Issue 01: SOIGNÉ

Page 1

Style is a way to say who you are without having to speak.

SOIGNÉ VOLUME 1

Ayka Magazine 2k21

ISSUE 1

July 28th


Reverie

D E S I G N E D

1

B Y :

A D I T I

K I R A N


ABOUT AYKA Ayka

is

an

covers a

online-based

distribution/magazine

that

wide scope of issues and subjects, including

worldwide

news

on

amusement

and

lifestyle.

Established in 2021, Ayka has been at the forefront of everyday attracts

news readers

and of

aims

all

to

produce

interests,

be

it

content

fashion,

that

music,

history or even technology. Ayka

takes

platform.

pride

As

we

in

being

combine

a

versatile

first-class

and

inclusive

reporting

with

extraordinary content and visuals, it is our aim for Ayka to be a platform for prime content. At Ayka, we put stock in straightforwardness and believe in

transparency.

We

aim

at

curating

media

that

appeases audiences from all walks of life. Ayka praises you

and

your

art

and

is

just

about

as

obvious

as

a

straightforward body.

Regardless of whether you are searching for the latest style or are in need of new vacation spots, Ayka is just one read away from it all. Click on the icons below to check out our socials:

Click here to check out our website. Contact Us: aykamagazine@gmail.com

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NOTE FROM THE FOUNDER Dear readers, We

present

to

you

our

first-ever

summer

issue,

SOIGNÉ.

SOIGNÉ

focuses

on

fashion and its variants with the strong implication that fashion is characterized by change. SOIGNÉ pays attention to sartorial fashion, on the grounds that clothing has an intimate relationship with the physical body and by extension, the personal identity of the individual. SOIGNÉ thus celebrates fashion and its form but most importantly, it helps create and inspire your fashion identity and style through articles and interviews you would enjoy reading.

I am beyond grateful to every writer, designer, editor, and contributor who played a role in building SOIGNÉ. I also take this opportunity to express gratitude towards Akanksha Mallick, the head of the issue’s design, without whose help and backing, this would not have been conceivable in any means.

The French word SOIGNÉ means to dress with elegance and poise, befitting Ayka. It gives me immense pleasure to flip through the pages of the issue; a product of hard work put in by an astounding and committed group.

SOIGNÉ holds a special place in my heart since fashion has consistently been a subject of my interest, and we welcome all of you to peruse and appreciate it. Ayka hopes that you, dear reader, will have as much fun reading as we did in creating this magazine issue!

Kind regards, Anshita Yadav Founder

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NOTE FROM THE DIRECTORS With Blair Waldorf as someone that I adore so much, and with an absolute keen interest in Fashion, SOIGNÉ holds a very special place in my heart.

This summer

issue gives insight into the different aspects of the Fashion industry, and a real perspective through our writers' eyes.

Reading through all the content with

enthusiasm always, I can not wait to see the magazine go places. I adore Ayka and the founder too much. Lots of Love Ayusha Surve Head of Content

"Fashion is one of the purest expressions of art because it is an art lived on a daily basis", by Georges Berges and finally here we are, after such a long wait publishing our first issue SOIGNÉ, which couldn’t have been possible without the sincere hard work of the team members. The issue is based upon fashion and contains a variety of articles and interviews. We are all very grateful to the team for all their time and efforts. We are extremely excited for you all to read and enjoy it! Ananya Singh Head of Editing

Since

my

association

with

Ayka

Magazine,

I

have

developed

a

profound

connection with the SOIGNÉ 01 issue. Fashion has always piqued my interest. In fact, I grew up idolizing Audrey Hepburn as a fashion icon. For me, fashion not only

expresses

individuality

but

also

celebrates

it–

and

that's

truly

beautiful.

Fashion inspires me. And after reading this issue, I hope it inspires you too! Akanksha Mallick Head of the Issue's Design

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CONTENTS 07

ACADEMIA FASHION AESTHETICS

11

SUSTAINABILITY IN FASHION

15

THE DARKSIDE OF THE FASHION INDUSTRY

13

OSCARS 2021: THE RED CARPET

17

EVOLUTION OF FASHION

BRING BACK MANLY MEN- OR DON'T

19

21

THE ONLY CONSTANT IN FASHION IS CHANGE

5

09

SELF EXPRESSION THROUGH FASHION


CONTENTS 23

25

OUTFITS AND OUTCRIES: STORIES OF PROTEST FASHION

REVIEWING VIRAL FASHION HACKS

27

31

COCO CHANEL: THE WOMAN WHO CHANGED THE GAME:

INTERVIEW WITH SRIJAN

33

35

INTERVIEW WITH KAVYA

INTERVIEW WITH CHATANYAA

37

39

INTERVIEW WITH SHOP.USTAT

SUMMER PLAYLIST

41

CONTRIBUTORS DESIGNED BY: AKANKSHA MALLICK

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ACADEMIA FASHION AESTHETICS Academia fashion is a fashion aesthetic that began to gain momentum during the pandemic, often credited to both the LGBTQ+ community and the lockdown of schools due to the virus. This fashion aesthetic romanticizes the field of academia, including arts, literature, and architecture. We’re talking about old archaic textbooks, late nights in the library, and reading classics by the candlelight while listening to Chopin's melodies play in the background. Previously famous on the LGBTQ+ facet of Instagram, it has now become a trend throughout the app. They are a great way to add a vintage theme to your closet and provide a spotlight for geeky know-it-alls to thrive in. Here are the two main fashion aesthetics in academia explained. Dark Academia: This aesthetic is inspired by 90’s British-themed outfits typically worn by Oxford students. They are usually semi-formal or formal and consist of an earthy color palette. This entails a variety of chocolate browns, earthy greens, heavy greys, maroons and black. As outfits best worn in winter or fall months, they range from coats and sweaters to suits and woollens; perfect for autumns and winters. The dark academia aesthetic pays homage to intellect and romanticizes the concept of classical knowledge, as seen in its outfits, which usually align with the titular reference and fit academic settings. This can include libraries, bookstores, or workplaces. On occasion, you could enter a café with your classics and find a fellow dark academic sipping tea and typing away on their laptop. Light Academia: As the name suggests, this aesthetic is the lighter counterpart of dark academia. It is for people with the same love for academia, only without the existential and philosophical dread that the above-mentioned trend exudes. It is for sunnier people that don’t necessarily indulge in the menacing, dramatic darkness of knowledge, but rather its positives. It primarily consists of semiformal and now and then borders on casual wear. Although also containing neutrals and muted shades, it is on the lighter end of the color palette with nude-inspired tones. Think softer shades like beige, sage green, chestnut brown, and off-white. They reflect a more light-hearted, pensive mood, contemplating various existential trails of thought, only without the impending doom!

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(Dark Academia)

(Dark Academia)


Popularized during the pandemic, majority of academia inspired outfits are typically androgynous. The clothes are often paired with classics, glasses, and a laptop. The outfit ideas for academia include layering sweaters with shirts, wearing blazers and a tie with (almost) everything, and plaid formal trousers. Some other pairs would be waistcoats and formal shorts, sweater vests over full sleeve shirts, and short pleated skirts with stockings. Accessories are usually minimalistic, and footwear usually entails Oxfords, loafers, or any kind of dress shoes, usually in leather, brown or black. Since academic fashion is still emerging, there aren’t stores specifically made for academics to shop from. Instead of spending thousands on a tailor-made suit, there are a few budget-friendly alternatives both in-person and online to look for that sell these clothes. You are free to browse in-person locally, or in small businesses online in and around your area. Academia culture is all about sustainable, eco-friendly fashion, so a better alternative than typical fast-fashion brands like Zara or H&M would be looking for some local thrifts in your area. In India, some popular online ones that ship all over the country include @thriftwoo, @thev_intage, and @_allthingspreloved (all on Instagram). Or you could always rummage through your parents’ closet for some vintage wear. Keep an eye out for winter or fall wear if you prefer dark academia. The material to typically look out for is wool, tweed, linen, and satin. Summer or spring-wear will do just fine if you prefer light academia, as long as you stick to duller or muted colors. The clothing for this can range from cotton to linen and the occasional tweed. Usually, the clothes are not printed in either aesthetics, apart from the occasional inconspicuous stripes or plaid. The color palette is a great place to start! Using earthy tones, particularly darker shades of brown gives you a kickstart to exploring this fashion aesthetic. Contrasts are usually avoided in this aesthetic, so try to pair complementary colors that have the same undertones together. And remember, when in doubt, go monochrome! Naturally, pair white with light and black with dark. If you enjoy this aesthetic, keeping some basic groundwork in mind, there is a lot of room for exploration. Before you know it, you will be looking like an Oxford student, or at least feeling as academically empowered as one! Authored By: Rachita Jain Edited By: Aditi Kiran Designed By: Anshita Yadav

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(Light Academia)

(Light Academia) All photos via Pinterest


THE DARKSIDE OF THE FASHION INDUSTRY While the fashion industry is popularly known for its glamour, richness, amazingness, there is a darkside to it which can't be ignored. It is often mentioned that the industry preys on the vulnerable people, taking away their wealth, freedom, etc. People enter into this world with dreams and desires, especially when it comes to fitness and looks. They often end up dealing with concerns regarding pressure to maintain their image, their reputation, their finances, etc. They easily become targets of this dark side. It takes a lot of effort for them to create their own spaces within the industry. They will be seen by thousands of people, and so it becomes necessary for them to be extra careful with everything that they do.

(Model Bridget Malcolm who was pressurized to lose weight by modelling agencies)

Due to immense pressure and stress, they are forced to take drugs just for a huge amount of money and respect. Only for this many models lose their life at the early age of their success. People only know how to earn money by forcing people, even if it's wrong or right, you have to listen to them. Hard Work is not the only way through which women become models. At times they even tend to succumb to wrong ways.

(Photo via Time Life Pictures) (Supermodel Donyale Luna who devastatingly passed away from an overdose)

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People working in this industry aren't born to entertain others through exposing their bodies. Once people enter the industry, from that day on they aren't living life for themselves but for others only for respect, popularity, etc. They lose their privacy and become a public property for entertainment.


(Well known supermodels) They are pressurized to get touch ups like plastic surgeries, fillers, eye lifts, or nose jobs. Only for this (Bella Hadid and others on the runway) models spend huge amounts of money just for one chance to get into the industry to settle down. They have to compromise their natural beauty to fit into the industry's extreme beauty standards. The models even need to sign inhumane contracts which take away some of their rights and freedom. Not to forget the abuse they have to face within their working environment. However not every model experiences this, some of them may experience special treatment and be shielded from abuse. But if we look carefully, not only models experience bad things but also workers in that industry suffer problems like cutting wages to increase other's income. There are also many hidden cases about the death of models due to the natural green dye used in their clothes because the natural green dye is produced from poison. It can be said that no industry is perfect, but it is necessary that no industry should have it's people be traumatized and involved in inhumane practices. 10

(Natural green dye used in clothes earlier was dangerous) Authored By: Shreta Das Edited By: Shreya Gupta Designed By: Anshita Yadav


SUSTAINABILITY IN FASHION I want to preface this article by saying that it is not an attempt to disrespect people who can’t afford sustainable clothing or don’t have the time to go thrifting. The goal here is to address the thousands of bucks spent mindlessly on fast fashion brands. The problem lies when these clothes are discarded, and enter landfills after being used for haul videos or Instagram pictures. This is one of the major contributors of land pollution. Up to 85% of textiles go into landfills each year. That’s enough to fill the Sydney harbour annually. Social Media has cranked the scale of overconsumption with massive hauls readily available. This makes the audience seem like they don’t have enough, and thus leads to more consumption, which then forms a constant toxic cycle. I won’t put myself on a pedestal and pretend I’ve never felt like I couldn’t wear something because I’d posted a picture of myself wearing that on Instagram. Basically, it's common thinking that outfits should not be repeated, and in order to be perceived as fashionable by others, it is necessary that one should not frequently wear the same outfits.

When we combine this weird notion of not repeating outfits with the concept of micro-trends (which refer to trends that only last 3 months on an average), it’s a recipe for disaster for the environment, and a win for fast fashion industries. There’s a lot of gatekeeping in sustainable fashion, and sustainable brands are often on the expensive side and are not very exclusive of the size ranges. Thus, it becomes difficult to make them accessible.

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(Photo via Amanda Vick) Fast fashion has normalized quantity over quality and devaluing the cost of clothes. We have gotten so used to paying a very low price for clothes that even slightly pricey items makes us think they’re overpriced, when in reality, businesses that compensate their workers adequately and source their raw materials ethically and carry out the production in a sustainable manner are adequately priced.

It is agreeable that affordability is subjective but there are several Indian small businesses that have the same items available at Zara or H&M and are usually similarly priced. Zara puts out 24 collections per year, while H&M offers between 12 and 16. A significant amount of these clothes are dumped in landfills after use.


Clothes from fast fashion brands are usually made from cheap synthetic fibres like polyester which can take up to 200 years to decompose. With the rate these companies produce clothes, we’re essentially living on a pile of plastic. With the rise of social media, the problem of overconsumption of clothes has become more prevalent than it ever was before. Celebrities, models, and fashion magazines were the only ones influencing mainstream fashion which was meant for the masses. Their ways of influencing and promoting fashion products are small as compared to influencers from social media platforms. Now that anyone can be an influencer, it has become easier for big brands to target those influencers and promote their products through them on a largescale. They scramble to dress the top models and influencers, because chances are if Kendall Jenner or Bella Hadid is seen wearing something, then it will become a trend soon. Once something becomes a trend, you’ll begin to see it everywhere. Influencers have different and unique ways to promote products that lead to people buying them in big quantities. This in turn wreaks havoc on the environment.

According to weforum, the fashion industry is responsible for 20% of all industrial water pollution worldwide. 85% of all textiles go to the dump each year. And washing some types of clothes sends thousands of bits of plastic into the ocean. It is not only polluting land, but also important water bodies. Water bodies are necessary for the harvesting of materials such as cotton. Overconsumption of clothes leads to overuse of these water bodies. One example of this is in Uzbekistan where the overuse of the water from the Aral Sea for the production of highly water-intensive cotton has led to it being dried up after about 50 years. We should try to be more mindful of our consumption practices and where we’re buying our clothes from. Investing in clothes that can be worn for a long time and are stylish is also effective. Contributing to companies, small businesses, and brands that operate with a sustainable focus in mind is also an essential step. While fast fashion cannot be avoided completely, it is necessary for one to think about sustainability when buying products from them.

(Photo via Getty Images) (Protests against fast fashion) (Photo via Wiktor Szymanowicz/ Barcroft Media) Authored By: Aneka Khanna Edited By: Shreya Gupta Designed By: Akanksha Mallick

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Collective efforts such as campaigns, sessions, marketing, etc. are necessary to change the way the fashion industry affects the environment so that future generations will not only embrace the fashion, but also have the legacy of a clean and healthy environment.


OSCARS 2021 : THE RED CARPET The biggest night in Hollywood is here! The Oscars 2021 are set to take place at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, California. The Academy Awards isn’t only about the films — it’s also about fashion. In fact, the red carpet has always been the goto place for celebrities to express personal style. This year’s red carpet gave us glamorous fashion moments while adhering to all the COVID-19 safety regulations. The guests strutting down the red carpet were requested to monitor and secure their lifestyle for the past ten days. Rapid COVID-19 testings were administered on the location, and temperature checks were mandatory on arrival. It was only during the camera roll that the guests were not asked to wear masks. However, during commercial breaks and other times, they were required to do so. For the jaw-dropping event, both A-list nominees and presenters made appearances, including Andra Day, Vanessa Kirby, Carey Mulligan, Viola Davis, and Frances McDormand. Better yet, all of these celebrities staged the red carpet in their breath-taking evening attire before the show. Celebrities wore everything from bright tuxedos to bejewelled ball gowns. Some stars also attended the Oscars in flamboyant jumpsuits and dresses with cut-outs that were as iconic as them. And while each guest came with a unique style, they all upheld the spirit of the event. Some notable outfits were Daniel Kaluuya in a Bottega Veneta suit, Cartier jewels, and a Santos de Cartier Skeleton watch; Viola Davis in Alexander McQueen, Jimmy Choo heels, and Forevermark jewels; Margot Robbie in Chanel Haute Couture, and Chanel Fine Jewellery; Angela Bassett in Alberta Ferretti, and Chopard jewels; Halle Berry in custom Dolce & Gabbana; Riz Ahmed in Prada, and a Girard- Perregaux Laureato Skeleton watch; Andra Day in Vera Wang, and Tiffany & Co. jewels; Reese Witherspoon in Dior and BVLGARI jewels; Steven Yeun in Gucci; Emerald Fennell in Gucci; Laura Dern in Oscar de la Renta, and Pomellato jewels; Chloé Zhao in Hermès; Colman Domingo in Versace Atelier, Christian Louboutin heels, and jewellery by David Yurman; Sacha Baron Cohen in Ralph Lauren; and Isla Fisher in Dior, and BVLGARI jewels.

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(Photo via Campbell Addy) LaKeith Stanfield with auburn hair in a 70s-inspired Saint Laurent jumpsuit by Anthony Vaccarello (styled by Julie Ragolia)

Some celebrities also unveiled new looks. Margot Robbie debuted a fresh set of French bangs, while Halle Berry showed off a graduated bob that recalled the iconic geometric cuts of Vidal Sassoon. Even the hair chameleon, Zendaya, walked onto the red carpet with hip-skimming waves that came down her back, giving a mermaid-like effect. The Oscars are widely known for their sense of style, but we can’t overlook the winners. After all, it’s the person with a combination of style and substance that makes a name in history. Mentioning awards, Chloé Zhao took home the trophy for Best Director, becoming the second woman to hold that title. Chloé Zhao’s film, Nomadland, also bagged the Award for Best Picture. Mia Neal and Jamika Wilson, two-thirds of the hairstyling and makeup team behind Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, also made history. The Best Costume Design Award and the Best Hair and Makeup went to Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.


After years of criticism for the lack of diversity in the entire event, this year’s slate of nominees contained some notable firsts. For the first time, an all-Black producing team was nominated for Best Picture, two actors of Asian descent received a nod for Best Actor, and two women were nominated for Best Director. This spirit of inclusion was reflected when the names of the winners were revealed. The event of 2021 was a different yet alluring experience. Despite the heavy COVID-19 regulations, celebrities went all out on the red carpet, giving us iconic moments which will be the subject of conversations for years to come. Take a look at some of the best dressed:

(Photo via Christian Högstedt) Carey Mulligan in Valentino

(Photo via Lindsay Flores) Halle Berry in Dolce and Gabbana debuting her new graduated bob

(Photo via Getty Images) Margot Robbie in Chanel debuting her new bangs

(Photo via @iamreginaking on Instagram) Regina King in Louis Vuitton and Forevermark jewellery

Authored by: Esha Sahay Edited By: Akanksha Mallick Designed By: Aditi Rohatgi

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EVOLUTION OF FASHION “I have always believed that fashion was not only to make women more beautiful but also to reassure them, give them confidence.” – Yves Saint Laurent The origins of fashion design can be traced back to 1826. From 1826 to 1895, Charles Frederick Worth is regarded as the world's first fashion designer. Worth, a former draper, opened a fashion house in Paris. He established the tradition of fashion houses and advising customers on what type of clothing would suit them. Several design houses began to hire artists to create patterns for garments during this time period. Clients would be shown patterns and, if they liked them, would place an order. It was during this time period that the tradition of presenting patterns to customers and then stitching them began, as opposed to the previous system in which finished garments would be presented to them. At the turn of the twentieth century, new fashion developments would emerge in Paris first, before spreading to the rest of the world. New clothing designs would be born in Paris before spreading to the rest of the world. In other words, Paris became the "fashion capital". "Fashion" during this time period was mostly haute couture, which was exclusively designed for individuals. Fashion garments began to be mass-produced in the midtwentieth century. The volume of production increased, and people began to have more clothing options. People's fashion awareness increased toward the end of the twentieth century, and they began choosing clothes for themselves based on comfort and their own style, rather than relying on market trends. As previously stated, fashion design is now widely accepted as a viable career path. A slew of fashion institutes have sprouted up around the world, offering courses in a variety of fields. The number of students considering fashion as a serious career and enrolling in courses in the field has steadily increased over the years. Fashion design can be defined broadly as the art of creating fashionable apparel. However, with the passage of time, the concept of fashion designing has expanded to include other items such as fashion accessories such as jewellery, bags, footwear, and so on. Given the evolution of fashion design, it would not be incorrect to define it as "fashion creation."

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(Courtesy: A Victorian) House of Worth at 7 rue de la Paix, Paris in 1894

Fashion design has progressed far beyond the simple design of clothing. Today, fashion design has evolved into a fullfledged industry. It is widely recognized as a viable career option all over the world. Aside from design, there are a variety of other career options that have emerged in this industry over time. Fashion is a universal subject, a language that many people understand and speak. When we look back over the last 100 years, we can see that the change and influence of fashion has been exponential. New trends are introduced decade after decade, heavily influenced by pop culture, political attitudes, and inspiring style icons of the time. It is a form of expression for many people and is regarded as a necessity by others. To be fashionable used to be associated with wealth, but as we entered the glittering Great Gatsby era of the 1920s, fashion became liberated as Coco Chanel ascended to the throne. She popularised many timeless fashion trends, such as the little black dress, espadrilles, and costume jewellery, but she was also a driving force behind the liberation movement, advocating for casual dressing as corsets were removed and trousers for women became the new wardrobe staple. Of course, there were other iconic women from the glistening Jazz Age who had a significant impact on our fashion liberation. Greta Garbo, Colleen Moore, and Anita Page all helped to revolutionise — and normalise — the way we dress and style our hair, paving the way for future decades of inspiring and truly innovative fashion trends. The androgynous look persisted into the 1940s, exemplified by Katherine Hepburn's masculine shirt and loose-fitting trousers. By the 1950s, Christian Dior, a French designer, had introduced us to one of fashion's most popular trends: the pencil skirt. A popular choice for Jackie Kennedy, the First Lady at the time.


The 1960s was a stark contrast to previous decades in what became known as the rebellious era.It was a period of great upheaval, both politically and creatively, and is associated with a much shorter hemline, as governed by British designer, Mary Quant, who introduced her mini skirt. Mod fashion also played a role, with designer Emilio Pucci introducing bold geometric shapes, bright primary colours, and psychedelic prints. It was the decade of experimentation and nonconformity that lasted until the 1970s. Bohemian dressing took centre stage as hemlines became longer and trousers became tighter – literally, in the case of style icon Joni Mitchell. Long, flowing skirts, the DVF wrap dress, and embroidered, peasant-style clothing became increasingly popular, with stores such as Biba and Laura Ashley promoting them. The 1970s are a prime example of fashion trend cyclicality. Last summer, more than 40 years later, we saw the off-shoulder Bardot and embroidery trends reappear in our favourite high street stores in a revival of the decades most popular looks. Disco clothing, complete with platform shoes and bell bottom jeans, quickly gave way to the memorable punk rock era of the 1980s, fueled by bands like the Sex Pistols and designers like Vivienne Westwood. Jackets and distressed denim were adorned with spikes and studs — it was a DIY era, not only in fashion but also in hairstyles. In just fifty years, fashion has changed dramatically, from floor-length embellished gowns to the introduction of trousers for women, to hot pants, Mohawks, and fishnet tights. Just as punk rock music popularised and influenced many recent fashion trends, so did the big screen. Following Madonna's performance in Desperately Seeking Susan, flash dance normalised leg warmers for daywear, and brightly coloured, if not a little gaudy, costume jewellery became a staple accessory. As big shoulder pads became the order of the day and oversized masculine blazers became a popular look for women, the 1980s became known as the decade for power dressing. It's difficult to believe that the 1990s were more than a decade ago; a period in fashion culture marked by minimalism, baggy jeans (for both men and women), and voluminous hairstyles. We were once again heavily influenced by music artists, with bands such as Nirvana and Marilyn Manson paving the way for the popular gothic trend. But, just as the 1970s made a comeback more than four decades ago, we're still recycling trends from 40, 50, and even 60 years ago, and, more recently, even further back due to the resurgence of the popular Victoriana trend.

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(Courtesy: Washington Post) Marilyn Manson and The Spooky Kids in the early 1900s made a huge contribution towards the gothic trend. While many people avoid trends in order to maintain originality and a more ethical approach to fashion, the majority of what we wear has been ‘fashionable at some point – even items we find buried in the back of a charity shop or tucked away on a broken rail in a vintage emporium. Our fashion sense evolves as we age, and I'm not sure we ever discover what we like and what suits us until our 30s. However, whenever that personal style is sought, fashion allows us to be creative, original, stand out, fit in, or provoke controversy. Fashion is a topic that is truly universal and all-encompassing. Many women can spend years searching for the perfect wedding gown, while girls as young as seven year old dream of becoming fashion designers, buyers, writers, and, of course, bloggers. We are as enamoured with the sartorial elegance of others as we have ever been, following our favourite style icons on Instagram and looking to fashion bloggers for inspiration. In that regard, little has changed in all those decades, with women feeling inspired by icons of their own era: Ingrid Bergman's classic androgynous style in the 1940s, Twiggy's reign with her spidery lashes in the 1960s, and, of course, the discovery of Kate Moss at the tender age of 14 in the late 1980s.

(Courtesy: Pinterest) Ingrid Bergman proved to be effortlessly chic through the years. The fashion industry is now a highly reputable, competitive, and tremendously influential business. Our unwavering dedication and interest in the biannual fashion week shows, as well as our excitement at the arrival of new season stock in Top Shop, has not wavered. More than a century later, our dedication to fashion and looking stylish remains unique and passionate. Authored by: Navya Bhardwaj Edited By: Sowmithaa Shri Designed By: Aditi Rohatgi


BRING BACK MANLY MEN — OR DON’T (Courtesy: Louis Vuitton Campaign: Springs 2016) Jaden Smith was the face of Louis Vuitton’s Spring Collection and was captured sporting a skirt.

Assume someone I know has recently given birth, and I've decided to give them baby clothes as a gift. I go to the store and buy some adorable pink onesies and matching pink mittens. I'd like you to guess the gender of the baby based on the information provided. If you chose a gender now, and that gender is female, I'm sorry to inform you that you have been consumed by societal gender norms. From gendering colours to styles to brands, society has done an awful job by imposing restrictions on what should be worn by whom. However, as is always the case when there are rules, there are also rule breakers. These rule breakers are known for notoriously changing the field of binary fashion. We have all as yet seen various male celebrities sporting what is often considered to be typically female clothing with sheer tenacity. We've also seen female celebrities dress in uncharacteristically masculine outfits on numerous occasions. They have been lauded and chastised for it.

Celebrities such as David Bowie, Prince, Lady Gaga, Harry Styles, Jaden Smith, Billy Porter, Jared Leto, Keiynan Lonsdale, Jonathan Van Ness, Kristen Stewart, Ezra Miller, Marc Jacobs, Zendaya, Cara Delevingne and others have (Courtesy: Vogue December ‘20 Edition) worn some of the most iconic gender bending looks that Harry Styles chose to express his love for non-binary broke not only the internet but also several stereotypes. fashion by posing for Vogue's cover in a dress and jacket.

When male celebrities appear with painted nails and/or dresses, the “what is appropriate for a man to wear” debate erupts all over the world. It's no surprise that all conservatives agree that men should stick to suits and ties. Gender definitions and rules become more ambiguous over time, as they should. However, it appears that many people still adhere to outdated fashion definitions. In 2018, actor-singer-songwriter Jaden Smith addressed the harsh criticism he received for wearing skirts and dresses. Smith explained to Nylon magazine, “You just have to believe in yourself, you know. The world is going to keep bashing me for whatever I do and I'm going to keep not caring. I'm going to take most of the blow.” He continued saying, “So you know, in five years when a kid goes to school wearing a skirt, he won't get beat up and kids won't get mad at him. It just doesn't matter. I'm taking the brunt of it so that later on, my kids and the next generations of kids will all think that certain things are normal that weren't expected before my time.” Hopefully, we'll get to the point Jaden articulated in the next two years.

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Of course that wasn’t the last time a celebrity was bashed for putting on a skirt or a dress. When singer-songwriter-actor Harry Styles was shot clad in a periwinkle blue Gucci dress and a jacket, he made history by becoming the first solo male on the cover of Vogue, and he was vindicated by an outstanding response. There was an overwhelming outpour of support and love expressed globally towards Styles and Vogue. But, unsurprisingly that wasn't all that was expressed, there was an equal share of criticism. Candace Owens, an American author, made one of the most outspoken comments. Owens expressed her conservative views on Twitter, urging the West to "bring back manly men." This sparked a riot on social media and was discussed as a political issue by a few. Nevertheless, the Grammy winner responded appropriately to the critics by posting a photo on Instagram in which he could be seen wearing a frilly blue suit while relishing a banana, with the caption- ‘Bring back manly men’. Styles is now seen as the new face of (Courtesy: Twitter) gender bending fashion and one couldn’t agree more. Harry Styles gave a fitting response to his critics when he reinstated what had been said against him from a different perspective.

( Courtesy: MTV’s VMAs 2011) Lady Gaga as Jo Calderone bagged two VMAs on that eventful night.

When discussing people who have been condemned for their fashion choices, it is impossible not to mention Lady Gaga. Actress-singersongwriter-model Lady Gaga has never shied away from making bold choices; whether it's her music or her clothing, Gaga has always been the one to make a statement. One of the most notable and eccentric things the Pop Icon has done is bring her alter ego to life during the 2011 VMAs. Gaga turned heads and dropped jaws when she arrived dressed as Jo Calderone; for those who didn't know who he was, Jo explained that he was Lady Gaga's man and was there to show her how much he loves her. Jo made it a point to steal the show that night. Gaga said in an interview with New York magazine about her then-recent classic, the Bubble dress: “A year from now, I could go away, and people might say, ‘Gosh, what ever happened to that girl who never wore pants?’ But how wonderfully memorable 30 years from now, when they say, ‘Do you remember Gaga and her bubbles?’ Because, for a minute, everybody in that room will forget every sad, painful thing in their lives and they’ll just live in my bubble world.” Surely history will not forget her or her bubble world. If none of these artists haven’t yet inspired you to dress and carry yourself however you please, I hope someone along the way will inspire you soon. Wear those heels, paint your nails, rock that dress, flaunt your suit and most importantly express yourself no matter what gender you choose to identify yourself

Authored By: Sowmithaa Shri Edited By: Uddantika Kashyap Designed By: Dhriti Bhatia

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THE ONLY CONSTANT IN FASHION IS CHANGE The fashion world is ever-changing with the world witnessing different styles and trends it keeps introducing. A style is a way a person chooses to express themselves through various types of clothes, accessories, makeup, etc. Whereas a trend refers to the fashions that are popular at a given point of time. The very nature of fashion trends is to come and go. Style is an individualistic aspect of fashion, whereas trends cover the collective aspects of fashion. Today, a fashion trend starts with fashion designers such as Gucci, Versace, etc; who design a spring and fall collection based on cues and inspiration they’ve gathered throughout the season. These cues can include popular culture, celebrities, music, politics, nature or something else entirely. Fashion styles were largely influenced by the political history of a particular area. Colonial rules by European countries brought their dressing styles to a global audience and made them popular all around the world. While the masses wore clothes made of natural fibres in neutral colors, it was the rich who flaunted their wealth wearing bright colors and classy accessories. It was only by the 16th century or to be precise from the 1770s that fashion evolved as a mainstream thing. From the middle of the 19th Century, world of fashion was dictated by designers of the fashion capital of the world, Paris. Whatever Parisians donned the world followed and copied. Major designers (mostly from the 20th century) like Chanel, Givenchy, Prada, Dior, etc., started to revolutionize the fashion world by introducing their authentic styles, trends and forms to the world. They are continued to be applauded for their significant contributions in so many aspects. Some of those contributions include as follows:

(Photos via TheEnglishCostumeCo) Gowns inspired by those worn during the Colonial Era

Dior is credited with restoring French clothiers to the exalted status they enjoyed before the war. Coco Chanel held sway over haute couture for six decades. Chanel’s collections were casual clothes that were elegantly styled. Dolce and Gabbana are known for their reimagining of intimate apparel for outerwear and their use of animal prints and colorful apparel. By the 20th century with the cheap availability of quality clothes, fashion was no longer just popularly adorned by the rich, but was adopted by the masses as well; hence giving rise to a wide range of different individual styles. Most of the fashion from that point onwards was largely influenced by the media.

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(Photo via Getty Images) Dolce and Gabbana owners


People started following trends portrayed in the entertainment industry. It was marked by the people's freedom in choosing whatever they wish to wear according to their bodies, embracing their inner callings of style with utmost liberty, not caring of a certain expected fashion sense but instead daring to flaunt their minds through the clothes and accessories on their bodies. 1990’s fashion was far more subdued than the garish, wild styles of the 1980s. Bands like Nirvana influenced the grunge look, which featured rock-concert tee shirts under plaid flannel shirts, jeans and long, greasy hair. Overalls were worn by both sexes, either with one or both shoulder straps unhooked. The punk style of the 1870s and 1980s evolved into the goth fashion trend, which featured black clothing, black boots and studded bracelets in the style of bands like Nine Inch Nails and Marilyn Manson.

(Photo via Danielle Webster) Globalization also influenced clothing trends, with the incorporation of Middle Eastern and Pride flag inspired outfit Asian dress into mainstream European, American and Australasian fashion. Furthermore, eco-friendly and ethical clothing, such as recycled fashions and fake fur, were prominent in the 2000s.

Nowadays, Street style is a modern phenomenon. It reflects the choices of clothes and trends that people are referring to in today's world. It showcases each and every person's unique styles based loosely on common trends. It encompasses anything from elegant dresses, simple jeans or shorts and tops, cultural dresses with a modern take, to designer clothes with interesting patterns, patterns, silhouettes,etc. Street style stars in the past have done brightly colored suits, tonal looks (wearing the same color from top to bottom, only with variation in texture and color shade), and color blocking. Celebrities and influencers are significantly known for fashion endorsement. One of the significant trends that has been endorsed by big designers and celebrities is feminine clothes for men. It is still considered a taboo for men to wear feminine clothes. Singers Harry Styles and Lil Nas X have become important figures in endorsing this trend.

(Photo via Pinterest) A Nirvana T-shirt

Another trend that is being given more attention is comfortable clothes for plus-sized people. Throughout the years, there was a pressure arising from the entertainment and the beauty industries that in order to be attractive, a person has to be thin. Plus-sized people were discriminated against and some major fashion companies were not even making clothes (especially for women) for them. Singer Lizzo has been a role model for many as she encourages people to be proud of their bodies and her being a plus-sized woman herself in the music industry; where there are still some rigid body standards. Fashion trends and styles today stand for a person's unique individuality and choices. They are pretty flexible and change according to people's different ways of expressing themselves. Incorporation of the LGBTQ+ community in the fashion world has been a remarkable example of that. Whether it's taking inspiration from the pride flag or major fashion companies providing opportunities to LGBTQ+ people, fashion has come a long way in providing people with freedom to fully embrace themselves. It has continued to change for the good and it still has a long way to go; giving the upcoming generations assurance that fashion is one major way to express and celebrate themselves for who they are.

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(Photo via Tyler Joe) Street Style Authored By: Shreya Gupta Edited By: Ananya Dutta Designed By: Dhriti Bhatia


SELF-EXPRESSION THROUGH FASHION Fashion. What is fashion? Fashion is a non-verbal form of communication and expression. Fashion not only includes clothes but also accessories, hairstyles, shoes, makeup, etc. Fashion enables us to make ourselves understood by rapid communication with the onlooker. The clothes that we wear keep us warm, keep us comfortable and bring us a sense of belonging. Our clothes form our identity. At times, although much to our displeasure, what we wear often induces a quick judgment in others. When we walk into a room, our outfits are indirectly the first thing that someone notices about us. This is because what we wear often influences our energy and auras. When you wear what makes you feel confident, your energy levels increase, and YOU become the person who influences the room's spirit. There are countless perspectives on fashion. Despite the differences, we can all agree that fashion is the bridge that fills the gap between our inner state and outer appearance, thus, entirely bringing out our true selves. Although clothing will never be able to communicate who you are deep down, it is the cherry on top for people to get a sense of who you are upon first meeting you.

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(Harry Style’s VOGUE shoot- defying toxic masculinity) Think about all those times you were going out for a beautiful dinner with your family. The times you and your friends went out for a movie. The time you formally accepted an award on stage. What is the one thing in common in all of these scenarios? It is the fact that 80 minutes prior to these events, you stood in front of your wardrobe and wondered, “What should I wear today?” This is a question so many of us come across every day. There is a reason that we ask this question over and over again. It is because fashion does tie into our confidence and our sense of self. Wearing what makes you feel true to yourself gives you a sense of clarity and certainty. Fashion can be a means of communicating your social and cultural background. It can be a means of rebellion against the pressures that society throws upon you. Fashion can be your outlet for everything going wrong in your life. Fashion can be your way of making a statement.


When you are going through the phase in life where you're figuring out your personality, fashion plays a major role, because it changes as you change. And this can be so beautiful. It can be a way for people to subtly notice the changes within you, and empathise with everything you are going through. Isn't it amazing how so much can be communicated simply through clothing and accessories?

(VOGUE’s September 2020 issue- celebrating black artists and entrepreneurs)

If you've been on the Internet even once within the past 3 to 4 years, you have come across the terms ‘e-girl/ e-boy,’ ’soft girl’, ‘indie kids,’ ’90’s aesthetic,’ ‘vintage aesthetic,’ ‘artsy girl aesthetic,’ ‘country aesthetic,’ ‘royal aesthetic,’ ‘fairy aesthetic’, etc. All these aesthetics are tied strongly to the way one dresses. For example, soft girls would wear light pastel colours with dainty jewellery; e-girls and eboys would wear dark clothing with heavy silver accessories, and black makeup. Although these trends are a means of expressing who you are on the inside, our personalities also change, and with it, our fashion sense changes. It is not necessary to fit within a certain aesthetic, but rather, look at fashion through the eyes of a child. Fashion can be fun and therapeutic. It can be a way of experimenting with who you are. When you are going through the phase in life where you're figuring out your personality, fashion plays a major role, because it changes as you change. Authored by: Zoya Bhargava Edited by: Ananya Dutta Designed By: Aditi Rohatgi

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Remember, defining fashion is completely up to you. It can be what you want it to be. You get to present yourself in a way that makes your insides burst with happiness and comfort and safety and love. Fashion breeds compassion. As someone who is deeply passionate about creativity and upcycling, fashion has been a major outlet for me. Cutting, stitching, tie-dying, and painting my old clothes have helped me express myself in ways that I never thought I could. Beading together colorful jewellery for my friends has been my way of giving gratitude. Fashion doesn't even have to mean buying new clothes from trendy brands. It does not even have to mean upcycling your old clothes to fit the current trends. Fashion is a way of expressing what makes you unique in the truest sense while rising above the shallow barriers of expectations put on you by those around you. Remember to not spend too much time worrying about whether your colours are coordinated or not, or if it's the right or wrong thing to wear at the moment. Just be true to your heart and if you feel happy from within, wear it and flaunt it! If the new trends make you happy, follow them! If not, then that's perfectly okay! Don't let harsh criticism get to you. Because most of the time, ruthless criticisers are the ones who are intimidated by what you can pull off and they can not. You are the one who gets to decide how you want to be perceived, and fashion is a major tool that will help you on your journey of self-discovery and selfexpression!


OUTFITS AND OUTCRIES: STORIES OF PROTEST FASHION Historian Quentin Bell once said, “the history of dress is the history of protests”. Dissent is the cornerstone of social change. Voices of the discontented populace have continued to echo through time because of their manifold manifestations. From songs and art to protest marches and speeches, dissent can be expressed in many forms. Fashion too is an important but rather underrated form of protest. During the medieval and early modern ages in Europe, fashion and clothing were important forms of passive protest. Social deviants including jesters, executioners, and prisoners challenged the dominance of the Church. The bold and often eccentric patterns they wore came into conflict with Christian values. Women who performed in theatres after the restoration of Charles II to the English throne in 1660, often wore breeches to play characters of the opposite sex. This was considered scandalous because the calves of the wearer would be visible through these breeches. The French Revolution of 1789 has many important symbolisms ranging from chants of passionate battle cries in La Marseillaise to the iconic French tricolour. Fashion, however, was also employed by oppressed French people to show their dissatisfaction with despotism. Red, white and blue coloured ribbons were pinned to the breasts of angry protesters. The most popular fashion statement was made by a group of dissenters who were christened ‘sans-culottes ‘after they refused to wear knee-breeches as they symbolized tyrannical nobility and monarchy. They chose to don instead loose-fitting trousers made out of coarse cloth in solidarity with labouring classes. After the executions of Louis XVI and his queen Marie Antoinette and the end of the infamous Reign of Terror, protest fashion in France began to change. Men and women who now sought to condemn the aristocracy began to be called the Incroyables (unbelievable) and Merveilleuses (marvellous women). Earrings, green jackets, and loose trousers were worn by men while the women dressed up in fine Greek dresses that exposed their bodies. Blond wigs banned by the Paris Commune were also worn by women.

(Markéta Martišková, Protest Fashion)

(Sans-culottes)

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The suffragette movement too used fashion to make political statements. Initially wielded in a derogatory sense, the term ‘suffragette’ was reclaimed by a group of women who believed in the use of militancy to win voting rights for women. This movement utilized various colours to spread its message. Suffragette white has become the most prominent example of this strategy. Over 30,000 female protesters were encouraged to wear white for the first time in 1908 at a ‘women’s Sunday’ meeting hosted by the Women’s Social and Political Union in Hyde Park, London. The affordability of white fabric and the colour’s association with dignity and purity were the primary reason behind its selection. In India too, protest fashion played a role in the fight against colonialism. From the use of Gandhi caps to the spinning of Khadi, clothes were used as tools of resistance. The Swadeshi Movement focused on increasing the production of locally made clothes to demonstrate the nation’s self-sufficiency. 1960s America saw the re-emergence of fashion activism with the birth of the Civil Rights Movement. The Civil Rights Movement was a fight against racial injustice and inequality in America. To personify ideas of ‘Sunday Best’ women who took part in the movement wore cardigans, button-ups, and stockings. Men on the other hand used dark suits, starched white shirts, and ties to challenge notions that reinforced ideas about the place of Black Americans in the social hierarchy. Women like Rosa Parks and Angela Davis dressed in tailored and business-like attire in order to make statements about unequal racial access to the American dream. Denim was worn often by protesters to reclaim the fabric’s role in the clothes of AfricanAmerican sharecroppers and workers of the South. While some protesters chose to appropriate African cultural symbolisms like head wraps, the Black Panther Party opposed them and chose instead to don berets. The berets stood for militancy and also became popular symbols for the followers of Marxist leaders like Che Guevara. While many supporters of these movements advocated violent revolutions, many others fighting for nuclear disarmament during the heights of the Cold War sported the ‘peace sign’. This very sign was also utilized by Americans protesting the Vietnam War. The death of George Floyd sparked the Black Lives Matter Movement in America and other parts of the world in 2020. Protesters wore black outfits and berets in a nod to the Black Panthers of the Civil Rights Movement. The popular perception encourages people to believe that politics is the game of the elite. Contrary to this belief however common people across historical epochs have used fashion to raise their voices in protest and have left an indelible mark on history.

Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. (Leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial) Credits: NARA

Authored By: Tarini Agarwal Edited By: Loyna Kaur Designed By: Anshita Yadav

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REVIEWING VIRAL

FASHION HACKS

(Source:wattpad.com Via PINTEREST)

Over the last five years, we've seen many social media handles and bloggers rise to the top. Companies and individuals such as 5 Minute Craft, Komal Pandey, and Sakshi Sindwani, to name a few, have changed the way people dress by providing people with ideas and new fashion trends. Giving out fashion hacks is a part of their blog or work that includes making others' lives easier, more comfortable, and stylish by keeping the dress in a friendly atmosphere. A fashion hack is simply giving a piece of clothing a new way to be worn. A popular hack involves wearing an oversized T-shirt, taking your hands out of the sleeves, and pushing it all the way down to your waist. Then, pair a tube top with a stylish, thin belt that you insert through your sleeves and tie a little below your waist. Now, I believe this is a very impractical hack because, first and foremost, no one will buy a T-shirt with a collar as wide as their waist because it will look very improper and have a very bad fit. Second, this hack is nearly useless to a healthier group of people because it simply will not look good or fit. So, this hack gets a thumbs down from me, or a 2 out of 10. 25


Another hack requires only a loose t-shirt and a bangle. So, first, we take all of the cloth below our chest area and pass it through a bangle; then, we take the cloth that has been passed through the bangle, twist it, and simply place it inside our bra. This hack appealed to me because it requires no cutting and is extremely simple to implement. Second, it turns out to be a very cute and simple crop top for people who are comfortable wearing them, and more importantly, it fits all body types, so I give this hack a thumbs up or an 8.5 out of 10. For hack 3, we'll need to cut a pair of pyjamas into shorts. Then, using a thick strip or a drawstring, tie one of the remaining pieces around your chest as a tube top. I believe there are two drawbacks to this hack. The first is that the cut shorts will not look very proper and it will be obvious that it was cut as the cloth will become loose. Second, in most cases, the leftover cut piece will not be wide enough for the chest, nor will the drawstring provide you with enough security, which is an important part of dressing. Overall, I'll give this hack a thumbs down, or a 3 out of 10.

(Source:amazon.com Via Pinterest)

This hack should be familiar to any active internet user. This hack only requires two shirts! Wear each shirt on one side and then button them up, then take that hanging sleeve and bring it forward from the other side and repeat for both sides, then tie them in a knot, and ta-da! A new type of sleek top will be ready. This hack was rather complicated for me and took about 15 minutes to put together. It looked pretty good after it was put together, but I couldn't button it up because I wasn't assembling it that way, which didn't give it that secure feeling. It worked well as a brunch outfit, and if worn with proper colour contrast, etc., it could become a good trend. I have mixed feelings about this hack, so I'd rate it a 6 out of 10. The majority of these hacks were created to make people's lives easier while also making them more fashionable and sustainable. While new clothes are always exciting to wear, you'd be surprised at how many different outfits you can put together with clothes already in your closet. Isn't it always fun to be fashionable while protecting the environment?

Authored by: Darshika Jallan Edited by: Sowmithaa Shri Designed by: Harsha Jain 26


COCO CHANEL Fashion does not exist solely in the form of dresses. Fashion is in the sky and on the street; it has to do with ideas, the way we live, and what is going on. Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel was a fashion designer and businesswoman from France. The Chanel brand's founder and namesake, Coco Chanel, is a fashion designer known for her timeless designs, trademark suits, and little black dresses, with an emphasis on making clothes that are more comfortable for women. So, what made her a fashion game changer? What exactly did she do? We all know she was a prolific fashion designer, a fashion bigwig. But what has she done for women that makes her so special? When we think of women's rights, we don't usually think of haute couture fashion houses. But there she was, at the turn of the twentieth century, the one Parisian fashion designer whose clothes encouraged not only elegance but also individuality and liberation for women. Gabrielle Chanel revolutionised women's clothing and challenged women to live by their own rules.

THE WOMAN WHO CHANGED THE GAME Pants first appeared – and have persisted – because they are functional: they protect the legs and keep the wearer covered up while still allowing for easy movement. However, in places such as Europe and the United States, they came to represent power, equality, and freedom from physical, social, and moral constraints. So it’s no surprise our patriarchal society just couldn't seem to wrap their heads around that. Prior to her indulgence, women were quite literally made to look like hourglasses. They wore incredibly uncomfortable corsets that held them in place so tightly that they couldn't breathe. We're sorry, but you don't meet our standards because you don't seem to have the tiniest waist to look like an hourglass. With all of these societal influences on women at the time, their selfesteem was at an all-time low. Perfect or ugly, there was no in-between.

To be irreplaceable, one must always be unique, which is exactly what she did. Coco Chanel pioneered women's pants after World War I. In the 1920s, the French fashion designer designed trousers for herself to help her climb into Venice's rocking gondolas. That's what sparked her idea: if I've been exposed to this and it's helped me so much, why not share it with others? Coco Chanel was inspired by men's clothing for her desirability during a trip to the French coast. She made her yachting pants out of the straight, wide cuts of sailor's trousers, among other things.

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(Courtesy: Wikimedia) Gabrielle Coco Chanel is photographed wearing pants she designed, which paved the way for a women's fashion revolution.


Pants became more acceptable as a result of Coco's indulgence. They still stood for power, equality, and freedom from all constraints. Without a doubt, Gabrielle was not the only woman to solve this problem, but she was the most well-known. Chanel did not consider herself a feminist, but she did work to advance women's rights. She was the French icon who revolutionised women's clothing and challenged women to live by their own set of rules. Coco Chanel had a major influence on women's fashion. She had an impact on both men and women. Women now had more leeway in terms of what they were expected to wear; they could dress however they pleased. Chanel made menswear that could also be worn as womenswear; this was a significant step because it demonstrated how women and men were equal. She liberated the ankles, loosened the waistline, allowed women to cut their hair, and simply gave them so much more freedom to do so much more. Gabrielle influenced men by demonstrating that women were capable of more than just being housewives. They were capable of working and accomplishing just as much as men; they had simply not been given the opportunity. She instilled in women the notion that they could wear whatever they wanted and be whoever they wanted. While Chanel did not alter men's perceptions of women, she did usher in a new perspective. Coco Chanel is a luxury fashion designer who is wellknown throughout the world. But she was the woman who truly demonstrated to the world that there is no gender in fashion. She was the woman who liberated women from the constraints of what they were ‘supposed' to wear. She was the woman who dismantled barriers.

Coco Chanel is the woman who changed fashion forever.

(Courtesy: Quartz Magazine) Marlene Dietrich, one of the most famous actresses of that time, wore a “masculine style” pantsuit by Coco Chanel in 1933.

(Courtesy: Pinterest) The double C Chanel logo was designed by Gabrielle Channel in 1925.

Authored by: Aadya Sinha Edited by: Sowmithaa Shri Designed by: Harsha Jain

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INTER


VIEWS


SRIJAN ON BREAKING STEREOTYPES, GREATEST STRENGTH, SETBACKS AND MORE

“I would describe my fashion style as ‘The Girl Next Door’ because that’s what I seek. I want a look that is simple, comfortable and easy to jump in or out of. Although I do love to glam myself up sometimes.” Says Srijan Chanta, a 20-year-old fashion model and student. When asked more about her profession she said, “Digging into my profession, I would say that I am passionate about my work. Because I love what I do. My love for modelling can be very evident.” Srijan who has 34.7K followers on Instagram with almost 200 posts, hails from Himachal Pradesh though she has been brought up in Chandigarh. Telling us more about herself she said that she’s a people person. She loves meeting new people and learning about their lives and backgrounds. She can almost always find common ground with strangers and likes making people feel comfortable in her presence.

On being asked about how she got into fashion, she said that all her love for fashion comes from Bollywood. When she was a kid, she used to watch actresses in movies and used to dress up in front of the mirror. She used to perform a model walk, drape clothes out of her mum’s saree and what not. She states that was the beginning of fashion for her. On being asked about her routine as a model, she said that due to her profession she is expected to wake up early, have a proper diet and workout regularly but on the contrary she is very laidback. She doesn’t have any fixed routine or schedule for her day. But she ensures to make her day productive by working out for at least for 30 minutes. When asked about her goals as a model she says, “Body-shaming, colorism, pimples and cellulite-related embarrassments are harsh realities that play havoc with the self-esteem of women. My one goal is to break the stereotype that models are supposed to be tall, slim or pretty.” She continued saying that she is 5’4” tall but she never lets herself feel less superior than any other woman out there. She believes that appearances aren't everything. Character, values, skills -these are the attributes one must seek to acquire or develop. On further being asked about something that people wouldn’t get to know about her from looking at her profile, she said, “Well I bet you didn’t know that I had a Non-Medical background. Sadly, I wasn’t as smart as I thought I was when I took it so I dropped it in college. I still remember the ‘betas and omegas’ though.”

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Our next question to her was her greatest strength as a model to which she replied, “My greatest strength as a model are people who support me. To begin with, I would like to start with my greatest strength — my mom.” She continued to talk about how her mother wakes her up every morning with a positive attitude, and a smile on her face. Her mother’s presence is Srijan’s greatest strength. Her dad, too, supports her in everything she does. She feels extremely privileged to be born in such a family. On the other hand, she praises her friends by saying that they are really supportive of her. They help her with important advices and choices. They always tell her the truth even if it is something that she doesn’t want to hear, but they tell her with kindness and without any judgment. She mentioned how her strength is each and every person out there who encourages her to do her best. On being asked how she recovers from setbacks in the studio, she replied that things don’t always go how we expect them to. Setbacks happen to most of us from time to time, and that no one is perfect. It could be the designer's or the artist's or even the spot boy’s fault. We all fail at something at some point in time. Setbacks are a normal part in the path to success and she doesn’t believe in shying away from them rather she believes in embracing them. Whether the fault is her's or someone else’s, she makes sure that nobody even realizes it till the shoot’s over. To end the interview, she was asked to describe her modelling career in three words to which she said, “Three words to describe my modelling career would be: unbelievable, exciting and anticipating.” Srijan has also appeared in many Punjabi music videos with one video exceeding 12 Million views. Her Instagram posts get around 11K likes with almost 70K+ views on some of her reels! She is an upcoming model and we’re excited to see where she goes from here!

In Conversation: Srijan Chanta Edited by: Uddantika Kashyap Designed by: Harsha Jain

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KAVYA ON FASHION, STYLING, AND ESTABLISHING A SMALL BUSINESS! “I would love to try the egirl aesthetic. It attracts me a lot, I think it's very edgy and out there. I do like egirl hairstyles and makeup a lot”.

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Kavya, the founder of GLAMPUFF GIRLS, talking about her journey in a conversation named Pinterest as the biggest inspiration for her so far. “All of my outfits are mostly Pinterest inspired”, she said. As a teenager, Kavya used to get limited pocket money so she started styling clothes from her dad’s closet to quench her growing interest in fashion. She described her aesthetic to be Y2k and "bruh-girl". On being asked if she would like to change her aesthetic, she replied “I would love to try the e-girl aesthetic. It attracts me a lot, I think it's very edgy and out there. I do like e-girl hairstyles and makeup a lot”. Kavya, being an owner of a small business, is a keen supporter of other small businesses on Instagram. On being asked the reason behind this, she stated, “I believe the amount of hard work and efforts small businesses put to run the store on Instagram is appreciable. Also, I thrift a lot and I do support slow fashion.” When she was further asked about her thoughts on sustainable fashion and thrift shops she declared herself to be “the biggest supporter of thrifted and sustainable fashion”

She further added, “thrift stores attract me more than branded fast fashion stores. First of all, thrifted stuff is unique and sometimes you get your hands on really good stuff for much lesser prices.” She then describes an incident where she thrifted a pair of brown converse originally priced at 18k for only Rs. 1500. According to her, the top three summer wardrobe essentials are a white tank top, an oversized t-shirt, and sweatshirts or biker shorts. While concluding the interview, when asked what inspired her to start her own small business, she told us, ”I wanted to be productive and utilize my free time. So, I impulsively made an Instagram account called glampuff.girls which today has 10.2k followers. I sell the stuff which I would love to buy as a customer”. In conversation: Kavya Edited by: Loyna Kaur Designed by: Harsha Jain

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CHATANYAA'S

DISTINCTIVE STANCE ON CURRENT BEAUTY STANDARDS, SUSTAINABLE FASHION, AND MUCH MORE

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" I think it's time we acknowledge that being healthy in medical terms is more important than how beauty, features and body shapes are perceived." Chatanyaa, a Singapore-based influencer with around 4000 followers on Instagram, is well-known for her classy and simple style. She loves to stay true to her mood, comfort and feelings, and dresses accordingly. For that reason, she usually doesn't have any particular sets of color palletes. If she's feeling bubbly, she goes for bright colors; or else if she's feeling like she needs to keep it classy, she will go for denims or black. She started posting on Instagram without thinking too much about her style, but it eventually blew up and people started admiring it and getting inspiration from it. She stayed confident and hoped that it might help someone get ideas out of her fashion. She also loves adapting to the culture around her. Despite living in Singapore as an Indian for more than 14 years, she doesn't forget to respect both the cultures she belongs to. Her clothing can include anything from a lehenga to baggy clothes or elegant dresses.

Being an influencer who promotes her clothing style, Chatanyaa also gives importance to sustainable fashion. According to her, "I think all of us should approach this concept by thinking twice about which clothing items our wardrobe really needs. You increase your chances of utilising most of your wardrobe by purchasing pieces that will stay evergreen — which is obviously sustainable in terms of spending in the long run". She has also shared her views on the current beauty standards. She believes that we all have our own features and body shapes. It is necessary to focus more on one's health, than to judge one based on their own unique features.

In Conversation: Chatanyaa Authored by: Shreya Gupta Designed by: Harsha Jain

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At last, she was asked about her top three photoshoot locations, to which she answered, "I personally love photos that are on the move and candid so one of my favourite locations to shoot will always be the city area. Second favourite has to be car parks because of their minimalistic colour scheme. The carpark background will always allow your outfit to pop the most. And my third favourite would be cafés, restaurants or bars because they help me in staying candid".


SHOP.USTAT ON BRINGING INTO INDIAN MARKET A FRESH SENSE OF FASHION, ALL CRAFTED BY BARE HANDS A 22-year-old Journalism Graduate who started Shop.Ustat in the winter of 2020, Ustat Kaur, says that she thrives within every aspect of running a business and being her own boss. Though always filled with creativity and scribbling about fashion, fabricating clothes has been a fresh discovery for Ustat. Shop.Ustat is a tiny homegrown brand that started as a thrift store and now sells made on order, handmade and customized clothing. They strongly believe in being inclusive, unconventional and transparent, thus Shop.Ustat has always been open to ideas and establishing a genuine communication with their audience, intending strongly to build a community and not just a place one buys some clothes from. The proud and grateful owner of the Shop states that she was initially driven towards the idea of starting up her own small business majorly because of the lingering sense of freedom that comes with it. The initial thought-cloud was born in her head while researching upcycled clothing for an article, which then led to an impulsive buy: a sewing machine. After trying her hands on sewing for a few months through YouTube, the idea of launching the Shop finally came into life.

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When asked what inspires her so much in the field of fashion, Ustat threw in what may as well be a very relatable feeling for most of us youngsters out there! Various prints and aesthetics on her Pinterest ignited her mind to get on creating more new prints and patterns. Through the means of the Shop, Ustat wishes and works to bring more shades of authenticity and new dynamics to the Indian Market. She firmly believes that handmade items must be relatively more cherished because mass production isn't a case here, allowing the items to be rare and raw and spun with love. She wishes to somehow encourage people to adorn themselves with whatever style they feel called to, rising above expectations and idealistic fashion goals, while embracing their truest selves freely, comfortably and fashionably! When her first clothing drop was sold out within the first days, she realised how much she respected the small victories along the way. Needless to say, she became nearly obsessed with working for the Shop so that she could feel the warm complimentary or even suggestive reviews from buyers. She says that she would also love to introduce a zine or a digital magazine that works hand-in-hand with the shop and interacts more with the audience in a collaborative form. Lastly, Ustat Kaur shared the ecstasy she feels to introduce two of her new collections, very soon; one of them named Warped due to some super interesting prints, introducing new designs that would be customizable. For all the gen-Z fashionistas and even the ones looking for a wardrobe renovation, Shop.Ustat definitely provides with a hint of something more to anticipate!

In Conversation: Ustat Kaur Edited By: Ananya Dutta Designed By: Anshita Yadav

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SPOTIFY SOIGNÉ SUMMER PLAYLIST 1. BRUTAL BY OLIVIA RODRIGO

11. FEEL SOMETHING BY BEA MILLER

2. SAVE YOUR TEARS BY THE WEEKND, ARIANA GRANDE

12. SUMMER FEELINGS BY LENNON STELLA, CHARLIE PUTH

3. GOOD 4 U BY OLIVIA RODRIGO

13. THIS FEELING BY THE CHAINSMOKERS, KELSEA BALLERINI

4. MOTIVE BY ARIANA GRANDE, DOJA CAT

14. PIERRE BY RYN WEAVER

5. WATERMELON SUGAR BY HARRY STYLES

15. BUTTER BY BTS

6. GOOD DAYS BY SZA

16. BUILD A BITCH BY BELLA POARCH

7. SOLAR POWER BY LORDE

17. THIS IS WHAT YOU CAME FOR BY CALVIN HARRIS, RIHANNA

8. LONDON BOY BY TAYLOR SWIFT

18. LUSH LIFE BY ZARA LARSSON

9. NIGHT CHANGES BY ONE DIRECTION

19. I TOOK A PILL IN IBIZA BY MIKE POSNER

10. SWEATER WEATHER BY THE NEIGHBOURHOOD

20. HEAT WAVES BY GLASS ANIMALS

DESIGNED BY: AKANKSHA MALLICK

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SPOTIFY SOIGNÉ SUMMER PLAYLIST 21. CAN’T HELP FALLING IN LOVE BY ELVIS PRESLEY

31. LEVITATING BY DUA LIPA, DABABY

22. JAILHOUSE ROCK BY ELVIS PRESLEY

32. STAY TOGETHER BY NOAH CYRUS

23. DANCE WITH ME BY SHILOH DYNASTY, ITSSVD

33. HICCUP BY VALLEY

24. JUST THE TWO OF US BY KAUAI45, SWEET COCOA

34. HEAR ME CALLING BY JUICE WRLD

25. TALKING TO THE MOON BY BRUNO MARS

35. JEALOUSY, JEALOUSY BY OLIVIA RODRIGO

26. RIPTIDE BY VANCE JOY

36. ME, MYSELF & I BY G-EAZY, BEBE REXHA

27. TO BEGIN AGAIN BY INGRID MICHAELSON, ZAYN

37. BILLS, BILLS, BILLS BY DESTINY’S CHILD

28. VIBEZ BY ZAYN

29. MET HIM LAST NIGHT BY DEMI LOVATO, ARIANA GRANDE

30. BEGGIN’ BY MÅNESKIN

38. JIUCE BY LIZZO

39. SUCKER BY JONAS BROTHERS

40. THE NIGHTS BY AVICII

DESIGNED BY: AKANKSHA MALLICK

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CONTRIBUTORS FOUNDER: ANSHITA YADAV DIRECTORS: AYUSHA SURVE: HEAD OF CONTENT ANANYA SINGH: HEAD OF EDITING AKANKSHA MALLICK: HEAD FOR ISSUE’S DESIGN EDITORS: ADITI KIRAN AKANKSHA MALLICK ANANYA DUTTA LOYNA KAUR SHREYA GUPTA SOWMITHAA SHRI UDDANTIKA KASHYAP CONTENT WRITERS: RACHITA JAIN SHRETA DAS ANEKA KHANNA ESHA SAHAY NAVYA BHARDWAJ ZOYA BHARGAVA SOWMITHAA SHRI SHREYA GUPTA TARINI AGARWAL DARSHIKA JALLAN AADYA SINHA DESIGNERS: ANSHITA YADAV AKANKSHA MALLICK HARSHA JAIN ADITI KIRAN ADITI ROHATGI DHRITI BHATIA TRISHA SINGH DESIGNED BY: AKANKSHA MALLICK

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