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ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO AIR ABPL30048

AYKIZ ZEHRA GOKMEN 539948 – TURORIAL 5


Contents Introduction

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Case for Innovation

A1 Architectural Discourse 5 A2 Computational Architecture 10 A3 Parametric Modelling 14 A4 Algorithmic Exploration 17 A5 Conclusion 18 A6 Learning Outcomes 19

Design Approach

B1 Design Focus 21 B2 Case Study 1.0 24 B3 Case Study 2.0 25 B4 Technique: Development 26 B5 Technique: Protoype 28 B6 Technique Proposal 29

B7 Algorithmic Sketches 30 B8 Learning Objectives and Outcomes 31

Project Proposal

C1 Design Concept 33 C2 Tectonic Elements 34 C3 Final Model 36 C4 Algorithmic Sketches 50 C5 Learning Objectives and Outcomes 54

References

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Introduction Ayk覺z G繹kmen As a third year University of Melbourne student, majoring in Architecture I currently have an interest in Modernism, the concept of honest architecture, and how spaces can induce a certain feeling to accommodate a user. With a background and interest in hand crafts, my approach and thoughts about architecture relate to a personalisation of spaces, for example the difference between a house and a home. In first year I completed Virtual Environments and produced the model below, but in undertaking Design Studio Air, I find myself needing to understand new architecture in the context of new technology and what it has to offer for the new age, which will be explored in this project.s

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A1 Architecture as Discourse Architectural Discourse reflects the discussions that relate to building programs, their concept, design, resulting outcome and the approach to these things. It is always changing and can be seen reltive to something new that emerges in architecture. This new thing may be different to what is produced at the time, and thus it is a new way of thinking which causes a conversation to occur to discuss this new outcome. It is not a new concept, but can be noted that it is sparked by innovation. It is significant to look at past projects that are known and familiar to understand that there is a reason why why these projects are still known today and it is a result of them being published and talked about.Discussed A1 Architecture as Discourse, looks to Modern architecture to present why these buildings that we know today are still relative and important in the realm of architecture. It is because they created a new path of designing architecture that departed from what was happening at the time. These examples are Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and Alvar Aalto’s Maison Louis CarrÊ, By looking at projects that

are familiar we can understand the importance of looking to architectural discourse to understand what is happening in the course of architecture. These buildings are known for a reason, they changed the course of architectural design by presenting a new ethos, setting it apart from the known and obvious which is something to keep in mine when considering the current interest of architectural design: Parametric Modelling. It is not something to fear because it is different, but rather something to understand, investigate, and explore. It is only by doing this that we can delve into this new possibility in architectural design, to understand its potential in what it can offer us with the development of technology. It is a new way of thinking, and a new way of approaching architecture in the design process that presents outcomes of design and form that we may not consider achievable because of the continued use of two dimensional documentation extensively used by architecture firms throughout. It is important to understand the possibilities presented through change.


CASE FOR INNOVATION

A1

ARCHITECTURE AS A DISCOURSE

Looking to past, familiar projects provides an understanding of architecture in the present by understanding a conceptual approach and ethos of the architect and how they thought differently. Fallingwater was to address the needs of the Kaufmann family, in allowing them to live in their mountatin and country estate where they often retreated.1 Why this would have been considered, as it was suprising also for the Kaufmann family, is that the house was designed to be built on the waterfall, rather than be built to view the waterfall. This difference in perspective and viewing the land would have sparked a surprise at the time after it was built. This contributes to a new approach to design or thinking about architecture, in that the house not only becomes designed upon the existing land but that it appears like an ascension from its existing environment. A different approach to building on a property like that of this house, rejected an idea that a property with a view ought to have a house built to see it, instead here it is incorporated into the living space, and a part of everyday life. This further demonstrates an idea that the house should reflect the inhabitants, and serve them to support their daily activities and interests. For the Kaufmann’s, it was the hiking and countryside retreating, camping in Bear Run and their love for

the river that drove Wright to have the river run through their lives within the house.2 The house being a part of the Modernist movement, declares in itself the interest in a new way of designing for the purpose and necesities of the building and its users. Because of this, many other Modernist examples relate to Fallingwater in the cautious design decisions in plan, site awareness and the user. The cantilevered members appear to float although are different aesthetically, are a reminder of the Farnsworth House by Mies van der Rohe in its floating appearance, pulled up from the ground. Its significance in resulting in a new design approach and thinking provides a basis for learning. Still today it is a house that is looked to for inspiration, which aid in formulating one’s own place in architectural design or discourse, or even as a home owner in what they would like. Wright’s Fallingwater is not the only project to have been designed with the furniture and furnishings inherent to its external design in mind, however during this movement towards Modernism it would have been different to the conception of architecture only being about the the exterior. That it is also about the interior, just as the exterior forms an extension from the site, the interior is an extension of the lives of the inhabitants.

1.1 Fallingwater, Bear Run, Pennsylvania, Frank Lloyd Wright

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1.2 Fallingwater Site Plan

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CASE FOR INNOVATION

A1

ARCHITECTURE AS A DISCOURSE

Maison Carré is significantly different in appearance from Wright’s Fallingwater, however the thought and design approach to the built form contributes to the lives of the inhabitants, and further, the idea of architecture contributing to discussion. Maison Carré was built for an art collector in France, and the importance of designing for the user comes through in this project just as much as it does in Fallingwater. It is interesting that the art collector, Louis Carré had looked for an architect that would suit him and what he wanted.1 This is important to note in architectural design with purpose, it is an example of its everlasting specialty and delicacy to the matter of being customised for the user and is presented through the fact that the house was not sold to any buyer with the money, but to someone who was interested in maintaing the house as it is.2

focusing on shaping or tailoring a house for the user. The entire house in its form, exterior, interior, lighting, furnishings, furniture were designing by Aalto. This can be seen in the foyer and entrance of the house where fitouts are designed to hold and display artwork—it is designed for Louis Carré and how he would want to use the spaces of his home to support his interest and passion in life. This makes it even more valuable for those living in the house, but it is still something that would be found valuable today in the consciensious design decisions in tailoring for the user. It makes them valuable still today, to remember and understand an example of architecture that considered critically how the the spaces inside would be used.

1.3 Maison Louis Carré, Bazoches-sur-Guyonne, France, Alvar Aalto

1.4 Maison Louis Carré, Entrance and Foyer

It is currently maintained in its near original condition, but is available for renting for film, photoshoots, possibly for accommodation, but also used for seminars about architecture, which provides a sense of knowing th specialty of the house. This contributes to a way of thinking about architecture by allowing a thoughtful process

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1.5 Maison Louis CarrĂŠ Site Plan

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A2 Computational Architecture

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Design through Computation Efficiency Productiveness Management of project in drawings / modelling Automation in what can and can’t be applied Human in Computation Input programmed to allow the design idea Critical analysis in the input Selecting a solution to suit the concept

The use of computers in architectural design, alters the design process from that of traditional drawing or computer-aided design. Computing in design, in the beginning of a project allows efficiency and effectiveness through the collection of information and data from the very beginnind of the process. It allows the ongoing prediction of errors through the programming or coding applied, rather than the identification of potential problems with project later in the design. Computing allows more flexibility by developing a project from the beginning, through the ongoing changes that can be made. Kalay suggests that computational design offers a solution space, it provides solutions to the design that has been created up until that stage in the prcess in the program, furthermore, this allows the analysis of the designed input to produce a number of approppriate solutions to be applied to the design, particularly in the case of a problem. While computation may allow difficult to produce forms such as curved forms in the built environment and a way of structuring these forms automatically, the human embodies the sympathy

necessary in the design to achieve a harmonious relationship between the concept and function, where a computer will not be able to identify the most appropriate arrangements for experiential qualities and feeling, from the most efficient. Despite the potential offered by computers, these are recognised and unleashed by the human input to produce what is appropriate, it is where computers are restricted to algorithms and cannot determine feeling.

2.1 Columns, Michael Hansmeyer (previous page)

It can be overwelming to be faced with something new, however it is like a new constructional method that has newly emerged in the present and is still being explored, for example the exploration of the cantilever in buildings such as Fallingwater or Farnsworth House. However it is not a new method of construction, but a method of design that is to be explored. The cantilevered structure was the new technology of then, just as much as computational architecture, or specifically parametric modelling is the new method of design in the now. It needs to be explored, it is new, but its potential must be understood. We can move on from two dimensional planes and explore three dimensionality.

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CASE FOR INNOVATION

A2

COMPUTATIONAL ARCHITECTURE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7V5cLCjKpJM

Currently being used by most architecture firms, AutoCAD has been noted to be exhaustive because it doesn’t offer efficiency or effectiveness that is expected from software. However Rice Daubney is an architecture firm that uses ArchiCAD, where Darren Tims discusses why they have moved on from AutoCAD. ArchiCAD allows reduced risk in documentation and thus increases profitability as poor documentation time costly caused by tedious tasks by the architect at the computer. ArchiCAD calls for design decisions to be made earlier in the process which results in an overall better design, due to the depth of detail that is included from the beginning. It creates a model that displays the construction drawings and representation drawings, without having to use multiples files for the one design. But this requires coordination, collaboration and staff attention. It provides a further knowledge of construction; when a model is pulled apart, it shows the construction details like the studs in a wall, ultimately offering an understanding of what happens in the construction process and what the design requires builders to do. Overall, BIM allows productivity, particularly when changes are made to the model, it applies it to the construction drawing and thus reduces time and error from drawing or redrawing building plans, sections, elevations after revisions or ammendments.

“lines don’t have intelligence in them”

- Darren Tims 6

The three dimensional models in ArchiCAD can be cut horizontally for a plan, which are automated from the model. The human input into the documentation drawings then become the annotations of details rather than redrawing the model multiple times. When the model is changed, the software updates the drawings for documentations. BIM has the ability to automate scheduling in documentation: tags will update after changes are made to the model, and this removes the human input in these processes that are time consuming and may cause errors made by tedious tasks and lack of attention.

2.2 Coca Cola Place, Sydney, Rice Daubney

It is important to note that coordination in collaborating with consultants, particularly in those with an interest in moving towards the use of BIM is important as it is still new it requires patience for understanding the new format for modelling. Darren Tims identifies that there is room for improvement as it is a new movement in architecture to be using BIM models. Now that the need to move on from AutoCAD has been discussed with the potential of ArchiCAD to increase productivity, it can be seen that a move forward is necessary for good design. However now it is significant to discuss how we can move even further by using parametric modelling and discovering that its potential in design allows a move away from conventional building design and on to something different.

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As discussed earlier, two dimensional documentation of architecture has been in use for years, in fact centuries.5 First through hand drawing, AutoCAD for the past few decades, and now there is the emergence of advanced software that allows a designer to act as a programmer through data and algorithm input and exploration. A new method and approach to design has emerged through the further advancement of technology, and it is emerging now in architecture. It is new, innovative and inventive. Never seen before, it takes from something already existing but it is not a copy of its source. Michael Hansmeyer’s column exploration project shows how technology available to us now is advantageous in creating something different. It is a method that forms what is generative design and occurs through the input of algorithms or scripting, which produces a model and when tweaked or manipulated, produces its variants and forms.

the brink of something new and something worth exploring.

2.3 Columns, Michael Hansmeyer

Hansmeyer’s use of algorithms, the generation of three dimensional forms as above has been made possible to build with the development of 3D printers. Not only can these be designed, but they can be produced. A physical presence of what has been created. Hansmeyer’s use of technology extensively explores the potential of what can be created in the present. It is evident that we are not limited to find the new amongst what has already been done, but have an open space, a new realm, to explore through the use of parametric modelling Hansmeyer’s project is an example of inspiration that may drive designers to use and explore the realm of computation in architecture, and see the potential it presents in current architectural discourse and design.

It may appear surreal, unprecedented, wonderous and out of this world. It puts us as designers at

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A3 Parametric Modelling A contemporary method of computational architecture, it allows the creation and representation of forms or objects, that is created within parameters and defined constraints. It can involve the inclusion of scripting from the representation of the design during the process, or at the beginning of the design process, where the form evolves from input. Because parametric modelling ihas been newly introduced in architectural education and is still yet to be used extensively by architecture firms, it means that there is much to be learnt and understood in terms of the the available techniques and tools, as well as the potential limits that programming makes available. However, computational architectural, and more specificically parametric modelling in the use of algorithms is still very new at this stage in architecture and it is not understood completely. The software itself requires a grasp on the concept of parametric modelling as well as the tools and techniques it offers. Being at such an early stage of its presence in architecture means

it still needs to be explored in depth, it is only the introduction and the beginning of understanding what it is capable of. Small projects such as Aranda Lasch’s algorithmic explorations, and Michael Hansmeyer’s column explorations with algorithms are the beginnings of extending these experimentations into architecture. How these small experimentations can then be manipulated and transformed into building programs that support itself and the life within. Despite the shortcomings of uncertainties that exist due to the idea of parametric modelling and algorithms in architecture being new, it deters from the potential it offers by designers. A change in attitude towards this idea of parametric modelling in architecture is needed, from being something different to being something that can be done. And only then can we experience and create new architecture, or reinvent architecture. To present architecture that hasn’t been seen before, to explore sculptural forms in architecture that coordinates with structural stability and serviceability. To reinvent how we experience spaces.

“When architects have a sufficient understanding of algorithmic concepts, when we no longer need to discuss the digital as something different, then computation can become a true method of design for architecture.” – Architecture Design 7


The use of parametric geometries here justifies its form and allocation of spaces in plan, but it also shows the result of the use of three dimensional software and programming which achieves a new approach to a building typology, that of a museum.8 One cannot deny having the thought of Frank Llyod Wright’s Guggenheim Museum in considering the resultant of a new approach to museum design and spiraling access surrounding a central atrium. However, in the context of parametric architecture, the constraints placed for the design of the building considering the location of particular displays and central opening has formed the model around these voids. The very aim was to develop a new museum, differentiating from the common and those that are of the now. The Mercedes Benz Museum is just an example of a built project that shows how parametric modelling influences the design of a built form. It is influential in identifying smooth forms, and appropriate materials. The technical details of the project become intrinsic such as structure, serviceability, become intrinsic

to the form created using parametric modelling. However it should be noted that the software itself does not allow this to happen automatically, but like the use of BIM for Coca Cola Place by Rice Daubney, the coordination with consultants is of import in the construction of such a project to ensure that the form is practical in terms of construction and ensurance that the functions within the building can be carried out.

3.1 Mercdes Benz Museum, UN Studio

3.2 Mercdes Benz Museum, concept of movement and spaces

“It was our ambition to create an environment in which contemplation would be stimulated – though not forcibly by presenting only a restricted field of view. We wanted to achieve an intense visual experience...”

– UN Studio 9

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CASE FOR INNOVATION

A3

PARAMETRIC MODELLING

Aranda Lasch is a firm that explores parametric modelling through algorithms extensively. Their small projects of what can be described as murals and walls with extruding surfaces and objects of geometry, are an example of the potential of parametric modelling and what it can offer us today in architecture and design. These projects can be related to the previously noted columns by Michael Hansmeyer, and how they are produced on a small scale and induce experiential spaces and objects. They seduce and entice through the potential of technology, and displaying objects that are imanigable with traditional drawing and representation methods. The fact that this work by Aranda Lasch is an installation at the Museum of Modern Architecture, in itself notes that the piece is not an architectural building or structure. However thhis is not to say that it is not a project of architectural exploration. The form created here uses the basic pyramid, exploded and extracted to produce the repeated forms, which is shown in the Algorithmic Exploration to the right. This allows us to see how these processes take place.

The exploration of repeated geometries growing from each other, extruding from the surface or the surface of another extrusion, or even imprinted into the wall surface, may be difficult to conceive in architecture. Particularly through imagination in the context of architecture as it is known comfortably today through hand drawing and two dimensional representation. However it is an exploration like such that can influence a design of a building program and thus take such forms for its end structure. It may appear as a sculptural art, but it may become a part of architectural interiors in a project. Or perhaps another concept or geometry may be taken in a similar effect to relate to a different building typology.

3.3 Rules of Six, Installation at MoMA, New York, United States, 2008. Aranda Lasch

Parametric modelling allows the execution of ideas that occur in the mind, it allows those far fetched ideas that would normally be difficult to produce, but could be managed by hand crafts through paper or clay, however it is in the technological realm, and there is a fabrication output that allows its production. It can be done, and it enables the growth of different ideas, an escape from what is already known.

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A4 Algorithmic Exploration

These algorithmic explorations are reflective of the work of Aranda Lasch, and just trying to recreate these forms, one’s imagination takes ideas further on how they maybe used as sculpture. How they can extrude from surface, subtract from them. They are yet to be taken even further but one may wonder how this kind of form may be applied to curved surfaces, or be explored further to take such forms from conflicting forms. As mentioned, it is still new and must be understood completely to take advantage of what the tools in Rhino and Grasshopper offers for a sculptural project.

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A5 Conclusion

What Parametric Modelling and design have to offer in architectural design. It offers the ability to explore extents and limits of what is given to produce something different, new and unexpected. This unexpected creation is the innovation that can offer the client a desirable solution given the circumstances of the brief, location and the available capacity of technology and parametric modelling. Computers open up the many possibilities to transform inputs to numerous outputs, it is through the currently available new technology that new designs can be created. So why not use the new technology that is available to us today?

Using paramteric modelling and scripting software for a design project will allow the many possibilities in the outcome for the brief. It would provide something new, something different as the techniques used, although may be the same as others, guarantees a varied result due to its differing inputs and process. Importantly, it would allow a design that speaks to the now and the future in architectural style, change, and discourse. This is an important point to make: If the use of existing available software that allows two dimensional documentation as a computerisation process, the imagination is limited and restricts it to what has been done before. If computation in parametric modelling context is considered in the process, it allows the imagination to go beyond the conceivable, what has already been done before. It allows the room for further exploration.

Create something new and unconceived Use the new available technology Exceed the imagination Exceed the present Design the future

5.1 Columns, Michael Hansmeyer

A new experience 18


A6 Learning Outcomes Parametric Modelling allows the conceiving of new designs that may not have been thought of or imagined possible without the use of software. Parametric modelling can be somewhat different and difficult to understand from being accustomed to traditional drawing, but as new technology develops in the new age it is significant to understand the new ways of completing tasks. Difficult at times to comprehend and it is dependent on the attitude towards this approach to design and technology. It’s easier to see the initial idea and then the output of an existing project, however it is still some what difficult to comprehend how what is fed into the software as data, transformed with inputs and varied process, amount to a rather crazy design. What it can create is new, different, and a move forward from the current two dimensionality, and its ability to recognise the constraints in a project is important. The idea of the algorithm resulting on a design is the difficult part to wrap one’s head around. But one can appreciate the thought and detail

that goes into the tedious manipulation. One can appreciate the automation of the tedious tasks where the designer presses buttons and inputs numbers, to have the programming alter the object, rather than have the designer redraw and move lines around, and have to redraw it for another view or perspective of the object. There has been a change in attitude since the beginning of the initial response to parametric modelling and architecture. What is at first somewhat cold and distant in comprehensibility is now appreciated and understood. It is still architecture, it has not changed but the method of which it is constructed has altered. The process can now take place using software and the design development is not formed from a drawn sketch design to a two dimension line drawing, but the sketch design can evolve from the three dimensional model through techniques that manipulate the design further for exploration in what is achievable. It is the how that will now be explored and consiered in the Expression of Interest phase of this project.

A past project, ‘Bodyspace’, completed in Virtual Environments could have taken a more developed form considering what has been learnt from architectural discourse as well as the further development of software, by looking at the project in the context of an urban environment by allowing an increased number of constraints, rather than just a sculptural exploration held in the air. There is still a long way of exploring parametric modelling and algorithms. This projects will be a journey through this exploration in the Expression of Interest phase.

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Expression of Interest Design Approach


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B1 Argument for Innovation: Sectioning Sectioning as a technique in parametric design and architecture offers variability. It allows adaptability in design to be able to form lots of different results and outcomes that can be placed in a number of different contexts and circumstances. The characteristics of sectioning that is useful in design, and is the basis for the selection of this technique is: Adaptability, three dimension quality in its sculptural capabilities, and dynamism. The potential of sectioning is important in architectural design when considering its qualities and what it has to offer, as these features also relate to conditions which can enhance sectioning as a technique. This furthers its case for how it can be innovative. Sectioning can be manipulated

and combined with other tehcniques whether that is through the application of patterning, but it can also be related to the technique of structure, where the sections created can form a structural form in itself. But the conditions that enhance sectioning as a technique also includes environmental features, to improve is aesthetics nd experiential quality. These include the interplay between the sculpture and sunlight and shadow, topography and contouring, and movement. But it can also be taken out of the context of land and contouring, and instead be applied to a section of an object or structure that is interesting, to then break it down to the forms within it.

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DESIGN APPROACH

B1

ARGUMENT FOR INNOVATION: SECTIONING

A very obvious approach to the concept of sectioing, Zebar, a bar designed using parametric modelling presents an understanding of the simplest form of the technique, by allowing a starting point of imaginging the possibilities in using the ideas of contouring and sectioning.10 Though it is simple, as seen above, the spaces between each planar panel representing a contour has a space before the next plane which allows the installation of lighting for effects. It is also valuable to see that morphing the surface allows

the placement of other surfaces, which in this case is the black cushioning for seating. As seen below (Figure 6.2), the sections and contouring allows the possibility to create depth through shadows with the integration of light in the interior installation. It makes for an adaptable, flexible and potential for space making with the integration of other surface, objects, or effects, and could be manipulated to create interesting contrast in light and dark spaces, as well as variations in form.

6.1 Zebar, 3Gatti Architecture Studio.

6.2 Zebar, 3Gatti Architecture Studio.

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The interior fo the restaurant design is an example of how a section of an object may be taken and introduces the idea of iterweaving which is brought about by the coming together of two cultures in cuisine.11 Taking the design out of the hospitality context, it may be valuable to look at forms that may be created with this kind of approach, of abstracting the meaning of a concept, rather than to take a section directly from a tangible land like the ideas of contouring. However, this design scheme also

introduces similar concepts for effects in trying to produce an interesting design with the inclusion of lighting behind the curved panels, and the idea of shadow.

6.3 Ikibana Restaurant, El Equipo Creativo.

This scheme may prove introguing for its weaving qualities, and the flexible appearance of the structure allows thoughts and ideas of how this kind of concept may be applied in a sculptural manner, in producing a different object or abstraction.

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B2 Case Study 1.0 BanQ Office dA. 2008. The below explorations are based on the provided Rhino model and Grasshopper definitions to begin explorint the options and possibilties that parametric modelling allows.

original form from definition

number slider: increase

number slider: increase

vector: x = 5 y=0 u=3

vector: x = 0 y=5 u=3

vector: x = 5 y=3 u=3

curve vector: x = 5 y=3 u=3

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B3 Case Study 2.0 The Digital Weave University of California, Berkeley / Lisa Iwamoto. 2004. The project is based on a volume, where the technique of sectioning is applied to form a ribbed surface which ultimately allows the form to contract and expand into its final form. The form below was a reconstruction of the project using grasshopper to imitate its form, by identifying the techniques and inputs that produce it.

ating an overall built form using a surface in Rhino

surface

Generating an overall built form using a surface in Rhino

surface

diagrid

extrude

Surface (Rhino) |

diagrid

Diagrid | Extrude

extrude

Helicoid (Grasshopper) | Diagrid | Extrude

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B4 Technique Development 1

2

3

4

a

b

c

introduces concept of interlocking forms

d

e

intersecting planes for interesting perspectives and views

webbing idea, could transform further with weaving

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B4 Technique Development

a

b

6 7 8 Architectural Discourse reflects the discussions that relate to building programs, their concept, design, resulting outcome and the approach to these things. It is always changing and can be seen reltive to something new that emerges in architecture. This new thing may be different to what is produced at the time, and thus it is a new way of thinking which causes a conversation to occur to discuss this new outcome. It is not a new concept, but can be noted that it is sparked by innovation. It is significant to look at past projects that are known and familiar to understand that there is a reason why why these projects are still known today and it is a result of them being published and talked about.Discussed A1 Architecture as Discourse, looks to Modern architecture to present why these buildings that we know today are still relative and important in the realm of architecture. It is because they created a new path of designing architecture that departed from what was happening at the time. These examples are Frank extrusion and similar Alvar Aalto’s Lloyd Wright’sinterwoven Fallingwater, to Ikibana Restaurant Maison Louis CarrÊ, By looking at projects that

9 are familiar we can understand the importance of looking to architectural discourse to understand what is happening in the course of architecture. These buildings are known for a reason, they changed the course of architectural design by presenting a new ethos, setting it apart from the known and obvious which is something to keep in mine when considering the current interest of architectural design: Parametric Modelling. It is not something to fear because it is different, but rather something to understand, investigate, and explore. It is only by doing this that we can delve into this new possibility in architectural design, to understand its potential in what it can offer us with the development of technology. It is a new way of thinking, and a new way of approaching architecture in the design process that presents outcomes of design and form that we may not consider achievable because of the continued use of two dimensional documentation extensively used by architecture firms throughout. It is important to understand the possibilities presented through change.

c

unexpected result with curve reference

d

e

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B5 Technique: Prototypes The fabrication of prototypes based on the algorithmic sketches produced in Grasshopper has made it possible to evaluate material characteristics that would be suitable for the final design. Despite still being in an early stage in the process, and continuing to find forms, the fabrication process has also allowed the taking of components found from the algorithmic sketches, selecting what works, and then applying it with paper, card or string to find or transform it into something that may very well be built in reality. This also lead to the finding of ideas that were taken from the models, but departing from them also by taking what works, and applying it in a new way.

The FabLab was not utilised in this stage of the fabrication to allow for the exploration of ideas by hand, which correlates with the proposed concept of rediscovering the ideas of handcraft in a contemporary context. The fabrication method of model making by hand was beneficial in understanding the ways in which the conceptual ideas worked, and further, how they were manipulated to function in a similar manner, but differing with the integration of an evaluative process, of how it would perform and whether it was the desired effect.


B6 Technique Proposal Based on the fabricated prototypes, further refinement of the ideas and the models may take place in identifying what does and doesn’t work for them, and how they can be used to produce something else. The key features that have been found through exploration and the ideas in which are ideal to present in a sculptural piece include: depth, movement, lightness, variation, density and

perception. These features have been a part of the process through the exploration of the diagrid and the concept of weaving or knitting, which allows for a wealth of differing designs. The idea of knitting or weaving being the overarching characteristic of defining form for the final product, is in itself innovative in architecture for the return of a traditional handcraft in a contemporary context.

One of the main models proposed under the weaving idea, may contribute in that it is flexible, moves (site climatic conditions of wind), allows the integration of sun to create shadows, and there is there possibility to engage with the idea to take it further by introducing knitting techniques to produce complexity in form.

The main model under the exploration of the idea of depth, presents an opportunity for a flexible structure in that it can be adapted to the site, and is intriguing in the different views it offers from different perspectives. It also offers the postential of patterns created with shadows by the sun.

Another minor study under the weave, this model using thread using one point to begin with, travels within the constrains, determining the paths with selected points, ultimately interconnecting and passing through other parts of the thread. This is different to what has been explore, and is lightweight and delicate compared to the typical ideas founding sculptures.

This model based on the interlocking weave of the ‘stockinette’ and chain pattern, may be valuable to explore further on a larger scale to understand how it may operate. This idea in particular may be beneficial towards the brief as it will allow the understanding through exploring how it works, its connections, and how it may be developed or applied differently.


B7 Algorithmic Sketches The following are a selected collection of algorithmic sketches explored in Grasshopper that contribute to the proposal concept, as well as the aspects of the designs which may present ideas for the future refinement of the design. Below are also listed the reasons as to why they may influence and contribute to the sculptural form.

helicoid surface diamond grid u: 8 extrude f: 4 integer, division, surface morph rows & columns: 3

incorporates ideas of weaving and knitting with literal form of thread helicoid surface integer, division, rows & columns: 3 surface morph, join, rebuild curve diamond grid u: 5 extrude f: 2

adds depth to the concept of knitting as well as creating an interesting interlocking forms surface integer, division, rows & columns: 3 surface morph, join, rebuild curve diamond grid u: 3 extrude f: 3

interlocking notion of chains and knitting

surface integer, division, rows & columns: 3 surface morph, join, rebuild curve diamond grid u: 3 extrude f: 3

incoporation of interlocking and weaving in a wall-like system

surface diamond grid u: 4 v: x: 0 y: 7 z: 5

sculptural form with ocerlapping and weaving over

surface diamond grid u: 4 v: x: 0 y: 6 z: 5 curve extrude (lines)

consists of sculptural form, may contribute to sounds

surface diamond grid u: 4 v: x: 0 y: 7 z: 5 curve extrude (lines)

sculptural form of mulptiple curves and planes

surface diamond grid u: 4 v: x: 0 y: 7 z: 5 curve extrude (lines)

multiple curves interwaving

30


B8 Learning Objectives and Outcomes As discussed discussed earlier in A6: Learning Outcomes, the use of parametric modelling has made it possible to conceive different forms and models in the software, by providing thought and control into a new software that although has definitive possibilities, allows the exploration of forms and models that may not have been imagined by the human thought due to the habitual traditional methods of designing. Part B has allowed one to delve further into the realm of the software, and evaluate the outcomes against the criteria of the argument of the group, the personal choices based on aesthetics, as well as the brief and the need to strive for innovation. It has furthered the understanding and comfort of using parametric modelling to design structures and forms that can be transformed, manipulated and controlled to develop into a more desired aesthetic, as well as to understand the ways in which these forms created in the software can be fabricated either by hand, or by the aid of laser cutting machines. The most crucial part of being able to be design parametrically, is knowing that it is within our hands to create any number of different forms, those of which can then be further developed through an iterative process, to also produce forms that would not have been thought of or conceived with traditional methods of designing.

Feedback from the crit: The feedback with the panel was helpful and valuable to understand how architects would evaluate the work that had been done objectively. It was an opportunity to present the work and have what did and didn’t work identified by someone who isn’t involved and biased to the project. But most importantly, why these things did or didn’t work to think about where the project and group may be heading next with the design technique and ideas. The main comment based on the presentation was the need to push the idea of knitting or weaving further, to push boundaries and produce an unexpected outcome that would be intriguing, and eye catching. The panel was helpful in understanding how we could do this, and pointed in the direction of looking at real knitting patterns: various knitting patterns and templates, vernacular techniques and processes, as well as tradition. But further on from this, that the looking into defects in patterns, or knitting compositions with several materials would be beneficial in identifying where it may drive the team and designs next in working towards the final design.

31


Project Proposal Gateway Project


C1 Design Concept The Gateway Project is an installation signifying the the Wydnham community. With the need for the project to be eye-catching, intriguing, and producing a long-lasting impact within Wyndham as well as contribute to architectural discourse, this Gateway Project symbolises, and produces the growth of Wydnham. The installation consists of three parts, the structure, derived and created within the parametric realm of design, an interest in and return to handcrafts of weaving and knotting, as well as the consideration of the natural environment as an expression of the design. These three components have been integrated in a new way to create a structural and sculptural solution to freeway art, differing from its counterparts, in opening up the road to Wyndham. The primary driving force, the structure, was created using the digital software, Rhino and Grasshopper to find and create a solution for a gateway, taking inspiration from the tradition handcraft of weaving. The parametric software has allowed a process in design in which the design is explored and experimented with in this context, rather a form of representation. This has lead to an iterative process of finding a suitable outcome that reflects the needs of the Wyndham community, as well as the context of the site. The definition used in this design project has allowed for the reinterpretation of the weave, a digital weave, which has allowed for the incorporation of different weaving patterns. However it is also significant that what drove the starting points for this weave to form, was the ability to reference points and lines from the contours of the site at hand, which ultimately feeds and begins to weave Wyndham into the design from the very beginning. The interest in traditional handcrafts inspired ideas from weaving, knotting and knitting, all of an interlocking nature, identifying in the project, a notion of interconnectedness and further ideas

of weaving in the community. The sculptural component produced from a knotting technique, inspired by MacramÊ,12 contributes ideas to the installation that identify with a sense of community, tradition, intrigue, as the knotting technique embodies these characteristics — ultimately providing a familiar knotting technique into the sculptural body of the design that drivers, adults, children, all demographics can connect with by creating a relationship based on familiarlarity. Furthermore, this integration of weaving and knotting, allude to growth as the techniques and patterns within the realm of handcrafts, are based on patterns that begin at points, creating lines of points through which thread or yarn is woven or knotted through continuously. The ongoing application of weaving and knotting through these points and lines, mean that piece being created is always growing or can be added to. This is the idea that is intended for Wyndham an its community. The third component of the natural environment, is the inclusion of landscaping by planting greenery within the knotted materials on the woven structure. The plants embedded within the knotting as seedlings, creates a foundation for which the plants will grow in over time, weaving its roots through, and following, the knotted paths across the structure. This is the ultimate solution to the installation that allows for naturally growing plants to continue from the ideas of handcrafted growth. This is the future of Wyndham. The Gateway Project is an installation that characterises the future growth, and eventual strong foundations of a rich community. It is intriguing, eye-catching, and most importantly, creates an everlasting impression for its visitors — an architecture that is constantly evolving, not only differing in design from day to night, but from season to season as well as over the years of its lifetime. A truly new experience and identity for Wyndham.

Organic growth for everlasting impact Weaving in parametric realm Growing with community Constantly evolving Exceed the present

A new experience 33


C2 Tectonic Elements Based on general understanding of structural components, the composition used to hold the sculptural elements of the design up is a simple connection of structural steel and cables to allow the suspension of the steel cables in tension, as well as the further suspension of knotted material on the cables. In theory the design for structure is sufficient for the intended load being placed on it. The idea is based on steel H-Columns and beams to be jointed together. However the card used at the 1:100 scale, made holes into to allow the fishing line to go through causes the weakening of the card and ultimately to lead to bending. It is difficult at this scale to represent the design, while at the same trying to relate to the reality of construction on the site, and demonstrating the design at the correct scale.

C

A

line

series

B

divide

series series

item D item item item item item

The possible issues of the model considered was the span, and whether it would be sufficient to hold up the original design. It was considered that the spans were too long to be structurally stable to provde the rigidity intended and derived in the parametric software. Originally, files were prepared to produce digitally fabricated models using the Fab Lab, however due to the waiting list for sigital fabrication and the inability to use certain material thicknesses, it was decided to construct the final model by hand to be able to start on the model immediately. However in this process, advantages and disadvantages of both model-making by hand and digital fabrication was recognised, where digital fabrication was more suitable in the case of a design solely created in the digital realm, while the model-making by hand, compromised strength in materials.

C

D

line line

B

A

line line

General definition used in Grasshopper to create weaving patterns

Reference for lines A, B, C and D for below (how they appear in the final design) 2

2

1

1

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

A

D

A

B

B

C

2

2

0

0

Different weaving patterns lines: A - D, A - B, A - C, derived from the definition above in Grasshopper.

2

2

2

1

1

1

0

0

0

34


0

0

0

0

This diagram depicts the way in which the underlying structure, representing structural steel beams, and the steel cables, are used and connected to form a weave throughout the design. This particular example is the weaving pattern from lines A to B, seen on the previous page. This composition of top and bottom holes allowed for the weave to come back through the same beam, as well as to readjust the weave in tightening it.

This diagram depicts the way in which the cladding system of the knotting occurs over the structure presented above. The knotted material here uses the woven lines, used as the substructure, allows its use as a guide and starting point for the knotting material to be created by the robot. It can be used to knot along the weave, or around it, which later sets the foundation for the planting of greenery to allow the plants to grow, and eventually weaving through like the patterns of the knotting.

Knotting woven through steel weave, with greenery woven between.


C3 Final Model


xx xx

xx xx

Process of Construction for Final Model

x xx xxx xx xx xx

x xx xxx xx xx xx

xx xx

xx xx xx xx

xx xx

xx xx

xx xx

1

xx xxx xx x

Points for column placement x xx xxx xx

xx xx

xx xx

2

Weave: B - C

xx xx

xx xx

xx xx xx xx

5 x xx xxx xx

xx xx

xx xx

xx xxx xx x

Beams over columns creating lines A, B, C, D

3

Weave: A - D

4

Weave: A - B

6 All weaves complete + Making of knotted material

7

8

Weaving of knotted material through structure

Plantation of greenery within knotting

37


PROJECT PROPOSAL

C3

FINAL MODEL

1

1

Structure, based on ideas of steel construction, with the use of materials representing columns and beams, connected to create lines A, B, C and D. These 0 into them 0 ‘beams’, have holes punched 2 steel 2 for the fishing line, representing to allow cables, to go through and back out to produce the varying weaves from the definition as identified in C2 ‘Tectonic Elements’,

2

The overlaying of the knotted paper to form the primary growth pattern that would drive the last instalment of the installation, creating a path for the growth.

5

Tied knot

Below is a step by step diagram depicting the construction of the paper twists to create the knotted material, inspired by the simple knotting technique of Macrame.

2

6

0

0

0

Three thin strips of paper

1

1

1

1

1

Twist paper in one direction

3

Final twisted paper

Tie knot with two threads of paper

7

Use middle thread, already tied to outer thread (not tied yet)

4

Tie knot with three threads of paper

8 Use middle thread and tie knot with outer thread on left. Repeat

0 2

1

0


Planting of greenery over the weaving and knotting, beginning frlom the mound depicting an organic growth, as though occurring naturally, starting the first sprouts at the base, and sprouting in spots in the more dense areas of the installation.

Knotting woven through steel weave, with greenery woven between.

39


C4 Algorithmic Sketches Line 1 Divide Item | series s=0 n=2 Item | series s=0 n=2 Line Line2 Divide Item i=20 Item i=8 Line Line3 divide Item |series s=0 n=2 Item | series s=15 n=1 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=2 Item |series s=0 n=1 Line Join

Line 1 Divide Item | series s=1 n=1 Item | series s=8 n=1 Item | series s=5 n=1 Line Line2 Divide Item | series s=1 n=1 Item | series s=1 n=2 Item | series s=0 n=1 Item i=15 Line Line3 Divide Item i=0 Item i=0 Item |series s=1 n=2 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=1 Line Join

Line 1 Divide Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=0 n=4 Item i=0 Line Line2 Divide Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=1 n=2 Line Line3 Divide Item i=0 Item |series s=0 n=1 Item |series s=1 n=2 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=1 Item |series s=0 n=4 Line Join

Line 1 Divide Item | series s=0 n=2 Item | series s=0 n=2 Line Line2 Divide Item i=20 Item i=8 Line Line3 divide Item |series s=0 n=2 Item | series s=15 n=1 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=2 Item |series s=0 n=1 Line Join

Line 1 Divide Item | series s=1 n=1 Item | series s=8 n=1 Item | series s=5 n=1 Line Line2 Divide Item | series s=1 n=1 Item | series s=1 n=2 Item | series s=0 n=1 Item i=15 Line Line3 Divide Item i=0 Item i=0 Item |series s=1 n=2 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=1 Line Join

Line 1 Divide Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=0 n=4 Item i=0 Line Line2 Divide Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=1 n=2 Line Line3 Divide Item i=0 Item |series s=0 n=1 Item |series s=1 n=2 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=1 Item |series s=0 n=4 Line Join


item series line

divide

series series

item item item item item

line line

line line

Line 1 Divide Item | series s=0 n=3 Item | series s=2 n=3 Line Line2 Divide Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=1 n=1 Line Line3 Divide Item |series s=1 n=1 Item |series s=0 n=1 Item |series s=1 n=2 Item |series s=0 n=2 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=3 Item |series s=2 n=3 Item |series s=0 n=2 Item |series s=0 n=2 Item | series s=2 n=2 Line Join

The above iteration from the exploration of definitions was selected for its simplicity, to easily show the weave made from the lines connecting from A-D, A-B, and B-C. However this selection is also more applicable to the context in situating the installation over the road to allow drivers a view up into the sculpture, rather than creating a too complex design to be placed on the side of the road, that would not produce an experience induced by the interplay of sun and shadow, light and dark, and the ability to gaze up and view different weaves, driving in the direction of the lines.

51


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{179.228571, {174.314286, {169.4, {164.485714, {159.571429, {154.657143, {149.742857, {144.828571, {139.914286,

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1134.0, 1112.914286, 1091.828571, 1070.742857, 1049.657143, 1028.571429,

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65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0}

{297.171429, 1112.914286, 65.0} {287.342857, 1091.828571, 65.0} {277.514286, 1070.742857, 65.0}

Data set of points (x, y, z) and segment lengths that the structure created through Grasshopper iss derived from.

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6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 1

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6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6


65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 16.0}

65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0} 65.0}

{135.0,

765.0,

65.0}

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{115.373569, 1180.0, {109.923651, 1159.107871, {104.473733, 1138.215743, {99.023814, 1117.323614, {93.573896, 1096.431485, {88.123978, 1075.539357, {82.67406, 1054.647228, {77.224142, 1033.755099, {71.774223, 1012.862971, {66.324305, 991.970842, {60.874387, 971.078713, {55.424469, 950.186585, {49.97455, 929.294456, {44.524632, 908.402327, {39.074714, 887.510199, {33.624796, 866.61807, {28.174877, 845.725941, {22.724959, 824.833813,

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{115.373569, {107.198692, {99.023814, {90.848937, {82.67406, {74.499182, {66.324305, {58.149428, {49.97455, {41.799673, {33.624796, {25.449918,

16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0}

1180.0, 1148.661807, 1117.323614, 1085.985421, 1054.647228, 1023.309035, 991.970842, 960.632649, 929.294456, 897.956263, 866.61807, 835.279877,

{112.64861, 1169.553936, {107.198692, 1148.661807, {101.748774, 1127.769678, {96.298855, 1106.87755, {90.848937, 1085.985421, {85.399019, 1065.093292, {79.949101, 1044.201164, {74.499182, 1023.309035, {69.049264, 1002.416906, {63.599346, 981.524778, {58.149428, 960.632649, {52.699509, 939.74052, {47.249591, 918.848392, {41.799673, 897.956263, {36.349755, 877.064134, {30.899836, 856.172006, {25.449918, 835.279877, {20.0, 814.387748,

16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0}

{109.923651, 1159.107871, {104.473733, 1138.215743, {99.023814, 1117.323614, {93.573896, 1096.431485, {88.123978, 1075.539357, {82.67406, 1054.647228, {77.224142, 1033.755099, {71.774223, 1012.862971, {66.324305, 991.970842, {60.874387, 971.078713, {55.424469, 950.186585, {49.97455, 929.294456, {44.524632, 908.402327, {39.074714, 887.510199, {33.624796, 866.61807, {28.174877, 845.725941, {22.724959, 824.833813,

16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0}

{109.923651, {101.748774, {93.573896, {85.399019, {77.224142, {69.049264, {60.874387, {52.699509, {44.524632, {36.349755, {28.174877,

16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0} 16.0}

1159.107871, 1127.769678, 1096.431485, 1065.093292, 1033.755099, 1002.416906, 971.078713, 939.74052, 908.402327, 877.064134, 845.725941,

199.142463 1 9 5 .1 4 8 5 1 9 1 .1 7 1 5 8 2 187.212794 183.273313 1 7 9. 3 5 4 4 1 175.457464 17 1.58397 1 167.735556 163.913985 1 6 0 .1 2 1 1 8 156.359235 152.630431 148.937258 145.282433 141.668924 138.099975 203.562141 199.420475 195.289342 191.169423 187.061459 182.966257 178.884691 1 74 .81 7 7 1 8 1 70.76 6 3 1 6 6.7 31 81 7 162.715276 158.7 18126 154.741869 150.788159 146.858816 142.955849 1 3 9. 0 8 1 4 8 135.238166 201.145519 1 97.1 4 3 4 1 5 193.157844 1 8 9.1 8 9 8 5 185.240563 1 81 .31 1 20 6 177.403102 173.517687 169.656522 165.821298 1 6 2 .0 1 3 8 6 158.236212 1 5 4 .4 9 0 5 4 150.779227 147.10 4873

143.470318 143.470318 136.333305 201.490032 197.353551 193.227936 189.113898 1 8 5.0 1 2 2 1 180.9237 11 176.849318 172.790026 168.746926 1 6 4 .7 2 1 2 1 1 160.7 14186 156.727286 152.762086 1 4 8.8 2 0 3 2 144.903902 141.014942 1 37.1 5 57 7 7 1 37.1 5 57 7 7 439.081968 433.352429 427.634257 421.927916 416.233892 410.552698 404.884873 399.230986 3 9 3.5 9 1 6 4 387.967467 382.359137 376.767357 37 1.192877 365.636486 360.099023 354.581373 349.084477 343.609331 3 3 8.1 5 6 9 9 332.728577 327.325282 321.948368 316.599181 311.27915 305.989796 300.732736 295.509696 2 9 0.3 2 2 51 285.173136

280.063659 274.996303 269.973439 264.997599 2 6 0.0 7 1 4 8 439.081968 433.352429 427.634257 421.927916 416.233892 410.552698 404.884873 399.230986 3 9 3.5 9 1 6 4 387.967467 382.359137 376.767357 37 1.192877 365.636486 360.099023 354.581373 349.084477 343.609331 3 3 8.1 5 6 9 9 332.728577 327.325282 321.948368 316.599181 311.27915 305.989796 300.732736 295.509696 2 9 0.3 2 2 51 285.173136 280.063659 274.996303 269.973439 264.997599 2 6 0.0 7 1 4 8 255.197962 778.393913 738.465373 698.795128 659.429796 620.427419 581.860989 543.823261 506.433381 469.846041 434.26413

399.956085 367.279057 780.642308 740.364296 700.303984 660.500985 581.877836 543.199964 505.074338 467.636049 431.064221 395.599232 361.566928 751.748214 7 11.987 172 6 7 2 .51 4 3 8 633.383731 594.662771


C5 Learning Objectives and Outcomes The Gateway Installation Project for Design Studio Air was a different experience that exceeded the primary studies of Virtual Evnironments. It pushed the designs further, with a need for a much more comprehensive and refined final design as well as the need to identify what is important when designing. The use of computation in the design process highlighted the advantages of a digital drawing and such factors of the vast possibilities in manipulating a design, the quick changes that can be made to solve errors or problems, as well as to explore the model in the three dimensional realm by being able to view it from different angles. However the difficulty in using parametric in the course of this subject was the realisation of what happens between the imagination of a design in the software, and fabrication in the real world. The difficult part of the fabrication was finding a way to take the idea from the software and construct it, considering a framework created to generate the underlying form for further sculptural works to be placed on, which does not comprise of a tectonic solution to its construction being produced in Grasshopper or Rhino. Thus the structure to hold up the weave generated in Grasshopper, was considered outside of the software and identified structural steel and steel cables to do the job. However when taking this form generated outside of the software, and trying to to bring to life the weave that was made in the software, the model fails to produce a harmonious integration between the two, thus failing to represent the essence of the structure. This leads to an idea that perhaps such structures are near impossible to produce to perfection in such a short period for a project with large spans. It is difficult to deal with designing in a non-reality such as digital software as Grasshhopper and Rhino that do not deal with the reality of air and gravity, so that when taken out of this environment and placed onto a surface and connected to one another, they do not act the way that has been imagined throughout the design process because it has been designed in the most ideal realm of

the software. There is much focus placed on the way it will perform in the software, that it takes away what will be of most import when it comes to proposing a project - how it will work in reality. Although parametric modeling in architecture allows for an expansive imagination in what can be produced, particularly work that is inventive and innovative because of this opening of opporutnities in exploration and experimentation, it fails to recognise reality and forms a space that is ideal - ideal expansive spans that do not fail with constructional realities of tension, compression, or torsion, the identification of forces and their impact, or material quality in the process. Because of this, the material quality is imaginatively applied, neglecting how it would really act, likewise in the software, that when it comes to producing a model at 1:100 in the context, it is open to faults and failure. The critique and feedback from the panel of professionals in the industry both for the midsemester and final presentation proved a significant lesson to learn from when proposing a project. The studio and project has allowed for understanding what is important when presenting a design and idea, as well as how to argue for it. The push towards digital design has allowed for a learning experience that has highlighted both the advantages and downfalls where software and technology present a large pool of possibilities, however is restained by lack of understanding and knowledge. It’s found that further learning will only aid the process as architecture continues to evolve within the parametric realm. Most importantly and holistically, the project set a standard of presentation for design projects that opens up another tool for designing architecture from conception that exceeds pen and paper, as well as the imagination. Ultimately, this opens a door to new ideas for future design studios in creating ideas, whether the design process generates the overall form, or informs it, is a subject matter in which I will be open to explore in the future.

54


David Ogle’s installation artwork, “installation”, particiularly “Lines”, provide an example of where fishing line has been used as a piece of sculptural artwork.13 In relation to the gateway project, in which fishing line was used as a representative material for steel, it provide a precedent in which suspending cables in tension, starting at one point to another, has been executed well to present the rigidity of the lines, allowing it to appear stronger. The image below (7.2) is another example of his work, but in which case the delicacy of the fishing line is demonstrated, allowing it to curve. Perhaps even this design will require maintenance over time to ensure the tension is retained in its lifetime, just like in string instruments, having needing tightening after use. The project will also face direct impact by force, wind damage and these may affect the essence of the intended rigid appearancec of the model. Perhaps if this model were to be further developed or construction for presentation knowing the outcome of using certain materials at this scale, it may be beneficial to explore 3D printing by abstracting the final design, however this too presents an issue with the loss of what the design project and concept presents — it would appear more like a sculptural piece, rather than the threading and weaving appearance intended. However is also presents the issue of cost, and format restrictions such as

the size restrictions on printing, therefore it may be more appropriate for a model at a smaller scale. As mentioned earlier in reflecting on the project, it is difficult to produce a model at this scale that truly represents the concept, while also needing to represent how the design would appear in reality.

7.1 Installation, David Ogle

7.1 Installation, David Ogle

55


References 1

Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, ‘What is Fallingwater’, Fallingwater, <http://www. fallingwater.org> [ accessed 16 March 2013].

2

Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, ‘What is Fallingwater’, Fallingwater.

3

Maison Louis Carré, ‘History’, Maison Louis Carré, <http://www.maisonlouiscarre.fr> [accessed 17 March 2013].

4

Lovell, S. ‘Artful Lodger’, Wallpaper, April 2003, p. 104–110.

5

Woodbury, R. and Burrow, “Whither Design Space?” in Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing, 2006.

6

Tims, D. “Australian Architect firm Rice Daubney’s Darren Tims discusses implementation of BIM using GRAPHISOFT ArchiCAD”, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7V5cLCjKpJM> [accessed 25 March 2013].

7

Architecture Design, 2013, “Computation Works - The Building of Algorithmic Thought”, p. 12.

8

Detail, 2006, “Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart”, <http://www.unstudio.com/media/ articles/6054-detail-mercedes-benz-museum-in-stuttgart> [accessed 3 April 2013].

9

UN Studio, “Mercedes-Benz Museum” <http://www.unstudio.com/projects/mercedes-benz- museum> [accessed 4 April 2013].

10

Rose Etherington, Dezeen, December 2010, <http://www.dezeen.com/2010/12/15/zebar-by-3gatti-architecture-studio/> [accessed 1 May 2013].

11 Erin, Contemporist, Ikibana Restaurant, May 10 2013, < http://www.contemporist.com/2013/05/10/ikibana-restaurant-by-el-equipo-creativo/?utm_ source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+contemporist+%28CONTEMPORI ST%29> [accessed 13 May 2013]. 12

Harvey, Virginia., “Macramé: New Applications for the Ancient Art of Knot-Tying”, National Art Education Association, Vol. 19, No.0, November 1966. p. 25-27.

13

Ogle, David., “Installation”, from ‘David Ogle, <http://www.davidogle.co.uk/#!installation> [accessed 10 June 2013].

14

Wang, Jess, and Tang, Emily, images in “C4 Algorithmic Sketches”, Architecture Design Studio: Air, 2013.

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Images 1.1

“Fallingwater, Bear Run, Pennsylvanie”, ‘Fallingwater Picture’, Wright House, <http://www.wright-house. com/frank-lloyd-wright/fallingwater-pictures/F1SW-fallingwater-in-fall.html> [accessed 16 March 2013].

1.2

“Falling Water Site Plan”, ‘Fallingwater Plan and Drawings’, Fallingwater, <http://www. fallingwater.org/132/fallingwater-drawings-and-plans> [accessed 16 March 2013].

1.3

“Maison Louis Carré, Bazoches-sur-Guyonne, France”, in ‘La maison Louis Carré d’Alvar Aalto, un édifice unique en France’, Maison.com, <http://www.maison.com/architecture/realisations/maison- carre-alvar-aalto-edifice-unique-france-6511/galerie/25965/> [accessed 17 March 2013].

1.4

“Maison Louis Carré Entrance and Foyer”, in ‘La maison Louis Carré d’Alvar Aalto, un édifice unique en France’, Maison.com, <http://www.maison.com/architecture/realisations/maison-carre-alvar- aalto-edifice-unique-france-6511/galerie/25969/> [accessed 17 March 2013].

1.5.

“Maison Louis Carré Site Plan”, in ‘Views’, Maison Louis Carré, <http://www.maisonlouiscarre.fr> [accessed 17 March 2013].

2.1

Michael Hansmeyer, “Columns”, <http://www.michael-hansmeyer.com/projects/columns_large. html?screenSize=1&color=1#7>, [accessed 4 April 2013].

2.2 http://www.archdaily.com/139868/australia’s-1st-completed-building-information-modelling-bim-high- rise-wins-more-awards/ 2.3

Michael Hansmeyer, “Columns”, <http://www.michael-hansmeyer.com/projects/columns_ large.html?screenSize=1&color=1#7>, [accessed 4 April 2013]

3.1

UN Studio, “Mercedes-Benz Museum” <http://www.unstudio.com/projects/mercedes-benz- museum> [accessed 4 April 2013].

3.2

UN Studio, “Mercedes-Benz Museum” <http://www.unstudio.com/projects/mercedes-benz- museum> [accessed 4 April 2013].

3.3

Kaplan, D. “Safavid Surfaces and Parametricism “ <http://archinect.com/features/article/29553480/ safavid-surfaces-and-parametricism> [accessed 4 April 2013].

5.1

Michael Hansmeyer, “Columns”, <http://www.michael-hansmeyer.com/projects/columns_large. html?screenSize=1&color=1#7>, [accessed 4 April 2013]

6.1

“Zebar by 3Gatti Architecture Studio”, <http://www.lorenzodeparis.com/tag/3gatti/> [accessed 1 May 2013].

6.2

“Zebar by 3Gatti Architecture Studio”, <http://www.lorenzodeparis.com/tag/3gatti/> [accessed 1 May 2013].

6.3

“Ikibana Restaurant”, < http://www.contemporist.com/2013/05/10/ikibana-restaurant-by-el- equipo-creativo/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+c ontemporist+%28CONTEMPORIST%29> [accessed 13 May 2013].

6.3

“Ikibana Restaurant”, < http://www.contemporist.com/2013/05/10/ikibana-restaurant-by-el- equipo-creativo/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+c ontemporist+%28CONTEMPORIST%29> [accessed 13 May 2013].

7.1

“Installation by David Ogle”, <http://www.davidogle.co.uk/#!installation> [accessed 10 June 2013].

7.2

“Installation by David Ogle”, <http://www.davidogle.co.uk/#!installation> [accessed 10 June 2013].

57



Studio Air 539948 Aykiz Gokmen