile Technology, April 2015 www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/04/30/racial-and-ethnic-differences-in-how-people-use-mobile-technology/ http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/04/30/racial-and-ethnic-differences-in-how-people-use-mobile-technology/

DATO S

A Z 85

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Latinos Are Heavy Smartphone Users

Latinos Are Heavy Smartphone Users 80% 66%

77% 66%

60%

App Store

Social Media Network

Latinos

60%

Online Video

Non-Latinos

Source: Latin Post, Latinos Still Owning Key Digital Technology User Trends, August 2015 Source: Latin Post, Latinos Still Owning Key Digital Technology User Trends, August 2015 www.latinpost.com/articles/72867/20150818/latinos-still-owning-key-digital-technology-user-trends.htm

http://www.latinpost.com/articles/72867/20150818/latinos-still-owning-key-digital-technology-user-trends.htm

Mobile Application Duration By Ethnicity Mobile Application Duration By Ethnicity 274

NOTE: MAD - The amount of time in minutes consumers spend on each platform

248 231

Duration Index*

184 145 128

133

126

142 146

144

138 108

97

142

124

175

137

99 62

Facebook

Google

Instagram

LinkedIn

Snapchat

8.1 AVG MINS

3.7 AVG MINS

7.0 AVG MINS

7.0 AVG MINS

6.6 AVG MINS

Multicultural

Hispanic

Black

Asian *Indexed to Non Multi-Cultural consumers

Source: Nielsen, The Multicultural Edge: Rising Super Consumers, March 2015

www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/the-multicultural-edge-rising-super-consumers-march-2015.pdf Source: Nielsen, The Multicultural Edge: Rising Super Consumers, March 2015 http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/the-multicultural-edge-rising-super-consumers-march-2015.pdf

DATO S

A Z 86

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

U.S. Teen and Social Media Use

U.S. Teen AndofSocial Use Percentage Teens In TheMedia U.S. 71

PERCENTAGE OF TEENS IN THE U.S.

75 70 64

50

52 42

48

45

40 41

34

31

26

31

29

24

22

13

Facebook

Instagram

Snapchat

Twitter

White

Black

Google+

Vine

15 10

Tumblr

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Teen, Social Media and Technology Overview 2015, April 2015 www.pewinternet.org/files/2015/04/PI_TeensandTech_Update2015_0409151.pdf

Source: Pew Research Center, Teen, Social Media and Technology Overview 2015, April 2015 http://www.pewinternet.org/files/2015/04/PI_TeensandTech_Update2015_0409151.pdf

Hispanic And African-American Teens Use Messaging Apps More Frequently Than White Teens Hispanic and African-American Teens Use Messaging Apps More Frequently Than White Teens PERCENTAGE OF TEENS WHO USE MESSAGING APPS Percentage of Teens Who Use Messaging Apps

47

46

24

White

Black

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Teen, Social Media and Technology Overview 2015, April 2015 Source: Pew Research Center, Teen, Social Media and Technology Overview 2015, April 2015 www.pewinternet.org/files/2015/04/PI_TeensandTech_Update2015_0409151.pdf http://www.pewinternet.org/files/2015/04/PI_TeensandTech_Update2015_0409151.pdf

DATO S

A Z 87

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Digital Technology Used By Millennials By Race Digital Technology Used By Millennials By Race

94% 93% 95% 91%

54% 50% 51%

46%

10% 10% 11% 11% Smartphone

Tablet

Overall

Whites

Cell Phone Without An Internet Connection

African-Americans

Hispanics

Source: American Press Institute, How Millennials Use Technology To Get News, August 2015 www.americanpressinstitute.org/publications/reports/survey-research/race-ethnicity-device-usage-connectivity/

Source: American Press Institute, How Millennials Use Technology To Get News, August 2015 https://www.americanpressinstitute.org/publications/reports/survey-research/race-ethnicity-device-usage-connectivity/

YouTube Relied On Heavily By Hispanics To Obtain News and Information YouTube Relied On Heavily By Hispanics To Obtain News and Information

APPLICATIONS/WEBSITES VISITED TO NEWS INFORMATION Applications/Websites Visited ToOBTAIN Obtain News andAND Information 45% 38% 33%

20%

YouTube

30%

19%

16% 14% 11%

Instagram

14%15% 9%

Twitter

White

7%

Pinterest

African-American

10% 6%

Reddit

Hispanic

Source: American Press Institute, How Millennials Use Technology To Get News, August 2015 www.americanpressinstitute.org/publications/reports/survey-research/race-ethnicity-device-usage-connectivity/ Source: American Press Institute, How Millennials Use Technology To Get News, August 2015 https://www.americanpressinstitute.org/publications/reports/survey-research/race-ethnicity-device-usage-connectivity/

DATO S

A Z 88

2 0 1 6

9%

11%

5% Tumblr


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 3

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Hispanic Internet Users Look To Interact With Others While Online Hispanic Internet Users Look To Interact With Others While Online

AMONG INTERNET USERS, THE % WHO READ OR COMMENT IN DISCUSSION FORUMS Among internet users, the % who read or comment in discussion forums

17%

16% 13%

White

Black

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Mobile Messaging and Social Media 2015, August 2015 Source: Pew Research Center, Mobile Messaging and Social Media 2015, August 2015 www.pewinternet.org/2015/08/19/mobile-messaging-and-social-media-2015/ http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/08/19/mobile-messaging-and-social-media-2015/

3 Out Of 4 Hispanics Use Facebook Regularly While Online 3 Out Of 4 Hispanics Use Facebook Regularly While Online Among Internet users, the % who use Facebook

AMONG INTERNET USERS, THE % WHO USE FACEBOOK 75%

70%

67%

White

Black

Hispanic

Source: Pew Research Center, Mobile Messaging and Social Media 2015, August 2015 www.pewinternet.org/2015/08/19/mobile-messaging-and-social-media-2015/ Source: Pew Research Center, Mobile Messaging and Social Media 2015, August 2015 http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/08/19/mobile-messaging-and-social-media-2015/

DATO S

A Z 89

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

Mobile Messaging And Social Media 2015 2

36% OF SMARTPHONE OWNERS USE MESSAGING APPS, PEW RESEARCH CENTER WHILE 17% USE APPS THAT AUTOMATICALLY DELETE SENT MESSAGES BY MAEVE DUGGAN

Summary of Findings

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS today’s world, people — particularly InIn today’s world, people — particularly youngyoung people — are continually adapting —people are continually finding andfinding adaptingand new ways of new ways of communicating electronically to fit communicating electronically to fit their needs. Case in point: theirmarks needs. in Pew point: 2015 marks theasked first 2015 the Case first time Research Center has time Pewabout Research hasapps asked specifically mobile Center messaging as a separate specifically about mobile messaging a kind of mobile activity apart from cell phone apps texting.asAnd separate kind oftomobile activity apart from cell already, according a new survey, 36% of smartphone phonereport texting. already, according to a new owners usingAnd messaging apps such as WhatsApp, survey, 36% and of smartphone report using Kik or iMessage 17% use apps owners that automatically messaging apps such suchasasSnapchat WhatsApp, Kik or delete sent messages or Wickr. iMessage, and 17% use apps that automatically delete sent messages such as Snapchat oramong Both of these kinds of apps are particularly popular Wickr. young adults. Half (49%) of smartphone owners ages

Throughout this report, analysis is largely based on these

18 to 29 use messaging apps, while 41% use apps that

groups.

Messaging Apps Appeal to Smartphone Owners % of smartphone owners who use …

Pew Research Center Survey, March 17-April 12, 2015. PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Both of these kinds apps are particularly popular among young adults. Half (49%) of automatically delete sent of messages. These apps are free smartphone owners ages 18 to 29 use messaging apps, while 41% use apps that automatically and when connected to Wi-Fi, they do not use up SMS Along with asking about usage of mobile messaging apps, delete sent messages. These apps are free, and whentheconnected to Wi-Fi, they do not use up SMS (Short Messaging Service) or other data. Furthermore, they survey also tracked usage of a variety of social media (Short Messaging Service) or other data. Furthermore, they offer a more private kind of social offer a more private kind of social interaction than traditional platforms and online forums. Among the key findings: interaction than traditional social media platforms such as Facebook or Twitter. social media platforms such as Facebook or Twitter. •

The proportion of online adults who use Pinterest and

The results in this report reflect the noteworthy and rapid emergence of different kinds of The results in this report reflect the noteworthy and rapid Instagram has doubled since Pew Research Center communications tools serving different social needs. These new tools add to an already complex emergence of different kinds of communications tools first started tracking social media platform adoption and varied terrain of online and mobile interaction. serving different social needs. These new tools add to an

in 2012. Some 31% of online adults use Pinterest

already complex and varied terrain of online and mobile

(up from 15% in 2012), while 28% use Instagram

Overall, this survey found that 85% of adults are internet users and 67% are smartphone users. interaction. (up from 13% in 2012). However, none of the social Throughout this report, analysis is largely based on these groups.

media platforms measured in this survey experienced

Overall, this survey found that 85% of adults are internet

a statistically significant increase in usage between

Along with asking about usage of mobile messaging apps, the survey also tracked usage of a variety users and 67% are smartphone users. September 2014 and April 2015. of social media platforms and online forums. Among the key findings:

RECOMMENDED CITATION: Duggan, Maeve. “Mobile Messaging and Social Media – 2015” Pew Research Center. August 2015. Available at: www.pewinternet.org/2015/08/19/mobile-messaging-and-social-media-2015/

The proportion of online adults who use Pinterest and Instagram has doubled since Pew Research Center first started tracking platform adoption A Z 2 0 1 6 in 2012. Some 31% of DA T Osocial S media online adults use Pinterest (up from 15% in 2012), while 28% use Instagram (up from 13% in 90


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

In terms of user engagement, the proportion of

likely than women to participate in discussion forums

Instagram, Pinterest and LinkedIn users who use each

online.

respective site daily has increased significantly since September 2014. Fully 59% of Instagram users, 27%

3

The analysis in this report is based on telephone

of Pinterest users and 22% of LinkedIn users visit these interviews conducted March 17, 2015 through April PEW RESEARCH CENTER platforms daily. 12, 2015 among a national sample of 1,907 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states •  Facebook theengagement, most popular social media site of Instagram, and the District of Columbia. 672 respondents were In termsremains of user the proportion Pinterest and LinkedIn users who – use 72%each of online adults aresite Facebook users,increased amounting significantly interviewed a landline telephone and59% 1,235 respective daily has since on September 2014. Fully ofwere

users, 27% of Growth Pinterest users LinkedIn on users visit these platforms daily. toInstagram 62% of all American adults. on the site and has 22% ofinterviewed a cell phone, including 730 who had largely plateaued. There has not been a significant

no landline telephone. Of the full sample, 1,612

 change Facebook theofmost popular social 72% ofusers. online in the remains overall share users since 2012. Thosemedia site are–internet Theadults marginare of Facebook sampling error for amounting to 62% of allwith American adults. Growth theon site plateaued. onusers, Facebook remain highly engaged 70% saying results on based thehas full largely sample is plus or minus 2.6 There has not been a significant change in the overall share of users since 2012. Those on based they log on daily, including 43% who do so several percentage points. Because many items were Facebook log samples, on daily,results including who do so in times a day. remain highly engaged with 70% saying they on half based 43% on internet users several times a day. this report have a margin of sampling error of either •

Some 15% of internet users read or comment in

plus or minus 3.9 percentage points or plus or minus

 discussion Some 15% of internet users read forumspoints. suchResults as reddit, or forums such as reddit, Digg or or comment Slashdot, in discussion 4.0 percentage basedDigg on smartphone Slashdot, while use website the blogging Young are ofparticularly to 4.6 while 10% use the 10% blogging Tumblr. website Young Tumblr. owners haveadults a margin error of pluslikely or minus use both Tumblr and more generally, and men likely than adults are particularly likelydiscussion to use bothforums Tumblr and percentage points.are Seemore the Methods sectionwomen at the end to participate in discussion forums online. discussion forums more generally and men are more of this report for more details.

Pinterest and Instagram Usage Doubles Since 2012, Growth on Other Platforms is Slower % of online adults who say they use the following social media platform, by year

Pew Research Center Survey, March 17-April 12, 2015. PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Source: www.pewresearch.org

The analysis in this report is based on telephone interviews conducted March 17, 2015 through DATO S A Z 2 0 1 6 April 12, 2015 among a national sample of 1,907 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 91


YOUR TIME MATTERS. That’s why we deliver a world of resources through a real relationship focused on you and your business.

We are relationship-focused and highly responsive, bringing you deep local roots, expert bankers, access to decisionmakers, flexible solutions and a real commitment to superior service. All part of $15 billion Western Alliance Bancorporation, ranked #10 in the Forbes 2016 “Best Banks in America” list.

Your business matters.

Alliance Bank of Arizona, a division of Western Alliance Bank. Member FDIC.

602.389.3500 alliancebankofarizona.com


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Hispanics Are Active Digital Consumers

THE INTERNET IS A TRUSTED MEDIUM

INCREASED ACCESS TO INFORMATION

61

54

%

Agree, “For information, the first place I look is the internet”

USING FOR ENTERTAINMENT

40

%

%

Agree, “The internet has increased my desire to search for information”

Agree, “The internet has become a primary source of entertainment for my family” vs. 33% Non-Hispanic

Source: Simmons NHCS Winter 2016, Full Year. Base: Hispanic A18+ Online User (used any web sites in the last 30 days).. Courtesy of

Phoenix Online Hispanics Phoenix Online Hispanics Are a Growing Demo You Need to Reach Are A Growing Demo You Need To Reach Growth of Those Who Have Been Online In Past 30 Days

GROWTH OF THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN ONLINE IN PAST 30 DAYS 2011 2011 -- 2016 2016 +87%

+50% +35%

+8%

+15%

+11%

A18-34

+27%

+2% A35-44

+14%

+3% A45-54

Non-Hispanic

A55+

Hispanic

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Trending, 2011 Release 1 (Feb10-Jan11) to 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Source: Hispanic Scarborough Trending, 2011 Release 1 (Feb10-Jan11) to 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Adults 18+ who have visited a Adults 18+ who have visited a website in the past 30 days; Phoenix DMA website in the past 30 days; Phoenix DMA

DATO S

A Z 93

A18+

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Tucson Online Hispanics Tucson Online Hispanics Are a Growing Demo You Need to Reach Are a Growing Demo You Need to Reach GROWTHofOF THOSE WHO HAVEBeen BEENOnline ONLINEInINPast PAST30 30Days DAYS Growth Those Who Have 2011 2016 2011 - 2016

+75% +58% +33% +9%

+5%

+2% -12%

A18-34

+34%

+27%

-26%

A35-44

A45-54

Non-Hispanic

A55+

A18+

Hispanic

Source: Scarborough Trending, 2011 Release 1 (Feb10-Jan11) to 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Adults 18+ who have visited a website in the past 30 days; Tucson DMA

Source: Scarborough Trending, 2011 Release 1 (Feb10-Jan11) to 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Adults 18+ who have visited a website in the past 30 days; Tucson DMA

Courtesy of

Phoenix Has…

933,000 Hispanic Adults

IN THE PHOENIX DMA

849,000

91%

805,000

86%

Hispanic Adults THAT ARE ONLINE

Hispanic Adults

WITH A MOBILE DEVICE

673,000 Hispanic Adults ON SOCIAL MEDIA

72%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanics 18+; Phoenix DMA

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 94

2 0 1 6

24


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Tucson Has…

302,000 Hispanic Adults

IN THE TUCSON DMA

264,000

87%

245,000

81%

Hispanic Adults THAT ARE ONLINE

Hispanic Adults

WITH A MOBILE DEVICE

214,000

71%

Hispanic Adults ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Source: Scarborough, 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanics 18+; Tucson DMA

Courtesy of

Internet Penetration Rate in Phoenix Since 2011, internet use by Hispanics grew by 23 percentage points vs. Non-Hispanics only 8 percentage points

Internet Penetration Rate In Phoenix SINCE 2011, INTERNET USE BY HISPANICS GREW BY 23 PERCENTAGE POINTS VS. NON-HISPANICS AT ONLY 8 PERCENTAGE POINTS

93% 91%

85% 68%

2011

2012

2013

2014

Non-Hispanics

2015

2016

Hispanics

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+; Phoenix DMA;“internet use” defined as any internet access. Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+; Phoenix DMA; “Internet Use” defined as any Internet Access.

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 95

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Internet Penetration Rate In Tucson Internet Penetration Rate in Tucson Since 2011, internet use by Hispanics grew by 17 percentage points vs. Non-Hispanics at only 9 percentage points

SINCE 2011, INTERNET USE BY HISPANICS GREW BY 17 PERCENTAGE POINTS VS. NON-HISPANICS AT ONLY 9 PERCENTAGE POINTS

91%

82%

87% 70%

2011

2012

2013

2014

Non-Hispanics

2015

2016

Hispanics

Source: Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+; Tucson DMA; “internet use” defined as any internet access.

Courtesy of

Source: Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+; Tucson DMA; “Internet Use” defined as any Internet Access.

Mobile Device Penetration in Phoenix Mobile Device ownership by Phoenix Hispanics has surpassed Mobile Device ownership by Non-Hispanics since 2014

Mobile Device Penetration In Phoenix MOBILE DEVICE OWNERSHIP BY PHOENIX HISPANICS HAS SURPASSED MOBILE DEVICE OWNERSHIP BY NON-HISPANICS SINCE 2014 86% 82%

0% 0%

2011

2012

2013

2014

Non-Hispanics

2015

2016

Hispanics

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+,

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+, Phoenix DMA; “Mobile Device” defined as owning a Tablet or Phoenix DMA; “mobile device” defined as owning a tablet or smartphone. Smartphone.

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 96

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Mobile Device Penetration in Tucson Mobile Device ownership by Tucson Hispanics has surpassed Mobile Device ownership by Non-Hispanics since 2014

Mobile Device Penetration In Tucson MOBILE DEVICE OWNERSHIP BY TUCSON HISPANICS HAS SURPASSED MOBILE DEVICE OWNERSHIP BY NON-HISPANICS SINCE 2014 81% 80%

0% 0%

2011

2012

2013

2014

Non-Hispanics

2015

2016

Hispanics

Source: Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+; Tucson DMA; “mobile device” defined as owning a tablet or smartphone. Source: Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+; Tucson DMA; “Mobile Device” defined as owning a Tablet or Smartphone.

Courtesy of

Social Media Penetration in Phoenix Social Media Usage by Phoenix Hispanics has NOW surpassed Social Media Usage by Non-Hispanics

Social Media Penetration In Phoenix SOCIAL MEDIA USAGE BY PHOENIX HISPANICS HAS NOW SURPASSED SOCIAL MEDIA USAGE BY NON-HISPANICS 72% 71% 47% 37%

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Non-Hispanics Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+; Phoenix DMA; “social media” defined as having spent any time on social media websites in the past 30 days. Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+; Phoenix DMA; “Social Media” defined as having spent any time on social media websites in the past 30 days.

DATO S

A Z 97

Courtesy of

2 0 1 6

31


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Social Media Penetration in Tucson Social Media Usage by Tucson Hispanics has NOW surpassed Social Media Usage by Non-Hispanics

Social Media Penetration In Tucson SOCIAL MEDIA USAGE BY TUCSON HISPANICS HAS NOW SURPASSED SOCIAL MEDIA USAGE BY NON-HISPANICS 71% 69% 45% 44%

2010

2011

2012

2013

Non-Hispanics

2014

2015

Hispanics

Source: Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+; Source: Scarborough 2011-2016 Release 1, Adults 18+; Tucson DMA; Tucson DMA; “social media” defined as having spent any time on social media websites in the past 30 days. “Social Media” defined as having spent any time on social media websites in the past 30 days.

Courtesy of

Phoenix Online Hispanics Top Websites/Apps Visited Past Month AMONG PHOENIX HISPANIC ONLINE ADULTS18+ (SORTED BY HISPANIC PERCENT) WEBSITE/APP VISITED PAST 30 DAYS

PHOENIX HISPANIC % COMPOSITION INDEX

1.

Facebook

81.1%

110

2.

Google

79.7%

96

3.

YouTube

72.1%

4.

Netflix

49.8%

5.

Amazon

6.

WEBSITE/APP VISITED PAST 30 DAYS

PHOENIX HISPANIC % COMPOSITION INDEX

11. Instagram

30.1%

132

12. Cox

27.0%

94

141

13. Pinterest

22.9%

110

120

14. FOXNews

20.9%

96

47.2%

100

15. CNN

20.3%

108

Craigslist

46.2%

117

16. Groupon

19.4%

89

7.

Pandora

45.1%

149

17. Twitter

19.3%

134

8.

Yahoo!

35.9%

101

18. Arizona Cardinals

17.3%

124

9.

Google+

33.2%

175

19. ESPN

17.2%

85

33.0%

124

20. Bing

16.8%

106

10. eBay

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Release 1 2016 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanic Adults 18+; Phoenix DMA; Base: Access Internet Index: % more or less likely than market’s average person

DATO S

A Z 98

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Tucson Online Hispanics Top Websites/Apps Visited Past Month AMONG TUCSON ONLINE HISPANIC ADULTS18+ (SORTED BY HISPANIC PERCENT) WEBSITE/APP VISITED PAST 30 DAYS

TUCSON HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

INDEX

WEBSITE/APP VISITED PAST 30 DAYS

TUCSON HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

INDEX

11. Instagram

26.7%

143

12. eBay

23.1%

95

1.

Google

87.0%

100

2.

Facebook

72.2%

98

3.

YouTube

53.2%

104

13. Pinterest

22.1%

113

4.

Pandora

50.2%

130

14. ESPN

21.6%

98

5.

Netflix

40.2%

101

15. CNN

19.6%

112

6.

Amazon

37.9%

83

16. Bing

17.7%

97

7.

Craigslist

35.3%

98

17. ABCNews

14.4%

118

8.

Google+

35.2%

165

18. The Weather Channel

14.1%

65

9.

Yahoo!

30.0%

97

19. Groupon

14.0%

88

28.7%

106

20. iHeartRadio

13.9%

115

10. Cox

Source: Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanic Adults 18+; Tucson DMA; Base: Access Internet Index: % more or less likely than market’s average person

Courtesy of

Phoenix Online Hispanics Top Media Websites Visited Past Month AMONG PHOENIX ONLINE HISPANIC ADULTS18+ (SORTED BY HISPANIC PERCENT)

MEDIA WEBSITE VISITED PAST 30 DAYS 1.

Fox10Phoenix.com/MyFoxPhoenix.com

2.

Cox.com

3.

ABC15.com

4.

Univision.com/UnivisionArizona.com

5.

AZFamily.com

6.

Arizona Republic online/AZCentral.com

7.

TelemundoArizona.com

8.

KPNX online/12News.com

9.

KUPD-FM/98kupd.com

PHOENIX HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

PHOENIX SPANISH-DOMINANT HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

24.9% 20.8% 18.4% 16.0% 15.5% 12.7% 12.5% 10.8% 6.5% 6.3% 5.0% 4.3% 4.2% 3.9% 3.0%

10. AZTV.com 11. KKFR-FM/power983.com 12. KPHO.com 13. My45.com 14. KTAR-FM/ktar.com 15. KNIX-FM/knixcountry.com

20.1% 23.1% 14.4% 30.6% 11.8% 3.7% 23.6% 7.3% 5.2% 5.6% 5.7% 1.7% 1.9% 1.3% 0.4%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanic Adults 18+ and Spanish-dominant Hispanic Adults 18+; Phoenix DMA; Base: Access Internet Index

DATO S

A Z 99

Courtesy of

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Tucson Online Hispanics Top Media Websites Visited Past Month AMONG TUCSON ONLINE HISPANIC ADULTS18+ (SORTED BY HISPANIC PERCENT)

TUCSON HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

MEDIA WEBSITE VISITED PAST 30 DAYS 1.

Cox.com

2.

KGUN9.com

3.

Univision.com

4.

TucsonNewsNow.com

5.

TelemundoArizona.com

6.

KVOA.com

7.

Arizona Daily Star online/Tucson.com/AZStarNet.com

8.

KRQQ-FM/krq.com

9.

XFINITY.com/Comcast.net

TUCSON SPANISH-DOMINANT HISPANIC % COMPOSITION

18.9% 18.5% 18.2% 17.9% 16.9% 16.4% 13.9% 7.8% 5.7% 4.2%

10. TucsonCitizen.com

17.4% 9.8% 39.2% 12.1% 37.7% 8.8% 2.8% 2.0% 3.7% 0.2%

Source: Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanic Adults 18+, Tucson DMA; Spanish-dominant Hispanic Adults 18+; sorted by Hispanic % Base: Access Internet Index

Courtesy of

Phoenix Ranks 5th With Hispanic Smartphone Penetration % OF HOUSEHOLDS WITH A SMARTPHONE

88%

HISPANIC TOTAL US

93%

DENVER

92%

SACRAMENTO

91%

DALLAS

90%

HOUSTON

89%

PHOENIX

TOTAL US SMARTPHONE PENETRATION

89

%

PHOENIX

#5

88%

CHICAGO

86%

MIAMI

85%

LOS ANGELES

83%

NEW YORK

81%

SAN FRANCISCO

=86%

Hispanic Smartphone Penetration in Phoenix is Higher than the Hispanic Total U.S. and the Phoenix Total U.S.

Source: Local Watch Report 1Q 2016, The Nielsen Company; Mobile Insights, P13+, FEB2015

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 100

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Phoenix Hispanic Smartphone/Tablet Ownership and Usage

78

50

%

%

OF PHOENIX HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS OWN SMARTPHONES

OF PHOENIX HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS OWN TABLETS

Vs. 70% for Non-Hispanics

Vs. 57% for Non-Hispanics

VARIOUS WAYS PHOENIX HISPANICS USE INTERNET/APPS ON SMARTPHONE VS TABLET LISTEN TO LOCAL RADIO STATION ONLINE

MOVIES (WATCH OR DOWNLOAD)

ONLINE DATING

LISTEN TO RADIO (LOCAL OR INTERNET)

WATCH TV ONLINE (NETFLIX, HULU)

DOWNLOAD/ PURCHASE MUSIC

INSTANT MESSAGING

PLAY OR DOWNLOAD GAMES

Smartphone

193

181

154

142

142

125

124

121

Tablet

268

202

166

175

165

196

110

132

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanic Adults 18+; Phoenix DMA; Index: % more or less likely than market’s average person; sorted by smartphone

Courtesy of

Tucson Hispanic Smartphone/Tablet Ownership and Usage

76

49

%

%

OF TUCSON HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS OWN SMARTPHONES Vs. 72% for Non-Hispanics

OF TUCSON HISPANIC HOUSEHOLDS OWN TABLETS

Vs. 48% for Non-Hispanics

VARIOUS WAYS TUCSON HISPANICS USE INTERNET/APPS ON SMARTPHONE VS TABLET LISTEN TO LOCAL RADIO STATION ONLINE

MOVIES (WATCH OR DOWNLOAD)

ONLINE DATING

LISTEN TO RADIO (LOCAL OR INTERNET)

Smartphone

137

132

231

Tablet

103

131

280

INSTANT MESSAGING

DOWNLOAD/ PURCHASE MUSIC

SOCIAL MEDIA

WATCH VIDEO CLIPS (YOUTUBE, ETC)

127

106

105

104

103

130

121

91

107

112

Source: Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanic Adults 18+; Tucson DMA; Index: % more or less likely than market’s average person; sorted by smartphone

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 101

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Hispanics Are Super Social

94

%

OF ONLINE HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ ARE SOCIAL MEDIA USERS vs. 89% of Non-Hispanics Content shared by Hispanics is

Hispanic Consumers

Share Content

13% more likely

5X

More Often

to be clicked on by others

Than Non-Hispanics Source: Simmons NHCS Winter 2016, Full year, Population Adults 18+; Base: “Online” defined as visited website/search engine in past 30 days; “Social Media User” defined by Simmons as visited social media websites in past 30 days, visited online sharing sites, or engaged in online social media activities (i.e. blogging) in past 30 days

Courtesy of

Phoenix Hispanic Social Media Users

72

AMONG PHOENIX HISPANIC ADULTS 18+

% USE SOCIAL MEDIA APPS

TIME SPENT USING SOCIAL MEDIA TIME SPENT/AVG DAY

PHOENIX HISPANICS % COMPOSITION

PHOENIX NON-HISPANICS % COMPOSITION

HISPANIC INDEX TO TOTAL

< 1 hour

25%

47%

61

1-2 hours

38%

26%

133

3-4 hours

21%

10%

171

5+ hours

7%

6%

112

Source: Hispanic Scarborough 2016 Release 1(Feb15-Jan16) Phoenix, Hispanic Adults 18+; Base: Visited Social Media site past month Index: % more or less likely than market’s average person

DATO S

A Z 102

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 3

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Tucson Hispanic Social Media Users AMONG TUCSON HISPANIC ADULTS 18+

71

% USE SOCIAL MEDIA APPS

TIME SPENT USING SOCIAL MEDIA TIME SPENT/AVG DAY

TUCSON HISPANICS % COMPOSITION

TUCSON NON-HISPANICS % COMPOSITION

HISPANIC INDEX TO TOTAL

< 1 hour

35%

40%

90

1-2 hours

24%

36%

76

3-4 hours

15%

9%

137

5+ hours

11%

6%

146

Source: Scarborough 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16), Hispanic Adults 18+ ; Tucson DMA; Base: Visited Social Media site last month Index: % more or less likely than market’s average person

Hispanics Hispanics are more engaged on Mobile Are More Engaged NATIONAL

Courtesy of

On Mobile

NATIONAL 61%

I use my cellphone in many ways to get the information I need

58% 48%

My cellphone connects me to my social world

44% 40%

Friendships would not be as close as they are without my cellphone

33% 39%

Texting is just as meaningful as an actual conversation on the cellphone

35% 24%

I am likely to purchase products I see advertised on my cellphone

I would be interested in receiving advertisements on my cellphone

14% 17% 7% Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Simmons, Winter 2016, 12-month study; Base: Non-Hispanic Adults 18+, Hispanic Adults 18+ Answered above statements with any agreement

Courtesy of

Source: Simmons, Winter 2016, 12-month study (Base: Non-Hispanic Adults 18+, Hispanic Adults 18+). Answered above statements with any agreement.

DATO S

A Z 103

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 3

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

TECHNOLOGY

Netflix Usage Is Higher Among Hispanics Than Any Other Ethnicity NATIONAL Total US

Hispanics

Netflix (DVD/Streaming)

38%

45%

Netflix Streaming

35%

44%

Hulu Total

16%

16%

Hulu Plus

7%

7%

Basic Hulu

11%

11%

Amazon Prime Instant Video

15%

10%

Source: Nielsen, 2014 SUBSCRIPTION Video-on-demand Survey Courtesy of

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 104

2 0 1 6


When you go back to school, you’re not only proving something to yourself, you’re showing your family it’s never too late to pursue a brighter future.

Big ideas shape the world. | phoenix.edu

KNOWLEDGE HAS A RIPPLE EFFECT Business | Healthcare | Security | Technology | Sciences | Education

The University’s Central Administration is located at 1625 W. Fountainhead Pkwy., Tempe, AZ 85282. ©2016 University of Phoenix, Inc. All rights reserved | NAT-7146


Join Our Team!

Full and Part-Time Jobs Available

Join for a Job,

Stay for a

Career! To Join Our Team, go to jobs.frysfood.com

Excellent Advancement and Career Opportunities Fry’s ’ is an Equal Opportunity Employer


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

NOTES

Notes

DATO S

A Z 107

2 0 1 6

M A R K E T


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 4

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Primary Languages Spoken In The United States Number of Primary Language Speakers in the United States 231,122,908

37,458,470

English English

2,896,766

2,047,467

1,613,346

Chinese Chinese

French/French Creole French and French Creole

Tagalog Tagalog

Spanish Spanish

Source: World Atlas, The Most Spoken Languages in America, December 2015 Source: World Atlas, The Most Spoken Languages in America, December 2015 http://www.worldatlas.com/articles/the-most-spoken-languages-in-america.html www.worldatlas.com/articles/the-most-spoken-languages-in-america.html

Bilingualism Among Hispanics Bilingualism Amongst Hispanics Continues To Rise Continues To Rise 44% 38% 34%

31%

31%

22%

Bilingual

English-Dominant

2003

Spanish-Dominant

2013

Source: Nielsen, The New American Vanguard, October 2015 Source: Nielsen, The New American Vanguard, October 2015 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2015-reports/hispanic-consumer-report-oct-2015.pdf http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2015/the-new-american-vanguard-latinos-50-are-healthy-wealthy-and-wise.html

DATO S

A Z 108

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

U.S. Hispanics And Primary Language Used By Nativity U.S. Hispanics and Primary Language Used By Nativity 76%

3rd Generation

42%

2nd Generation

All Hispanics

5%

1%

50%

56%

U.S. Born

Foreign Born

23%

8%

39%

35%

5%

60%

25%

36%

38%

English

Both

Spanish

Source: Pew Research Center, A Majority of English-speaking Hispanics in the U.S. Are Bilingual, March 2015 Source: Pew Research Center, A Majority of English-speaking Hispanics in the U.S. Are Bilingual, March 2015 www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/24/a-majority-of-english-speaking-hispanics-in-the-u-s-are-bilingual/ http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/24/a-majority-of-english-speaking-hispanics-in-the-u-s-are-bilingual/

U.S. Hispanics And Primary Language Used By Age U.S. Hispanics and Primary Language Used By Age 65 years and older

50-64 years

30-49 years

18-29 years

13%

40%

47%

25%

21%

32%

42%

33%

47%

36%

42%

English

Both

Spanish

Source: Pew Research Center, A Majority of English-speaking Hispanics in the U.S. Are Bilingual, March 2015 www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/24/a-majority-of-english-speaking-hispanics-in-the-u-s-are-bilingual/

Source: Pew Research Center, A Majority of English-speaking Hispanics in the U.S. Are Bilingual, March 2015 http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/24/a-majority-of-english-speaking-hispanics-in-the-u-s-are-bilingual/

DATO S

A Z 109

2 0 1 6

22%


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 4

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

U.S. Hispanics And Primary Language Used By Origin U.S. Hispanics and Primary Language Used By Origin Salvadoran Salvadorean

Dominican Dominican

Cuban Cuban

63%

35%

3%

51%

36%

13%

40%

34%

26%

Mexican Mexican

48%

43%

10%

16%

41%

42%

Puerto PuertoRican Rican

Englsih English

Both Both

Spanish Spanish

Source: Pew Research Center, A Majority of English-speaking Hispanics in the U.S. Are Bilingual, March 2015 Source: Pew Research Center, A Majority of English-speaking Hispanics in the U.S. Are Bilingual, March 2015 http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/24/a-majority-of-english-speaking-hispanics-in-the-u-s-are-bilingual/ www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/24/a-majority-of-english-speaking-hispanics-in-the-u-s-are-bilingual/

Rise In English Proficiency Among Young Hispanics Since 2000 Rise In English Proficiency Among Young Hispanics Since 2000 88% 76%

73% 59%

Ages 5 to 17

53% 55%

Ages 18 to 33

Ages 34 to 39

2000

52%

48%

Ages 50 to 68

2014

Source: Pew Research Center, Rise In English Proficiency Among U.S. Hispanics Is Driven By The Young , April 2016 Source: Pew Research Center, Rise In English Proficiency Among U.S. Hispanics Is Driven By The Young , April 2016 http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/04/20/rise-in-english-proficiency-among-u-s-hispanics-is-driven-by-the-young/ www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/04/20/rise-in-english-proficiency-among-u-s-hispanics-is-driven-by-the-young/

DATO S

A Z 110

2 0 1 6

43% 42%

Ages 69 and Older


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

English The Dominant Language Used By Hispanics While Engaged Online Language Used by Hispanics While Online

English The Dominant Language Used By Hispanics While Engaged Online LANGUAGE USED BY HISPANICS WHILE ONLINE

48%

52%

English

Spanish

Source: The Wall Street Journal, "YouTube Rolls Out Ad Targeting Tool Geared For Hispanic Audiences," March 2015 blogs.wsj.com/cmo/2015/03/11/youtube-rolls-out-ad-targeting-tool-geared-for-hispanic-audiences/

Source: The Wall Street Journal, YouTube Rolls Out Ad Targeting Tool Geared For Hispanic Audiences, March 2015 http://blogs.wsj.com/cmo/2015/03/11/youtube-rolls-out-ad-targeting-tool-geared-for-hispanic-audiences/

'IS SPEAKING SPANISH NECESSARY Speaking Spanish Not Necessary To Be Considered Hispanic TO BE HISPANIC?'

28%

71%

All Hispanics

11%

19%

41%

87%

81%

58%

Foreign Born

U.S. Born

No, not necessary

Yes, necessary

Source: Pew Research Center, Is Speaking Spanish Necessary To Be Hispanic?, February 2016 Source: Pew Research Center, "Is Speaking Spanish Necessary To Be Hispanic?," February 2016 http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/02/19/is-speaking-spanish-necessary-to-be-hispanic-most-hispanics-say-no/ www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/02/19/is-speaking-spanish-necessary-to-be-hispanic-most-hispanics-say-no/

DATO S

A Z 111

2 0 1 6

Hispanic Registered Voters


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Strong Presence Of Media Strong Presence of Media In Latino Lifestyle In Latino Lifestyle (Number of users in thousands)

AM/FM AM/FMRadio Radio

Hispanic

Multimedia Device Multimedia Device

Black

18,627 7,295

10,390

14,485

22,611

Internet on aa PC PC Internet on

4,235

5,749

13,211

20,001

5,442

9,059

Game Game Console

5,248

19,397

DVD/Blu-Ray DVD/Blu-ray Device Device

3,634

10,029 4,514

DVR/Time-shifted DVR/Time-shifted TV TV

7,013

13,629

10,899

7,409

Live Live TV+DVR

25,525

31,392

37,089 29,343 20,331 12,147

19,013

28,580

34,982

(NUMBER OF USERS IN THOUSANDS)

Video Video on a PC

App/Web App/Web on on a a Smartphone Smartphone

Video Videoon onaa Smartphone Smartphone

Asian-American

Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016

http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf

Hispanic Media Consumption By Age Range Monthly Minutes Spent By Medium Hispanic Media Consumption By Age Range

Live TV+DVR TV+DVR Live

DVR/Time-shifted DVR/Time-shifted TV TV

AM/FM Radio AM/FM

18+ years

DVD/Blu-ray DVD/Blu-Ray Device Device

18-24 years

Game Console Console

25-34 years

Multimedia Multimedia Device Device

Internet on on a a PC PC

35-49 years

Video on a PC Video

50-64 years

Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016

Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf

DATO S

A Z 112

2 0 1 6

204 313 193 184 112

3,234 3,660 3,361 3,385 2,411

1,189 1,270 1,351 1,581 640 515

2,560 2,585 2,825 2,621 2,273 2,147

1,304 1,465 1,659 1,132 921 950

1,528 2,591 1,635 936 606 670

611 655 694 555 615 506

1,135 794 1,141 1,131 1,286 1,381

3,611 2,884 3,317 3,897 4,135 3,861

4,192

6,031 7,302

7,529

9,732

13,116

MONTHLY MINUTES SPENT BY MEDIUM

App/Web on a App/Web Smartphone Smartphone

65+ years

Video on on a a Video Smartphone Smartphone


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Percentage of Households With Various Devices By Ethnicity

92%

Hispanic

49%

44%

55%

49%

57%

16%

22%

27%

Enabled Smart High Definition Enabled Smart High-definition TV TV TV

39%

43%

48%

63% DVD DVD

16%

23%

41%

45%

44% DVD/Blu-Ray DVD/Blu-ray Player Player

71%

82%

90%

96%

94% 68%

74%

73%

90%

Percentage of Households With Various Devices By Ethnicity

Multimedia Multimedia Device Device

Black

Any Any Smartphone Smartphone

Subscription Subscription Video Video on On Demand Demand

Asian-American

Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 113

2 0 1 6

Any Any Tablet Tablet

Video VideoGame Game Console Console


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Mobile Device Penetration Among Mobile Subscribers 13+ By Ethnicity Mobile Device Penetration Among Mobile Subscribers By Ethnicity

20%

80%

White

12%

16%

12%

88%

84%

88%

Black

Hispanic

Smartphone

Asian-American

Feature Phone

Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf

http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf

Smartphones, Radio and TV Are The Most Popular Forms of Media Consumed By Hispanics Smartphones and Radio Are The Most Popular Forms of Media Consumed By Hispanics Weekly Minutes Spent By Race WEEKLY MINUTES SPENT

3,028

3,500

3,000

0

TV

Radio

TV-Connected Devices

Hispanic

Black

PC Total

114

2 0 1 6

80

141

80

Asian-American

A Z

431

Smartphone (App+Web)

Source: Nielsen, Comparable Metrics Report, April 2016 Source: Nielsen, Comparable Metrics Report, April 2016 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/comparable-metrics-report-q4-2015.pdf http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/comparable-metrics-report-q4-2015.pdf

DATO S

609

650 266

439

309

256

500

225

219

1,000

798

1,500

811

1,085

2,000

1,670

2,500

Tablet (App+Web)


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Strong Smartphone Usage Among Hispanics Strong Smartphone Usage Among Hispanics

Weekly Minutes Spent By Race

DVD/Blu-Ray DVD/Blu-ray Device Device

Total Adults

Game Console Console Game

Device

Hispanic

Black

Video Video on onaaPC PC

29

17

22

427

631

578

App/Web App/Webon ona a Smartphone Smartphone

32

104

74

76

Multimedia Device Internet Internet on Multimedia on aa PC PC

79

337

222

230

137

59

118

73

125

80

112

115

63

59 AM/FMRadio Radio AM/FM

43

309

DVR/Time-Shifted DVR/Time-shifted TV TV

59

190

120

204 LiveTV+DVR TV+DVR Live

132

504

748

728

728

976

1,489

1,888

2,677

WEEKLY MINUTES SPENT BY RACE

Video Videoon ona a Smartphone Smartphone

Asian-American

Source: Nielsen, Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 The Total Audience Report, March 2016 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf

Hispanic Adults Highly Engaged Hispanic Adults Highly Engaged in Social Media In Social Media Percentage of Adults Engaged In Social Media

72%

Total U.S. Adults

80%

U.S. Hispanics

Source: MarketingProfs, "How To Effectively Market To The Growing US Hispanic Market," July 2015 www.marketingprofs.com/articles/2015/28151/how-to-effectively-market-to-the-growing-us-hispanic-market#ixzz3wft8OKpn

Source: MarketingProfs, How To Effectively Market To The Growing US Hispanic Market, July 2015 http://www.marketingprofs.com/articles/2015/28151/how-to-effectively-market-to-the-growing-us-hispanic-market#ixzz3wft8OKpn

DATO S

A Z

115

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Percentage of Households With Various Percentage of Households With Various Television Distribution Sources By Ethnicity Television Distribution Sources By Ethnicity 87%

84%

81%

77%

45% 45%

42% 36%

35%

31% 26%

10%

14%

16% 16%

12% 13% 11%

20%

16%

3% 2% 3% Broadcast Only

Cable Plus

Wired Cable (No Telco)

White

Black

Telco

Hispanic

Satellite

7%

Broadband Only

Asian-American

Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf

Number of Households With TV Provider and Internet Status By Ethnicity Number of Households With TV Provider (In thousands) And Internet Status By Ethnicity (IN THOUSANDS) 8,448 8,585

3,842

1,087

3,707

4,186

1,487 1,530 653

698

Broadcast Only and Broadband Access

320

153 Broadcast Only and No Internet/Dial-Up Access

Hispanic

Cable Plus and Broadband Access

Black

Asian-American

Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf

Source: Nielsen, The Total Audience Report, March 2016 http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/reports-downloads/2016-reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf

DATO S

A Z 116

2 0 1 6

Cable Plus and No Internet/Dial-Up Access


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Since 2008, Revenues At Spanish News Radio Stations Have Declined Significantly Since 2008, Revenues at Spanish Radio Stations Have Declined Significantly

REVENUES Revenues at Spanish News Radio Stations AT SPANISH NEWS RADIO STATIONS

$1,328,000

$1,028,000

$949,000

2008

2009

$1,005,000

2010

$977,000

2011

$936,000

2012

2013

$875,000

$855,000

2014

2015

NOTE: This only reflect national spanish news station, not all spanish radio stations; Source: PEW Research Center, State of the News Media 2016, June 2016 sadly yes,http://www.journalism.org/2016/06/15/state-of-the-news-media-2016/ but this is only 'news' in spanish radio station not 'all' Source: PEW Research Center, State of the News Media 2016, June 2016 www.journalism.org/2016/06/15/state-of-the-news-media-2016/

Weekly Time InWeekly Time in Minutes Spent Listening to Radio Minutes Spent Listening To Radio 939

898

891

848

841 781

747

Black

820

842 776

719

Hispanic Hispanic

2011

883 807

749

824

777 727

842 792

708

English-DominantH English-Dominant Hispanic

2012

858

2013

Spanish-DominantH Spanish-Dominant Hispanic

2014

802

764

728

704

Other Other

2015 *Adults 18-49 years of age

Source: Nielsen, "The Latino Listener: How Do Hispanics Tune In To The Radio," January 2016 www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/the-latino-listener-how-do-hispanics-tune-in-to-the-radio.html Source: Nielsen, The Latino listener: How Do Hispanics Tune In To The Radio, January 2016 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/the-latino-listener-how-do-hispanics-tune-in-to-the-radio.html

DATO S

A Z 117

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Weekly National Hispanic Radio Audience Has Increased 11% From 2011-2015 Weekly National Hispanic Radio Audience Has Increased 11% from 2011-2015 (In millions)

(IN MILLIONS) 40.4

36.5

2011

2015

Source: Nielsen, The Latino listener: How Do Hispanics Tune In To The Radio, January 2016 Source: Nielsen, "The Latino Listener: How Do Hispanics Tune In To The Radio," January 2016 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/the-latino-listener-how-do-hispanics-tune-in-to-the-radio.html www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/the-latino-listener-how-do-hispanics-tune-in-to-the-radio.html

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 118

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Continued Low Representation Of Hispanics In U.S. Media Continued Low-Representation of Hispanics in U.S. Media % of Hispanic Journalists Working at U.S. Daily Newspapers

% OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS WORKING AT U.S. DAILY NEWSPAPERS 5% 4%

2004

4%

2006

4%

4%

5%

4%

4%

2008

2010

4%

4%

2012

2014

4%

2016

Source: PEW Research Center, State of the News Media 2016, June 2016 Source: PEW Research Center, State of the News Media 2016, June 2016 www.journalism.org/2016/06/15/state-of-the-news-media-2016/ http://www.journalism.org/2016/06/15/state-of-the-news-media-2016/

Major Spanish Daily Newspapers Major Spanish Daily Newspapers Face Significant Decline FaceTotal Average Monday-Friday Circulation Significant Decline READERSHIP

49,953

La Opinion (Los Angeles)

64,260

40,315

El Nuevo Herald (Miami)

46,960

29,339

El Diario La Prensa (New York)

32,150

2015

2014

Source: PEW Research Center, State of the News Media 2016, June 2016 www.journalism.org/2016/06/15/state-of-the-news-media-2016/ Source: PEW Research Center, State of the News Media 2016, June 2016

http://www.journalism.org/2016/06/15/state-of-the-news-media-2016/

DATO S

A Z 119

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Phoenix TV Landscape ADULTS 18-49 – 4 BOOK AVERAGE – JUL 15/NOV 15/FEB 16/MAY 16 TOTAL DAY AVERAGE AUDIENCE

#1

15,900

#6

7,900

#2

13,900

#6

7,900

#3

11,900

#6

7,900

#3

11,900

#9

4,000

#3

11,900

#9

4,000

Source: NSI, Phoenix, 4 Book Average Jul '15/Nov '15/Feb '16/May '16 Sweeps, Live+SD, Adults 18-49. Rankings based on thousands. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a. *Includes only top 10 TV Stations

Courtesy of

KTVW UNI + KFPH UMA 4 BOOK AVG • • BROADCAST SHARES in PHOENIX• ADULTS 18-49 4 BOOK AVERAGE BROADCAST SHARES IN PHOENIX• ADULTS 18-49 KPPX ION 4%

KAZT IND 2%

KUTP IND 2%

KASW CW 4%

KTVW UNI 13%

KTVK IND 8%

KTAZ TEL 8%

KTAZ TEL 27%

KFPH UMA 8%

ALL BROADCAST

SPANISH LANGUAGE KSAZ FOX 15%

KPNX+ NBC 12%

21%

KFPH UMA 26%

KNXV ABC 12%

KPHO CBS 12% KMOH MMX 0%

KTVW UNI 47%

KVPA ETV 0%

KMOH MMX 0%

KPDF AZA 0%

29%

KPHE IND 0%

KVPA ETV 0%

73%

KTVW/KFPH Share: 21%

KTVW/KFPH Share: 73%

Spanish Language TVSPANISH share of Broadcast Viewing: 29% KTVW/ KUVE/ LANGUAGE Source: NSI, Phoenix, 4 Book Average Jul’15/Nov’15/Feb’16/May’16 Sweeps, Live+SD, Adults 18-49. Rankings based on thousands. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a. TV SHARE OF KFPH KFTU BROADCAST SHARE SHARE VIEWING

Source: NSI, Phoenix, 4 Book Average Jul '15/Nov '15/Feb '16/May '16 Sweeps, Live+SD, Adults 18-49. Rankings based on thousands. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a.

DATO S

A Z 120

Courtesy of

2 0 1 6

KPDF AZA 0%


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Tucson TV Landscape ADULTS 18-49 – FEB/MAY 2016 AVERAGE TOTAL DAY AVERAGE AUDIENCE

#1

4,600

#2

3,300

#6

1,700

#7

1,200

#8

800

#9

400

#9

400

#9

400

2,900

#3

#3

2,900

#5

2,100

Source: NSI, Tucson, 2 Book Average Feb & May 2016 Sweeps, Live+SD, Adults 18-49. Rankings based on thousands. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a.

Courtesy of

KUVE UNI + KFTU UMA FEB/MAY 2016 • BROADCAST SHARES in TUCSON• ADULTS 18-49

FEB/MAY 2016 • BROADCAST SHARES IN TUCSON• ADULTS 18-49 KWBA CW 4%

NHRR ION 2%

KUDF AZA 2%

KTTU IND 6%

KFTU UMA 2%

KHRR TEL 8%

KMSB FOX 10%

KUDF AZA 7%

KUVE UNI 14%

KUVE UNI 54%

ALL BROADCAST

KHRR TEL 32%

KOLD CBS 22%

SPANISH LANGUAGE

KGUN ABC 14% KFTU UMA 7%

KVOA NBC 16%

KUVE/KFTU Share: 16% Spanish Language TV share of Broadcast Viewing: 26%

16%

26%

KUVE/KFTU Share: 61%

SPANISH LANGUAGE TV SHARE OF BROADCAST VIEWING

61%

Source: NSI, Tucson, 2 Book Average Feb & May 2016 Sweeps, Live+SD, Adults 18-49. Rankings based on thousands. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a.

KUVE/ KFTU SHARE

KUVE/ KFTU SHARE

Source: NSI, Tucson, 2 Book Average Feb & May 2016 Sweeps, Live+SD, Adults 18-49. Rankings based on thousands. Total Day TP M-Su 6a-2a.

DATO S

A Z 121

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Spanish Language Is Here To Stay More Than 70% Of Hispanics Will Speak Spanish At Home In 2034 Spanish-Language is Here to Stay More than 70% of Hispanics will speak Spanish at home in 2034 HISPANICS AGE 5+ WHO SPEAK ANY SPANISH AT HOME HISPANICS AGE 5+ SPEAK ANY SPANISH AT HOME

Hispanic%% Share Share Hispanic

73.3%

72.9%

72.4%

45.9

41.5

36.8

9.4 2014

71.3%

55.4

50.6

41.3

37.6

34.0

30.7

27.4

71.9%

10.7

11.8

13.0

14.0

2019

2024

2029

2034

Speak Only Spanish at Home

Speak Spanish and English at Home

Hispanic (in Millions)

Source: IHS Source: IHS Economics. Hispanic Immigration and US Economic Growth, February 2015. Economics. Hispanic Immigration and US Economic Growth, February 2015 Courtesy of

81% of Hispanics 81% of Hispanics Speak Speak Some Spanish At Home Some Spanish At Home English Only

19%

% 81

Only/Mostly Spanish

34%

Speak Some Spanish

Mosly English

Phoenix DMA

28%

English/Spanish Equally

19%

Source: 2016 Nielsen Phoenix Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+ Source: 2016 Nielsen Phoenix Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+

DATO S

A Z 122

Courtesy of

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 4

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

84% of Tucson’s Hispanics 84% of Tucson’s Hispanics Speak Some Spanish At Home Speak Some Spanish At Home English Only

16%

% 84

Only/Mostly Spanish

36%

Speak Some Spanish

Tucson DMA

Mosly English

34%

English/Spanish Equally

14%

Source: 2016 Nielsen Tucson Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+ Source: 2016 Nielsen Tucson Universe Estimates, Hispanic TV Household Language Strata based on People 2+ Courtesy of

Did You Know

However,

SPANISH

ENGLISH

94

81

%

%

OF SPANISH-LANGUAGE TELEVISION VIEWERS IN TUCSON SPEAK SPANISH INSIDE THE HOME.

OF THIS GROUP, ENGLISH IS THEIR LANGUAGE OF CHOICE OUTSIDE THE HOME.

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb15– Jan16) , Phoenix DMA, (Base: Hispanic Adults 18+); KTVW/KFPH+/KTAZ M-Su 4a-2a cume audience

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 123

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 4

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Did You Know

However,

SPANISH

ENGLISH

96

81

%

%

OF SPANISH-LANGUAGE TELEVISION VIEWERS IN TUCSON SPEAK SPANISH INSIDE THE HOME.

OF THIS GROUP, ENGLISH IS THEIR LANGUAGE OF CHOICE OUTSIDE THE HOME.

Source: Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb15-Jan16 Tucson A18+ (Base: Hispanic); SLTV includes any daypart viewers (M-Su 4a-2a) of KUVE+ and KHRR)

Courtesy of

Bilingual Adults TV Ratings M-SUBilingual Adults Choose Univision KTVW 6A-2A • BILINGUAL ADULTS 18-49 • PHOENIX

M-Su 6a-2a • Bilingual Adults 18-49 • Phoenix

1.7 Over 2X the bilingual ratings of any other English-Language TV station!

1.0

1.0 0.7 0.4

0.3

0.3

0.2

Source: Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 4 Book Average (Jul’15/Nov’15/Feb’16/May’16). Time Period Data, Tucson DMA. Bilingual is defined as Adults 18-49 Speaking Mostly Spanish, Spanish / English Equally or Mostly English in the Home. Source: Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 4 Book Average (Jul '15/Nov '15/Feb '16/May '16). Total Day: M-Su 6a-2a. Top 10 stations shown. Time Period Data, Tucson DMA. Bilingual is defined as Adults 18-49 Speaking Mostly Spanish, Spanish/English Equally or Mostly English in the Home. Total Day: M-Su 6a-2a. Top 10 stations shown.

DATO S

A Z 124

2 0 1 6

0.2

Courtesy of

0.2


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Bilingual Adults TV Ratings

Bilingual Adults Choose Univision KUVE M-SUM-Su 6a-2a • Bilingual Adults 18-49 • Tucson 6A-2A • BILINGUAL ADULTS 18-49 • TUCSON 2.0

Over 2X the bilingual ratings of any other English-Language TV station!

0.9

0.8 0.5

0.4

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.2

0.1

0.1

Source: Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 2 Book Average (Feb/May 2016). Time Period Data, Tucson DMA. Bilingual is defined as Adults 18-49 living in Bilingual Households (Speaking Source: Nielsen, Nielsen Local Television View Ratings Cutback, NSI, Live+SD, 2 Book Average (Feb/May 2016). Time Period Data, Tucson DMA. Bilingual is defined as Adults 18-49 living in Bilingual HH’s (Speaking Courtesy of Mostly Spanish, Spanish/English Equally or Mostly English in the Home),Total Day: M-Su 6a-2a. Mostly Spanish, Spanish / English Equally or Mostly English in the Home) ,Total Day: M-Su 6a-2a.

Top 20 Spanish-Language TV Advertisers in Phoenix

SPANISH

JAN–DEC 2015 & JAN–JUN 2016 TOP SPANISH-LANGUAGE TV ADVERTISERS JAN–DEC 2015 RANK

ADVERTISER

RANK

TOP SPANISH-LANGUAGE TV ADVERTISERS JAN–JUNE 2016

ADVERTISER

RANK

ADVERTISER

RANK

ADVERTISER

1

Cox Communications

11

Emergency Chiropractic

1

Cox Communications

11

Ashley Furniture

2

Honda Dealer Assn

12

Conn's HomePlus Store

2

Honda Dealer Assn

12

Volkswagen Factory

3

Nissan Factory

13

Mega Furniture Store

3

Nissan Factory

13

Mega Furniture Store

4

Ford Dealer Assn

14

Ford Factory

4

Alcock & Assoc (Attorneys)

14

Jeep Factory

5

Chevrolet Factory

15

CenturyLink

5

Chevrolet Factory

15

Emergency Chiropractic

6

Curacao Exports

16

Freeway Auto Insurance Agency

6

Ford Dealer Assn

16

McDonald's Restaurant

7

Alcock & Assoc (Attorneys)

17

Blue Cross & Blue Shield

7

Conn's HomePlus Store

17

Freeway Auto Insurance Agency

8

Jack in The Box Restaurant

18

Volkswagen

8

Curacao Exports

18

Toyota Dealer Assn

9

McDonald's Restaurant

19

Arizona State Lottery

9

Honda Factory

19

Ram Factory

10

Hastings & Hastings (Attorneys) 20

Living Spaces Furniture Store

10

Jack in The Box Restaurant

20

Amica

Source: Kantar, Jan-Dec 2015 & Jan-Jun 2016 (Market Advisor 7-15-16), Adjusted Data through 5/31/2016, Phoenix DMA Spanish TV Stations Include KTVW-UNI, KFPH-UMA & KTAZ-TEL

DATO S

A Z 125

Courtesy of

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Top 20 Spanish Language TV Advertisers In Tucson

SPANISH

JAN–DEC 2015 & JAN–JUN 2016 TOP SPANISH-LANGUAGE TV ADVERTISERS JAN–DEC 2015 RANK

ADVERTISER

RANK

TOP SPANISH-LANGUAGE TV ADVERTISERS JAN–JUNE 2016

ADVERTISER

RANK

ADVERTISER

RANK

ADVERTISER

1

Cox Communications

11

Arizona State Lottery

1

Cox Communications

11

Loan Max Title Loans

2

Nissan Factory

12

O'Rielly (Local Auto Dealer)

2

Nissan Factory

12

Chevrolet Dealer Assn

3

Curacao Exports

13

Casino Del Sol

3

Curacao Exports

13

Ford Dealer Assn

4

Chapman Local Dealer

14

McDonald's Restaurant

4

Peter Piper Pizza Restaurant

14

Honda Dealer Assn

5

Jack in The Box Restaurant

15

Conn's HomePlus Store

5

Chapman Local Auto Dealer

15

Royal Local Dealer

6

Jim Click Local Auto Dealer

16

Mattress Firm Store

6

Jim Click Local Auto Dealer

16

Conn's HomePlus Store

7

Peter Piper Pizza Restaurant

17

Kool Smiles Dental Center

7

Toyota Factory

17

O'Rielly (Local Auto Dealer)

8

Sam Levitz Furniture Store

18

Fry's Food

8

Jack in The Box Restaurant

18

Mattress Firm Store

9

Freeway Auto Insurance Agency 19

Chevrolet Dealer Assn

9

Sam Levitz Furniture Store

19

Casino Del Sol

10

Ford Dealer Assn

Volkswagen Factory

10

McDonald's Restaurant

20

Consolidated Credit Counseling Services

20

Source: Kantar, Jan-Dec 2015 & Jan-Jun 2016 (Market Advisor 7-15-16), Adjusted Data through 5/31/2016, Tucson DMA Spanish TV Stations Include KUVE-UNI & KHRR-TEL

Courtesy of

Spanish-Language Newspaper Readership Among Phoenix Hispanics Spanish Language Newspaper Readership Among Phoenix Hispanics 168,818

161,170

116,063

118,334 118,341

111,084 93,958 70,008

63,487 28,327

Prensa Hispaña

TV y Más La Voz Arizona

Teleguía en Español

Hispanic A18+

Qué! Magazine

Other Spanish-language weekly newspaper

Spanish Preferred A18+

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb15– Jan16) , Phoenix DMA Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb15– Jan16) , Phoenix DMA, Base: Hispanic Adults 18+ and Spanish Preferred Adults 18+ (Prefer to speak only or mostly Spanish) Base: Hispanic Adults 18+ and Spanish Preferred Adults 18+ (Prefer to speak only or mostly Spanish)

DATO S

Courtesy of

A Z 126

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Spanish-Owned Radio Stations FIESTA RADIO

UNIVISION RADIO

KSUN 1400 AM- Radio Fiesta, Regional Mexican

KHOT 105.9 FM- “Qué Buena,” Regional Mexican

EN FAMILIA, INC.

KOMR/KKMR 106.3/106.5 FM- “Más Variedad,” Spanish Adult Hits KQMR /KHOV 100.3/105.3 FM- “Latino Mix,” Spanish Contemporary

KIDR 740 AM- Spanish Religious

ENTRAVISION COMMUNICATIONS

AMIGO MULTIMEDIA, INC. KNUV 1190 AM- Talento Independiente, Spanish News/Talk/Sports

KLNZ 103.5 FM- Tri-Color, Regional Mexican KDVA/KVVA 106.9/107.1 FM- José, Spanish Adult Hits

RADIO HOGAR

KBMB 710 AM- ESPN Deportes, Spanish Sports

KASA 1540 AM– Radio KASA Tunota de Amor, Spanish Religious

UNITED FARMWORKERS UNION

DEPORTES Y MUSICA COMMUNICATIONS

KNAI 88.3 FM– Radio Campesina (Non-Commercial), Regional Mexican

KRPH 99.5 FM– La Raza, Regional Mexican

Courtesy of

Radio Reaches Over 96% Of Phoenix Hispanics Radio Reaches Over 96% of Phoenix Hispanics Radio Reaches more than 9 in every 10 RADIO REACHES MORE THAN 9 IN EVERY 10 HISPANIC ADULTS IN PHOENIX EVERY WEEK Phoenix Hispanic Adults every week

97.2%

96.4%

96.3%

95.5%

94.5% 93.3% 92.3% 91.0%

A18+

A18-34

A18-49

Total

A25-54

Hispanic

Source: Phoenix Nielsen Audio PPM, Jan-June 2016 YTD; Total and Hispanic Adults; Mon-Sun 6a-mid; Source: Phoenix Nielsen Audio PPM, Jan-June 2016 YTD; Total and Hispanic Adults; Mon-Sun 6a-mid; Weekly Cume Estimates, / % Weekly Cume Estimates, /% Reach across demos Reach across demos

DATO S

A Z 127

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 4

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Phoenix Hispanics Are Very ENGAGED With Spanish Radio

More Than 2X

Spent With Spanish Radio Phoenix Hispanics Spend 150% More Time Listening to Spanish-Language Radio TIME SPENT WITH ENGLISH-LANGUAGE RADIO

TIME SPENT WITH SPANISH-LANGUAGE RADIO

% MORE WITH SPANISH-LANGUAGE

3.5 HOURS

8.75 HOURS

150%

Source: Phoenix Nielsen Audio PPM Jan-June 2016 YTD, Hispanic A18-49, TSL Total Week (Top 5 SL Stations vs. Top 5 EL Stations among A1849)

Courtesy of

Phoenix Spanish-Language Radio Share Of Voice Phoenix Spanish Language Radio Share of Voice

Non-com

Radio Campesina

22.0%

Univision Radio

43.0%

Entravision

35.0%

*NOTE Univision Radio KHOT-FM, KOMR-FM, KQMR/KHOV-FM; Entravision KLNZ-FM, KVVA/KDVA-FM, KBMB-AM; United Farmworkers KNAI-FM (Campesina)

*Note: Univision Radio = KHOT-FM, KOMR-FM, KQMR/KHOV-FM; Entravision = KLNZ-FM, KVVA/KDVA-FM, KBMB-AM; Source: Phoenix Nielsen Audio PPM, Jan-June 2016 YTD, Adults 18-49 / Total Week / Share of Spanish Average Quarter Hour listening by Group Owner United Farmworkers = KNAI-FM (Campesina) Courtesy of Phoenix Nielsen Audio PPM, Jan-June 2016 YTD, Adults 18-49 / Total Week / Share of Spanish Average Quarter ening by Group Owner

DATO S

A Z 128

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Top 20 Spanish Radio Advertisers In Phoenix, 2015 And Jan-June 2016 YTD TOP SPANISH RADIO ADVERTISERS, 2015

TOP SPANISH RADIO ADVERTISERS, JAN-JUNE 2016 YTD

1. State Farm

11. JCPenney

1. Rapid’o Express

11. Macy’s

2. O’Reilly Auto Parts

12. Sprint

2. AutoZone

12. State Farm

3. Rapid’o Express

13. Walgreens

3. O'Rielly (Local Auto Dealer)

13. Walgreens

4. The Home Depot

14. Toyota Dealer Association

4. Understood.org

14. Midway Nissan

5. Understood.org

15. T-Mobile

5. The Home Depot

15. San Jorge Children’s Foundation

6. Bashas’ Food City

16. Midway Nissan

6. Bashas’ Food City

16. Metro PCS

7. Boost Mobile

17. Rosetta Stone

7. JCPenney

17. US Dept of Transportation (USDOT)

8. AutoZone

18. La Red Hispana Communications Network

8. Toyota Dealer Assn

18. McDonald’s

9. Macy’s

19. Fry’s

9. La Red Hispana Communications Network 19. Sprint

10. Honda Dealer Association

20. Silverdado Night Club LLC

10. Honda Dealer Association

20. Mega Furniture

Source: Media Monitors, 2015 full year and 2016 YTD (Jan-June 2016), based on # of total spots; among qualifying Spanish stations only (KHOT-FM, KOMR-FM, KLNZ-FM, KVVA-FM)

Courtesy of

NATIONAL

Spanish Radio Formats REGIONAL MEXICAN

SPANISH CONTEMPORARY

These styles are regionalized very much like C&W - and are derived from various parts of Mexico. • BANDA • RANCHERO • NORTEÑO • TEJANO • GRUPERO • MARIACHI • CORRIDOS

This format encompasses music from romantic to rock and boasts smooth, danceable beats.

SPANISH ADULT HITS Broad mix of Spanish classic hits from the 60s, 70s and 80s.

• REGGAETON • SPANISH AC • ROMANTIC • BALLADS • INTL POP HITS • SPANISH ROCK

• MEXICAN ADULT HITS • POP ADULT HITS

Total Market Equivalent:

Total Market Equivalent:

COUNTRY MUSIC

RHYTHMIC CONTEMPORARY

Total Market Equivalent:

TROPICAL

NEWS/TALK

With Cuban and Puerto Rican origins, this format has heavy layers of blaring horns, percussion and exhilarating dance rhythms.

This format is meant to inform, help and entertain.

HEAR THE DIFFERENCE

• SALSA • CUMBIA • BACHATA • MERENGUE • REGGAETON

• NEWS YOU CAN USE • TALK SHOWS • COMMENTARY

ADULT HITS

Hover over the icon below and push play for a sound perspective of the differences by genre.

CLICK HERE

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 129

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 4

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Radio, TV And Mobile Are The Top 3 Choices For Hispanics In The U.S. Radio, TV, and Mobile Are The Top 3 Choices For Hispanics in The U.S. Weekly Reach by Medium - % of Population

WEEKLY REACH BY MEDIUM - % OF POPULATION 93%

97%

87% 89% 70%

80% 56% 43%

35% 24%

Radio

TV

Mobile Devices

Total

Desktop

Tablet

Hispanic

HISPANICS WATCH MORE TV, TV, RADIO AND MOBILE OVER 97% OF HISPANICS • Over 97% of Hispanics listen to Radio every week vs. 93% of all adults ARE MORE AVID RADIO MEDIA’S REACH IS HIGHER LISTEN TO RADIO Hispanics watch more TV, are more avid radio listeners, and spend the most time on mobile devices Source: 2015 Nielsen Total Audience Report Q1 2015, Weekly Reach by Medium (A18+) • LISTENERS AND SPEND THE AMONG HISPANICS VS. TOTAL EVERY WEEK • TV, Radio, and Mobile media’s reach is higher among Hispanics vs. total consumers in the U.S. MOST TIME ON MOBILE DEVICES CONSUMERS IN THE U.S. VS. 93% OF ALL ADULTS Source: 2015 Nielsen Total Audience Report Q1 2015, Weekly Reach by Medium (A18+) Courtesy of

Radio Is The Main Source For Music Discovery Radio is The Main Source for Music Discovery Hispanics Keep Up-To-Date with Music with Radio How We Discover Music HispanicsSince 2014, more people are discovering music on the Radio and at live events! Keep Up-To-Date With Music With Radio

HOW WE DISCOVER MUSIC SINCE 2014, MORE PEOPLE ARE DISCOVERING MUSIC ON THE RADIO AND AT LIVE EVENTS! Video Games Band/Artist Sites In-Store Live Events/Concerts Online Music Stores

8% 9% 10% 12% 13% 23% 25% 27%

TV Social Media Apps Online Audio/Video Streaming

31%

Movies/Soundtracks

45%

Friends/Relatives

61%

AM/FM Radio Source: 2015 Nielsen Year End Music U.S. Report Courtesy of Source: 2015 Nielsen Year End Music U.S. Report

DATO S

A Z 130

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Radio Is The Original Music Service For Hispanic Listeners Radio is The Original Music Service For Hispanic Listeners HA18-49 - In millions

HA18-49 - IN MILLIONS 26.1

25.1

14.5

6.9

5.9

Radio reaches +80% more Hispanic A18-49 in a week than PANDORA reaches in a month.

RADIO REACHES 80% MORE HISPANICS A18-49 IN A WEEK THAN PANDORA REACHES IN A MONTH.

Sources: Radio Advertising Bureau Why Radio Facts - Based on RADAR ® 127, December 2015 (24-Hour Weekly Cume Estimate HA18-49 / comScore Media Metrix December 2015 – Hispanic A18-49 MUV Sources: Radio Advertising Bureau Why Radio Facts - Based on RADAR ® 127, December 2015 (24-Hour Weekly Cume Estimate HA18-49 / comScore Media Metrix December 2015 – Hispanic A18-49 MUV Courtesy of

And Also Is The Original Social Network For Hispanic Listeners And The Original Social Network For Hispanic Listeners Too

HA18-49 - In millions

HA18-49 - IN MILLIONS 26.1

25.6

18.0

16.2

10.4

10.0

Radio reaches +61% more Hispanic A18-49 in a week RADIO REACHES +61% MORE HISPANIC A18-49 IN A WEEK THAN than Twitter reaches in a month. TWITTER REACHES IN A MONTH. Sources: Radio Advertising Bureau Why Radio Facts - Based on RADAR ® 127, December 2015 (24-Hour Weekly Cume Estimate HA18-49 / comScore Media Metrix December 2015 – Hispanic A18-49 MUV

Sources: Radio Advertising Bureau Why Radio Facts - Based on RADAR ® 127, December 2015 (24-Hour Weekly Cume Estimate HA18-49 / comScore Media Metrix December 2015 – Hispanic A18-49 MUV

DATO S

A Z 131

2 0 1 6

Courtesy of


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

LANGUAGE & MEDIA

Digital Audio Usage Among Hispanics Has Quadrupled vs. 8 Years Ago 2014 %

32

2012 %

25

+300% Growth!

“RADIO REACHES ALMOST ALL HISPANICS ADULTS EACH WEEK, BUT MOBILE USAGE IS GROWING AND WITH THE INCREASED POPULARITY OF SMARTPHONES, ONLINE MEDIA CONSUMPTION (I.E. DIGITAL AUDIO) HAS GROWN SIGNIFICANTLY BETWEEN 2006 AND 2014.”

2010 %

15 2008

9%

2006

8%

% OF HISPANICS USING DIGITAL AUDIO

Source: Nielsen “The Latino Listener: How Hispanics Tune into the Radio,” Jan. 2016 Courtesy of

AN ESTIMATED

22.5M HISPANICS ARE STREAMING AUDIO ONLINE OR ON MOBILE DURING AN AVERAGE WEEK. That’s a 62% of Reach of U.S. Hispanics A18+ Source: Nielsen Comparable Metrics Report Q3 2015. Hispanic A18+ Reach Cume/Uniques (PC Streaming Audio/Smartphone Streaming Audio/Tablet Streaming Audio Unique Devices)

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 132

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 4

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY

Véndeme Tu Sueño CASE STUDY PITCH ME YOUR DREAM HISPANIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP CAMPAIGN

113

U.S. Hispanics are bursting with ideas — so we provided a chance to pitch them. Univision Arizona and SEED SPOT created Véndeme Tu Sueño: a competition of original ideas. As seen in our webisodes, 20 contestants underwent intensive training and mentoring to advance ideas into businesses. Afterward, three finalists received scholarships of $3,500; 250 hours of education, networking and support in law, finances, design, the web and investments; and the chance to realize their dreams.

VÉNDEME TU SUEÑO WINNER: LUCY’S GARAGE As the winner of Véndeme tu Sueño, Israel Medellin, was awarded $30,000 in media support from Univision Arizona and a $2,500 cash prize from SEED SPOT. Medellin’s business idea, Lucysgarage.com, connects car owners with local, experienced, off-duty or independent mechanics in a safe, secure, online platform. The overall goal of Lucysgarage.com is to keep the money local and build a trusted network of professional mechanics, providing them with a steady stream of business opportunities. “I am extremely grateful for what Univision Arizona and Seed Spot have done for me. Véndeme tu Sueño has been a blessing for me.” ISRAEL MEDELLIN www.youtube.com/watch?v=nb3qQl8-zMU

DATO S

A Z 133

2 0 1 6

Photos Courtesy of Univison Arizona

ENTREPRENEURS ENTERED THE COMPETITION


DREAM. BELIEVE.

Build.

234525-16

Diverse cultures and people have made Arizona the great state it is today and they will continue to shape our future. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona is proud to support the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s DATOS study. Your influence is helping to shape a better Arizona.


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY

2016 Comparative Analysis

1NUTRITIONAL | Conversation Volume and Sentiment SUPPLEMENTS

Nutritional Supplement U.S. Hispanic Supplement Conversation Herbalife

CASE STUDY

75%

28%

Nutrilite

72%

• GNC had the highest negative sentiment (12%) with consumers reviewing the product Female Female

BRIEF & APPROACH

92%

Bayer

Being healthy and looking fit is a point of pride that most people work on at one time or another. Over the past few decades, many companies have catered to the healthconscious market by promoting nutritional supplements. The OYE! Intelligence platform was recently tasked to gauge the latest conversation trends in the industry and provide insights into what Hispanics currently discuss about several of the brands that are readily available in the U.S. marketplace.

25%

97%

GNC

and mentioning poor experiences in their Omnilife Male stores -

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000

Hispanic

45% 45%

55%7,000

5,000

6,000

8,000

Non-Hispanic

U.S. HISPANIC SENTIMENT U.S. Hispanic Sentiment

The following Hispanic Nutritional Supplements Analysis is a comparative study that provides a review focused on 5 brands; Bayer, GNC, Herbalife, Nutrilite and Omnilife. This analysis was extrapolated from a sample of 15,338 conversations on Twitter, Facebook, blogs, forums and the web at large, of which 3,153 were from verified U.S. Hispanics. All data was pulled from in 2016 between May 1 and May 31.

38%

61%

Herbalife

7%

74%

19%

Nutrilite

6%

94%

Bayer

31%

65%

Omnilife 0%

20%

12%

36%

52%

GNC

40% Positive

60% Neutral

80%

100%

Negative

RESULTS

• Men led in overall conversation when it came to supplements, with Omniife having the highest amount of male conversation (88%) followed by GNC (80%)

• Herbalife had the highest conversation overall and also had the highest Hispanic proportion (25%) • Omnilife had the fewest mentions overall among U.S. Hispanics but had the highest positive sentiment (65%) with Herballife coming in second (61%) 2016 Comparative Analysis

• Herbalife led in female conversation with 35% and Bayer followed behind closely with 33%

1NUTRITIONAL | Conversation Volume and Sentiment SUPPLEMENTS

U.S. HISPANIC SUPPLEMENT CONVERSATION

U.S. HISPANIC GENDER ANALYSIS

U.S. Hispanic Supplement Conversation

75%

25%

Herbalife

72%

28%

Nutrilite

92%

Bayer

97%

GNC

Omnilife -

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000

Hispanic

5,000

Male 55%7,000 6,000

Female Female 45% 45% 8,000

Non-Hispanic

U.S. Hispanic Sentiment Source: OYE! Intelligence www.oyeintelligence.com 61%

Herbalife

Nutrilite

Bayer

38%

19%

74% 94%

DATO S

A Z

7%

6%

135

2 0 1 6

4


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Reported Health Status Reported Health Status By Ethnicity By Ethnicity 40.1%

39.1% 31.8%

34.2%

31.9%

30.4%

30.4% 27.7%

26.5% 23.6%

27.8%

26.3%

27.4% 24.8%

22.1%

10.9% 10.7%

9.9%

6.4%

5.9%

3.2% 2.0%

Excellent

Very Good

White

Good

African-American

3.1%

Fair

American Indian

Asian

1.4%

2.3%

Poor

Hispanic

Source: CDC, Summary Health Statistics: National Health interview Survey, 2014 Source: CDC, Summary Health Statistics: National Health interview Survey, 2014 http://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/NHIS/SHS/2014_SHS_Table_P-1.pdf ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/NHIS/SHS/2014_SHS_Table_P-1.pdf

Top Diseases and Risk Factors for Hispanics Top Diseases And Risk Factors For Hispanics 47.1%

36.3%

17.7%

6.8% 2.7%

1.4%

Cancer

10.3% 3.6%

Heart Disease

Obesity

US-Born

Foreign-Born

Source: CDC, Hispanic Health, May 2015 www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/hispanic-health/

Source: CDC, Hispanic Health, May 2015 http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/hispanic-health/

DATO S

A Z 136

2 0 1 6

Cigarette Smoking


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Differences In The Leading Causes Of Death NON-HISPANIC WHITES

HISPANIC

1.

Heart Disease

1.

Cancer

2.

Cancer

2.

Heart Disease

3.

Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases

3.

Unintentional Injuries

4.

Unintentional Injuries

4.

Stroke

5.

Stroke

5.

Diabetes

6.

Alzheimer’s Disease

6.

Chronic Liver Disease & Cirrhosis

7.

Diabetes

7.

Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases

8.

Influenza & Pneumonia

8.

Alzheimer’s Disease

9.

Suicide

9.

Influenza & Pneumonia

10. Kidney Diseases

10. Kidney Diseases

Source: CDC, Hispanic Health, May 2015 www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/hispanic-health/

Participation In Exercise Low Among Hispanics Participation in Exercise Low Amongst Hispanics PARTICIPATION IN LEISURE-TIME AEROBIC AND MUSCLE-STRENGTHENING ACTIVITIES BY RACE Participation in Leisure-Time Aerobic and Muscle-Strengthening Activities by Race 24.1 21.4

20.7

21

15.7

21.5

19.9

17.8

17.2 15

21.7

22.1

17.7

18.3 16.8

17

16.6

15.3

14.4

14.1 12.7

12.2 10.6 9.2

2000

All Persons

2010

White

2013

African-American

American Indian

2014

Asian

Hispanic

*According to 2008 CDC Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

Source: CDC, Health, United States, 2015, May 2016 Source: CDC, Health, United States, 2015, May 2016 www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf NOTE: Figures in percentage

DATO S

A Z 137

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Arizona Mortality Rates For All Ethnicities Have Decreased Significantly Since 1995 Arizona Mortality Rates For All Ethnicities Have Decreased Significantly Since 1995

ARIZONA MORTALITY RATES BY ETHNICITY, 1995-2014 Arizona Mortality Rates by Ethnicity, 1995-2014 1110.4

1053.1

1011.4

1057.5 1010.4

776.6 774.6

891.8

849.2

823.7

823.1

1006.6

835

769.9

818.5 739.9

674.4 685.7 612

636.9

629.5

595.8 504.1

424.1 371.8

White WhiteNon-Hispanic Non-Hispanic

Hispanic Latino Hispanic or Latino

1995

African-American African-American

2000

2005

American Indian or American Indian or Alaska Native Alaska Native

2010

2014

Source: Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona Health Status and Vital Statistics 2014 Annual Report, 2015 Source: Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona Health Status and Vital Statistics 2014 Annual Report, 2015 www.azdhs.gov/plan/report/ahs/2014/pdf/2b3.pdf http://www.azdhs.gov/plan/report/ahs/2014/pdf/2b3.pdf

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 138

2 0 1 6

Asian Asian


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY

2016 Comparative Analysis

ZIKA VIRUS Overall Conversation Volume and Language

Zika Virus

Overall Conversation Volume

Cases

CASE STUDY Birth Defects

BRIEF & APPROACH

Travel on the data collected and analyzed, Based Hispanics discussed the Zika virus in Spanish Treatment (89%) versus English (10%). Travel was the topic most often discussed in English (27%), while Prevention mentions of10,000 treatments over-indexed (2%)60,000 with 70,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 Hispanic H Non-Hispanic bilingual mentions among ispanics.

The Zika virus is a global health threat affecting thousands of people and has loomed large in the public eye since the first confirmed Zika infection was found in Brazil in May 2015. The OYE! Intelligence platform was tasked to analyze what Hispanics discussed most often about Zika virus. This analysis covers over 80,000 U.S. Hispanic and Latin American English, Spanish and bilingual conversations gathered from Facebook, Twitter and other social forums about the Zika virus. The data was collected between Feb. 8 and Feb. 14 in 2016.

Language Preference Analysis

LANGUAGE PREFERENCE ANALYSIS Industry Cases

RESULTS

Online users in Latin America as well as U.S. Hispanics mentioned cases of Zika and birth defects most often when discussing the Zika virus online. Notably, prevention conversations had the highest overall Hispanic proportion (57%). This analysis provides international

Birth Defects Travel Treatment Prevention 0%

10%

20%

prevention efforts as well as to determine resource allocation priorities.

2016 Comparative Analysis

ZIKA VIRUS Overall Conversation Volume and Language

40%

English

health organizations a sample of overall health threat conversations and can be used to support

30%

50%

60%

Bilingual

70%

80%

90%

100%

Spanish

Hispanic women mentioned travel and birth defects most often, at 69% and 61%, respectively. Men favored posting (48%) in 2016about Comparativeprevention Analysis regards to the Zika virus. Overall conversations Gender Analysis were 58% female, 42% male.

OVERALL CONVERSATION VOLUME

Hispanic Gender Analysis

HISPANIC GENDER ANALYSIS

Overall Conversation Volume

Cases

Industry Cases

Birth Defects

Birth Defects Travel Travel Treatment

Treatment

Prevention

Prevention -

10,000

20,000

30,000 Hispanic

40,000

50,000

60,000

0%

70,000

10%

20%

30%

40%

Non-Hispanic

Male

Source: OYE! Intelligence www.oyeintelligence.com Language Preference Analysis

DATO S Industry

A Z 139

2 0 1 6

50%

60%

Female

70%

80%

90%

100%

2


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Hispanics Are Facing A Childhood/Adolescence Obesity Problem Hispanics Are Facing An Obesity Problem

25 21.9

22.8 22.6

21.4

19.5 15.6

14.7

19.6 13.6

10.4

8.6

9.8

9.4

5.2

Total (2-19 years)

2-5 Years

Hispanic

6-11 Years

Black

White

12-19 Years

Asian

Source: CDC, Health, United States, 2015, May 2016 Source: CDC, Health, United States, 2015, May 2016 www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf NOTE: Figures in percentage

Hispanics Follow American Indians In Percent Of Serious Psychological Distress Among Adults Percent of Serious Psychological Distress Among Adults 8.1 7.2 5.6

2.6 2.5

3.5

2.9

1999-2000

All Adults

3.1 3.0

3.5

2001-2002

White

4.0 3.0 2.9

3.6 3.5 3.7

2004-2005

African-American

3.3 3.2

3.7

2010-2011

American Indian

Source: CDC, Health, United States, 2015, May 2016 www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf Source: CDC, Health, United States, 2015, May 2016 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf

DATO S

A Z 140

2 0 1 6

5.4 4.0

4.5 3.4 3.4 3.5

2013-2014

Hispanic


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Latino Health Disparities Compared To Non-Hispanic Whites • Hispanic death rate is • Hispanics are about • Hispanics have

24% lower than Non-Hispanic Whites more likely to die from diabetes or liver

50% disease than whites

35% less heart disease and 49% less cancer

• Hispanics have

24% more poorly controlled high blood pressure

• Hispanics have

23% more obesity

• Hispanics have

28% less colorectal screening

Source: CDC, Hispanic Health, May 2015 www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/hispanic-health/

Percent of Adult Females Who Are Cigarette Smokers Percent of Adult Females Who Were Cigarette Smokers

36.7 34.7

24.3 22.2 23.1

18.0 19.7

15.8

16.4 12.1

14.2 7.3

6.3

6.7

1990-1992

1999-2001

White Females

African-American Females

5.2 2012-2014

American Indian Females

Asian Females

Source: CDC, Health, United States, 2015, May 2016 www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf Source: CDC, Health, United States, 2015, May 2016 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf

DATO S

A Z 141

2 0 1 6

Hispanic Females


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Percent of Adult Males Who Are Cigarette Smokers Percent of Adult Males Who Were Cigarette Smokers

34.2 33.9

30.3 27.2

27.4

25.1

25.7 24.8

23.1 22.2

21.8 20.0

20.3

15.7 14.6

1990-1992

White Males

1999-2001

African-American Males

2012-2014

American Indian Males

Asian Males

Hispanic Males

Source: CDC, Health, United States, 2015, May 2016 www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf Source: CDC, Health, United States, 2015, May 2016 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus15.pdf

Average Number of Drinks Consumed PerAverage Number of Drinks Consumed Per Week by Country/Nation of Origin Week by Country/Nation of Origin 16.9

15.9

9.5

8.9

8.4

3.8

3

Puerto Rico

Mexico

South/Central America

Men

Women

Source: NIAAA, Alcohol and the Hispanic Community, December 2015 Source: NIAAA, Alcohol and the Hispanic Community, December 2015 pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/HispanicFact/HispanicFact.htm http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/HispanicFact/HispanicFact.htm

DATO S

A Z 142

2 0 1 6

3.4

Cuba


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Percentage Of U.S. Hispanics Who Have Received Alcohol Use Treatment Percentage of U.S. Hispanics Who Have Received Alcohol Use Treatment by Country/Nation of Origin By Country/Nation Of Origin 9.9

10.4

10.1 9.1 8.2

Total U.S. Hispanics

Mexico

Puerto Rico

South/Central America

Source: NIAAA, Alcohol and the Hispanic Community, December 2015 Source: NIAAA, Alcohol and the Hispanic Community, December 2015 pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/HispanicFact/HispanicFact.htm http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/HispanicFact/HispanicFact.htm

NOTES

DATO S

A Z 143

2 0 1 6

Cuba


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

2015 JFCS COMMUNITY IMPACT

41,341

97%

LIVES WERE TOUCHED

ARE AT OR BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL

8,100

DIVERSITY

learned conflict resolution, anger management skills and substance abuse prevention through our community-based program “Creating Peaceful Families”

AT RISK CHILDREN

White: 54%

1,781

2,775

SURVIVORS

PEOPLE GUIDED

of domestic violence helped increase their safety, independence and self-sufficiency with Shelter Without Walls

4%

GENERATIONS

Older Adults

by Health Navigators in the coordination of their appointments, medication-tracking and wellness goals, thereby substantially reducing healthcare costs

29%

Adults

67%

Children & Teens

5,304 CHILDREN AND ADULTS

received supervised visits, parenting skills and family preservation counseling

CORE PROGRAMS 47% Behavioral Health 37%

4,665

662

JEWISH PATIENTS

PEOPLE RECEIVED MEALS

and their families received spiritual care and comfort from a Rabbinical chaplain

and gifts through the JFCS Holiday Programs

14% 2%

DATO S

A Z 144

Child & Family Solutions Jewish Community Services

Older Adults

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

PROFILE

Jewish Family & Children’s Service Healing Lives. Whatever It Takes.

Jewish Family & Children's Service PROFILE María Rodriguez knows what it’s like to live with parents facing mental illness and drug addiction. Removed from her home by state authorities for her own safety, she began living in foster care when she was 10 and lost both parents before she was 14.

served last year almost 19,000 selfidentified as Latino or minority. She added that most JFCS clients live in poverty, and over 67 percent are children. “Our goal is to foster healing, resiliency and self-sufficiency, which will ultimately strengthen our community, because no family is immune from mental health and substance abuse issues,” Hernandez said.

It wasn’t until she received help from Jewish Family & Children’s Service (JFCS) that she understood that she her past didn’t have to define her future. Today, María’s is the story of a once forgotten girl who became a leader. “There’s so many people that don’t want to talk about their story,” she said. “So, telling a counselor helped me not be shy about it.” María first learned she had leadership skills through a job development program at JFCS, a non-profit, non-sectarian organization that offers a wide range of behavioral health, medical and social services for the needy. “I didn’t even know I was a leader,” said María, but after helping organize a community celebration she discovered she had the knack for leading others and the power to change her life for the better. Liz Hernández, Director of Public Relations and Communications at JFCS, said María is one of thousands of people, mostly children, who are helped by the organization every year. The group’s services are open to anyone regardless of race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, sexual preference, disability, age, economic status or religious background. Hernández said of the 41,000 children and adults JFCS

Celebrating over 80 years of service, JFCS is one of the largest providers of behavioral health services in Arizona. It recently opened the Michael R. Zent Healthcare Center—a patient-centered, whole-health clinic located in the largely Hispanic West Valley community of Maryvale. The Center was named in honor of the organization’s highly-regarded CEO & President, who passed away earlier this year, and was designed to provide medical and behavioral health services. “True to the man himself, the Michael R. Zent Healthcare Center is cutting-edge and it serves a community in need,” said Dr. Mario Lippy, co-director of the clinic. “Dr. Zent was very involved with the Latino community, and like many of our patients, he spoke Spanish and grew up in Arizona. He also had the vision of a whole healthcare model that addresses complex behavioral health and medical issues, and helps to improve the well-being and quality of people’s lives.” With additional clinics in Glendale, Avondale and Mesa, JFCS received the 2016 Industry Leaders of Arizona “Community Impact Award” for its response to the ongoing child welfare crisis and its commitment to deliver quality healthcare and social services to the diverse communities. “At the core of our agency is the power of people, including the compassion, dedication and hard work of our more than 600 employees and a strong network of community partners,” said Hernández. As for María, She has graduated high school and plans to become a nurse. She works as an advocate for education and mental services for youth in foster homes and serves in variety of youth leadership roles, including as president of the Maricopa County Youth Advisory Board. And she is still not shy about telling her story.

DATO S

A Z 145

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

NOTES

Notes

DATO S

A Z 146

2 0 1 6

M A R K E T


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Latino Community’s High Contribution To Latino Community’s High Contribution to National HIV Infection Rate (2014) National HIV Infection Rate (2014) 24%

76%

U.S. Latinos

Rest of U.S. Population

Source: The Latino Commission on AIDS, February 2016 www.latinoaids.org/news_detail.php?cat=pr&id=171

Source: Latino Aids, The Latino Commission on AIDS, February 2016 https://www.latinoaids.org/news_detail.php?cat=pr&id=171

28% Increase In HIV Infection Among Latino Youth MSM* 28% Increase on HIV Infection Among Latino Youth MSM 1,898

1,488

2010

2014

*MSM refers to Men having sex with men

Source: The Latino Commission on AIDS, February 2016 www.latinoaids.org/news_detail.php?cat=pr&id=171 Source: Latino Aids, The Latino Commission on AIDS, February 2016 NOTE:https://www.latinoaids.org/news_detail.php?cat=pr&id=171 Figures are the amount of HIV cases among MSMs in that year

DATO S

A Z 147

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Hispanics Account For 1/3 of HIV/AIDS Cases Hispanics Account For 1/3 of HIV/AIDS Cases Reported in Arizona Every Year Reported in Arizona Every Year HIV/AIDS Cases By Year of Diagnosis

HIV/AIDS CASES BY YEAR OF DIAGNOSIS 5% 1%

6% 2%

33%

32%

11%

8% 2%

35%

9% 17%

50%

49%

38%

2005

White

2010

African-American

Hispanic

2014

Asian

American Indian or Alaskan Native

Source: Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona Health Status and Vital Statistics 2014 Annual Report, 2015 Source: Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona Health Status and Vital Statistics 2014 Annual Report, 2015 www.azdhs.gov/plan/report/ahs/2014/pdf/3c3_3c4.pdf http://www.azdhs.gov/plan/report/ahs/2014/pdf/3c3_3c4.pdf

Percentage Unaware Of Financial Penalty Percentage Unaware of Financial Penalty For Lacking Health Insurance For Lacking Health Insurance 46% 41%

Hispanics

Non-Hispanics *Based on a survey of 554 Hispanic respondents, conducted by the McKinsey Center for U.S. Health System Reform

Source: McKinsey & Company, Insight into Hispanics’ Enrollment on the Health Insurance Exchanges, August 2015 healthcare.mckinsey.com/insights-hispanics%E2%80%99-enrollment-health-insurance-exchanges Source: McKinsey and Company, Insight into Hispanics’ Enrollment on the Health Insurance Exchanges, August 2015 http://healthcare.mckinsey.com/insights-hispanics%E2%80%99-enrollment-health-insurance-exchanges

DATO S

A Z 148

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Percentage Of Hispanics Percentage of Hispanics Who Have Shopped For Health Insurance Who Have Shopped For Health Insurance 78 69

31 22

Shopped

Did Not Shop

% of Hispanic Population

% of General Population *Statistically significant difference between Hispanics (n=554) and general population

Source: McKinsey & Company, Insight into Hispanics’ Enrollment on the Health Insurance Exchanges, August 2015 healthcare.mckinsey.com/insights-hispanics%E2%80%99-enrollment-health-insurance-exchanges Source: McKinsey and Company, Insight into Hispanics’ Enrollment on the Health Insurance Exchanges, August 2015

http://healthcare.mckinsey.com/insights-hispanics%E2%80%99-enrollment-health-insurance-exchanges

Hispanics Behind General Population Hispanics Behind General Population in Insurance Plan Enrollment In Insurance Plan Enrollment 58

39 30 20

Enrolled in a Plan

% of Hispanic Population

Did Not Enroll

% of General Population *Statistically significant difference between Hispanics (n=554) and general population (n=3,006)

Source: McKinsey & Company, Insight into Hispanics’ Enrollment on the Health Insurance Exchanges, August 2015 healthcare.mckinsey.com/insights-hispanics%E2%80%99-enrollment-health-insurance-exchanges Source: McKinsey and Company, Insight into Hispanics’ Enrollment on the Health Insurance Exchanges, August 2015 http://healthcare.mckinsey.com/insights-hispanics%E2%80%99-enrollment-health-insurance-exchanges

DATO S

A Z

149

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY

Inspiring Arizona’s Youth To Embrace Healthy Choices CASE STUDY THE CHALLENGE

Childhood is a time to run and play and climb trees. It’s also when we start to develop habits that will last a lifetime. It is important we learn that fruits and vegetables are an essential part of our diet. We must learn as children the benefits of drinking water, not soda. And, how do we choose to be active individuals rather than couch potatoes? These lessons and habits are acquired at a young age. In recent years, our children have become less active and less healthy. Childhood obesity is at an all-time high, leading to a slew of health problems among children, including heart problems, bone and joint problems, sleep apnea and social and psychological issues. In one population-based sample of 5- to 17-year-olds, 70 percent of obese youth already had at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Plus, overweight and obese children can experience stigmatization and poor self-esteem, which can lead to risky behavior such as alcohol and tobacco use.

Childhood obesity is not just a problem; it is an epidemic stealing years from our children’s lives. Research shows if nothing is done about the rapid rise in childhood obesity, it could shorten the average life span by as much as five years. This would be the first time in several generations that American children have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. This is both a quality-of-life issue and a health care problem. Obesity is a preventable condition, yet its negative health effects cost the U.S. nearly $200 billion annually. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 21 percent of the medical costs in the U.S. can be attributed to obesity.

THE SOLUTION

As a community, we are concerned about the health of our children as well as the impact of obesity on our health care

Photos Courtesy of BCBS

Approximately 17 percent of children and adolescents between the ages of 2 and 19 are obese, according to The Journal of the American Medical Association. Another

24 percent are considered overweight. Within the Hispanic population, 20.9 percent of children are obese while 38 percent are overweight.

Sources: A systematic analysis of childhood obesity prevention interventions targeting Hispanic children: lessons learned from the previous decade obr_809 151..158 Branscum, P and Sharma, M. (onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-789X.2010.00809.x/epdf) CDC and Let’s Move campaign materials www.nytimes.com/2005/03/17/health/childrens-life-expectancybeing-cut-short-by-obesity.html?_r=0 www.pewhispanic.org/states/state/az/

DATO S

A Z 150

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY

INSPIRING ARIZONA’S YOUTH TO EMBRACE HEALTHY CHOICES

system. Education is a critical first step. That’s why Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona (BCBSAZ) is working to increase awareness of healthy lifestyle choices among Arizona’s youth. To tackle the staggering childhood obesity epidemic, BCBSAZ designed the Walk On! Challenge. This free, month-long health education program is designed to educate and motivate fourth- and fifth-grade students, their teachers and their families to focus on positive, healthy choices. Held in February, the Challenge is available to every school in Arizona and has been implemented as far south as Nogales and as far north as Page. The Walk On! Challenge teaches children to aim for 5-2-1-0 every day. • Eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables every day. • Limit screen time (TV, video games, computer) to 2 hours or less per day. • Get 1 hour or more of physical activity every day. • Reduce sweetened drinks to zero. Each teacher who registers his or her students for the Challenge receives a tool kit. Inside the tool kit is a calendar for each student to use to track their 5-2-1-0 progress as well as a customized curriculum guide for teachers. BCBSAZ also offers incentives to help increase program participation, including five $5,000 grants to teachers who participate in the program. Participating teachers can apply for the grants, which are applied to their schools’ ongoing efforts to decrease childhood obesity. To further promote healthy eating, BCBSAZ also holds a healthy cooking contest for children ages 9 to 12. In addition, each year Arizona’s governor proclaims the first day of the Challenge, February 1, as Walk On! Day around the state. In 2016, BCBSAZ teamed up with an elementary school in Phoenix’s Washington School District to celebrate Walk On! Day. The on-site event focused on teaching the students about the 5-2-1-0 goal. They participated in a relay race, a game of Name That Healthy Food, a dance session and a water bottle ring toss. Children also took home a grocery bag of healthy fruits and vegetables to share with their families, along with a letter describing the Walk On! Challenge and how families could get involved.

THE RESULTS

The 5-2-1-0 goal offers a practical challenge to participating fourth- and fifth-graders and provides ample opportunity for teachers and students to explore the benefits of increasing exercise and improving nutrition. Teachers who incorporate

DATO S

this program into their curriculum each February have a big impact on their students’ knowledge about nutrition and fitness. To measure the impact, BCBSAZ provides teachers with a pre-Challenge survey and a post-Challenge survey in their tool kits. They are instructed, as part of their participation in the program and to be eligible to submit a grant application, to conduct the pre-Challenge survey before introducing the Walk On! Challenge to students and then again at the conclusion of the Challenge. More than 50 percent of teachers submitted their pre- and post-Challenge survey results. The results showed that the Walk On! Challenge, with support of teachers, can increase children’s knowledge and affect their behavior. The 2016 program resulted in a 34.25 percent increase in overall knowledge of the choices children should be making every day. Since launching this program in 2005 nearly 307,000 tool kits have been distributed around the state and teachers have received $175,000 in grants. All of this benefits Arizona youth and increases their awareness of the importance of healthy choices.

A Z 151

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

U.S. Hispanic Uninsured Rate Decreased By 10.4 Percentage Points U.S. Hispanic Uninsured Rate Decrease by 10.4 Percentage Points

38.7%

28.3% 20.9% 17.1% 11.0%

11.9%

11.4% 6.4%

National Adults

Whites

Hispanics

Q4 2013

Q1 2016

Source: GALLUP-HEALTHWAYS WELL-BEING INDEX, Gallup, April 2016 www.gallup.com/poll/190484/uninsured-rate-lowest-eight-year-trend.aspx?tr=y&auid=16612036 Source: Latino Aids, The Latino Commission on AIDS, February 2016

https://www.latinoaids.org/news_detail.php?cat=pr&id=171

DATO S

A Z 152

2 0 1 6

Blacks


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY

I'mpact One CASE STUDY Elizabeth Ayers-Cluff's world came to a halt in 2009. Married with three children, she had her work cut out for her: She was taking care of her younger daughter with medical disabilities that resulted in multiple surgeries and running kids to birthday parties and sports events, all while holding a job working with at-risk students at an East Valley school. Suddenly, she was blindsided by a diagnosis of breast cancer. Like a warrior determined to win her battle, she began her courageous bout with stage 3B breast cancer. After struggling through the initial mastectomy recovery, chemotherapy and radiation treatments, she began what would become an arduous journey through reconstruction and many failed surgeries to put her “back together again.”

ADVERSITY TO TRANSFORMATION

Through it all, she has remained resilient, resourceful and ready for the challenge. Such journey with adversity has inspired her to take action and help those less fortunate facing the same challenge and outcome. After many hours of research and work through local organizations, Elizabeth founded Impact One. The organization works with women in underserved, low-income communities to get the necessary items, at no cost to the survivor, after mastectomy surgery, reconstruction or treatment to make them feel “whole again.” The organization was created to alleviate the financial and emotional burden experienced during expensive breast cancer treatment and recovery. It targets predominantly underserved, low-income communities with a concentration on the Latino population. There are many unique challenges found in our Latino target audience: namely cultural, socioeconomic and, most importantly, an understanding of health issues and prevention.

is 29%. Potential reasons for delayed diagnosis include: less access to mammography screening, lower confidence in the value of screening and use of mammography, longer intervals between mammograms and delayed follow-up for abnormal results (possibly due to economic factors and fear and denial of disease). Fortunately, breast cancer screening among Latinas is increasing thanks to more targeted breast cancer education like the efforts of the Impact One Foundation. The I'mpact One Foundation has partnered with local organizations to provide support and education to emphasize to the importance of breast cancer screening. Of great importance is the pre- and post-surgery support offered to women within underserved areas of metropolitan Phoenix and outlying areas in Arizona. As of January 2016, Impact One has shipped products to 56 survivors, with 32 of those recipients being Hispanic women in need of post-surgical garments as well as support information. We haven’t even touched the surface!

PARTNER WITH US TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

RISK IMPACT FOR LATINO WOMEN

Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among Hispanic women, with an estimated 2,800 deaths expected in 2015. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among Hispanic women with an estimated 19,800 Hispanic women expected to be diagnosed in 2015. According to Cancer Facts & Figures for Hispanics/Latinos 2012-2014, a study published by the American Cancer Society, the breast cancer incidence rate in Hispanic women

I’mpact One Foundation www.impactone.pink Helpline | 623-738-6794 Email | support@impactone.pink

Source: America Cancer Society www.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/hispanics-latinos

DATO S

A Z 153

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

PROFILE

Self-Described 'Unicorn,' Blue Cross Blue Shield Of Arizona Executive Deanna Salazar Relishes Company’s Community Commitment PROFILE Deanna Salazar says it was Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona’s (BCBSAZ) reputation for philanthropy and community engagement that drew her to the company. Seventeen years later, it’s that same commitment to public service that she proudly touts when she’s out and about in the community. “I have been fortunate to work for an employer, BCBSAZ, which embraces these same values,” said Salazar. “Even in terms of where our corporate headquarters is located (in North Central Phoenix), we feel like we have a responsibility to be good neighbors,” she said. Salazar’s own commitment to public service should be no surprise. After earning her law degree at 24, Salazar she considered joining the Peace Corps but discovered they preferred recruiting engineers and health care workers than lawyers. Instead she joined the prestigious Valley-based firm known then as Lewis & Roca, now known as Lewis Roca RothGerber Christie. A graduate of Arizona State University’s School of Law, Salazar joined the BCBSAZ legal team in 1999. As a result of her performance in the legal division, Salazar was asked to serve first as director and then as vice president of the company’s human resources department, a job she held for six years. She still oversees human resources, but now serves as senior vice president and general counsel for the company, where she leads a team of 8 lawyers and four paralegals who advise the company on risk assessment, contracting, regulatory compliance and litigation management. Salazar said her passion for the work she does at BCBSAZ is tied to the organization’s mission and to its commitment to economic development, health and wellness, education and cultural endeavors. In addition to her formal responsibilities, Salazar serves as an unofficial community liaison for BCBSAZ. It’s a role she said she relishes. She has served as a board member for several non-profit organizations: Valley of the Sun United Way, Fresh Start Women's Foundation, Phoenix Women's Sports Association, Chicanos Por La Causa, and she currently serves as Chair of the Hispanic Women’s Corporation. In 2014, she received a Profiles of Success Award from Valle del Sol for her community service. More recently, Salazar joined the board of the Phoenix Art

Museum, which is now led by Amada Cruz, who was born in Havana, Cuba, making her the first Latina CEO in the iconic art institution’s history. Salazar said she’s appreciated working on the museum’s new diversity initiative, and applauds Cruz’s approach to the job. “Instead of saying we’re just here as trustees to pay our (membership) dues,” said Salazar, “it’s more like we feel responsible to our commitment.” When she’s not working, Salazar loves to cook. Aside from being relaxing, it lets her be creative. In a profile for the Arizona Republic, Salazar said, “In my next life, I might do a food truck.” As a top corporate executive, who also happens to be Latina, Salazar knows she’s something of a rarity. “I’m a unicorn,” she said. It’s a responsibility she does not take lightly, often mentoring Latinas and other young women and girls about the challenges they will face in the professional world. “I am proud of my Latina heritage,” Salazar once told Latino Perspectives Magazine. “My family instilled in me the importance of a strong work ethic and doing the right thing.” Salazar’s said her father was a political attaché for the U.S. Department of Justice and her mother was a certified teacher who ran an education program for migrant children. Education was always a major priority in her family. “Thou shalt go to college,” was a family mantra, Salazar jokes. Salazar is the first to admit that her job at BCBSAZ and her outside philanthropic work keep her extremely busy. But she has no regrets. “A bored Deanna is a troublesome Deanna,” she said.

DATO S

A Z 154

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Hispanics Don’t Allow Financial Issues To Get In The Way of Health Issues • HALF OF HISPANICS AGED 35+ SAY THEY ARE WILLING TO PAY ANYTHING WHEN IT CONCERNS THEIR HEALTH • THIS CONSUMER GROUP IS GROWING DRAMATICALLY: BETWEEN 2005 & 2015 HISPANICS AGED 45-54 WILL GROW BY 52%, WHILE THOSE AGED 55-64 WILL GROW BY 82%. Source: Mintel Oxygen Report, February 2011

Health Is A Top Priority For Hispanics

Hispanics Spent

Phoenix

$1.1 Billion

on Health Care in 2014 Tucson

Hispanics Spent

$370 Million

on Health Care in 2014 Source: IHS Global Insight Hispanic Market Monitor 2015, Phoenix DMA

Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 155

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Health And Wellness Concerns All The Family

“I worry about...” The Health of Other Family Members

Taking Care of Elderly Family Members

Of Hispanics

Of Hispanics

vs. 47% of NH Whites

vs. 23% of NH Whites

62% 42% Source: 2010 Yankelovich MONITOR Multicultural Marketing Study, Based on P16+. Following Top 2 Box Summary of Amount of Worry or Stress Caused by Each of the Following

Doctors Are Hispanics Top Source For Health Information

Doctors Are Hispanics Top Source For Health Information

TOP 10 SOURCES FOR GATHERING HEALTH INFORMATION Top 10 Sources for Gathering Health Information 49%

Doctors

HISPANICS ARE Hispanics are more MORE LIKELY likely than NH THAN NONWhites to rely on family and media HISPANIC reports for health WHITES TO RELY information ON FAMILY AND MEDIA REPORTS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION

36% 35% 34%

The Internet Family Dentists

22%

TV/Radio Reports

29% 26% 25% 23% 25%

Physician Assistants

Friends Nurses

Hispanic

30%

17%

Pharmacists

Government Sources

10%

24%

18%

24% 24%

Non-Hispanic White

Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on Persons 16+. Summary of 4-5 on a 5-point scale where 5 is "Get a great deal of information."

ce: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on Persons 16+. mary of 4-5 on a 5 point scale where 5 is get a great deal of information.

DATO S

A Z 156

27% 31%

2 0 1 6

57%


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Doctors Are Hispanic Women’s Top Source Doctors are Hispanic women’s top source of gathering health information Of Gathering Health Information Hispanic women are HISPANICS more likely ARE MORE than NH LIKELY THAN Whites to rely NON-HISPANIC on family and WHITES TO RELY media reports for health ON FAMILY AND information MEDIA REPORTS

52%

Doctors The Internet Dentists

27%

TV/Radio Reports

33%

32%

18%

30% 29%

Pharmacists Magazine or Newspaper Reports

27%

16%

Government Sources

26%

9%

26% 23%

Physician Assistants The Food & Drug Administration

Hispanic W18+

33%

22%

Family

FOR HEALTH INFORMATION

58%

34% 36%

25%

9%

Non-Hispanic White W18+

Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on Persons 16+. Summary of 4-5 on a 5-point scale where 5 is "Get a great deal of information."

Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on Women 18+ Summary of 4-5 on a 5 point scale where 5 is get a great deal of information.

• 55% of Hispanics help care for their parents or elderly relatives vs. 34% of Non-Hispanic Whites

Hispanics Are More Likely To Care Hispanics Are More Likely To Care For The Elderly Relatives For The Elderly Relatives Ways Help Care for Parent or Elderly Relative

WAYS HISPANICS HELP CARE FOR PARENT OR ELDERLY RELATIVE

55% OF HISPANICS HELP CARE FOR THEIR PARENTS OR ELDERLY RELATIVES VS. 34% OF NON-HISPANIC WHITES

9%

Choose Their Physician

3% 8%

Choose Their Hospital

3% 7%

Choose Their Pharmacy

2% 5%

Choose or Manage Their Health Insurance

Hispanic

2% Non-Hispanic White

Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on P16+.

Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on P16+.

DATO S

A Z 157

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Hispanics Are More Trusting OfHispanics Are More Trusting of the U.S. Healthcare System The U.S. Health Care System

Percent of Hispanic and Non-Hispanics Who Agree with the statement: PERCENT AND NON-HISPANICS WHO THEfairly” STATEMENT: “I OF trustHISPANIC the U.S. healthcare system to treat meAGREE and myWITH family

“I trust the U.S. healthcare system to treat me and my family fairly.” 28%

12%

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic White

Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on P16+. (Top 3 Box on 10-point scale where 10 is "Trust completely.)

Source: Yankelovich 2010 Multicultural Marketing Study. Based on P16+. (Top 3 Box on 10 Point Scale Where 10 Is Trust Completely)

Hispanic Trust And Follow Doctor Recommendations Hispanic Trust and Follow Doctor Recommendations % of Adults Who Strongly Agree % OF ADULTS WHO STRONGLY AGREE

34%

25%

25% 18%

"It's"It's important doctorwhen whenI'm I'm Importanttotogo gototo the the doctor ill"ill."

"I always doctortells tellsme me "I alwaysdodowhat what my my doctor to to do"do."

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Simmons NCS/NHCS Winter 2016 NHCS Adult Study 12-month (Feb 2015 – Mar 2016); Total U.S.; Base: A18+ Source: Simmons NCS/NHCS Winter 2016 NHCS Adult Study 12-month (Feb 2015 – Mar 2016); Total U.S.; Base: A18+

DATO S

A Z 158

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Health Ads Impact Hispanics Health Ads Impact Hispanics

% OF HISPANICS & NON-HISPANICS % of Hispanics & WHO MADE AN Non-Hispanics who Made an appt to see a made an APPOINTMENT TOdoctor appointment to see SEE A a doctor as a result DOCTOR AS Aof a health ad. RESULT OF A HEALTH AD.

26% 24% Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 ( Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+

Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 ( Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Phoenix DMA, Adults 18+

U.S. Hispanics Are More Likely U.S. Hispanics Are More Likely to Be Actively Engaged in Their Health To Be Actively Engaged In Their Health • Hispanics are more

• Hispanics Are More likely than the U.S. Likely than the U.S. population in general Population in General to be categorized as to Be Categorized as an “Image Shaper.” an “Image Shaper.” • “Health and image • “Health and image are allied together for are allied together for them. Looking good them. Looking good means being healthy. means being healthy. Convenience and healthy choices can— Convenience and and do—go together healthy choices can— for this group.”

26%

156 Index

Above Average Health & Well Being Image Shapers

90 Index

and do—go together for this group.”

Total

Hispanic

24%

Non-Hispanic

Source: Simmons NCS/NHCS Winter 2016 NHCS Adult Study 12-month (Feb 2015 – Mar 2016); Total U.S.; Base: A18+

Source: Simmons NCS/NHCS Winter 2016 NHCS Adult Study 12-month (Feb 2015 – Mar 2016); Total U.S.; Base: A18+

DATO S

A Z 159

2 0 1 6

41%


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Latinos Were Crucial To The Affordable Care Act’s Success “And just as Latinos were crucial to President Obama’s re-election in 2012, they are now key to the implementation of his health law. The administration has made clear that the health law will succeed only if Latinos…enroll. And it’s pulling out all the stops to make sure they do.” Source: NPR.org, June 25, 2013

Hispanics Represent Significant And Profitable Growth Market Across Key Areas Of The Health Care Industry • Hospitals – Hispanics have larger families, more births and generally trust large, well-established institutions. They also are increasingly privately insured. • Insurers – Hispanics are open and motivated to utilize lower-cost, alternative health care options and treatments. • Health Care Providers – Hispanics are comfortable and willing to pay outof-pocket for healthcare services. Also, in some regions of the U.S., Hispanic consumers often over-index in expensive, high-margin procedures such as bariatric and cosmetic surgery. • Digital Health – Hispanics ages 35-64 are increasingly connected and trust doctors and the internet equally for health care advice.  • Pharma – Hispanics are more likely to request brand name products when they are advertised to them in culturally relevant ways. • Medical Device Manufacturers – Older Hispanics have active lifestyles that they want to maintain. Source: www.mediapost.com/publications/article/269836/hispanics-and-healthcare.html

DATO S

A Z 160

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

The Percentage Of Insured Hispanics In Phoenix Has Increased Dramatically In the Past 3 Years The Percentage of Insured Hispanics in Phoenix Has Increased Dramatically in the Past 3 Years PERCENT OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ WITH ANY HEALTH INSURANCE IN PHOENIX

79.7% 0.797

79.9%

67.6%

60.0%

3 Years Ago

2 Years Ago

Last Year

NOTE: Figures include all types of health insurance including,

Current

Courtesy of

but not limited to, group and individual. Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study, 2013 Release 1 through 2016 Release 1, Phoenix DMA, Hispanic Adults 18+ Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study, 2013 Release 1 through 2016 Release 1, Phoenix DMA, Hispanic Adults 18+

The Percentage of Insured Hispanics in Tucson Has Increased Dramatically in the Past 3 Years The Percentage Of Insured Hispanics In Tucson Percent of Hispanic Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance in Phoenix Has Increased Dramatically In the Past 3 Years PERCENT OF HISPANIC ADULTS 18+ WITH ANY HEALTH INSURANCE IN TUCSON 87.6 0.876 %

79.5% 73.4%

73.0%

3 Years Ago

2 Years Ago

Source: Scarborough Study, 2013 Release 1 through 2016 Release 1, NOTE: Figures include all types of health Tucson DMA, Hispanic Adults 18+

but not limited to, group and individual.

Last Year

insurance including,

Current

Courtesy of

Source: Scarborough Study, 2013 Release 1 through 2016 Release 1, Tucson DMA, Hispanic Adults 18+

DATO S

A Z 161

2 0 1 6

37


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Phoenix Hispanics’ Preferences For Health Insurance Differs from Non-Hispanics’ Phoenix Hispanics’ Preferences for Health Insurance Differs from Non-Hispanics’ PERCENTAGE OF INSURED PHOENIX HISPANICS AND NON-HISPANICS Percentage of Insured Phoenix Hispanics and Non-Hispanics by Group/Individual Health Insurance Provider BY GROUP/INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE PROVIDER 21%

United Healthcare

21%

Blue Cross & Blue Shield

How to Read: Of all Phoenix Hispanics with health How to Read: insurance, Of all Phoenix 21% have Hispanics with Blue Cross health insurance, Blue Shield 21% have Blue as their health Cross Blue Shield asinsurance their health provider.

insurance provider.

Aetna

9%

Health Net

9%

4% 5%

1%

Humana Aflac

1%

30%

13%

8% 9%

CIGNA State Farm

26%

4% 5% 3%

Other provider

21% Hispanic

27%

Non-Hispanic

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 ( Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 ( Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance

Tucson Hispanics’ Preferences For Health Insurance Differs From Non-Hispanics’ Tucson Hispanics’ Preferences for Health PERCENTAGE OF INSURED TUCSON HISPANICS AND NON-HISPANICS Insurance Differs from Non-Hispanics’ BY GROUP/INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE PROVIDER Percentage of Insured Tucson Hispanics and Non-Hispanics by Group/Individual Health Insurance Provider United Healthcare

41% 17%

Blue Cross & Blue Shield Health Net

How to Read: Of all Tucson Hispanics with health insurance, 17% have Blue Cross Blue Shield as their health insurance provider.

How to Read: Of all Tucson Hispanics with health insurance, 17% have Blue Cross Blue Shield as their health insurance provider.

6%

23%

9%

7% 6%

CIGNA

3%

Aetna Meritus Health Partners

0% 1%

Aflac

0% 1%

State Farm

0% 1%

7%

23% 22%

Other provider

Hispanic

Non-Hispanic

Source: Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance Source: Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance

DATO S

A Z 162

2 0 1 6

45%


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Type of Health Insurance Used In Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING EACH TYPE OF HEALTH INSURANCE Type of Health Insurance Used In Phoenix Ranked by Percentage of Hispanics Using Each Type of Health Insurance

39% 35% 29%

27%

24%

22%

19% 12%

10%

13% 5%

2% Other type

Medicaid, etc.

PPO

Medicare

Hispanic

HMO

1%

Military

1%

POS (Point of Service)

Non-Hispanic

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 ( Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 ( Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance

Type of Health Insurance Used in Tucson RANKED BY PERCENTAGE Type of Health Insurance Used in Tucson OF HISPANICS USING EACH TYPE OF HEALTH INSURANCE Ranked by Percentage of Hispanics Using Each Type of Health Insurance

36% 29%

27%

24%

22% 18%

18%

20% 15% 8%

9% 5%

4%

1% Medicaid, Etc.

HMO

Other type

PPO

Hispanic

Medicare

Non-Hispanic

Source: Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance Source: Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance

DATO S

A Z 163

2 0 1 6

Military

POS


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Top Medical Specialists Visited in Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING MEDICAL SPECIALISTS IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS

Top Medical Specialists Visited in Phoenix Ranked by Percentage of Hispanics Using Medical Specialists in the Past 12 Months

44% 39%

28% 22% 21%

27%

22% 18%

16%

18%

16%

15% 9%

11%

9%

9%

7%

4%

6%

4%

0% Dentist

Eye Examiner

Eye Doctor

OB/GYN

Other specialist

Chiropractor Cardiologist

Hispanic

Skin Doctor

Physical Therapist

Orthopedist

0%

Cosmetic Surgeon

Non-Hispanic

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 ( Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 ( Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ with Any Health Insurance

Top Medical Specialists Visited in Tucson RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING MEDICAL SPECIALISTS IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS Top Medical Specialists Visited in Tucson Ranked by Percentage of Hispanics Using Medical Specialists in the Past 12 Months 54%

33%

31% 32% 24% 20%

23% 19% 18%

20%

16%

15% 9%

8%

10%

9% 5%

Dentist

Eye doctor

Other specialist

OB/GYN

Eye examiner

Hispanic

Cardiologist

Physical therapist

Orthopedist

Non-Hispanic

Source: Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+ Source: Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+

DATO S

A Z 164

5%

2 0 1 6

4% Skin doctor

3% Chiropractor


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 5

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Top Medical Services In Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING MEDICAL SERVICES IN PAST 3 YEARS MEDICAL SERVICE Other medical service Hospital emergency room Urgent care facility Maternity care Pediatrics Any overnight stay procedure Cancer/oncology Teeth whitening, veneers, etc. Cardiac care Neurology Orthopedics Corrective eye surgery Mental health care

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13

30.8% 26.9% 25.2% 16.7% 15.5% 9.1% 8.6% 8.3% 7.6% 7.1% 6.8% 5.7% 2.7%

#3 #1 #2 #11 #7 #4 #7 #13 #5 #9 #6 #9 #12

28.0% 32.9% 29.8% 6.4% 9.5% 16.1% 9.5% 4.1% 12.1% 7.5% 10.6% 7.5% 5.0%

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 ( Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ Courtesy of

Top Medical Services In Tucson RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING MEDICAL SERVICES IN PAST 3 YEARS MEDICAL SERVICE Other medical service Hospital emergency room Urgent care facility Maternity care Pediatrics Any overnight stay procedure Orthopedics Cardiac care Neurology Mental health care Cancer/oncology Corrective eye surgery Teeth whitening, veneers, etc.

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13

36.8% 30.1% 23.1% 17.3% 14.8% 12.6% 9.5% 8.5% 8.0% 5.9% 4.2% 4.1% 3.8%

#1 #1 #1 #9 #7 #2 #5 #4 #7 #7 #5 #9 #12

36.4% 34.1% 32.6% 6.8% 10.0% 17.1% 11.5% 11.7% 7.3% 6.9% 10.6% 6.7% 4.1%

Source: Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+ Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 165

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 5

M A R K E T

HEALTH

Top Hospitals Used in Phoenix RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING HOSPITALS IN PAST 3 YEARS HOSPITAL SERVICE

HISPANIC RANK

% OF HISPANICS

NON-HISPANIC RANK

% OF NON-HISPANIC

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12

12.5% 11.9% 11.5% 9.5% 9.4% 8.0% 7.6% 6.3% 5.9% 5.7% 4.7% 4.3%

#3 #10 #8 #2 #1 #16 #4 #6 #11 #12 #21 #9

6.7% 4.4% 5.1% 8.0% 17.8% 1.5% 6.3% 5.9% 4.1% 3.3% 0.7% 4.6%

St. Joseph Hospital & Medical Center Phoenix Children’s Hospital Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center Banner Desert Medical Center Other hospital Maricopa Medical Center Other Banner Health hospital Banner Thunderbird Medical Center John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital Chandler Regional Hospital Maryvale Hospital Banner Baywood Medical Center

Source: Hispanic Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 ( Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Phoenix DMA, Base: Adults 18+ Courtesy of

Top Hospitals Used in Tucson RANKED BY PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS USING HOSPITALS IN PAST 3 YEARS HOSPITAL SERVICE

HISPANIC RANK

Any hospital used Tucson Medical Center Banner University Medical Center - Tucson Campus St. Mary’s Hospital Banner University Medical Center - South Campus Northwest Medical Center University of Arizona Medical Center - Diamond Children’s St. Joseph’s Hospital Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute Other hospital VA Medical Center Oro Valley Hospital

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #8 #10 #11

% OF HISPANICS

81.7% 34.3% 20.0% 19.0% 17.4% 16.4% 14.0% 9.6% 7.3% 7.3% 5.5% 1.3%

NON-HISPANIC RANK

71.9% 27.6% 16.5% 10.0% 6.2% 19.2% 4.7% 15.3% 3.5% 8.8% 7.4% 6.8%

#1 #3 #5 #9 #2 #10 #4 #11 #6 #7 #8

Source: Scarborough Study 2016 Release 1 (Feb ’15 – Jan ‘16), Tucson DMA, Base: Adults 18+ Courtesy of

DATO S

A Z 166

2 0 1 6

% OF NON-HISPANIC


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

STATE OF LATINO ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative

Source: www.LatinoEl.org

DATO S

A Z 167

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

About This Report and implemented the data collection.

The Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI), a collaboration between the Latino Business Action Network (LBAN) and Stanford University, housed within the Stanford Graduate School of Business, created this report on the State of Latino Entrepreneurship in the United States. The information contained in this report was prepared from sources and data that we believe to be reliable, but we make no representation as to its accuracy or completeness and we assume neither responsibility nor liability for any damages of any type resulting from any errors or omissions. Projected to be published annually, this first report is published in November, 2015.

Dr. Jerry Porras is the cofounder and chairman of the board of LBAN, co-author of the business bestseller, Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies, and the Lane Professor of Organizational Behavior, Emeritus at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Other Contributors Remy Arteaga is the Executive Director of the LBAN, co-author of the Wiley published book, Pivot: How Top Entrepreneurs Adapt and Change Course to Find Ultimate Success. Tiq Chapa is the Program Manager of SLEI.

Principal Investigators

Jessica Salinas is the Community & Marketing Manager of LBAN.

Dr. Douglas Rivers, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor of political science at Stanford University, designed the research study,

Section I

2

Source: www.LatinoEl.org

DATO S

A Z 168

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

Acknowledgments Just as growing a business would not be possible without a network of support, SLEI has many to thank for its development and results.

We would also like to thank all the hard-working Latino entrepreneurs of the research panel who are helping build Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy.

First, LBAN would like to thank 21st Century Fox, Wells Fargo Bank, State Farm Insurance, Pitch Johnson, John Arrillaga, Microsoft, Comcast, Latino Donor Collaborative, and The Gilbert and Jacki Cisneros Foundation for their generous funding and support.

Finally, we would also like to thank Barbi Bistrowitz (bb@barbibistrowitz.com), who donated her time as art director to design this report.

Second, we want to thank our Board of Directors for their guidance and insights. The LBAN board: Victor Arias, Korn Ferry International Phil Pompa, International Accelerator, Inc. Jerry I. Porras, Stanford Graduate School of Business (Chairman - LBAN) Frank Ramirez, Entrepreneur David Segura, VisionIT Sol Trujillo, Trujillo Investments

3

Source: www.LatinoEl.org

DATO S

A Z 169

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

LBAN For more on information, please visit www.LatinoEI.org.

The Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI) is a research collaboration between Stanford University housed at the Graduate School of Business and the Latino Business Action Network (LBAN), a 501(c)3 not for profit organization located in Palo Alto, CA.

Vision The vision to make America stronger by empowering Latino entrepreneurs to grow large businesses through entrepreneurship research, education and networks.

Goal The Goal is to grow the American economy by doubling the number of $10+ million, $100+ million, and $1+ Billion Latino-owned businesses by 2020.

Section I

4

Source: www.LatinoEl.org

DATO S

A Z 170

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

1

Executive Summary With this report, Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI) provides the first annual State of Latino Entrepreneurship report. It provides academic researchers, policy makers and business leaders with a timely update of SLEIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research results.

U.S. economy. The potential impact on the U.S. economy if LOBs generated the same level of sales as NLOBs was calculated over the period of 20022012. A pattern was found to exist over these years. For example, in 2012 alone, if all LOBs averaged the same yearly sales per firm as all NLOBs, $1.38 trillion would have been added to the economy. This difference is named the Opportunity Gap and represents the potential economic impact of scaling LOBs to the same average level of NLOBs.

The report finds that even as the Latino population (currently at 17%) is growing at an undeniably fast rate (estimated to be 30% by 2060), and with it, an explosion in the number of Latino Owned Businesses (LOBs), there is a multi trillion dollar opportunity gap between Latino Owned Businesses and Non-Latino Owned Businesses (NLOBs), driven by the dramatic difference in size between the two.

Diverse Customers & Industries Our research also found that reasons often cited for lack of large size for LOBs- industry selection and customer base- are without merit. When comparing the mixture of industries of LOBs to NLOBs in industries with either high average sales per firm or high growth rates, SLEI found no discernible differences between the two groups in the percentage of firms within industries. On the second point, SLEI found that 80% of LOBs sell to a mixture of both Latino and non-Latino customers. The results counter the perception that LOBs are small because Latino entrepreneurs choose to open businesses in small industries or because of a lack of diverse customer base.

What can explain this difference? To answer that question, SLEI has created a carefully cleaned database of 1,432,746 Latino businesses, from which two panels of Latino businesses owners - 1,831 and 368 - who agreed to participate in ongoing surveys and research was created. This report expands on the U.S. Census based reports, including the Kauffman Foundation report, by examining the economic impact of LOBs on the American economy and issues related to growing large LOBs. For the first time, a deeper examination into the drivers that lead to smaller LOBs is analyzed.

An Entrepreneurial Mindset The data speak to an interesting misalignment between the mindset of the Latino business owner and the reality of the state of their business. Although the growth mentality is present, the reality is that more than half (54%) of the surveyed LBOs have businesses that are either growing slowly, staying stagnant or shrinking, revealing a clear disconnect between goals and reality.

Key Insights Multi Trillion Dollar Opportunity Gap The current gap between the average yearly sales generated by LOBs and NLOBs points to an exciting opportunity for significant growth in the

5 Source: www.LatinoEl.org

DATO S

A Z 171

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

2

Executive Summary Internal Motivations Affect Ownership and Capital

government funding programs for small businesses, according to our survey respondents, many Latino business owners are totally unaware of these government funds and programs. In fact, 22% have never heard of the SBA, 51% have never heard of the SBIC, and 56% have never heard of SBIR.

Further, our results indicate that Latino business owners are motivated primarily by internal, noneconomic factors. When asked, only 37% of Latino entrepreneurs responded that external market opportunity was a key inspiration for becoming business owners. Instead, Latino business owners point to reasons based on internal impact-- building something to pass down to children, parents or family members, working with family or friends, or having control of their financial future.

Next Steps Latino business owners are having a significant impact on the economy, and there is an opportunity to have an even greater impact by understanding the factors that inhibit growth. This report is a first step in improving the lives of Latinos through entrepreneurship, as it gives us a better understanding of the potential economic impact LOBs can have in the U.S. economy and the challenges that need to be addressed to get there.

Personal motivations contribute to more than business creation, also influencing ownership and capital decisions. When it comes to ownership, the results show that LOBs are predominantly family owned with only 8% non-family ownership, compared to 15% of NLOBs. Additionally, although over half of respondents believe that they could grow faster if they had additional capital, 67% are concerned about losing control of their business if during fundraising, they sold a share to someone else or brought in a partner.

In addition to the research, the Latino business database and research panel can help policymakers and business leaders understand and then accelerate the engines of job creation and wealth formation latent in the surging rates of Latino entrepreneurship. This report can also provide government agencies - such as the SBA, SBIC, SBIR - venture capitalists, banks and other commercial institutions, and nonprofits the opportunity to engage deeper with the Latino population, and specifically, the Latino entrepreneur.

Capital Awareness & Engagement Compared to NLOBs, LOBs were less likely to look to conventional institutional capital sources, like banks, for funding and were more likely to use credit cards. However, while taking a closer look at capital and LOBs, our survey found that â&#x2026;&#x201C; of respondents have been turned down for funding, with the majority of those being declined by banks.

In turn, further surveys and work with this research panel of LOBs can track the successes created by changes in public policy and public investments.

Further, while the SBA, SBIC and SBIR grants are three of the largest and most well-known

6 Source: www.LatinoEl.org

DATO S

A Z 172

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

EXCERPT

LBAN 3430 West Bayshore Road Suite 104 Palo Alto, CA 94303 650-666-0079 info@LatinoEI.org

Source: www.LatinoEl.org

DATO S

A Z 173

2 0 1 6

M A R K E T


Ready to save up to 90% on lighting upgrades? APS has a rebate for that. Making energy-saving upgrades is a great way for Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce members to reduce their operating costs. Thanks to our APS Express Solutions rebate program, making those upgrades has never been more affordable. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll cover up to 90% of the cost of lighting and refrigeration upgradesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and most projects pay for themselves in less than a year.


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

Latinos Are Taking The Lead In Entrepreneurship

'LATINOS NOW ACCOUNT FOR ONE OUT OF EVERY FIVE NEW ENTREPRENEURS IN THE UNITED STATES' Source: Center For American Progress, "Latinos Are Shaping The Future of the United States," November 2015 cdn.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/23114334/CAP-CIDE-report2-WEB.pdf

Since 2002, Hispanic-Owned Businesses Have More Than Doubled Since 2002, Number of Hispanic Owned Businesses Have More Than Doubled (In millions)

(IN MILLIONS) 4.1

1.7

2002

2015

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/ http://hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/

DATO S

A Z 175

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

Latinas Own Over 1/3 Of All Businesses Owned By Minority Women Latinas Own Over 1/3 of All Minority Women Owned Businesses U.S. Business Owned By Minority Women U.S. BUSINESS OWNED BY MINORITY WOMEN

36%

64%

Latinas

Other

Source: Hispanic Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/ http://hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/

The Rate of New Latino Entrepreneurs Since 1996, The Rate of New Latino Entrepreneurs Has More Than Doubled Has More Than Doubled Since 1996 22.1%

10.0%

1996

2014

Source: Robert W. Fairlie, et al., “The Kauffman Index: Main Street Entrepreneurship,” Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, December 2015. www.kauffman.org/~/media/kauffman_org/microsites/kauffman_index/state_and_metro_mainstreet_2015/kauffman_index_main_street_state_report_2015.pdf Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/

DATO S

A Z 176

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 6

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

In Arizona, Female Hispanic Firms Are Growing At A Rate Of 116%, 114 Percentage In Arizona, Female Hispanic Firms Are Growing At A Rate Of 116%, Number of Firms in Arizona Points 114 Percentage Points Higher Higher Than TheThan Rate For All The Firms! Rate For All Firms NUMBER OF FIRMS IN ARIZONA

2% Growth

600

492

500

500

Thousands

400

60% Growth

300

200

85

100

0

All Firms

70% Growth

136 53

Minority Firms

2007

90

Hispanic Firms

116% Growth 42

19

Female Hispanic Firms

2012

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015 Source: United States Census Bureau Survey, 2012; Released August 2015

Top Challenges of Conducting Business in Arizona SBE Concerns Include Top Challenges Of Conducting Business In Arizona (In Percentage)

(IN PERCENTAGE)

50 42

27

Education System

Workforce

State Government

Source: Alliance Bank of Arizona's Arizona 2016 CEO Outlook Source: Arizona 2016 CEO Outlook

DATO S

A Z 177

2 0 1 6

24

Healthcare costs


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 6

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

What Small Business Owners Are Confident About What Small Business Owners Are Confident About (In Percentage)

(IN PERCENTAGE) 89 75 58

37

Confident in 2016 Revenue Growth

More Opportunity Than 3 Years Ago

Investing in Hiring/Marketing

Expanding

Source: Alliance Bank of Arizona's Arizona 2016 CEO Outlook Source: Arizona 2016 CEO Outlook

Threats To Future Business Growth Threats to Future Business Growth (In Percentage)

(IN PERCENTAGE)

48

New Market Entrants

60

Shift in Consumer Spending

76

Cyber Threats/data breach

77

Deficiency of employees w/key skills

Source: Alliance Bank of Arizona's Arizona 2016 CEO Outlook

Source: Arizona 2016 CEO Outlook

DATO S

A Z 178

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

Between 2000-2015, Hispanics Accounted For 66% Of U.S. Labor Force Growth Between 2000-2015, Hispanics Accounted for 66% of U.S. Labor Force Growth

34%

66%

Hispanic

Other

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/ http://hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/

Percentage Of U.S. Hispanics In The Labor Force Percentage of U.S. Hispanics in the Labor Force (In Percentage) (IN PERCENTAGE)

68

68

67

2005

2010

2014

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

DATO S

A Z 179

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

Since 2009, Hispanic Unemployment Rate Has Decreased 7.7 Percentage Points Since 2009, Hispanic Unemployment Rate Has Decreased 7.7 Percentage Points 13.1%

5.4%

August 2009

February 2016

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016

http://hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/ Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/

Hispanics Have A Strong Presence In Labor Force

Hispanics Have A Strong Presence In Labor Force *Percentage Calculations from February 2016 *PERCENTAGE CALCULATIONS FROM FEBRUARY 2016 66

63

U.S. Rate of Labor Force Participation

U.S. Hispanic Rate of Labor Force Participation

Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/ Source: Hispanic Wealth Project, 2015 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, 2016 http://hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/

DATO S

A Z 180

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

EXCERPT

REPORT AUGUST, 2016

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

Source: www.renewoureconomy.org

DATO S

A Z 181

2 0 1 6

M A R K E T


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 6

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

| The Role of Immigrants as Entrepreneurs

The Role of Immigrants as Entrepreneurs 60,132

22%

immigrants in Arizona are self-employed. Immigrant-owned businesses generated $1.3 B in business income in 2014.

G

iven that the act of picking up and moving to another country is inherently brave and risky, it should be little surprise that immigrants have repeatedly been found to be more entrepreneurial than the U.S. population as a whole.1 According to The Kauffman Foundation, a nonprofit group that studies entrepreneurship, immigrants were almost twice as likely to start a new business in 2015 than the nativeborn population.2 The companies they founded ranged from small businesses on Main Street to large firms responsible for thousands of American jobs. Recent studies, for instance, have indicated that immigrants own more than half of the grocery stores in America and 48 percent of nail salons.3 Foreign-born entrepreneurs are also behind 51 percent of our countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s billion dollar startups.4 In addition, more than 40 percent of Fortune 500 firms have at least one founder who was an immigrant or the child of an immigrant.

Share of entrepreneurs in Arizona who are immigrants

113,760 people in Arizona were employed by immigrant owned companies in 2007

In 2010, roughly 1 in 10 American workers with jobs at private firms were employed at immigrantfounded companies. The super-charged entrepreneurial activity of immigrants provides real and meaningful benefits to everyday Americans. In 2010, roughly one in 10 American workers with jobs at private firms were employed at immigrant-founded companies. Such businesses also generated more than $775 billion in annual business revenue that year.5 In Arizona, like the country as a whole, immigrants are currently punching far above their weight class as entrepreneurs. Foreignborn workers currently make up 22.0 percent of all entrepreneurs in the state, despite accounting for 13.7 percent of Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population. Their firms generated

2

Source: www.renewoureconomy.org

DATO S

A Z 182

2 0 1 6


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 6

The Contributions of New Americans in Arizona

|

M A R K E T

EXCERPT

The Role of Immigrants as Entrepreneurs

$1.3 billion in business income in 2014. Arizona firms with at least one immigrant owner also provided jobs to roughly 114,000 Americans in 2007.6 Immigrant entrepreneurs have played an important part of Arizona’s economic success story. Avnet, a Fortune 500 technology distributer based in the state, was originally founded by Charles Avnet, a Russian immigrant. Avnet started out by selling spare radio parts in downtown Manhattan. By World War II, he had turned his company into one of the country’s leading radio distributors.7 Freeport-McMoRan, another Fortune 500 firm based in Arizona, had one founder whose parents immigrated to America. Together, these two companies employ 54,000 people globally and bring in almost $50 billion in revenues each year. Currently, there is no visa to come to America, start a company, and create jobs for U.S. workers — even if an entrepreneur already has a business plan and has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to support his or her idea. Trying to exploit that flaw in our system, countries around the world — from Canada to Singapore, Australia to Chile — have enacted startup visas, often with the explicit purpose of luring away entrepreneurs who want to build a U.S. business but cannot get a visa to do so.8 Here in the United States, many individuals have gone to great lengths to circumnavigate the visa hurdles. Many

entrepreneurs sell a majority stake in their company and then apply for a visa as a high-skilled worker, rather than the owner of their firm. And a few enterprising venture capitalists, led by Jeff Bussgang in Boston and Brad Feld in Colorado, have launched programs that bring over foreign-born entrepreneurs to serve as “entrepreneurs in residence” at colleges and universities. Because nonprofit academic institutions are exempt from the H-1B cap, such entrepreneurs can secure their visas by working as mentors at a school, and then build their startups in their free time. These innovative programs, which are currently available at 13 colleges and universities across the country, are already resulting in meaningful economic contributions. As of mid-2016, 23 entrepreneurs had secured visas through these programs nationally. The companies they founded had created 261 jobs and raised more than $100 million in funding.9

40% of Fortune 500 companies based in Arizona were founded by immigrants or their children. Those firms generate $49.6 B in annual revenue, and employ 54,000 people globally. 3 Source: www.renewoureconomy.org

DATO S

A Z 183

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 6

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

Percentage Of Employed And Unemployed Hispanics In The Past Decade Percentage of Employed and Unemployed Hispanics In the Past Decade (In Percentage)

(IN PERCENTAGE)

62

61

59

9

6 2005

6

2010

Employed

2014

Unemployed

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table Source: U.S. Census Bureau http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table

Top 5 Occupations For Hispanics In Arizona Top 5 Occupations for Hispanics in Arizona (In Percentage) (IN PERCENTAGE)

26

28 24

20 15

22

21

19

17

15

Management,professional, professional Management, and related related and

25

24

14

Service Service

Salesand andoffice office Sales

2005

Natural resources, resources, Natural construction and construction, and maintenance maintenance

2010

2014

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Source: U.S. Census Bureau factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table

DATO S

A Z 184

2 0 1 6

15

14

Production,transportation, transportation Production, andmaterial material moving moving and


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 6

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

Employment And Unemployment Status Of Hispanics In Phoenix Employment and Unemployment Status of Hispanics in Phoenix (In Percentage)

(IN PERCENTAGE) 66 58

54

9

5 2005

6

2010

Employed

2014

Unemployed

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Source: U.S. Census Bureau factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table

Top Industries For Hispanics In Arizona Top Industries For Hispanics in Arizona (In Percentage)

(IN PERCENTAGE) 19

10

11

12

19

18

13

13

14 14 10 10

9 7

Professional, scientific Professional, scientific, and and management management

Educational services, Educational services, health health social carecare and and social

Arts, entertainment, entertainment, Arts, recreation, accommodation, accommodation recreation, and food services services and food

2005

2010

Construction Construction

2014

Source: U.S. Census Bureau factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table Source: U.S. Census Bureau http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table

DATO S

A Z 185

2 0 1 6

7

Manufacturing Manufacturing


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 6

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

Unemployment Rate Down For Hispanics In Arizona Since 2010 Number of Hispanics Employed and Unemployed in Arizona (In Percentage)

(IN PERCENTAGE) 63

58

55

9

6 2005

6

2010

Employed

2014

Unemployed

Source: U.S. Census Bureau factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table Source: U.S. Census Bureau http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table

A Positive Outlook For Hispanic Labor Force Participation In The Future 'HISPANICS WILL ACCOUNT FOR APPROXIMATELY 11 MILLION JOBS OUT OF 14 MILLION NEW POSITIONS ACROSS THE ECONOMY BETWEEN 2016 AND 2034' Source: Nick Timiraos, “Hispanics Could Account for 40% of U.S. Job Growth by 2020,” Wall Street Journal, Feb. 24, 2015. hispanicwealthproject.org/state-of-hispanic-homeownership-report/

DATO S

A Z 186

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

SECTION I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 6

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

Phoenix Latinas In The Labor Force Have Remained Stagnant In The Past Decade Phoenix Latinas in the Labor Force Have Remained Stagnant In the Past Decade (In Percentage) (IN PERCENTAGE)

58

59

59

2005

2010

2014

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

The Majority Of Latinas Work In Service, Sales And Office Roles

While 50% of Phoenix Latinas Are in Labor Force Industries, There Are Plenty of Latinas who Pursue Other Occupations (In Percentage)

(IN PERCENTAGE) 35

35

34

35

33

23

21

15

2005

2010

Management, professional, Management, professional and and related related

2014

Service Service

Sales Sales and andoffice office

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Source: U.S. Census Bureau http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table

DATO S

A Z 187

2 0 1 6

35


T H E

SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 6

M A R K E T

BUSINESS & WORKFORCE

Employed And Unemployed Latinas In Tucson Employed and Unemployed Latinas in Tucson (In Percentage)

(IN PERCENTAGE)

53

50

52

7

7

2007

7

2010

Employed

2014

Unemployed

Source: U.S. Census Bureau factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table Source: U.S. Census Bureau http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table

Employment And Unemployment Status Of Hispanics In Tucson Employment and Unemployment Status of Hispanics in Tucson (In Percentage)

(IN PERCENTAGE) 59

57

54

10

7

5 2007

2010

Employed

2014

Unemployed

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Source: U.S. Census Bureau factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_S0201&prodType=table

DATO S

A Z 188

2 0 1 6


CHASE IS PROUD TO SUPPORT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

CHASE IS PROUD TO SUPPORT THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SO YOU CAN DO MORE FOR YOUR COMMUNITY. Contact Your Local Chase Business Banker Today. Kelly B. Shupe Vice President Business Banking Area Manager 480-970-7028

For more information, visit chase.com

®

JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. Member FDIC © 2016 JPMorgan Chase & Co.

The law firm of Quarles & Brady is a proud sponsor of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. For more information about our legal services, please contact Leonardo Loo at 602.229.5638/ leonardo.loo@quarles.com.

quarles.com


T H E SECTION I

S T A T E CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 6

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

PROFILE

Hive @ Central

Photos Courtesy of Hive @ Central

PROFILE

Libraries across our society serve as a cornerstone of access to and attainability of information, knowledge and resources for all who seek it, regardless of their station in life. For over 100 years, Phoenix Public Library has demonstrated a proven track record of embracing innovation, creating collaborations with partners and committing resources toward identified needs as they arise. Holding this as a core principle, the Phoenix Public Library in partnership with Phoenix’s Community and Economic Development Department and Arizona State University, launched hive @ central, a small business and entrepreneurial resource center, in January 2014. hive @ central’s signature offering, its Business Roadmap Program, is a series of eight startup workshops detailing the essentials to starting a business. It addresses the range of hurdles an entrepreneur faces, from limited access to workspace, seed capital, marketing guidance and drafting a sound business plan. These all play into the success of a future business owner. In addition, financial literacy skills are needed to manage a balance sheet or interpret a statement of cash flow. The Business Roadmap Program is a packaged step by step constructed resource, offering introductory workshops that include hands on advice. Offered in both English and Spanish, sessions resulted in 3,835 individuals attending various single workshops, 222 individuals completing the entire 8-workshop series and 120 new businesses launched since the program's beginning. The program serves older and younger adults, multilingual or monolingual and all are have equal access to learn and aspire to launch the biggest dreams of their lives. The extensive network of local business service providers that help spread the word to the community, resulting in well-attended programs. Since its launch, hive

@ central has hosted nearly 36,000 visitors, offered 594 business workshops and served over 8,000 aspiring business owners. As the center began to gain traction, so did the ways the space is used. More and more customers arrive to host meetings each day and established Phoenix business service providers convene to work on new initiatives, meet with stakeholders or connect with mentors to enhance their skills. As hive @ central concludes its third year in service to the community DreamBuilder, an online, self-paced, learning program (available in both English and Spanish) will be added to serve the needs of our growing customer base. It is an eight week, self-paced learning software developed by the Thunderbird Global School of Management at Arizona State University and Freeport McMoran that provides a scalable program for a relatively low investment to assist potential small business owners with the basics. Strategic plans are in place to offer hive @ central’s Business Roadmap Program at Phoenix Public Library’s Palo Verde location (4402 N. 51st Ave., 85031) in both English and Spanish. “Phoenix Public Library launching a small business and entrepreneurial resource center like hive @ central is a great resource for early stage small businesses. The library houses an extensive collection of business resources such as market research, small business tax reference guides, recent statistical research on a variety of populations, as well as online money and business directories,” says Phoenix City Councilman Daniel Valenzuela. “I applaud and support all the Phoenix Public Library’s hive @ central does to help our businesses thrive. They are an important partner in Phoenix’s entrepreneurial ecosystem.”

Source: www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org; www.Facebook.com/cityofphoenix; twitter.com/CityofPhoenixAZ or follow at @CityofPhoenixAZ; Subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.Youtube.com/cityofphoenixaz

DATO S

A Z 190

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

"Hispanics? Who are they? What is the Hispanic market? Population? Education? Language Preference? Home Ownership? Business Ownership? Purchasing Power? Brand Loyalty? Inquiring minds were discovering this “market” and frequently reached out to AZHCC for information. DATOS was born as a response to those numerous inquiries. It proved to be both entrepreneurial and an opportunity to inform and guide the general public. The Hispanic community was not a “sleeping giant” monolithic in nature but a vibrant, evolving demographic with a breath of history, origins, experiences, opinions, creating jobs, growing in purchasing power, emerging in voting power, seeking and becoming elected officials. We were and continue to be an innovative, productive and entrepreneurial class." SANDRA FERNIZA Former President & CEO Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, 1993-1998 Co-Founder, DATOS

DATO S

A Z 191

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

SECTION II

CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS Demographics Not Destiny, But Useful Indicator The number of Hispanics in the Phoenix area* has topped 1 million.

Demographers say these trends will continue for the foreseeable future.

In the Tucson metro area, there are more than 300,000 Latinos.

On the immigration front, the number of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. has dropped substantially in recent years—notwithstanding the vitriolic sentiment expressed toward immigrants by the GOP nominee on this year’s presidential campaign trail.

Arizona’s overall Hispanic population has grown threefold since 1990 to more than 2.1 million. There are now 56 million Latinos nationwide and that number could reach 119 million by 2060. Any way you look at it the Hispanic population is booming. “Demographic trends are not the only predictors of our destiny, but in Arizona the steady growth of the Hispanic population is a useful and illustrative indicator of the challenges and benefits to come in our state,” says Gonzalo A. de la Melena, Jr., president and CEO of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Two of the most illustrative indicators of things to come: • While Latinos are more than 30 percent of the state’s population, experts predict Hispanics could reach majority status in Arizona in one generation. • Among the state’s K-12 students, Hispanics are expected tor each majority status by 2020. Most of the growth among Latinos in Arizona and across the country is tied to population growth among U.S.-born Hispanics, not immigration. In Arizona, 72 percent of Hispanics were born in the U.S. U.S. Hispanics, meanwhile, are a comparatively young population and they tend to have more children—2.2 per Hispanic household versus 1.9 for whites. Nationally, the median age of Hispanics is 27, compared to 37 for Non-Hispanics. In Arizona, the Hispanic median age is 25 as compared to 41 for Non-Hispanic whites. About 50 percent of “Hispanics report having children [in household] younger than 18,” a Gallup survey found in 2015, “compared with 29% of whites, 39% of blacks and 36% of Asians.”

In a report published this year by Robert Warren of the Center for Migration Studies of New York (CMS), the number of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. has dipped below 11 million, down from its estimated peak of about 12 million in 2008. “The facts of the report tell a different story than what you might hear on the campaign trail or in the halls of Congress, where many send a message that we’re being overrun by undocumented immigrants,” Kevin Appleby, a senior director at CMS said to reporters during a press call. “The facts and the data show that’s just not true.” While the economic recovery and steady job growth now appear to be jumpstarting immigration rates to some degree, the origin of so-called “New Americans” is shifting. Whereas Mexico was the primary source of immigration, more Chinese immigrants moved to the U.S. in 2013 than Mexican immigrants. Mexico has seen a dip in birth rates and a surge in its economic expansion. The country is now the 15th largest economy in the world, according to the World Bank and is expected to the world’s fifth largest economy by 2050. Other factors behind the drop in Mexican migration includes stepped-up border enforcement and increased deportations. While immigration remains a factor in overall Hispanic population growth, native-born Latinos make up about two-thirds of the U.S. Hispanic community. In 2012, immigration from Mexico reached “net zero,” meaning as many Mexicans immigrated to the United States as left that year.

*Defined as Census County Division (CCD)

DATO S

A Z 192

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION II

S T A T E CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

O F

A R I Z O N A ’ S

CHAPTER 7

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

PROFILE

Cox Community Relations Specialist Perfectly Suited For Her Job PROFILE Roxanne Wingate loves her job. That’s what happens when your job helps make people’s lives better. Born in California and raised in Rio Rico near the Arizona-Mexico border, Wingate has worked as the senior community relations specialist for Cox Communications in Phoenix for six years. Determined to follow in her older sister’s footsteps, Wingate said she came to the Phoenix to attend ASU in 2001. She earned a degree in Human Communications and a minor in Spanish in 2005, but admits she was intimidated at first by life in the big city. Things changed for the better when joined ASU’s Latina sorority, Gamma Alpha Omega. She said joining the sorority helped reinforce her pride in her cultural and family roots, and gave her the determination to face the day-to-day challenges at a majority university. Culture and family have always been important in Wingate’s life. She grew up fully bilingual and still routinely uses both languages on the job. Her mother is from Sinaloa. Her father was born in California and his family is from Guadalajara, but the family made regular trips to the Mexican state of Sinaloa to visit relatives often. “We visited Sinaloa a lot when I was growing up,” said Wingate. “We always had our American side and our Mexican side. My parents were very bicultural, and that was our world, too.” After college, Wingate’s career advanced quickly and included a stint a Valley of the Sun United Way, which helped opened her eyes to the world of philanthropy and charitable giving. Before moving to Cox, Wingate worked at AAA, where she did community outreach and served as the point person for the Spanish-language press.

Wingate also participates in Cox’s Diversity Council, which addresses issues of minority representation in workforce hiring and promotion, supplier diversity, customer service, and community outreach. And she is responsible for the company’s multicultural outreach efforts with women’s groups, Hispanics, African Americans, Asians and other minority groups, as well as the LGBT community. When she isn’t overseeing the company’s employee volunteer program, she volunteers her own time with community groups like Habitat for Humanity. She serves as a board member at Friendly House, one of the Valley’s oldest and most prestigious nonprofit social service organizations. Friendly House celebrates its 100th birthday in 2020. One of Cox’s most exciting new projects, said Wingate, is its “Connect2Compete” program, which provides needy families with children in K-12 with low cost internet access. The goal is to bring together youth, education and technology in a way that helps promote economic development and family cohesion. “It’s so rewarding when it helps the families lacking in Internet access,” said Wingate. Families can receive internet access for as little as $9.95 a month. .Connect2Compete is a national non-profit program offered in partnership with leading cable companies like Cox Communications. “Connect2Compete”, like almost everything Wingate spends her time on, is about helping the neediest in our community and changing lives for the better. It’s also one more reason why Wingate loves her job.

An alum of the Hispanic Leadership Institute, a project run by Valle del Sol that teaches professional leadership skills, Wingate said HLI, “Armed her with the right tools…to make a difference.” She does exactly that at Cox. As part of her job there, Wingate oversees the company’s employee volunteer initiative. In 2015, more than 30 percent of Cox employees volunteered in the community and logged a total 39,000 volunteer hours.

Roxanne Wingate, far right, is senior community relations specialist at Cox Communications in Phoenix.

DATO S

A Z 193

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS BEHAVIOR

SECTION II I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 17 CHAPTER

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY POPULATION

Title

50,477,594

Hispanic or Latino

Mexican

Puerto Rican

2000

Cuban

12,270,073

1,785,547

1,241,685

4,623,716

3,406,178

20,640,711

Copy Here

10,017,244

CASE STUDY 31,798,258

35,305,818

U.S. Hispanic Population Changes U.S. Hispanic Population

Other Hispanic

2010

Source: 2010 Census Briefs www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-04.pdf

Source: 2010 Census Briefs http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-04.pdf

U.S. Hispanic Average Annual Percent Change In Population U.S. Hispanic Avg Annual Percent Change (IN THOUSANDS)

6%

5%

4.80%

4.50%

3.80%

4%

3.40%

3%

2%

0%

1990-1995

1995-2000

2000-2005

Source: Pew Research Center www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/06/25/u-s-hispanic-population-growth-surge-cools/

Source: Pew Research Center

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/06/25/u-s-hispanicpopulation-growth-surge-cools/

DATO S

A Z 194

2 0 1 6

2005-2010

Photos Courtesy of

1%


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS BEHAVIOR

SECTION II I

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 17 CHAPTER

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY POPULATION

U.S. Hispanic Fertility Rate CHILDREN) U.S.(NUMBER HispanicOF Fertility Rate (Number of Children)

Research Tip Birth rate is how many live births there were in an area per 1000 of the population in a year. Fertility rate is the average number of children born to each woman over the course of her life.

Title

3.5

3.1 3

CASE STUDY

2.53

2.5

1.94

Copy Here 2

1.5

1

0.5

0

1965-1970

2010-2015

2060-2065

Source: Pew Research Center www.pewhispanic.org/2015/09/28/modern-immigration-wave-brings-59-million-to-u-s-driving-population-growth-and-change-through-2065/9-26-2015-1-30-23-pm-2/

Source: Pew Research Center

http://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/09/28/modern-immigration-wave-brings-59-million-to-u-s-driving-population-growth-and-change-through2065/9-26-2015-1-30-23-pm-2/

1990 Hispanic Population

Other Hispanic

2000 Hispanic Population

DATO S

A Z

195

6,392,017

5,130,632

3,665,228

4,496,868

Non-Hispanic

Total

2010 Hispanic Population

Source: U.S. Census Bureau www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

Source: U.S. Census Bureau http://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

3,835,015

192,002

61,808

10,692

Cuban

207,180

2,976,890 Puerto Rican

5,272

2,079

34,787

17,587

8,256

1,657,668

1,065,578

Mexican

2 0 1 6

Photos Courtesy of

Hispanic or Latino

616,195

1,895,149

1,295,617

688,338

State of Arizona Hispanic Population State of Arizona Hispanic Population


T H E SECTION II

S T A T E CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 7

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

PROFILE

ACF Latina Giving Circle PROFILE Executive Leadership Program and formed the circle as a result of her local commitment to serve Latinas. Based on her research, she identified that we were possibly the first Latina Giving Circle in the nation. She also determined that many Latinas not working in formal philanthropic organizations were unfamiliar with the principle of endowment and growing funds to award into perpetuity. This is the cornerstone of the Latina Giving Circle: Share information about philanthropy, engage Latinas at all levels and together, build an endowment to serve Arizona Latino communities forever. Nationwide Latinos represent 17% of the population, but only 1.5% of philanthropic giving is directed toward Latino organizations and only 2.3% of foundation CEOs and presidents are Hispanic as of 2013. Board leadership data is not collected frequently, but the most recent survey in 2009 showed that only 4% of foundation board members were Latino. (Latino Leadership: Foundation Boards, 2015) What does this mean for Arizona Latinos, Latino-led and Latinoserving nonprofits in Arizona? To begin, we can safely assume that we are underrepresented at the philanthropic decisionmaking tables locally and nationwide. There are many outstanding philanthropic organizations that are serving the Latino community in Arizona and some have a very clear understanding of why they should include Latino voices in their grantmaking teams and committees. The Latina Giving Circle (LGC) was created with the vision to bring together women serving in all areas of our community to learn about philanthropy, contribute to a pooled fund and support the organizations and issues that are of key importance to a healthy and vibrant Latino community. The Circle was founded by Belen Gonzalez, Program Director at the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust. She was participating in the National Hispana Leadership Institute

The Circle has grown and developed to include four areas of grantmaking focus that represent the most urgent needs our members identified for the Latino community. Currently these areas are education, immigration, leadership and health. The Circle invites nonprofit organizations to submit grant requests and the limited funds are awarded based on a consensus-based selection process. The Circle is hosted by the Arizona Community Foundation in their efforts to make philanthropy accessible to all communities in the state. This partnership is vital to our success and key in our ability to accept gifts and grow our endowment. The Latina Giving Circle has built a supportive culture for members and visitors that engages three aspects of growth: personal development, professional development and philanthropic practice. Our members all have varied levels of skills and interest and participate in the meetings and practices that suits their goals and needs. The Circle provides an opportunity for Latinas to meet and deepen relationships with other members as we seek to improve our community together. At periodic intervals, the Circle will meet to learn more about a local business or community issue that could impact our grantmaking and our service to the community outside the LGC. Together we make vital choices to give and to support the Latino community. We believe our LGC work is also critical to develop the future CEOs and Foundation Board leadership that is currently a deficit for many philanthropic organizations. As the Latino community grows, we need to develop a host of local, knowledgeable and engaged leaders that are ready to serve. Through our philanthropic practice and a growing membership, we are able to have a more significant impact than only grant funds can create. We mentor, we share critical input on supporting the Latino community and most importantly we support each other. If you are interested in learning more about how to engage in this work or become a member of the Latina Giving Circle, please visit www.azlatinagivingcircle.org or email Joyce Medina Harper at joyce@doughertyfoundation.com.

DATO S

A Z 196

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS BEHAVIOR

SECTION II I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 17 CHAPTER

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY POPULATION

Pima Hispanic Population

Pima County Hispanic Population

Title

338,802

247,578 CASE STUDY Copy Here

163,262

1990

2000

2010

Source: U.S. Census Bureau www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

e: U.S. Census Bureau /www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf /www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf /www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

Maricopa Hispanic Population Maricopa County Hispanic Population 1,128,741

763,341

345,498

2000

2010 Photos Courtesy of

1990

Source: U.S. Census Bureau www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf e: U.S. Census Bureauhttp://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf

//www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf //www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

DATO S

A Z 197

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY POPULATION CHAPTER 17 CHAPTER Yavapai Hispanic Population

CONSUMER CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS BEHAVIOR

SECTION II I

Yavapai County Hispanic Population

Title

28,728

CASE STUDY 16,376

Copy Here

6,899

1990

2000

2010

Source: U.S. Census Bureau www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf e: U.S. Census Bureau www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

/www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf /www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf /www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

Pinal Hispanic Population

Pinal County Hispanic Population 106,977

53,671 34,062

2000

2010 Photos Courtesy of

1990

Source: U.S. Census Bureau www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf e: U.S. Census Bureau www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf /www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf

/www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf /www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

DATO S

A Z 198

2 0 1 6


T H E

S T A T E CONSUMER CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS BEHAVIOR

SECTION II I

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 17 CHAPTER

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY POPULATION

Hispanic Population in Phoenix

Hispanic Population In Phoenix*

Title

991,809

CASE STUDY 697,475 Copy Here

197,103

1990

2000

2010

*Area defined as Census County Division

urce: U.S. Census Bureau Source: U.S. Census Bureau p://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf p://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf p://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

Tucson Hispanic Population Tucson Hispanic Population 296,393 224,061

118,595

2000

2010 Photos Courtesy of

1990

Source: U.S. Census Bureau www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf

ce: U.S. Census Bureau www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf //www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1990/cp-1/cp-1-4.pdf //www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/phc-1-4.pdf //www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/cph-1-4.pdf

DATO S

A Z 199

2 0 1 6


T H E SECTION II

S T A T E CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 7

DATO S

H I S P A N I C

CASE STUDY

A Z 200

2 0 1 6

M A R K E T


T H E SECTION II

S T A T E CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS

O F

A R I Z O N A â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S

CHAPTER 7

H I S P A N I C

CASE STUDY

DATO S

A Z 201

2 0 1 6

M A R K E T


T H E

S T A T E

O F

CONSUMER CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS BEHAVIOR

SECTION II I

A R I Z O N A ’ S

H I S P A N I C

CHAPTER 17 CHAPTER

M A R K E T

CASE STUDY POPULATION

Arizona MARKET SNAPSHOT The Arizona Hispanic population continues to represent a substantial portion of the local population, accounting for close to one-third of Arizona residents. The 2015 statewide Hispanic population exceeds 2 million individuals.

Title

Arizona Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. A total of 52% of all Hispanics may be considered bicultural or less acculturated. Arizona Market Snapshot

CASE STUDY

Aggregate household expenditures among Hispanic (allportion consumer products and categories) exceeds $25 billion The Arizona Hispanic population continueshouseholds to represent a substantial of the local population, accounting for close to one-third of Arizona residents. The 2015 statewide Hispanic population exceeds 2 million individuals. annually, 19% of total. Arizona Hispanics are primarily of Mexican ancestry. 52% of all Hispanics may be considered bicultural or less acculturated. Aggregate household expenditures among Hispanic households (all consumer products and categories) exceeds $25 billion annually, 19% of total.

% OF POPULATION

POPULATION Copy Here

HISPANICS REPRESENT THE SECOND-LARGEST

2015 POPULATION

Hispanics Represent the second-largest population group in the POPULATION GROUP IN THE STATE AT CLOSE state at close to one-third of total.

TO ONE-THIRD OF TOTAL.

POPULATION % OF 2015 POPULATION POPULATION

Total

Total

100%

100%

Hispanic

Hispanic

31%

55%4%

280,390 3,757,632

Black Non-Hispanic

Asian NonHispanic

3%

Asian Non-Hispanic

American Indian NonHispanic

4%

4% 3%

**Carmen This is pg. **Carmen This is pg.Other NonAmerican IndianDATOSAZ14 Non-Hispanic Hispanic 4% 160 DATOSAZ14 160

3% 4%

2,136,185

2,136,185 3,757,632

Black NonHispanic

Other Non-Hispanic

6,796,459

31%55%

White NonHispanic

White Non-Hispanic

6,796,459

4% 2%

Hispanic

215,412 280,390

White Non-Hispanic Black