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Declaration by candidate May 26, 2017

The thesis titled Co Lab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center a requisite of the Bachelors Program in the Department of Architecture, School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi – 110002, was completed by the undersigned in January – May 2017. The supervisors were Prof. (Dr.) Mandeep Singh, Prof. Satish Khanna (Design Guides) and Prof. (Dr.) Aruna Ramani Grover (Research Guide). The undersigned hereby declares that this is his original work and has not been plagiarized in part or full from any source. Furthermore this work has not been submitted for any degree in this or any other University.

Ayush Kamalia A/2437/2012 B. Arch 5, Section- A School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Certificate June 2, 2017

We certify that the Thesis titled Co Lab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center by Ayush Kamalia roll no A/2437/2012 was guided by us in January – May 2017 and placed in front of the Jury by the candidate on 24-25th May 2017. On completion of the report in all respects including the last chapter by the candidate and based on the declaration by the candidate herein above, we forward the report to the Department to be placed in the library of the School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi.

Prof. (Dr.) Mandeep Singh (Design Guide)

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Prof. Satish Khanna (Design Guide)

Prof. (Dr.) Aruna Ramani Grover (Research Guide)

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Acknowledgments May 26, 2017

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the following people for their support and encouragement without which this thesis would not have been possible. I would like to thank my Design guides Prof. (Dr.) Mandeep Singh and Prof. Satish Khanna, for their valuable guidance and deep insights which motivated me to have faith in myself and my thoughts. I am grateful to my Research Guide and thesis coordinator Prof. (Dr.) Aruna Ramani Grover for guiding me throughout the program. I wish to extend my sincere regards to Ar. Sanjay Prakash and Ar. Sandeep Goel for their humble support and cooperation during in thesis research and understanding the project. I would be failing if I do not mention Ar. Sushil Aggarwal, Ar. Sambuddha Sen, Ar. Suneet Mohindru and Ar. Rajiv Agarwal for all the fruitful discussions over the course of development of this project I would also like to thank my parents and all my friends for patiently understanding and being around in all the difficult times.

Thank You Ayush

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सारांश

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Synopsis

In this global economy with rapidly changing market dynamics and trends, focus is now shifting from providing services to innovation and creativity, with workplaces getting informal and playful. As new demands are arising, new tools are required to tackle them, same built environment cannot satisfy the needs of upcoming ‘Idea based economy’. Thus, the search is an attempt to find an integrated approach towards creating an environment that supplement innovation and foster collaboration. Design demonstration in the form of Research Park was undertaken, envisaged to create an ecosystem, which can bring in innovators and executors with diverse cultural backgrounds, attitudes and scholarly abilities on a common platform so that they meet and exchange ideas. The research primarily comprise of understanding the functioning of research and innovation industry, studying different models and processes involved and lastly translating all of their requirements spatially, which can supplement the entire innovation process. Incorporating qualitative and quantitative requirements of different stakeholders in order to create a micro-climate, which is conducive for all, rather than a selected few. The focus is on ‘Place making’ demonstrating how configuration of spaces can initiate and influence our social behavior largely. It can play a vital role in the way to live and work. The project tries to address problems of brain drain, FDI induced competition and outsourced jobs. All this with a bigger aim to increase innovation and utilise the development potential of ideas to the fullest. The journey from a basic idea to design outcome in compiled in thesis books documenting all the tangible and intangible factors which influenced the overall process. The broader attempt is to design specifically for this new sphere of operations, which might be a totally different building typology in the future. The final result is majorly an approach or system rather than the product itself. The same approach could be used in diverse situations at different sites to cater to these new requirements.

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Table Of Contents

(i) Declaration ..3 (ii) Certificate ..5 (iii) Acknowledgments

(iv) सारांश

..7

..8 (v) Synopsis ..9 (vi) List of Tables ..12 (vii) List of Photographs ..13 (viii) List of figures ..14 (ix) List of Abbreviations ..17

Chapter 1.0:

Introduction ...19

Program Analysis

Background

Project Scope

Need for Research

Program components

World View

Preposition

Design Project Way Forward

Chapter 2.0:

Research & Case Studies ...29

Area Break up

Applicable Bye Laws Functional Relations Inferences

Chapter 4.0:

Project Site & Analysis Site Location

Case Studies

Site Analytics

Existing Site Condition

- Google Headquarters

NSIT Master Plan

Comparative Matrix

...85

Climate Study

- Agilent Tech. Campus - MIT Media Lab

...73

Institutional Structure

Areas of Research

Research Inference

10

Chapter 3.0:

Context Study

Vehicular Accessibility SPA, New Delhi


Chapter 5.0:

Technological Study

...97

Chapter 7.0:

Design Concept

...119

Chapter 9.0:

Design Outcomes

Structures

Different Organs- One Organism

Site Plan

Safety

Site Level Strategies

Building Sections

Sustainability

Streets and Hotspots

Services

Design Directives

Elevations

Zoning

Skin Detail

Chapter 6.0:

Building Plans

Building Level Strategies

Calculations

...133

3D Views

Model Photographs Jury Comments

...115

Chapter 8.0:

Design Development

SWOT Analysis

Form Exploration

Zoning

Design Stage-III

Footprint

Form Evolution

Functional Relation

Design Stage-II

Movement

Design Stage-IV

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

...125

Bibliography ...154 Annexes

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List of Tables Table 1 : Shift to an idea-based economy Source: Ar Clive Wilkinson,USA

24

Table 2 : Clients at IITM-RP 33 Source: http://respark.iitm.ac.in/

Table 3 : Selected sectors for set up Source: Author

39

Table 4 : Process of Startup 44 Source: Startupcommons.com

Table 5 : Case Study Comparative Matrix Source: Author

70

Table 6 : Area Breakup 80 Source: Author

Table 7 : Annual Wind flow in Delhi

88

Table 8 : Structural System and Span

98

Table 9 : Applicable GRIHA ponits on project

100

Table 10 : GRIHA points valid for project

101

Table 11 : Spatial Considerations for storage of gensets

106

Table 12 : Calculations of the size of fire escapes

107

Source: windfinder.com

Source: steelconstruction.info Source: Author Source: Author

Source: sudhirpower.com/Show_Diesel_Gensets.aspx Source: National Building Code

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List of Photographs: 22

P 4.3 : Covered service trench along site edge

90

P 1.2 : Stanford Research Park, USA 23

P 4.4- 4.9 : NSIT Context Photographs

93

P 2.1 : IITM Research Park building

P 4.10 - 4.15: Secondary Context Photographs

94

P 1.1 : Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park, China Source: english.pudong.gov.cn/html/pden/

Source: http://stanfordresearchpark.com/projects/ Source: iitm.ac.in

32

Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author

P 2.2 : Differential fenestration treatment 55

P 4.16 : Access Road Photographs 95

P 2.3- 2.4 : Photos of inner at rium

59

P 4.17 : Median break in front of campus entrance

95

P 2.5: Building envelope during day 60

P 4.18 : Traffic junction near site entrance

95

P 2.6: Building facade during night 60

P 5.1 : Service Integration in Cellular beams

98

P 2.8 : Internal spiral staircase connecting 2 levels

P 5.2 : Composite structure with cellular beams & decking floor

99

P 2.7 : Outside View from lab 61

P 8.1 : Stage 2- Massing and Form

128

P 2.9 : Interior view of Lab 61

P 8.2 : Stage 3- Massing model 129

P2.10-2.11 : AC ducting from top in temporary meeting spaces

68

P 8.3 : Stage 2- Building model 130

P 2.12- 2.13 : Use of tinted glass to allow light inside meeting spaces located away from windows

68

Source: Shift Architect Source: Andy Ryan Source: Andy Ryan Source: Andy Ryan

Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/

61

Source: https://www.media.mit.edu/about/mission-history/ Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/ Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/

Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author

Source: Bishop Hospital, Aukland Source: steelconstruction.info Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author

P 4.1- 4.2 : Site Photographs 90 Source: Author

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List of Figures & Illustrations Figure 1.1 : Process of Product Development Source: Author

20

Figure 1.2 : The lit bulb 21 Source: http://knowscience.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/

Figure 1.3 : Article published in TOI dated Mrch 2, 2017 Source: The Times of India

24

Figure 1.4 : Space Labelling to Place making Source: Author

25

Figure 1.5 : Logo of Govt. of NCT of Delhi & NSIT

26

Figure 1.6 : Collective process of innovation

28

Figure 2.1 : Logo of Aspire and IITMRP

31

Source: Google Images

Source: http://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/314186/Blog/ Source: IIT-M & IIT-B

Figure 2.2 : IITM RP Structure 32 Source: Author

Figure 2.3 : Credit system at IITM-RP

33

Figure 2.4 : Client distribution at IITM-RP

33

Figure 2.5-2.12 : Organisation models of innovation

36

Source: Author

Source: http://respark.iitm.ac.in/

Source: https://www.steelcase.com/insights/white-papers

Figure 2.13 : Comparative analysis of organisational models Source: www. SteelCase.com

Figures 2.14 : Process for short-listing the thrust areas of center Source: Author

Figures 2.15 : Components of an Open work plan Source: Author

Figure 2.16 : Design & performance factors at work Place Source: Author

Figure 2.17- 2.20 : Ideal space requirement for office space

Source: http://ns.kinnarps.tm/Countries/UK/PS%20minisite/Agreement/

Figure 2.21 : Satellite view of the Agilent campus Source: Google Earth 14

37 38 41 42 43 48

Figures 2.22 : Building Model 49 Source: SHiFT Architects

Figure 2.23-2.24 : Site Plan and Vehicular movement

49

Figure 2.25 : Ground Floor Plan with entries

50

Source: http://www.inde-design.org/index.php?/details/ Source: ShiFt Architects

Figure 2.26 : Formal Entry 50 Source: ShiFt Architects

Figure 2.27 : Typical Furniture Layout 50 Source: ShiFt Architects

Figure 2.28 : Daylight Penetration 51 Source: sHift Architects

Figure 2.30 : Building Section- AA’ 51 Source: sHift Architects

Figure 2.31 : Building Section- BB’ 51 Source: sHift Architects

Figure 2.32 : Informal breakout areas- Balconies and Squash court 52 Source: Author

Figure 2.33 : Formal meeting area- Glazed facade with outside view 52 Source: Author

Figure 2.34 : Location of AHU’s and service staircase

53

Figure 2.35 : Placement of toilets around the floor

53

Figure 2.36: Plan showing the location of public staircases

54

Figure 2.37 : Proximity of work spaces from lift lobbies

54

Figure 2.38 : Stair cases for fire safety

54

Figure 2.39 : North Facade detail, Large glazed windows

55

Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author

Source: Shift Architects

Figure 2.40 : Bottom-Up Air conditioning approach

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List of Figures & Illustrations... Cont. Source: Shift Architects

Source: Author

Figure 2.41 : Section through AHU rooms

56

Figure 3.2 : Institutional Structure and administrative relations

75

Figure 2.42 : Satellite view of MIT Media Lab

57

Figure 3.3 : Components’ relationship diagram

76

Figure 2.43 : Ground Floor and Site Plan- MIT Media Lab

58

Figures 3.4 : Area Distribution Chart

81

Figure 2.44 : Building Section 59

Figure 3.5 : Functional Relationship diagram

82

Figure 2.45: Vertical Segregation of functions

59

Figure 3.6 : Functional relations (in section)

83

Figure 2.46 : North Elevation- MIT Media Lab

60

Figure 3.8 : Functional relations (in plan)

83

Figure 2.47 : Layout of a typical Lab

61

Figure 4.1 : Satellite view of site and surroundings

86

Figure 2.48- 2.51 : Floor Plans- 2,3 ,4,6

62

Figure 4.2 : Landuse of and around site

87

Figure 2.52 : Satellite view of the Googleplex

64

Figure 4.3 : Accessibility to site 87

Figure 2.53 : Architect’s sketch for the campus

65

Figure 4.4- 4.8 : Climate Analysis diagrams 88

Source: Shift Architects Source: Google Earth

Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/design_4-4.html Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ Source: Author

Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/design_4-4.html Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/design_4-4.html Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/design_4-4.html Source: Google Earth

Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/

Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author

Source: Author Source: Author

Source: Google Earth

Source: Delhi Development Authority (DDA)

Image Source: Google Earth, Overlay: Author Source: windfinder.com

Figure 2.54 : Campus Master plan 65

Figure 4.9 : Site dimensions (Not to scale)

89

Figure 2.55 : Central Active Street design

66

Figure 4.10:Shifting existing parking lot as per Master-plan

90

Figure 2.56 : Different kinds of work spaces used in the project

67

Figure 4.11 : Site context relation 91

Figure 2.57- 2.58 : Location of different Hot and Cold spaces

67

Figure 4.12 : Physical context study 91

Figure 2.59 : Location Double height flexible spaces

68

Figure 4.13 : NSIT Masterplan analysis

Figure 2.60-2.63 : Spatial Distribution in plan

69

Figure 4.14 : Vehicular connectivity 95

Figure 3.1: Different Stakeholders interacting at the Research Park

74

Figure 4.15 : Azad Hind Fauz Marg Section-AA’

Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ Source: Author

Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Source: Author Source: Author

Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author

92

Source: Author

95 15


List of Figures & Illustrations... Cont. Source: Author

Source: Author

Figure 4.16 : Building Height Directive 96

Figure 5.22-5.24 : Facade modules and details

113

Figure 4.17 : Design Directives for plan

96

Figure 5.25 : Design Drivers from Technology

114

Figure 5.1 : Span range of cellular beam portal frame

99

Figure 6.1 : Final Zoning 117

Source: Author Source: Author

Source: steelconstruction.info

Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author

Figure 5.2 : GRIHA points distribution 100

Figure 6.2 : Movement System 118

Figures 5.3- 5.6 : Shadow analysis diagrams (April, 20)

102

Figure 7.1 - 7.2 : Concept Diagrams 120

Figures 5.7- 5.10 : Shadow analysis diagrams (Oct., 20)

103

Figure 7.3- 7.8 : Site Level Strategies 122

Figures 5.11 : Typical layouts of substation

105

Figure 7.9- 7.14 : Building Level Strategies

123

Figure 5.12 : Plan and Elevation of one genset

106

Figure 7.15- 7.16 : Zoning (Horizontal & Vertical)

124

Figure 5.13: Spatial Requirements for storage of gensets

106

Figure 8.1 : Schematic Site Plan- A 126

Figure 5.14 : Spatial Requirements for storage of gensets

106

Figure 8.2 : Schematic Building Plan 126

Figure 5.15: Integrated water flow diagram

108

Figure 8.3 : Schematic Section 126

Figure 5.16 : Structural System 110

Figure 8.4 - 8.6 : Scheme visualisation- B 127

Figure 5.17 : Location of Fire Staircases 110

Figure 8.7 : Stage 2- Site Plan 128

Figure 5.18 : Typical Core Details 111

Figure 8.8 : Stage 3- Site Plan

129

Figure 5.19 : Services in Site Plan and Basement

111

Figure 8.9 : Stage 4- Site Plan

130

Figure 5.20 : Typical VRV layout in the building

112

Figure 8.10 : Form Evolution 131

Figure 5.21 : Schematic floor section through ducts

112

Source: GRIHA India Source: Author Source: Author

Source: http://www.sudhirpower.com/Show_Diesel_Gensets.aspx Source: http://www.sudhirpower.com Source: Author

Source: sudhirpower.com/Show_Diesel_Gensets.aspx Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author 16

Source: Author

Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author

Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author

Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author Source: Author

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List of Abbreviations NSIT- Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology GOI- Government of India NCR- National Capital Region IT- Information Technology NCT- National Capital Territory IIT- Indian Institute of Technology DTU- Delhi Technological University NIT- National Institute of Technology IITMRP- IIT Madras Research Park RP- Research Park SPA- School of Planning and Architecture COP- Coefficient of performance CREDIT- Collaboration in Research and Engagement with Departments

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“ There’s a way to do it better- find it ” -Thomas Alva Edison This thesis attempts a similar quest.

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Chapter -1.0

Introduction What we need is a mushrooming of innovative start-ups and an enabling ecosystem that supports them. - Kiran Majumdar Shaw, CEO, BIOCON

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1.1 Background: In today’s global economy, innovation and entrepreneurship are central to a nation’s successful participation. Academic institutions are the main source of creativity and need to manage their creativity better. There is increasing evidence that competitive success depends more on localised concentrations of skilled people and technology than on large corporate efforts. (Ananth, 2011) Discovery and invention have been the driving forces for research. Innovation on the other hand includes a crucial economic component. It is often about extracting value from a creative understanding of what is already known. It has everything to do with commercial success and drives the economy. It is successfully managed by the ‘idea factory’ approach -­‐ bringing unlike minds together, creating the right atmosphere and giving them freedom but carefully structuring interactions. Minds can be unlike in terms of cultural background, disciplinary background or attitude. (Ananth, 2011) A century ago, the impact of knowledge on work was quite different. The typical organisation had a division of labour; the work of its employees was divided into multiple parts. The results of each person’s work were simply added together to create the resultant product. Only the bosses required the knowledge that allowed for a complete picture of work. However, today, in the innovation-driven organisation, the resource of knowledge is required in the work of nearly everyone. The results of knowledge of each individual’s work are not bought together at the end of a linear process, but are communicate throughout the process.

There is no substitute to innovation. – Richard Branson, CEO, Virgin Airlines 20

Earlier Linear Process

Now Collaborative Process

Figure 1.1 : Process of Product Development Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


Post liberalisation, the Indian private sector faced increasing foreign completion. This lead to an increase in technological advancements but decrease in employment. All this led to bringing up small entrepreneurs setting up their small enterprises or the ‘Start-Ups’. People started to bring in indigenous solutions to the world problems. (The Economist, 2010) The focus of current central government with initiatives like Start-Up India and Skill India are encouraging enough to dig deeper into these fields. (Verma, 15) For a stronger start-up culture in India we need a robust innovation ecosystem that relies upon the: ease of starting a start up, accessing capital and capital markets and mentors. Another factor that augments a start up culture is business synergy where diverse yet connected businesses feed off each other creating a cluster effect. If India is to address its socio-economic challenges in a manner that does not weigh it down, it will have to innovate its way into the future.

Figure 1.2 : The lit bulb Source: http://knowscience.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/innovation-portfolio.jpg Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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1.2 World View: We are living in a time of massive, world-changing innovation.- Business Insider “There were more unique inventions... Over the past year than ever before in the history of humankind,” note analysts in Thomson Reuters’ 2015 State of Innovation report. Science is universal, the scientist has a cultural background and hence many prejudices. Mixing minds from different cultural backgrounds can help overcome at least some of them as exemplified by the success of the US graduate schools in generating innovative ideas. The remarkable success of the Bell Labs in the post-­‐war decades of the twentieth century is an example of innovations triggered by bringing together multi-­‐disciplinary groups of researchers to work on problems of societal importance.

ernment. Many are in place already with encouraging initiatives: R&D centers of MNCs encouraged to team up with RPs; overseas Chinese scientists lured home with tax breaks and low rent (253 returnees for Zhangjiang High Tech (ZHT) Park in Shanghai alone in 2003); liberal venture funds made available to the RPs (more than $25 billion in 2006 for the ZHT Park in the Shanghai New Pudong area).

In present global innovation era, two countries stand out in terms of their support for research parks – China and the US.

China envisages about a hundred URPs, at least 100 acres each with $1.2b support from the gov22

P 1.1 : Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park, China Source: http://english.pudong.gov.cn/html/pden/pden_business_dz/Info/Detail_73180.htm SPA, New Delhi


The US is the pioneer in this respect with strong legislations like the America Competes Act, doubling of federal funding for research at NSF, NIST, DOE, new investments in S&T infrastructure, new financial support for research parks, permanent research and experimentation tax-­‐credit and strong lobbies through multiple forums like the Association of University Research Parks (AURP). Examples of successful research parks in the US abound: the Stanford RP housing Hewlett-Packard, IBM among others the Delaware RP housing DuPont, Optigenix, the North Carolina Research Triangle Park housing Glaxo, Wellcome, the Central Florida RP housing Aegis Research, AT&T Wireless, the University of California Irvine RP housing America Online, Cisco Systems and the MIT Route 128 housing DEC, Microsoft, Analog devices.

P 1.2 : Stanford Research Park, USA Source: http://stanfordresearchpark.com/projects/1450-page-mill-road Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

However, there is visible shift which is happening from Western world towards Asia. The Reuters’ analysts note stated that, “it’s clear that Asia has an edge over North America in its computer-related innovation.” The top innovator in information technology in 2014 was Samsung, with IBM - the only US Company in the global top five. Countries like India and China are becoming the most favourable destinations for MNC’s because of their knowledge wealth and huge emerging market. 23


1.3 Need for Research: •

Shift in the economy from a service based economy to an idea-based economy; still the alteration in architecture is not keeping pace with this shift in India.

In large campuses, lack of awareness of the knowledge or skills possessed by a co-worker is a major issue. Many organisations want to improve communication amongst scientists of their organisations for better productivity therefore, it is important to see the role which architecture and built-space can play in this process. (Ananth, 2011)

Enhance the innovation development in the country by remaining the most preferred destination for MNC’s to set up their R&D hubs.

Limited and compromised space for people and entrepreneurs to develop, validate and execute an idea, which has huge marketable potential.

Tackling issues like brain drain, F.D.I. (Foreign Direct Investment) induced competition, and red tape leaves the average Indian entrepreneur too tired to focus on innovation. In this global economy, there is a need to innovate faster and cheaper considering the factors such as low cost, Frugal and sustainable. (Verma, 2015) 24

Table 1 : Shift to an idea-based economy Source: Ar Clive Wilkinson,USA

Figure 1.3 : Article published in TOI dated Mrch 2, 2017 Source: The Times of India SPA, New Delhi


1.4 Proposition: The search is an attempt to create an integrated approach towards building a holistic ecosystem to supplement innovation and foster creativity. Architecture and built spaces plays a major role in making the space more interactive and collaborative. In the project, the focus will be on place making, rather than just allotting the spaces for each function. Understandings of how both the augmented and the physical spatial layout effects the users’ experiences and influences their behavioral social relations.

Figure 1.4 : Space Labelling to Place making Source: Author

Architecture for me is not just an aesthetically pleasing product, it is more about how the building ‘works’ for those who use it. It plays a major role in how we live, work and move in those spaces. The configuration of space can initiate and influence our social behavior to a great extent.

For good ideas and true innovation, you need human interaction, conflict, argument and debate.

The objective is to create diverse spatial experiences and opportunities to satisfy the need of different kind of people, yet building should function as a single organism. Making the facility active and interactive yet maintain the privacy of the individuals.

– Margaret Heffernan

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1.5 Design Project: The project chosen is - Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi in the Dwarka region within the campus of Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology. The project is proposed by the Government of N.C.T. of Delhi. This park will house R&D units of Indian and MNC firms along with providing incubation facility to student entrepreneurs and upcoming start-ups firms. This platform will serve as the knowledge hub in the National Capital region would further act as a catalyst in the proposed mechanism for academic industry interaction.

Project Current Status: • Land allocation within the NSIT is complete • The work of implementation of science and technology park at NSIT has been deferred presently for the time being till the economic recession is over • The facility will be functioning under the administrative control of Department of Training & Technical Education, Gov. of NCT of Delhi.

Selection of Location and Site: • • • Figure 1.5 : Logo of Govt. of NCT of Delhi & NSIT Source: Google Images 26

Close proximity to Gurgaon and Noida, which acts as the gateway points for National as well as Multi-national companies Presence of a number of technical institutions of high repute like Indian Institute of Tech nology-Delhi, National Institute of Technology, Delhi Technological University, Netaji Sub has Institute of Technology, Institute of Technology and Management, etc. but absence of an ecosystem to bring them together Cities in southern region of India like Bangalore and Hyderabad are emerging as the pre ferred destinations for innovation and Research facilities. For having a balance across the country, such developments are indispensable in country’s capital. SPA, New Delhi


1.6 About Research Parks: These technology parks have been known to add value and impetus to industry and business enterprises. The macro guiding principles behind the park are: • Creating a collaborative environment between industry and academia through joint research projects and consulting assignments • Creating a self-sustaining and technologically fertile environment • Encouraging and enabling R & D activities that are aligned to potential needs of the industry. • Providing world class infrastructure for R & D activities. • Enabling development of high quality personnel and motivating professional growth for researchers in the companies through part time Masters and PhD Programs. (Ananth, 2011)

Center of Gravity: Research Park provides infrastructure for companies to set up an R&D and innovation base. The Park will facilitate a collaborative relationship between tenants/ clients and technical institutes across Delhi (NSIT being the host institute). Academic institutions have always been on the forefront in collaborating with industry and the Research Park is expected to enhance this relationship further. Tenants will have the opportunity to tap into the research wealth of one of the leading technologically advanced area of the country. It will also enable the industry to leverage the specialized expertise of the faculty, utilize their research facilities, while providing part time employment and experience to the students. (Nationl Commitee of Sciences, 2008)

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1.7 Way Forward: Market dynamics and global trends clearly demonstrate that the way we look at work places is changing significantly. Focus is now shifting on innovation and creativity, with work places getting more informal and playful. Collaborative and collective efforts are granting very encouraging results, and built environment plays a major role in aiding the whole process. A Research park is best suited for the demonstration of proposition as it bring together minds with different attitudes: faculty with knowledge of fundamentals; students, with their spirit to conquer the world; and technical personnel from the industry with their ability to convert ideas into marketable products. • • • • • •

The overall objective of set up could be summarised as follows: Innovators and executors could meet at a common place and share their ideas To attract start-ups from all over the region as well as encourage institutional level start-ups A structure to reflect the contemporary and growing image of the country Induce an entrepreneurial mindset in the people Networking student enterprises from campus to incubators, seeding funds and angel investors

Figure 1.6 : Collective process of innovation Source: http://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/314186/Blog/Innovation_Abstract.png 28

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Chapter -2.0

Areas of Research & Case Studies The chapter is divided in two halfs. The first half will deal with the primary areas of research to have the background knowledge to start the design process. The second half will deal with looking at practical examples of similar such projects in the form of case study and understand how similar problem have been tackled earlier by other architects

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2.1 Areas of Research

2.1.1 Research Parks and their functionality 2.1.1.1Presence in India

2.1.1.2Case Example- IIT Madras Research park

2.1.2 Institutional structure- Innovation Models of Companies and Industries

2.1.2.1 Study of different institutional models which companies follow while setting up innovation centers 2.1.2.2 dentifying potential clientele and their physical requirements

2.1.3 NSIT and thrust areas of research 2.1.4.Reworking work Environments

2.1.4.1 Open Plan 2.4.1.2 Hot Desking 2.4.1.3 Space Standards

2.1.5 Journey from an idea to a reality

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2.1.4.1 Different stages of a budding company 2.1.4.2 Overall process of a start-up

SPA, New Delhi


2.1.1.1 Research Parks Research Parks are built to foster innovation, commercialization and economic development through collaborations between industry and universities. Research parks provide an ecosystem, where industries carry out their cutting edge research in a collaborative environment. For e.g., the Stanford Research Park, adjacent to Stanford University, occupies about 700 acres of land and hosts a large number of industries which carry out research in electronics, biotechnology, computers and aerospace. Similarly, the Research Triangle Park lies in the area between the cities of Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill in the North Carolina state of U.S.A. It is reputed to have transformed the economy of the region from tobacco farming to a modern industrial hub. It integrates research labs of leading industries with universities such as Duke University, University of North Carolina Raleigh and University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. (NRC, 2011) Research parks have a larger agenda that focuses not just on incubation efforts but also on propelling successful innovation in established R&D focused companies. They facilitates a collaborative relationship between tenants/clients and academic institutions. It connects industry personnel to the “innovation inputs” of knowledge and acts as a catalyst for radical, high-tech development. (IIT Bombay, 2017)

These technology parks have been known to add value and impetus to industry and business enterprises. The macro guiding principles behind the park are: •

• •

• •

Creating a collaborative environment between industry and academia through joint research projects and consulting assignments Developing a self-sustaining and technologically fertile environment Encouraging and enabling R & D activities that are aligned to potential needs of the industry. Providing world class infrastructure for R & D activities. Enabling development of high quality personnel and motivating professional growth for researchers in the companies through part time Masters and PhD Programs. Aiding technology and business skills sharing between the university and industry tenants

The “knowledge and innovation ecosystem”, the Research Park breaks down the traditional, artificial barriers of innovation through its connectivity and collaborative interaction. This helps the industry to create, integrate, and apply advancements in knowledge. The resulting synergy leads to matchless technological innovation and transfer. (Ananth, 2011)

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Presence in India: IIT Madras has set up a research park that is situated adjacent to the institute on an 11.5- acre campus. It has been operational since 2010 and currently has about 500,000 sq. ft. of built up space. It is now being expanded and will soon have around 1.6 million sq. ft of built up area. Aspire Research Park is a similar such facility proposed in collaboration with IIT Bombay in its Powai campus with an initial scope of 25000 sqm, with a future provision of additional 50,000 sqm built up area. Its construction is under process. Another similar project is going on under the name of ‘Innovation Center’ in Rajiv Gandhi education City, Sonipat as an offsite campus of IIT Delhi. (IIT Madras, 2017)

Figure 2.1 : Logo of Aspire and IITMRP Source: IIT-M & IIT-B 31


2.1.1.2 Case Example: IIT Madras Research Park IIT Madras Research Park endeavor to enable companies with a research focus to set up a base in the Park and leverage the expertise of IIT Madras. The park is located on a site adjacent to the IIT Madras campus. The IIT Madras Research Park assists companies with a research focus to set up a base in the park and leverage the expertise available at IIT Madras. It acts as a common ground for corporates and MNC’s to come together and interact with the academic institution. Mission: To create a knowledge and innovation ecosystem through collaboration between the industry and academia to enable, encourage and develop cutting edge technology and innovation that exceeds the global standard. (IIT Madras, 2017)

Institutional Structure:

IT Madras Research Park is an independent company promoted by IIT Madras and its alumni and was incorporated under Section 25 of the Companies Act 1956. The IIT Madras Research Park facilitates the promotion of research and development by the institute in partnership with industry, assisting in the growth of new ventures, and promoting economic development. The park offers rentable and leasable space which can be used by companies and individuals towards research and innovation. Clients can rent in space in the park and set up their Research facility in an collaborative environment. (IITM, 2017)

Spatial characteristics: Maximum floor plate area- 3,300 sqm partitioned between 1 to 8 tenants Amenities like food court, ATMs and coffee shops Residential Facility- transit Accommodation of 83 guest rooms provided by the Ginger Hotels. Facilities to be added in Phase 2: Child Care, Food Court, Fine Dining Restaurant, Multi-Purpose Hall, Auditorium, Indoor Recreational Facilities, etc.

Statistics: Commencement of operations of Phase 1March, 2010 (37,000 sqm built-up) Site Area- 11.2 acres Total Built up area in Master Plan- 1,60,000 sqm Total area already Built (Phase 1)- 37,200 sqm Areas for Entrepreneurship center- 2,500 sqm Occupancy- 35 companies, 2500 people 32

P 2.1 : IITM Research Park building Source: iitm.ac.in

Figure 2.2 : IITM RP Structure Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


CREDIT system:

(Beyond Physical infrastructure)

IITMRP has a proprietary CREDIT system to measure the extent of collaboration between a company and IIT Madras. CREDIT is an acronym for Collaboration in Research and Engagement with Departments in IIT Madras. The Research Park is not a real estate proposition. It is an ecosystem that facilitates R&D and innovation. Success is premised upon adequate engagement between the companies and IIT Madras. The CREDIT system merely ensures that the necessary levels of engagement continues on a sustained basis to ensure the companies benefit out of the ecosystem. Hence, each company has to earn a certain minimum number of Credits each year depending on the space occupied. (IIT Madras, 2017)

Client Profile: IIT Madras Research Park has chosen to bring in a diverse

set of companies straddling multiple domains, so that there is adequate interaction with as many of the 16 departments in IIT as possible. The pie chart below depicts the distribution across different segments.

Figure 2.4 : Client distribution at IITM-RP Source: http://respark. iitm.ac.in/

Clientele: The park has a diverse range of clientele, it includes the research centres of IIT Madras, incubation centers as well as a number or corporate clients. Some of them can be listed as follows: (IITM, 2017)

Figure 2.3 : Credit system at IITM-RP Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Table 2 : Clients at IITMRP Source: http://respark. iitm.ac.in/ 33


2.1.2.1 Institutional Structures & Strategies Each organization is distinguished by key attributes or variables across a range of options. By analyzing different combinations of attributes, researchers have identified eight models of innovation that support both sustaining and disruptive innovation. The placement of the eight on a spectrum shows the degree to which the innovation efforts are centralized or decentralized. Some organizations look inward; others look externally for fresh ideas and new ways of solving problems. (Steel Case, 2013)

1. In-House Marketplace Model In this highly centralized model, a culture of innovation and concept development is enmeshed at every level of the organization. There’s heavy cross-pollination of ideas, and each team and every person is responsible for innovation. Example: Qualcomm

2. In-House Share Model

3. In-House Center Model

In this resource-sharing model, members of multiple specialized groups can align easily on an as-needed basis. Team members can depend on immediate assistance from each other due to proximity, & the space supports a shared culture among groups that interact together almost continuously on both long and short-term projects. Example: SteelCase Research

This model of innovation empowers a distinct group that’s responsible for innovation within the organization. This special team, which has deep industry expertise, typically employs atypical processes yet remains part of the larger culture and relies on easy access to organizational resources. Example: Mayo Clinic (SPARC Program)

Spatial Translation:

Spatial Translation:

Spatial Translation:

Location: Onsite Characteristics: Create neighborhoods where each team can collaborate and share ideas. A central project area allows information to be posted ofor quick visual updates. Private areas support deep discussions or brainstorming without interruptions. The café is a spot to chat it up, serving as both a boundary between teams and an attractor for people 34

Location: Onsite Characteristics: Front porch where public information can be shared. Deeper into the space, more information is revealed. Private areas for each team allow them to risk new ideas and work through prototypes without the distracting scrutiny of outsiders.

Location: Onsite Characteristics: Neighborhood for their work that’s linked to an oasis at the center where they can chat. Project spaces are also linked to the oasis, which is big enough for sharing ideas and prototypes among team members. SPA, New Delhi


4. Offsite Model For some organizations, getting away is how innovation happens best. In this model, a remote center is where a team develops, prototypes, and validates innovation initiatives. The team has a unique culture and the freedom to pursue distinct values and processes. At the same time, access to organizational resources is a given. Example: Uber R&D center

5. Partnership Model Sometimes a melding of perspectives is the fastest way to breakthrough. Via long or shortterm alliances, organizations purposefully leverage diverse competencies, gain access to distinct resources, transfer knowledge, and share risk and cost. Example: Apple and Nike have teamed up to collaborate on products such as the running shoe Moire that includes a sensor working with an iPod to provide verbal information about distance and speed, as well as music that goes the distance.

6. Consultancy Model In this innovation experts do a house call by coming into an organization on a project basis. They bring with them a distinct problem-solving skill set and a fresh perspective that’s unencumbered by real or perceived organizational baggage. They leave behind lasting education on the hows of innovation that can transform many projects-to- come. Example: Procter and Gamble worked with IDEO as the innovation consultancy company.

Spatial Translation:

Location: Off site Characteristics: Connection with parent company is very necessary in this model, videoconferencing capabilities are especially important. A boundary of enclaves provides space for both private and public meetings. Alternative worksettings for mobile team members to be provided.

Spatial Translation:

Location: Onsite or Offsite Characteristics: Each partner has its own space, and they share space too. Alpha collaboration and testing happens in shared real estate, then each goes back to their own turf to consult with expert resources and work in specialized labs until they’re ready to come together again.

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Spatial Translation:

Location: Off site Characteristics: There’s a place allocated in the host company where both organizations share ideas, test prototypes, and push for innovation in neutral space that includes project zones, social spaces, and resource areas. Meanwhile, each has the backdrop of their separate sites where individual culture prevails. 35


7. The Network Model “If you build it, they will come” is the attitude behind this innovation model which invites people to visit and bring their ideas with them, joining a company- managed network that typically includes institutions, organizations, community members, or practitioners — or all of the above. The input process is random to allow for the breadth of perspectives and unexpected outcomes that come from self-selected contributors who have a personal motivation to participate.. Example: LEGO’s Design by me website

8. The Community Model It’s about the need of now, as an autonomous network comes together to contribute ideas and potentially solve a need quickly together. The advantages are a breadth of perspective that’s independent of any organization combined with a free and open transfer of knowledge. Example: T-Hub, Hyderabad

Spatial Translation: Spatial Translation:

Location: Off site Characteristics: Various types of hosting events —allow people to come together and share information that’s then taken back into a team neighborhood within the organization for further exploration and refinement.

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Location: Off site Characteristics: Membership spaces for today’s “co-working culture” are laboratories to study the growing phenomenon. A social lounge area is a welcome addition to the predictable fare of spaces for individual work and meeting rooms. A gallery for art displays or presentation space is another way to make the space less impersonal and more collaborative.

Figure 2.5-2.12 : Organisation models of innovation Source: https://www.steelcase.com/insights/ white-papers/how-place-fosters-innovation/?utm_ source=Direct SPA, New Delhi


2.1.2.2 Implications and Inferences: Out of all the structures, model number 4-8 will form the major clientele for the center which works mostly in the off center research labs. The primary aim behind that is have a separate independent environment which can enhance the productivity in the innovation and bring out of the box ideas.

1.

2.

3.

4.

Spatial understanding : • • •

5.

6.

7.

8.

Potential clientele for the project building

Being avn offsite campus, provision for floating workforce from parent company has to made. Spaces of two distinct characteristics required- Front yard : Public and interactive space and deeper space: For concentrated research work Relationship with parent company necessary so enough facilities for networking (e.g.-Video Conferencing) and hosting company executives (Accommodation) to be provided.

Figure 2.13 : Comparative analysis of different organisational models of innovation Source: www. SteelCase.com Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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2.1.3.1 Scope of Research fields: The primary aim of such facilities is to encourage multi-disciplinary collaborations and to provide a common platform to a diverse range of individuals and companies to come together in synergy and share resources and knowledge. Higher the cross-breeding, higher the purpose of establishing it will be sufficed.

But due to certain irresistible forces, all the applicable sectors can’t be accommodated in the Park. These are: • Limited Physical Space • Interests of the host institute- NSIT • Response to current market trends in R&D and Start-Up’s in order to make the facility economically viable • Distinctive Spatial requirements for certain kind of industries; for e.g.- large farmland for companies dealing with agricultural research

Because of all these constraints, a filter is required to identify the industrial and commercial sectors to which the center will cater to primarily. The diagram below shows the selection of thrust areas through a 3 stepped process.

Figures 2.14 : 3 stepped process for short-listing the thrust areas of center Source: Author 38

SPA, New Delhi


2.1.3.2 Host Institute- NSIT: Interests of host institute- Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology, formerly known as Delhi Institute of Technology (DIT) was established in July 1983. The institute was started as a government college and was later on converted into an administratively autonomous institution in 1986 under Govt. of NCT of Delhi. The institute is affiliated to the Delhi University has the following departments of studies: • Computer Engineering • Electronics and Communication Engineering • Instrumentation and Control Engineering • Manufacturing Processes and Automation • Information Technology • Bio-Technology • Humanities and Social Sciences • Management • Mathematics • Physics and Chemistry Excluded: • Automobiles • Aerospace Engineers • Medical and Pharma • Infrastructure Development • Energy and Natural resources • Agri Produce • Transportation • Animal and Nature Sciences • Music/Audio Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Short listed sectors for set up: Included: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Advertising Big Data Analytics Artificial Intelligence Mobile application development Cloud computing/ SAAS infrastructure Communication E commerce Healthcare IT and Services Marketing and Media IT hardware development Enterprise Software Product Development Software Digital service Providers Public Relations Social Ventures Gaming Manufacturing Technologies Material Energy/ Nano Technology

Table 3 : Selected sectors for set up Source: Author 39


2.1.4 Rewoking work Environment

The nature of co-working spaces have changed throughout the course of history. In this millennial era most of the work can be done in isolation with mere virtual human connection through the internet. This mobility and flexibility in a working spaces changes the nature of workplaces. Nowadays workplaces do not only provide private, secluded working spaces but promote interaction within workers to work collectively together. This can be achieved through various means such as: • Outdoor Spaces - Nothing freshens the minds of budding employees than fresh air itself. • Connectivity - Instead of segregating the workspace on the basis of department or post a better interaction between different kinds of employees can make them more broad minded. • Collaboration - Provisions such be provided architecturally to facilitate collaborations with different firms or organisations

• Learning - Facilities such as libraries and workshops should be provided to further train the employees . • Mobility - An employee shouldn’t be where the work is, the work should be where the employee is. With the technological advancement one does not need to be chained to desk for working. Work may happen at the go. • Socialise - More socialising spaces should be provided to allow interaction and networking within the employees. Provisions such as gyms, bars, cafés and restaurants should be made. •

Focus - Some spaces with a decent level of privacy and eace should also be provided to allow the workers to focus and concentrate. (IPD, 2007)

“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much” - Helen Keller

• Meeting Spaces - Some informal spaces should be provided which insight ad-hoc meetings. 40

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2.1.4.1 Open Plan The concept of large working places evolved during the Industrial Revolution whereby dingy, stuffy cubicles or desks used to be provided in a regularised fashion to reduce human interacton and increase productivity in monotony. However, humans crave interaction to be more creative and innovative. This seclusion within workers leaves out creativity and prevents collaboration and innovation. Studies have shown that an open plan improves the frame of minds of the employees. The open creative playground is a prevailing fundamental design for the digital economy. Many companies such as Google, Apple and Yahoo have moderated their working spaces to become more social by making interactive working spaces. The evidence presented in Working without Walls (Allen T, Bell A, Graham R, Hardy B & Swaffer F (2004) Working Without Walls OGC/DEGW, London) demonstrates that open plan environments are more common than they were, as enclosed offices have decreased in number, densities have risen and shared meeting and project areas have increased. A densely partitioned space tends to be less efficient by introducing more secondary circulation than is necessary and by increasing individual allowances on space. Growing numbers of organisations have therefore dispensed with cellular offices altogether, preferring instead a more egalitarian layout, with greater choice over work settings. (Nationl Commitee of Sciences, 2008)

Figures 2.15 : Components of an Open work plan Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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2.1.4.2 HOT Desking Growing numbers of organisations are introducing flexible working patterns, in which individuals exercise greater choice over where and when they work. This introduces the possibility of radical changes to space occupancy. The twin benefits of flexible working are to: 1. Maximise the efficiency with which desks are planned 2. Increase their people per workstation by introducing desk sharing. Such initiatives allow a building to support more people in the same amount of space and their impact on overall densities can be dramatic, often reducing an organisation’s appetite for space by 30% or more. The standard space per person varies considerably within overall office types with call centres averaging around 7.5 sqm per person and client-facing offices around 15.5 sqm. Hot-Desking helps us increase this number without increasing the cost by providing less amenities for the same workforce. It helps in creating spaces that feel more ‘ours’ rather than ‘mine’. The constant shuffle reducing monotony and translated to reduces office costs and increased networking opportunities. This prospect has become more successful with the 42

technological advancement that allows workers to work from almost anywhere.

COMMON SPACES They provide a platform for a series of serendipities such as ad-hoc meetings. These informal spaces help in networking and resolving problems in a collective manner. They also provide a space to work on larger projects collectively. They also include local support spaces which are essentially support spaces provided for the individual or local team. Thus personal and departmental filing/storage; print/copy facilities, local vending, break out areas, and so on are all included. (Dept. of Veterans Affairs, 1995)

Figure 2.16 : Design & performance factors at work Place Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


2.1.4.3 Space Standards The following are the results from a research report published by IPD titled ‘Efficiency Standards for Office Space’. It suggests the general trends in floor area according to number of occupants and workstations. The standards could be referred upon during the development of program and allotment of areas to each function.

Figure 2.17- 2.20 : Ideal space requirement for office space Source: http://ns.kinnarps.tm/Countries/UK/PS%20minisite/Agreement/Efficiency_Standards_for_Office_Space.pdf Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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2.1.5 Process of a Start-Up:

Table 4 : Process of Startup Source: Startupcommons.com 44

SPA, New Delhi


2.1.6 Key learnings: • The various phases that a start up goes through have their unique spatial needs that must be catered for in their peculiarities. These spaces each help a start up to develop and grow. Thus are very crucial in the development of the company. The phases of Ideation give way to Conceptualisations and commitment modules. These further grow to have a validation for the start up. Only then a company starts to scale up and establish itself. • These spaces must however all knit together in a seamless flow of spaces. The transition of a start-up from a new idea to an established firm must be smooth. Architecture has a great role to play in this by organising innovation and management into physical spaces. • This thesis aims to create a nurturing environment physically to guide and stimulate the growth of a start up and make it capable of much more innovation guided by the interactions spaces that the building shall offer. • One of the key understandings from research was that a strategically developed program is required in order to create a holistic model which serves to all its stakeholders. • The complete project will be designed and detailed as part of the thesis project. Since, the focus is on creating an experience, entire complex should act as a single organism

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Chapter -2.2

Case Studies Case studies have been chosen based on the varied approaches towards establishment of the relationship between work environment and interaction. Also projects were chosen considering similar scale and program as of the design project. Cases are: • • •

Campus for Agilent Technology, Gurgaon MIT Media Lab Google HeadQuartes, USA

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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2.2.1 Campus for Agilent Technologies India

Figure 2.21 : Satellite view of the Agilent campus Source: Google Earth 48

Primary Study Location : Sector 8, Manesar, Gurgaon Site Area : 10 acres Built up Area : 46,453 Sq. m Occupancy : 1800 workstations (2000 people) Architect : Ar. Sanjay Prakash (SHiFt Architects) Completion : 2009 N

Client : Agilent Technologies, USA SPA, New Delhi


Architectural approach :

Site Planning :

Vehicular Movement :

The campus has been crafted for the ultimate office experience, this building imparts distinctive character to enhance productivity while maintaining the sanctity of a quiet work environment.

Building block is compacted and located nearly in the site center leave enough space for future expansion. Site planning also allows for expansive bio-diversity by introduction of frontal landscape, cutting dust and noise.

Hard paved roads has been provided only along the site periphery (red), soft paved roads has been provided at all other places (including surface parking) to allow water penetration and reduce heat island effect (shown in blue).

The building utilises only 25% of the permissible FAR, while allowing the future expansion to full FAR. This not only serves to create valuable outdoor spaces for recreation. (Mayank, 2016)

Parking:

Total- 600 cars Basement parking- 2 floors Surface parking- soft paved (100 cars)v

N Figures 2.22 : Building Model Source: SHiFT Architects

Figure 2.23-2.24 : Site Plan and Vehicular movement Source: http://www.inde-design.org/index.php?/details/agilent-technologies/

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Structural System: RCC framed structure with a grid size of 8.5m * 8.5m has been used. Their are 3 grid bays going along the East West direction, making the typical width of floor slab as 25m. A large rain water harvesting tank is located below 2 parking basements

Building experience:

The northwest formal entrance, under a triple height space, integrates a water body and a concrete shear wall. This entrance leads to a grand atrium with a tree which is the connecting element of all the spaces within the complex. (Mayank, 2016) Intermediate spaces have been provided for repose from the intense work environment in the form of a roof top cafeteria, gardens, terraces and the atrium itself. Intermittent provision of internal and external courtyards also ensures enhanced indoor air quality. Meeting rooms project outwards, as distinct entities offering magnificent views of the building and outwards. (Prakash, 2016)

Figure 2.25 : Ground Floor Plan with entries Source: ShiFt Architects

The east approach within the campus is characterized by a large cantilevered office section with distinctive tensile structures which mark the staff entrance. This side lets the morning light filter in from certain portions.

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Figure 2.26 : Formal Entry Source: ShiFt Architects

Figure 2.27 : Typical Furniture Layout Source: ShiFt Architects

SPA, New Delhi


Courtyard Planning : An open courtyard has been provided in the center of building which helps creates a break in the large floor plate yet maintaining a visual connect among various floors. Floor plates has been optimised to a width of 25m to w.r.t. to window height to ensure natural light penetration till the center. (Prakash, 2016)

Figure 2.30 : Building Section- AA’ Source: sHift Architects

Figure 2.28 : Daylight Penetration Source: sHift Architects B

B’

A

A’

Figure 2.29 : Key Plan Source: sHift Architects

Figure 2.31 : Building Section- BB’ Source: sHift Architects

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Activity and breakout areas:

Figure 2.32 : Informal breakout areas- Balconies and Squash court (Inward Looking) Source: Author

Figure 2.33 : Formal meeting area- Glazed facade with outside view (Outward Looking) Source: Author

Each floor has accessibility to green terraces & break out spaces. Meeting Rooms and Atriums: Intermittent provision of internal and external courtyards also ensures enhances indoor air quality. Meeting rooms project outwards, as distinct entities offering magnificent views of the building and outwards 52

Recreational facilities: A number of recreation centres, cafĂŠs, day-care, medical and wellness facilities, play courts and amphitheatre. SPA, New Delhi


Service Integration:

Figure 2.34 : Location of AHU’s(Red) and service staircases (Blue) Source: Author

Figure 2.35 : Placement of toilets around the floor Uniformly spread- close proximity to cores Source: Author

The services of the building are integrated in a way to maximise the flexibility. Lighting- Efficient and flexible circulation patterns; workstations receive glare-free daylight, made possible by designing the building to never be deep (< 25m), and with a relatively higher ceiling height, 3.2 m. Provision of task Lighting- A typical luminosity of 150 Lux is maintained throughout the office mainly through natural daylighting. All Workstations are provided with very low-energy LED task lights which can be switched ON wherever extra working light is required.Delhi. The existing land use of the site is Institutional only. Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Personalized work environments utilize a hybrid under-floor air conditioning system based on the principle of cooling the user (not the space) while efficient variable air volume systems work even for the increased ceiling height of 3.2 meters. The extra height, as well as the limited floor plate depth of 25 m, allows much of the office to operate in natural light. 53


Vertical Circulation: The cores are positioned in a way to cover most of the floor area within the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;easyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; range of 25m. Also enough number of fire escapes are provided and whole floor plate gets covered with the 22.5 m accessibility from stairs.

Employees stairs- 4 nos. Fire Escapes- 5 nos. Service Staircase- 2 nos. Total staircases- 11 nos.

Figure 2.37 : Proximity of work spaces from lift lobbies (15, 25m) Source: Author

Figure 2.36: Plan showing the location of public staircases (Yellow-Internal, Green- Fire Escape) Source: Author 54

Figure 2.38 : Stair cases for fire safety (22.5m radii around stairs) Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


Sustainability: Heat ingress:

The main glazed facades are oriented north or south, avoiding west and east directions, thus eliminating uncontrollable solar radiation. Shading- Heat ingress is further controlled with the use of shading devices (horizontal on south, vertical on north) Façade and use of glass- Façade with glass but only about 60% on the north and south faces, so the mindless use of curtain wall glazing is completely eliminated except in the protected lobbies Differential and optimised facade treatment for West and South Side West- Small variable glass openings South- Maximised glass facade with fins

Water Conservation: Three step water recycling system in place, using normal water dosed with rainwater for hand wash, then treated hand wash water for flushing, the treated flushed water for irrigation of the landscaped gardens through a drip irrigation system reducing the losses to air. (Prakash, 2016)

West

South

P 2.2 : Differential fenestration treatment Source: Shift Architects

Step by step energy efficiency builtup: • Efficient building envelope • Air side eco nomiser • Demand control ventilation • Variable volume water flow • Variable speed CT fans

• High CoP chillers • Stratified chilled water storage • Under floor air distribution • Cooling energy stored in slab

(Prakash, 2016) Figures: Bottom-Up Air conditioning approach (flexibility in workstation layout) Figure 2.39 : North Facade detail, Large glazed windows Source: Shift Architects Source: Shift Architects Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Bottom-Up Air Conditioning: Simple steps in shading and orienting the building have been followed with sophisticated airconditioning design. An extremely low-energy, hybrid AC system (VAV, or variable air volume type with cooling by chilled water) has been used here. Ducts travel through the hollow under the false floor and throw cold air up rather than down. This creates a mushroom cloud of cold air within the habitable height of the room rather than cooling all the volume, which allows for higher floor heights (helping daylight enter). By investing in this high quality design and plant, the AC demand has been brought down by half than normal (to 32 sq metre per tonne). The power required for the facility has been reduced by 40 per cent compared to normal demand, Normal air-conditioning demand is calculated at 16 square metres per tonne, with inefficient examples being as low as 10 sq metres per tonne. (Mayank, 2016)

Figure 2.40 : Bottom-Up Air conditioning approach (flexibility in workstation layout) Source: Shift Architects 56

Figure 2.41 : Section through AHU rooms Source: Shift Architects SPA, New Delhi


2.2.2 MIT Media Lab USA

Figure 2.42 : Satellite view of MIT Media Lab Source: Google Earth Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Secondary Study Location : MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts Site Area : 2.5 acres Built up Area : 17,000 Sq. m Occupancy : ~800 Architect : Maki and Associates Completion : 2009 Client : Massachusetts Institute of Technology 57


“MIT Media Lab is a serene example of classic modernism — a glass-and-steel form wrapped in an elegant aluminium screen.” -James McCown

Access and Connectivity:

Site Boundary- Connection with annexe block

This structure, Building E14, stands at the heart of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts, linked to the adjacent Wiesner Building (1984) by I.M. Pei. The two buildings form an integrated home for the Media Lab and other programs in the School of Architecture + Planning. (MIT , 2017)

Spatial Configuration: Vertical Zoning: The base is composed of the main entrance and its fairly low-ceiling exhibition spaces; the upper and lower atria form the piano nobile; and the public spaces on the roof are the crown. Spatial Quality:  Open and non-hierarchical nature of the space. Circulation: Circulation is designed in a way to facilitate contact among researchers. The building actually includes two atria: a lower public atrium, and an upper atrium around which the labs are arrayed. Stairs bridging the atria are painted bright red, blue, and yellow. . 58

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Figure 2.43 : Ground Floor and Site Plan- MIT Media Lab Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/design_4-4.html SPA, New Delhi


Social Spaces: Crafted for the ultimate office experience, this building imparts distinctive character to enhance productivity while maintaining the sanctity of a quiet work environment. The building utilises only 25% of the permissible FAR, while allowing the future expansion to full FAR. This not only serves to create valuable outdoor spaces for recreation, but also allows for expansive bio-diversity by introduction of frontal landscape, cutting dust and noise. im reduces heat gain in summer while still allowing ample daylight to enter the building. Heat gain is further reduced by the high-performance, two-layer, argon-filled insulated glazing with low-e coatings and a 50-percent ceramic frit in a micro-dot pattern. Awning-style operable windows are used throughout the building to provide natural ventilation. (Poopong, 2011)

Figure 2.44 : Building Section Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

P 2.3- 2.4 : Photos of inner atriums Source: Andy Ryan

Figure 2.45: Vertical Segregation of functions Source: Author 59


Facade System: The steel-framed Media Lab building is sheathed in a system of aluminium rods. They created a scrim that both reduces heat gain and offers a reinterpretation of the views. Viewing the exterior from the interior is like looking at a lined painting. And at night the building glows like a lantern. The lightness of their construction allows light, views, and breeze to pass through while providing shade and privacy. Technical Detail- Â the exterior screens are made from extruded aluminum pipes three-quarters of an inch (19 millimeters) in diameter, spaced 1.5 inches (38 millimeters) on center. This creates 50 percent open and 50 percent shaded area on the largely glass perimeter. (Poopong, 2011) Reducing Heat gain: The aluminium scrim reduces heat gain in summer while still allowing ample daylight to enter the building. Heat gain is further reduced by the high-performance, two-layer, argon-filled insulated glazing with low-e coatings and a 50-% ceramic frit in a micro-dot pattern. Awning style operable windows are used throughout the building to provide natural ventilation.

P 2.5: Building envelope during day Source: Andy Ryan 60

Figure 2.46 : North Elevation- MIT Media Lab Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/design_4-4.html

P 2.6: Building facade during night Source: Andy Ryan SPA, New Delhi


Design of Lab: The building is designed in a way to foster the Media Lab’s hallmark cross-disciplinary research. Maki arrayed seven double-height research “cubes” around a central atrium. Home to research groups such as Tangible Media and Lifelong Kindergarten, these lab spaces are vertically staggered such that no two labs share a continuous floor plate, creating a complex section. Within each such volume, the faculty and grad-student offices occupy a mezzanine level, connected to an open research area by a spiral staircase. Each mezzanine is also accessible by elevator. (MIT , 2017)

Figure 2.47 : Layout of a typical Lab Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/

P 2.7 : Outside View from lab Source: https://www.media.mit.edu/about/mission-his-

P 2.8 : Internal spiral staircase connecting 2 levels Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/

P 2.9 : Interior view of Lab Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/

“The spaces facilitate what I call ‘diagonal thinking. You can stand in the atrium and see through glass into each one of the labs and observe what everybody is doing at any given time.” - Andy Lippman (Ass. Director, MIT)

(Poopong, 2011)

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Floor Plans: The building is designed in a way to foster the Media Lab’s hallmark cross-disciplinary research. Maki arrayed seven double-height research “cubes” around a central atrium. Home to research groups such as Tangible Media and Lifelong Kindergarten, these lab spaces are vertically staggered such that no two labs share a continuous floor plate, creating a complex section. Within each such volume, the faculty and grad-student offices occupy a mezzanine level, connected to an open research area by a spiral staircase. Each mezzanine is also accessible by elevator.

“The spaces facilitate what I call ‘diagonal thinking. You can stand in the atrium and see through glass into each one of the labs and observe what everybody is doing at any given time.” - Andy Lippman (Ass. Director, MIT)

Figure 2.48 : 2nd Floor Plan Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/design_4-4.html

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Figure 2.49 : 3rd Floor Plan Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/design_4-4.html

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N Figure 2.50 : 4th Floor Plan- MIT Media Lab Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/design_4-4.html

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Figure 2.51 : 6t Floor Plan- Public floor Source: http://www.architectureweek.com/2010/0714/design_4-4.html

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2.2.3 Google HQ (Googleplex) USA

Figure 2.52 : Satellite view of the Googleplex Source: Google Earth 64

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Secondary Study Location : California, Unites States Site Area : 11 acres Built up Area : 52,000 Sq. m Occupancy : 2200 Architect : Clive Wilkinson architects Completion : 2005 Client : Google SPA, New Delhi


Vision: To create a diversified campus environment, integrating highly focused software engineering workspace within a support system of learning, collaboration, recreation, and food facilities. A primary vision was to merge the idea of workplace with the experiences found in an educational environment into a new way of working and maintenance of an edge. The reasoning for this was the idea that within the loosely structured university system, there are resources available to allow the individual to conceive, investigate, and execute the impossibleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and that is how Google was originally conceived.

Figure 2.53 : Architectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sketch for the campus Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/

Master Plan: All of these opportunities, as well as the infrastructure, were incorporated into the architectural solution for the Googleplex. The process started with a unified master plan for the entire campus which incorporated the language of a campus: outdoor sports activities, food, a commons, and a bar. (Meachem, 2009)

Figure 2.54 : Campus Master plan Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/

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Design of Main Street: All the accessory functions from the program were strategically placed along a logical “main street” which allowed for the churning of ideas among the community, while the workplaces were located to allow for more concentrated, “head down” activities. (Meachem, 2009) A typical campus environment offers the concept of self containment, so within the immediate area, all of your basic work/life needs can be met and the possibility of casual encounters with fellow “students” for collaboration or recreation is possible anytime during the day or night. At the university level, these opportunities are to support the goals of personal education, with a focus on each individual’s interests, but when these interests become common to a community, the results can be very powerful.

Figure 2.55 : Central Active Street design Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ 66

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Personlised Environment: The concept to make the whole workspace playful was continued through the design of 13 individual environments, which re-created environments, usually found on a college campus, and were systematically integrated into the overall design of each building by the use of a hot and cold diagram: Hot areas being more public and active zones, while cold being more secluded and private. These zones were defined by location along the primary and secondary circulation corridors

13 different zones provided to suit the expecta-

tions of all for the work environment.

Figure 2.56 : Different kinds of work spaces used in the project Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/

Figure 2.57 : Location of different Hot and Cold spaces around central street (1 Floor) Figure 2.58 : Location of different Hot and Cold spaces around central street (2 Floor) Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Servicing of flexible zones: The sound absorption, artificial lighting, and air conditioning was provided through a custom ceiling made of upholstered acoustic fabric. To bring more democracy to the environment, the use of coloured glass to enclose all these team “offices”. That way, the light and outside view could come into the interior, but the teams would be afforded the privacy they needed and the identity of colour. Since these teams were critical to Google’s success, they selected the area along the windows for their location, in a traditional hierarchical way. (Meachem, 2009)

Figure 2.59 : Location Double height flexible spaces Source: Author

P2.10-2.11 : AC ducting from top in temporary meeting spaces Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ 68

P 2.12- 2.13 : Use of tinted glass to allow light inside meeting spaces located away from windows Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/ SPA, New Delhi


Location of different kinds of work environments:

Figure 2.60 : Nomadic or open spaces, uniformly distributed Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/

Figure 2.61 : Enclosed Meeting spaces, located towards the center of building Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/

Figure 2.62 : Learning Resource rooms, located on central spine Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/

Figure 2.63 : Leisure spaces, overlooking open central green Source: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/

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Case Study Matrix: Inferences have been drawn by evaluating each of these case studies against different principles of building design and analysing their possible contribution towards the project. The inferences are in the realm of programme, design, building construction and quality of spaces as all four are equally important consideration to be undertaken in the way ahead in this project.

Table 5 : Case Study Comparative Matrix Source: Author 70

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Chapter -3.0

Program Development & Analysis The chapter will deal with understanding all the programmatic components of the project. An area statement consisting a detailed breakup of areas which can act as a check list. The affinity of different components with one another in order to form a functional relationship diagram.

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3.1 Project Scope: The Research Park brings together, in a common ecosystem a diverse range of people, which include accomplished researchers from the industry, faculty of international repute, student community from the host institute-NSIT and other technical institutions around the region, technical & support staff and an effective administration, creating an ambience where research and innovation are celebrated as a way of life. It will be a property based venture which creates a local concentration of skill and technology, promoting innovation, competitiveness and entrepreneurship. It helps convert research ideas into innovative technologies, houses R&D of companies, creates and nurtures start-­‐ups and drives technology-­‐led regional economic development. Research Parks have become the most favoured policy intervention for R&D success and are the key catalysts for economic leadership. They help build sustainable competitive advantage through R&D, facilitate the commercialization of new technologies, attract FDI & leading technology companies from abroad. The Research Park is an “essential tool for institutions with an entrepreneurial and innovative culture that hope to benefit from complicated partnerships on a global scale”. 74

It can provide the physical space and facilities afforded not generally available on a university campus; it can do proprietary or classified research, which is not easily done in an academic environment. Apart from infrastructure many factors are necessary for the success of a RP: the availability of

skilled workers, reasonably easy  access  to  finance,  good  park  infrastructure  and  quality  of  life  amenities, strong and committed park leadership and the ability to attract entrepreneurs  and  skilled  managers.  Of  overriding  importance  is  a  policy  environment that is “patient, adaptable, and focused on commercialization”

Research Park

Figure 3.1: Different Stakeholders interacting at the Research Park Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


3.2 Institutional Structure: Though the site for the project is allocated within the campus of NSIT, the campus is supposed to function self-sufficiently without any sort of programmatic and spatial dependency on the existing university campus. Between the NSIT and center, the exchange will be predominantly of knowledge and resources rather than physical space. The entire center will be administered independently. The facility will be functioning under the administrative control of Department of Training and Technical Education, Govt. of NCT of Delhi.

Figure 3.2 : Institutional Structure and administrative relations Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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3.3 Functional components and spatial requirement The major functional components of the program can be divided as follows: Research Park: It will primarily house the rentable space, which can be rented out by MNCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and corporates to house their research labs and R & D centers. Three sizes of Lab spaces to be provided which can be rented based on the requirements. These are large clients (1000 sqm.), medium clients (500 sqm.) and small clients (200 sqm.). Flexibility and provision for merging two or more units also needs to be taken care of.

Common Semi-Public Facilities: It includes the functions which invites the community in like auditorium, exhibition space, Seminar halls, etc. These members of Research Park as well as Entrepreneurship center will share these areas, also for commercial viability these could be rented by external agencies as well. The location of these functions should be near the primary access road and should be strategically placed in such a way that their activity should not disturb the functioning of rest of campus.

Entrepreneurship Center: This will be the home for budding start-ups and entrepreneurs to develop their ideas into commercially feasible products. There will be a prototyping labs and workshops for actual product development. Co-working spaces and studios for people to come together and work, along with facilities like IPR, finance facilitation center, etc. Accommodation: To house out station researchers, guests and visitors of the companies, enough lodging provisions to be included in the program. Based on the duration of stay, arrangements for two kind of accommodation to be made. Shortterm accommodation will be in the form of guest rooms while the long term arrangement will have studio apartments. The number of accommodation units was calculated based on the facility given in IITMRP. 76

Figure 3.3 : Componentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; relationship diagram Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


3.4 Area Breakup: The following is a detailed division of all the broad components of the program to understand the spatial requirement and relationship of each small segment, which will come together, to form the entire project:

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Table 6 : Area Breakup Source: Author 80

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3.5 Applicable Building Bye-Laws:

Key Design Guidelines: The following are the guidelines given in the brief by IIT Bombay during the design competition for similar facility in the IIT campus. The same could be directly applicable for the design project because of similar scale and nature of project:

Applicable Floor Area Ratio- 225 Max. Ground Coverage- 35% Max. Permissible Height- 37m Parking Requirements- 1.33 ECS /100 sqm

Area permissible for Accommodation -30%

Translation on site: Total Built up proposed- 42,700 sqm Ground coverage- 7,700 sqm Avg. no. of floors required- 6 floors

Number of Parking ECS- 558 units Parking area approx.(32/ECS)- 17,856 sqm Area for Accommodation- 7,297 sqm

(Permissible 14,850sqm)

Total Built Up area- 42,897 sqm

Area Distribution:

Create an ambience for housing R&D labs of world-class engineering and technology companies. The design should reflect this. The design should incorporate the philosophy of sustainable design. Such sustainable design should minimize electricity consumption, conserve water and use environmental friendly material. The building design should provide adequate lighting, ventilation and minimize the consumption of air conditioning yet be functional and pleasant during hot climate. The design should take into account climate including heavy rains during Monsoons and should consider seismic zoning, topography, soil and vegetation of the site. The Master plan should enable free movement of research park companies’ employees and should properly segregate the vehicular traffic.

Figures 3.4 : Area Distribution Chart Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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3.6 Program translation & Functional Relations

AN INTEGRATED NETWORK - COMPONENTS ON SITE WORK IN RESONANCE WITH THE PHYSICAL CONTEXT. The complex does not claim to be self-sustaining in terms of its functioning and will work in collaboration with the many existing stakeholders and organisations to achieve the intended vision. The collaborations and tie-ups would be with NSIT, other technical institutions, Government of Delhi,

residents, avid explorers and innovators. Other support facilities with which the complex would have a symbiotic relationship include the Multi-National companies, upcoming start-ups and existing infrastructure along with the commercial market.

Figure 3.5 : Functional Relationship diagram Source: Author 82

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3.7 Design Inferences The understandings of this chapter can be appended to those from the previous chapter to arrive at design inferences inclusive of the two. Each building component in the programme has an inherent spatial quality attached to it and it can be evaluated against site conditions to locate the components appropriately. This gives a basic zoning of functions on site.

Figure 3.6 : Functional relations (in section) Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Figure 3.7 : Functional relations (in section) Source: Author

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Chapter -4.0

Project Site & Analysis The chapter is focused on understanding the site conditions for the project and its surroundings. Identifying the important determinants from the site analysis which can give hints for the design. Study of neighborhood and existing mobility infrastructure in order to orient the design in a way it can minimise the impact on the existing systems.

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Project Site: As proposed by the government of Delhi, the site is allotted within the campus of Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology, Dwarka, New Delhi. Being in the campus, the existing land use of the site is Institutional only. Within the campus, the site is primly located on the central road connecting the main entry gate of campus to the central academic block. The site is accessible by roads from 3 sides while a natural green cover flanks the fourth side.

Figure 4.1 : Satellite view of site and surroundings Source: Google Earth 86

N SPA, New Delhi


Locating Site: Country: India City: New Delhi Neighborhood: Dwarka Zone K-I Precinct: NSIT campus

Accessibility: The closet metro station to site is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dwarka Morâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at a distance of 900m. It will be the primary public transport hub to reach the site. Vehicular access is through 45m wide Azad Hind Fauz Marg which is a primary arterial road in the Dwarka. (Road section has been discussed later)

Zone -K I

Figure 4.2 : Landuse of and around site Source: Delhi Development Authority (DDA) Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Figure 4.3 : Accessibility to site Image Source: Google Earth, Overlay: Author 87


Climatic Data : Rainfall and mean Temperature

Sunshine Hours- New Delhi

With high average sunshine of 8 hours, harnessing solar energy wil be a viabe as well as reliable source of energy.

High annual rainfall (~800mm). Rain water harvesting can meet a ot of water requirements. Large storage tanks will be required.

Wind Analysis

Hot winds blow during the summers from South-West direction, enough provisions to be provided to block this off.

Table 7 : Annual Wind flow in Delhi Figure 4.4- 4.8 : Climate Analysis diagrams Source: windfinder.com 88

Solar Path- New Delhi

Notable difference in vertical solar angle of winters and summers, strategic design of windows can allow winter sun while blocking summer sun. SPA, New Delhi


Site Analytics : Total Site Area: 22,400 sqm. = 5.54 acres = 2.24 Hectares Total built-up area permissibe: 49,500 sqm.

The site is almost a rectangle measuring approximately 167m * 134m. The longer side of the site is aligned North South with a tilt of ~10 degrees. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a small triangular extension to the site towards the North-Eastern side wthile their southEast corner of the site is champhored in order to accommodate the round about which also acts as the primary drop off point for the institution.

N Figure 4.9 : Site dimensions (Not to scale) Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Existing site condition: The site currently has a grass cover and is used as a lawn. There are not many trees located on the site and the ones present are predominantly along the site edges. Being a lawn, the site is flat with natural slope towards the trench on the western side of site. There is also a visitors parking on the site for about 70 cars. This will be shifted to an adjacent bigger area as per the location allotted in the master plan. The piece of land is an intrinsic part of the campus master plan. Its strategic location of site permits a direct access to site from the Azad Hind Fauj Marg (45m wide) from the eastern side and access from the campus from the South and Western side. So, a direct vehicular connection can be made with Dwarka without disturbing the rest of the campus.

P 4.1- 4.2 : Site Photographs Source: Author

Visitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parking

P 4.3 : Covered service trench along site edge Source: Author 90

Figure 4.10:Shifting existing parking lot as per Master-plan Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


Context and Surroundings :

Area under redevelopment

Informal Commercial with some housing

The site context can be divided into 2 partsFirst the immediate surroundings of the NSIT campus in which the site is located, making it the Primary context to be responded to. Academic facilities and accommodation constitutes the major built up volume in the campus. The larger surroundings just outside the campus boundaries is the Dwarka colony can be considered as the Secondary context to site. Two very distinct characters are visible here, one structured formal high rise housing apartments and other of the informal low rise settlement which is under redevelopment as per Delhi Master plan.

Secondary Context

NSIT campus

Dwarka Developments

Primary Context Low Rise informal settements

SITE

High Rise formal Housings

NSIT Campus Planned High Rise (7-11 storey) Housing Figure 4.11 : Site context relation Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Figure 4.12 : Physical context study Source: Author

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NSIT Master Plan study :

Figure 4.13 : NSIT Masterplan analysis Source: Author 92

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Primary Context: NSIT campus has a central axis which leads directly to the central admin block, the axis. The axis continues through it leading to the central library with different academic departments on either side of it. Site is located on the left side of central axis, therefore the height of admin block should be considered while designing.

1.

4.

Key Plan

Finish and style- Brick cladding with green granite strips along the floor lines. Blocks are primarily orthogonal with 45 degrees tilt in between.

3.

2.

5.

2.

5.

6.

4.

1.

3.

6.

P 4.4- 4.9 : NSIT Context Photographs Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Secondary Context:

Key Plan

Two stark different characters is visible in the context. Diff. in built typology and operations. The southern side of campus has planned High rise building which are primarily Housing Apartments. Just below the campus is Pandit Deen Dayal Upadhyay college. It is the only other institution within close proximity to the NSIT.

1.

4.

4.

Area in the Western, northern and eastern side is under redevelopment as per Delhi Master Plan 2021. It currently has scattered low height built mass (1-3 storeys). Towards the road are shops majorly dealing in auto spare parts. Housing units starts mixing up as we go in.

2.

5. 6.

1.

2.

3.

3.

5.

6.

P 4.10 - 4.15: Secondary Context Photographs Source: Author 94

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Vehicular Accessibility :

1.

2.

The primary vehicular access to site is through 45m wide Azad Hind Fauz Marg, with a service lane on either side. Their is a break in median in front of the entry gate of campus. Their is a high density traffic junction at around 500m south of the site entry. Within the campus, 7.5 m wide 2 way road runs on the western side on the site. There is hardly any vehicular traffic on this road and is mostly used by pedestrians due to absence of footpath

P 4.16 : Access Road Photographs Source: Author

3.

4.

2 1

P 4.17 : Median break in front of campus entrance Source: Author

bus

A

Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

P 4.18 : Traffic junction near site entrance Source: Author

3

4 Figure 4.14 : Vehicular connectivity Source: Author

Figure 4.15 : Azad Hind Fauz Marg Section-AAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Source: Author

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Inferences and Directives : An analysis of the immediate site context and site conditions reveals key inferences which give a direction on the qualitative aspects of all portions of the site. These can be utilised in the best possible way to place functions which require those specific character of space. The qualities inferred from the analysis include: levels of privacy, vantage points of site, spatial character due to existing elements on site and potential points of entry to the site.

N Figure 4.17 : Design Directives for plan Source: Author

Figure 4.16 : Building Height Directive Source: Author 96

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Chapter -5.0

Technological Study If you look at history, innovation doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come just from giving people incentives; it comes from creating environments where their ideas can connect - Steven Johnson, Author and Theorist

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Structural System:

Table 8 : Structural System and Span Source: steelconstruction.info

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P 5.1 : Service Integration in Cellular beams Source: Bishop Hospital, Aukland

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P 5.2 : Composite structure with cellular beams and decking floor Source: steelconstruction.info

Figure 5.1 : Span range of cellular beam portal frame Source: steelconstruction.info Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Sustainability:

GRIHA Rating analysis

Figure 5.2 : GRIHA points distribution Source: GRIHA India

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Table 9 : Applicable GRIHA ponits on project Source: Author

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Applicable Criteriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s:

Table 10 : GRIHA points valid for project Source: Author

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Shadow Analysis: In the harsh sun of Delhiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer, open spaces becomes mostly unusable. To counter this, the building massing has been modified in a way such that at least 50% area of major open spaces remains shaded throughout the day. Placement of high mass towards South-West and North- West side of open greens ensures that the space remain shaded after noon, when people come out for lunch and interact with one another. Similarly, massing on eastern side of central spine ensures a shaded walk when people are coming in the campus.

Shadows as on - April,

11:00 a.m.

02:00 p.m.

05:00 p.m.

20

Figures 5.3- 5.6 : Shadow analysis diagrams (April, 20) Source: Author 102

08:00 a.m.

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Shadows as on - October,

20

Figures 5.7- 5.10 : Shadow analysis diagrams (Oct., 20) Source: Author

08:00 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

02:00 p.m.

05:00 p.m.

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5.2 Services Calculations:

Electric Power Requirements:

Being a Laboratory building, it has higher and some special services requirements. The section will deal with deriving the numerical figures according to which different services needs to be designed.

0.25 kW/ sqm for Research Center 0.15 kW/ sqm for Residential Facility

The following services were considered :

Load of Research Facility- 8750kW Load of Residential Facility- 1050 kW

Electricity Power Back Up Solar Panels and PV Cells Fire Safety Water Sewage Treatment Plant Rain Water

Area of Research Facility- 35,000 sqm Area of Residential Facility- 7,000 sqm

Total Load-

9,800 kW

Transformer Calculation: Total Load - 9,800 kW = 0.8 * 9800 kVA = 7,840 kVA Transformer Loading = 65% (Network R.M.C.) =0.65*7840 = 5,096 kVA = 5.1mVA So Transformer required- 33/11kV, 6.0 mVA capacity

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Sub-Station: The substation to be designed for rated voltage 11 kV and 6.0 mVA transformers.

Size of the Substation Required:

8.0m * 10.0m

Substation to include the following: • • • •

LV switchgear HV switchgear (RMU – Ring main unit) 2 transformers with EMF containment 1 external wall

The following rules are applicable while designing the substations: Size of transformer = 2000 × 2000 mm Transformer clearance to walls and other transformers = 500 mm Allow room to replace any  transformer  whilst other equipment is alive. LV and HV switchgear: Clearance at front = 1500 mm Clearance at sides = 500 mm The LV and HV switchgear should be near the door. A clear passageway at least 1000 mm wide Figures 5.11 : Typical layouts of substation shall be allowed from each item of switchgear Source: http://www.sudhirpower.com/Show_Diesel_Gensets.aspx to the access door. Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Power Back Up: Diesel Genset Liquid Cooled Silent Gensets, Brand- Sudhir Cummins Model No.- C3750 D5 Rating - 3750 kVA - 3000 W

For 100% Power Backup in Labs: No. of Gensets Required = 3 nos.

Figure 5.13: Spatial Requirements for storage of gensets Source: Author

Dimension of one genset7900*3028*3663mm

Table 11 : Spatial Considerations for storage of gensets Source: sudhirpower.com/Show_Diesel_Gensets.aspx

Figure 5.14 : Spatial Requirements for storage of gensets Source: sudhirpower.com/Show_Diesel_Gensets.aspx Figure 5.12 : Plan and Elevation of one genset Source: http://www.sudhirpower.com 106

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Solar Panels and PV Cells:

Fire Safety Requirements:

Permissible Ground Coverage- 35% Total Roof Area = Ground Coverage

Building type- E2 (As per NBC, Part 4) Building Height- 28 m

= 7,800 sqm.

Overhangs and canopies with solar panels (10%) extra = 780- sqm Total Area with panels= 8580 sqm As per thumb rules: 10 sqm has capacity of 1 kW So maximum capacity of panels possible on top = 8580/10 = 858 kW

Underground Fire water tank Capacity- 1,00,000 l

Overhead Fire Water tank Capacity- 20,000 l

= 100kl = 20 kl

Ground Pump Room: Total- 4 pumps 2 electric and one diesel pump of capacity 2 280 l/min and one electric pump of capacity 180 l/min

Energy produced in an year (@ 6 hrs sun for 300 days) = 300 * 6 * 858 = 15 ,44,400 units ~ 10% of total electric requirement

Table 12 : Calculations of the size of exits via rap, stairs and door Source: National Building Code

Other Calculations: Minimum width of Site Entry Gate- 4.5 m Maximum travel distance for fire escape- 30m Refuge Area at 24m height (@0.3m per person) = 75 sqm Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Water Requirements: 45 lit/ person for Research Center 135 lit/ person for Residential Facility 15 lit/ person for Assembly (Auditorium, Exhibition halls) Capacity of Research Facility- 1,750 pax. Area of Residential Facility- 200 pax. Capacity of Auditorium and Exhb.- 400+200 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 600 pax. Volume Required: Research facility- 45* 1750 = 78,750 lit. Accommodation- 135* 200 = 27,000 lit. Assembly functions-15* 600 = 9,000 lit. Total Water Capacity -1,14,750 lit. -115kl Total volume required â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 115.0 cu.m Typical size of tank- 6.0 m * 6.4 m * 3.0 m Incorporating Water Recycling System: Capacity of Recycled water tank = 1/3 of total requirement = 40 cu. m Use of pneumatic pumps, so Overhead tanks: Fresh Water: 20,000 L (40 cu.m) Recycled water : 20,000 L (20 cu.m) 108

Figure 5.15: Integrated water flow diagram for the whole building with calculated capacity of each tank Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


Sewage Treatment Plant:

Rain Water Calculations:

Total water requirement- 115 kl

Total Roof size = Ground Coverage: =35% of 22,500 =7875 sqm

From thumb rules: Water used for flushing purpose- 70% Water used for domestic purpose-30% Water for flushing= 80kl Gray Water= 35 kl Size of STP= 75% of domestic usage and 100% flushing usage = ( 0.75 * 35 ) + 80 = 26.25 + 80 = 106.25 kl So , STP

to be designed for 110 klD (kilo litre Demand)

The sewage generated during the operation phase will be treated up to the tertiary level in Sewage Treatment Plants (STP) The entire (100%) treated sewage from STP of 115KLD capacity will be reused for toilet flushing, car washing and landscaping in the project site.

Average rainfall- 800mm Total water volume available for catchment= 0.8 * 7875 = 6,300 cu.m

Catchment efficiency (@ 80%) Total collectable water = 80% of 6300 = 5,040 cu.m This water is enough for 45 days usage Divided over a span of 4 months Capacity of storage tank for 2 days peak rainfall:

= 180 cu.m

Source- http://mepbox.com

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Translation in Design : Structures:

Fire Safety:

Based on span and structural considerations, RCC framed structure has been used in project. Necessary expansion joints have been given at relevant places where-even the building gets too long. In order to maintain the overall beam depth, cellular steel beams have been used in place of RCC beams when the span increases more than 12m.

As per NBC norms, the building falls in E-2 category of fire safety. Necessary provisions has been provided in terms of fire tanks and fire escape staircases. The following diagram shows the location of fire staircases and minimum escape radii from that.

Figure 5.16 : Structural System Source: Author

Figure 5.17 : Location of Fire Staircases Source: Author

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Service Integration: Service cores has been provided uniformly through the building and typically consits of a fire staircase, toilets, electric room and VRV balcony.v

Ground Floor- Service penetration within the building is through the shorter side away from the primary circulation areas.

Basement:

Figure 5.18 : Typical Core Details Source: Author

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Along with car and 2-wheeler parking, a number of service areas are provided in the basement like- Rainwater tank, fresh water tank, fire tank, Garbage disposal, electric room, Driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room, VRV control room, etc.

Figure 5.19 : Services in Site Plan and Basement Source: Author

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HVAC System- VRV: Based on the varied occupancy and different temperature requirement in different areas, VRV system was chosen over Water-cooled and air-cooled system. Another big advantage is that , their is no need of taking ducts all around as an insulated pipe carries the coolant from the outdoor unit to the indoor unit. This reduces the floor height to a great extent. No AHUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s are required, although an open area to be provided to house the outdoor units. The indoor units comes with sensors and throw air based on the location and quantity of occupants, thus reducing the loads & saving energy. Though costlier, the other benefits offered by the system justifies it.

Ducting System vs. VRV system (Floor Depth)

Typical section through ducted system

Typical section through VRV system

VRV indoor units

Figure 5.20 : Typical VRV layout in the building Source: Author 112

Instead of a ducting system, a coolant based system will be used. This will reduce the clear height needed to 150mm, increasing effecieny drastically all across the building. Figure 5.21 : Schematic floor section through ducts Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


Skin Design: In order to counter each face in a unique manner while maintaining a common typology, a modular facade is proposed. The structure creates rhombus shape voids, and is flexible enough to contain a variety of modules. This adaptive facade adds to the energy performance as well as aesthetics of the building.

Rhombus module to break monotony.

Modular Approach

Final facade- Interplay of a variety of modules Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Conceptual assembly detail of Metal frame

Figure 5.22-5.24 : Facade modules and details Source: Author 113


Design Directives : Chapter readings reveal that the building is service intensive. It requires a fairly large amount of service area distributed among various floors. The service requirements should be merged with sustainability concepts in order to reach an integrated solution. Linear blocks could be possible with shorter sides facing towards East and West, Services can be put in these sides as their light are limited, Hence blocking the East and West from usable spaces. The work spaces can have large openings towards North and South allowing light in but blocking direct sun.

N Figure 5.25 : Design Drivers from Technology Source: Author 114

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Chapter -6.0

Determinants & Directives â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simplerâ&#x20AC;? - Albert Einstein

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SWOT Analysis:

Strengths •

NSIT campus within which the site is located is comparatively low density as compared to the rest of the surroundings; hence, there will be enough greens around the site. Proximity to academic institution will accelerate students’ employment employments, internships and partnerships Will become the knowledge hub of the city where diverse mind can meet and interact

Lack of awareness among people about the potential of such ventures

External pressure of generating enough revenues and making the whole facility economically positive

Large built up area due to high FAR resulting in compromised and insufficient open interactive areas. The plot was currently had a grass cover, the project will reduce the effective green space in the campus

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Opportunities

Weakness •

Developing the center as a coherent part of the campus, yet making it independently accessible from outside will be a huge challenge

New development can strengthen the Research and innovation potential of the region to a great extent.

Lack of such facilities around the country, hence the project can set an example which could be followed all around

Creating an interactive and collaborative environment yet maintaining individual’s privacy and data security.

Threats •

Project will fail if it is not able to produce a symbiotic relationship between all its stakeholders.

Because of considerably high commutation time for daily travel from Noida and Gurgaon & absence of proper public transport network, the project might not attract as much companies as expected.

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Design Directives: Based on the research, analysis and inferences made in all the previous chapters and merging that with SWOT analysis, the following design directives were derived upon. They will serve as the starting point for developing concept and design process. A number of parameters like functional adjacencies, Site edge condition, spatial quality required, existing structure of institution, etc. were overlapped one over the other to derive at these cumulative points

Zoning Parameters: • • •

Response to central drop-off of admin block Interaction with functions of the institute and edge condition Creating a centrally charged street

Figure 6.1 : Final Zoning Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Movement System Parameters: • • •

Considering the existing pedestrian movement through site No vehicular traffic on central vista Keeping vehicular roads minimum and along the site periphery

Figure 6.2 : Movement System Source: Author 118

N SPA, New Delhi


Chapter -7.0

Design Concept The chapter consists of all the concepts and strategies which were incorporated in the design. The big idea and the approach taken towards the final design.

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7.1 Different Organs- One Organism Hierarchy of interaction spaces

Paradox

Spaces of different scales and characteristics to be provided in order to cater to the requirements of different individuals. Also a variety in spaces will help in generating different ideas and following different thought processes.

Different people have different ways of working hence they require different spatial setting, thus the bigger aim is to create an environment where all these diverse spaces are coming together

Figure 7.1 : Concept Diagrams; Source: Author 120

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7.2 Streets and Hotspots: The approach of active streets within the built environment to be taken, these streets to be accomnied with high interaction zones (or hotspots) in between to didrupt the flow. The steet should also respond to the open green. All the interactive and

collective areas were located directly on the streets with visual connect with central green. The secured and restricted areas to be placed behind the active zones and with a weak connectivity with street.

Street with Hotspots

Active Charged Zone

Secured Areas

Primary open streets to be provided in the buildings with hotspots at regular interval to avoid monotony.

Interactive ares like play rooms, informal meeting areas to be placed along the main street to increase chance encounters and increased probability of collaboration

Secured and restricted areas to be placed behind the main charged areas with a confined entry .

Figure 7.2 : Concept Diagrams; Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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7.3 Site Level Strategies: In order to create an unified ecosystem, a number of strategies were devised and incorporated at site as well as building level. Concepts at both these levels are complementing each other so as to work together in a harmony.

Diverse character and scale of open spaces

Service Integration

Taking in services from East or West faces

Figure 7.3- 7.8 : Site Level Strategies ; Source: Author 122

Creating a central charged active street

Penetration of greens in the built spaces

Dynamic Open-Built Relation

Operable and changeable facade

No rigid boundary between built and unbuilt

Keep the image of building dynamic

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7.4 Building Level Strategies:

Interconnected Terraces

Green and active terraces to be provided which should be connected with one another

Thin Blocks

Light penetration though out the floor plate

Open Inviting Corridors

Singly loaded corridors directly opening towards green spaces to be provided

Streets and Hot Spots

Active streets are created on upper levels with interaction hot spots in between

Unified Blocking

Rather than separating all the functions into differernt blocks, a collective approach was taken

Modular Spatial Approach

Rentable spaces to be modularly planned so that they can be hired as per clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s requirements

Figure 7.9- 7.14 : Building Level Strategies ; Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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7.5 Zoning and Functional Distribution: Based on the axes created and adjacencies with the surroundings, conceptual zoning was derived. The primary axis through the site is dividing it into a semi public and a secured zone. Also various functions to be intermixed in order to create a vibrant functional distribution throughout the building.

Horizontal Zoning

Figure 7.15- 7.16 : Zoning (Horizontal & Vertical) Source: Author 124

N

Vertical Zoning

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Chapter -8.0

Design Development The chapter will showcase the journey of design from concepts to final products. All the approches taken, how the design evolution took place and what all were the steps in between.

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Approach-A

Design Stage - 1 Form Exploration

Figure 8.1 : Schematic Site Plan- A Source: Author

N

At this stage, two totally different approaches were taken to respond to the same problem. The buildings were at massing level only without much consideration given to the functionality.

Figure 8.2 : Schematic Building Plan Source: Author

Strengths: • • •

Multiple open spaces which can have distinct characters Direct connection between center and NSIT campus Narrow floor plates ensuring complete natural light penetration

Drawbacks: • • •

No private green open space Entry to the center is not welcoming Difficult to maintain security and people’s access

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Figure 8.3 : Schematic Section Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


Figure 8.5 : Scheme Building Plan - B Source: Author

N

Approach-B

Figure 8.4 : Scheme visualisation- B Source: Author

Strengths: • • •

Creating an interactive microclimate within the center The internal and external surfaces can have totally distinct characteristics Easier to ensure the security in center and control flow of people

Drawbacks: • • • •

One large open space restricts the possibility of smaller private greens Difficult to put in functions with distinct spatial characteristics in a singular mass Building is inward looking and is not interacting with the NSIT campus Residual open space between the building’s external edge and site boundary is not defined

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

Figure 8.6 : Scheme Section - B Source: Author

Inference:

Carefully analysing the characteristics of each approach and the project expectations, Approach-1 was considered to be evolved further. Although the built mass in approach-2 was creating a magnificent microclimate, major issue with it was non interaction with the NSIT campus which is a primary design consideration. 127


Design Stage - 2

Site Massing and form visualisation Strengths: • • •

Clear demarcation between pubic facilities and research area Multiple open spaces formed which can have distinct character Formation of a strong axis leading to the college admin block

Merging with Greens

Figure 8.7 : Stage 2- Site Plan Source: Author 128

Drawbacks: • • • •

Overall form of the massing is very rigid Vehicular entry plaza is very crammed Housing facility will have its distinct character, which were not considered Variation is scale of open spaces is not significant

Primary Pedestrin Entry

P 8.1 : Stage 2- Massing and Form Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


Design Stage - 3

Integrating functions and services Strengths: • • •

Massing adjusted in a way such that most of the built mass will receive South sun Auditorium placed in a way such that its activity will not cause disturbance in rest of the campus Separate private area designated for residential facilities

Drawbacks:

Figure 8.8 : Stage 3- Site Plan Source: Author

P 8.2 : Stage 3- Massing model Source: Author

Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

• • •

Extremely large central open green without any particular definition Poor visibility of block from central vista due to slope in building form In absence of any shading, open spaces will become unusable in harsh sun of Delhi

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Design Stage - 4

Defining open spaces Strengths: • • •

Multiple open spaces which can have distinct characters Massing adjusted in a way such that a large area of open space gets mutually shaded by built mass Narrow floor plates ensuring complete natural light penetration

Figure 8.9 : Stage 4- Site Plan Source: Author 130

Drawbacks: • • •

No private green open space Entry to the center is not welcoming Difficult to maintain security and peopl

P 8.3 : Stage 2- Building model Source: Author SPA, New Delhi


Final Form Evolution: Diagrams below gives a schematic representation of the entire process of achieving the final massing and overall form of the building. Creating a symbiotic relation between the built and open.

Figure 8.10 : Form Evolution Source: Author Thesis 2017: CoLab: Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center, New Delhi

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Chapter -9.0

Design Outcomes The chapter presents the final design in the form of drawings and illustrations which came up after considering all the factors which were discussed earlier.

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Site Plan

0

10m 20m

40m

40

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Figures Achieved: Total Site Area- 22,400 sqm Total Built-Up area- 33,200 sqm FAR achieved- 1.48 Ground Coverage- 7,900 sqm (35%) Total Parking - 520 ECS

Site Section 134

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Ground Floor Plan

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First Floor Plan

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Second Floor Plan

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Building Sections:

Schematic Section

Key Plan

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Third Floor Plan

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Fourth Floor Plan

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Fifth Floor Plan

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Sixth Floor Plan

Seventh Floor Plan

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First Basement Plan

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Building Elevations:

A C

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Elevation- B

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Active Hotspots:

Primary Active Zone Secondary Active Zone Tertiary Active Zone

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3D Visualisation:

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3D Visualisation:

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3D Visualisation:

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Model Photographs: Context Model (1:1000)

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Detail Model (1:200)

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Jury Comments and discussion: Jury members commended the overall program of the project and was satisfied the way it was being treated.

One of the jury member seemed skeptical about bringing in regular college students within the campus on a usual basis. But on explaining one of the primary objective behind the whole set up to enhance the industry-academia partnership, the jury seemed convinced enough.

They appreciated the selection of case studies and their relevance to the topic but suggested that it would have been better if the selected projects were one which could be physically visited and experienced, but it was not possible because of absence of projects of similar nature in the region.

They accepted the idea of an operable facade with multiple options. Although, the use of corten steel in facade jaali was questioned as it will make the panel heavy and decrease the flexibility in changing it. The response was accepted. In the end, jury complimented the overall scheme as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a very nicely executedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; scheme.

It was suggested that more activities could be put in ground floor to make it more active. But the planning was done in a way to distribute active zones in the form of hotspots within the entire campus rather than concentrating all the activities within a single space. The argument was accepted by the jurors. Response given to the existing context and design reflecting harmony within the campus was well acknowledged by the jury members. Recognising and developing the existing movement pattern through the site was also welcomed by the jury members.

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Bibliography:

Ananth, P. M., 2011. IITM Research Park Report. London, s.n. Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion, 2016. Start up India Report, New Delhi: Ministry of Commerce and Industry. Dept. of Veterans Affairs, 1995. Research Lab Design Guideline, New York: Dept. of Veterans Affairs. IBEF, 2017. Innovation and Patents, New Delhi: India Brand Equity Foundation. IIT Bombay, 2017. What do we offer. [Online] Available at: http://www.respark.iitb.ac.in/#!/home [Accessed 22 Feb 2017]. IIT Madras, 2017. Celebrating Research. [Online] Available at: http://respark.iitm.ac.in/celebrating_research.php [Accessed 22 February 2017]. IPD, 2007. Efficiency Standards for Offices, London: Office of Governmant Commerce. Mayank, 2016. Architecture Live. [Online] Available at: http://www.posts.architecturelive.in/campus-for-agilent-technologies-manesar-gurgaon-haryana-sanjay-prakash-shift/ [Accessed 3 Feb 2017]. 154

Meachem, J., 2009. GOOGLEPLEX: A NEW CAMPUS COMMUNITY. [Online] Available at: http://www.clivewilkinson.com/pdfs/CWACaseStudy_GoogleplexANewCampusCommunity.pdf [Accessed 6 February 2017]. MIT , 2017. About the building. [Online] Available at: https://www.media.mit.edu/about/about-the-building/ [Accessed 27 January 2017]. Nationl Commitee of Sciences, 2008. Understanding Research, Science and Technology Parks. Washington, National Academics Press. Poopong, K., 2011. [Online] Available at: http://housevariety.blogspot.in/2011/01/mit-media-lab-by-makiand-associates.html#.WTFSx2iGPIV [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. Prakash, S., 2016. Shift associates. [Online] Available at: http://shift.org.in/ [Accessed 30 January 2017]. Steel Case, 2013. How Workspace Design Fosters Innovation. [Online] Available at: https://www.steelcase.com/research/articles/how-place-fosters-innovation/?utm_source=Direct [Accessed 14 Feb 2017].

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SteelConstruction.info, n.d. Composite Construction. [Online] Available at: http://www.steelconstruction.info/Composite_construction#Types_of_composite_beam [Accessed 2 March 2017]. Schrage, M., quoted by Colby, S., in http:// colbys.blogspot.com/ 2004/ 11/ invention-­‐or-­‐innovation.html Stewart, T.A., “The Wealth of Knowledge”, Currency Doubleway, New York 2001. Introduction, Research  Park  in  the  21st  Century,  Report  of  Symposium  “Understanding Research, Science and Technology Parks : Global Best Practices”, National Academies Press, Washington, DC, 2001. Association  of  University  Research  Parks  (AURP)  website  accessed  on  11th  July,  2008 [www.au1p.net/about/whatis.cfm] Verma, P., 2015. For MNC’s, India remain RnD hub. The Economic Times, 9 June.

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And Thus, Thesis ended.

Co Lab- Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center  

'Old tools can't be used to solve new problems' Design Thesis for designing a workplace for the emerging idea-based economy.

Co Lab- Research Park and Entrepreneurship Center  

'Old tools can't be used to solve new problems' Design Thesis for designing a workplace for the emerging idea-based economy.

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