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AUBURN UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING


CONTENTS Introduction 02 Developing the Parti 03 Integrating Building and Site 05 Building Program 09 Nursing Simulation 19 Post Occupancy Results 23


1 Auburn University


“The new building serves as a proud place that we can call home.” — ASHLEY WESTBERRY, School of Nursing Graduate

Introduction The Auburn School of Nursing, established in 1979, prepares nursing leaders at all levels of personal and professional development to become integrated members of healthcare teams and their communities. In 2013, Auburn University published their Comprehensive Campus Master Plan Update and the results reinforced the need to establish a dedicated health sciences precinct to allow for nursing and pharmacy’s growing programs. In Miller Hall, the School of Nursing had limited growth potential and the program found it was only operating with 29% of the space the School required to support its mission. Therefore, the dire need for additional clinical learning space became a top priority for the University and the School of Nursing.

Ayers Saint Gross worked with Auburn University to program and design a health sciences precinct master plan and a new School of Nursing building. The project’s vision was to accommodate the School’s growth while fostering interprofessional collaboration. An important goal for the project was to inspire greater achievement, success, wellness, and community service while continuing the School’s excellence in nursing, teaching, and learning. This new facility joined all nursing programs (academic, clinical learning) and faculty and administrative space under one roof on a site that will accommodate future growth as a health sciences precinct.

26%

Space Allocation

25%

Auburn University’s School of Nursing building is comprised of classrooms and labs, student study and common spaces, faculty offices, and support.

DEANS SUITE

1,287 NASF

CLASSROOM & SUPPORT

FACULTY

12,369 NASF

5,324 NASF FACULTY SUPPORT

1,527 NASF STUDENT SERVICES

1,680 NASF

2%

49,866 NASF

BUILDING SUPPORT

1,173 NASF

FACULTY LOUNGE/ BREAKOUT

2,977 NASF

COMMONS

2,919 NASF

6,705 NASF

1,488 NASF

SIMULATION SUPPORT

1,570 NASF

STUDENT SPACES

1,644 NASF

SKILLS SUPPORT

SKILLS

975 NASF

8,228 NASF

18%

17%

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12%

SIMULATION SUITE

PUBLIC


Seamlessly extending the campus and defining a new edge.

Developing the Parti The cultural shift of decentralizing the School of Nursing from the heart of campus prioritized its positioning in relation to the Pharmaceutical Research Building to form a new health sciences precinct. The facility extends the campus while defining a new edge. Drawing from the University’s Georgian-inspired architectural vocabulary, the building accommodates a contemporary, innovative program that seamlessly knits into the existing campus fabric. The atrium’s classical entry and alignment with the landscaped courtyard function as an inviting portal and serves as a connection point between faculty offices and instructional space.

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Outward Expression The campus-facing facades are formally composed of contextual architecture, connecting building and place. The ceremonial entryway unites the wings of the building and morphs into programmed soft space on the interior.

Plan


Site Organization

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Stacking


Creating an anchor and lasting first impression.

Integrating Building and Site The School of Nursing’s growth projections demanded a site capable of future expansion, while addressing immediate needs and expectations of the current students and faculty. After investigating three site concepts to demonstrate entry gateway and building placement scenarios, the School was designed based on Concept C to provide a balanced integration of the building with the site. The facility’s anchor siting captures the School’s vision, establishing a strong campus presence while also elevating the stature of the nursing program amongst its community and peers.

The site serves as a front door to the southern edge of campus, while transparent connections to the courtyard and an energetic landscape create a welcoming first impression. The courtyard fulfills the program’s need for large, open areas to host large format interdisciplinary simulations, such as their “Disaster Day Drill,” while also serving as gathering space during social events for the precinct, the greater campus, and the community.

A LEM MOR RISO N DR

Concept A

SOU TH DON AHU E RD

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Pharmaceutical Research Building

Concept A suggests an entry gateway with two fronting facades. Two distinct wings of the building were identified in each scheme, exploring options to unite the north and east wings and compose an entry sequence off of a prominent corner of campus.

Entry


B LEM MOR RISO N DR

Concept B

SOU TH DON AHU E RD

Concept B establishes the east wing as the dominant edge of South Donahue Drive with the entryway facing campus (to the north). The schemes also explore the placement and flow between the entryway, commons and the courtyard.

Entry

Pharmaceutical Research Building

C LEM MOR RISO N DR

Concept C

Entry 6 School of Nursing

SOU TH DON AHU E RD

Pharmaceutical Research Building

Both wings of the buildings in Concept C favor the east edge of the site, freeing up area to enable future growth of, or connection to, the classroom/north wing of the building. The face of the north wing fronting South Donahue Drive is reminiscent of the federal style facade familiar to the campus vernacular establishing a strong presence and activating the corner. The entryway juxtaposed between the wings allows for framed views through the building to the lawn space and wooded area beyond.


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The double height entryway is an extension of the building’s commons while framing views through the building to the rear courtyard.


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The federal-style faรงade, consistent with campus guidelines, establishes a strong presence and activates the intersection of South Donahue and Lem Morrison Drives. The location of the building, while apart from the main campus, extends the perceived boundary of the campus. The building setback allows for the terrain to gently slope down to the entry. A terraced landscape feature at the entry plaza was designed for outdoor gathering space.


Designing for an interdisciplinary curriculum.

Building Program Over the past four decades, the School’s curriculum has continued to evolve as healthcare practices and technologies advance, but the core six skill sets embedded into the program remain resilient and relevant: communication and collaboration, critical thinking and clinical judgment, scholarship for evidence-based practice, clinical prevention and population health, diversity, and leadership.

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The School is located in proximity to only three major hospitals within a one hundred mile radius; thus, obtaining clinical placements for all nursing students in the region was taxing for both students and clinical faculty to coordinate. The rural setting, distance to the nearest major hospital, and aging population all accelerate the demand for nurse practitioners as a first line of defense in quality medical care. This deficit was realized in the School’s mission for their new building and influenced key drivers to best educate and graduate well-prepared nurses and nurse practitioners into

the community and region. To accomplish the mission, it was imperative that the pedagogy shift to expand clinical learning opportunities and offer more simulation-based education that will help to achieve greater success in student education, training, and clinical placement to continue saving lives in the region. Clinical learning environments comprise over a third of building’s area and are supplemented with flexible classrooms and gathering spaces that feature a blend of interior and exterior space to allow the School to engage with students, faculty, the campus, and the local community through various educational programs, outreach, and cultural events. While the “outer skin” reflects a more traditional architectural character, the inside accommodates a contemporary, forward-thinking, and innovative program.


FIRST FLOOR Academic Commons Storage / Support Core Office 10 School of Nursing

The first floor features a grand lobby, building commons, and circulation network filled with natural light and soft seating that connect the tiered collaborative classrooms and active learning classrooms to create an academic hub. The planned adjacency of the active learning classroom to open onto the commons allows for great flexibility in hosting events and collaboration outside of the classroom.


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SECOND FLOOR Two flexible skills labs adjoined by a large central storage room constitute the majority of the academic area on the second floor. Enclosed student meeting rooms and open seating overlook exterior vistas. The faculty hub on the south wing includes a communicating stair connection to its counterpart on the third floor.

Skills Lab Student Study / Meeting Storage Office Lounge Core


THIRD FLOOR Simulation Labs Prebrief / Debrief Storage Office Lounge Core 12 School of Nursing

The entire north wing of the third floor is dedicated to simulation based education. The EAGLES Center—Engaging Active Group Learning Environments in Simulation—is composed of med surg, L&D, trauma and community health simulation rooms, OSCE and standardized patient zones, as well as student queuing, prebrief and debrief spaces. Considerate storage, facilitator, control and observation areas are also included.


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The classrooms were designed following Auburn’s Engaged Active Student Learning (EASL) standards for technology.

Tiered collaborative classroom with active instructor demonstration, live broadcasting, and recorded lecture capabilities.

Adaptable classrooms support collaborative learning and traditional lectures, while providing alternative seating arrangements to test new pedagogies. A vertically folding operable partition expands the teaching environment to support a range in scales of clinical learning scenarios. Two collaborative tiered lecture classrooms allow for flexibility in learning arrangements, live demonstrations, and remote broadcasting.

The commons is seen as an extension of the classroom to promote collaboration and social connections among students, faculty, and the community. The design’s flexibility allows the building to accommodate the community for special events by expanding into the commons and adjacent outdoor green space. Outreach and wellness programs serve the ever-growing needs of the Auburn community and regions beyond.

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COMMONS AND CLASSROOMS


SKILLS LAB The skills lab houses technology-rich clinical learning spaces to teach introductory skills to first- and second-year students. Each bay is uniformly fit-out for the reality of working in hospitals and to teach muscle memory for routine care. Students receive their first exposure to the building blocks of their success in patient-centered

Group Work Flexible furniture facilitates group touchdown as students move throughout the learning stations.

Instructional / Demonstration

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The instructional space at the center of the room acts as an informal classroom for task learning and instructor demonstrations.

care, such as the importance of communication, collaboration, critical thinking, judgment, and leadership. A combination of group work, instructional, and hands-on learning replicate real life scenarios to develop the students’ comfort level working in typical floor layouts and fundamentals of their practice, such as IV insertion.


Hands-On Skill Learning

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The skills lab accommodates beginner and advanced skills training with low and high fidelity manikins to practice a wide range of skills. Audio and video recording is provided in the large bays facing the instructional area for demonstration, observation and to better prepare students for simulation.


FACULTY HUB

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The two-level faculty hub achieves a balance of refined office space and accessibility to students. In order to create chance meetings and allow easy access to academic spaces and labs, the central communicating stair boosts morale and fosters collaboration among faculty and students. The inclusion of an improved Dean suite allows the School of Nursing to adequately support the University’s mission to enhance and strengthen focused research.


Connecting stair to Second Floor Faculty Suite Open collaboration area. May add partitions to transform into faculty offices in the future

Level Three

Faculty Hub

Open collaboration area. May add partitions to transform into faculty offices in the future

Level Two

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The faculty hub was designed to balance faculty privacy when needed, yet be accessible to students and provide active collaboration and social spaces specific to the School’s culture. All of the faculty offices could not fit on the same level, so the open zone centers in the suite and the communicating stair enhances multi-level and cross circulation to easily bring everyone together.


Simulation Flow Student Path Faculty / Clinical Associate Path Standardized Patient Path Secure Access

E

Storage

M

Server

W

Office

Office

Support Zone

Lounge SP

Office

Faculty Support

CONTROL

Student Exit

Debrief 6p

Chart

OSCE B

Chart

SIM 5

Student Exit

Debrief 6p

OSCE D

Chart

SIM 7

Med Surg

SIM

Meds Dispensing

SIM 6

Debrief 6p

Chart

CONTROL

Med Surg

Student Exit

OSCE C

Simulation—Controlled Environment

PUBLIC CORRIDOR

OSCE A

OB / L&D

CONTROL

SIM 1

CONTROL

D

Meds Dispensing

Med Surg

SIM 8 Trauma

SIM 3

Med Surg

SIM

Student Exit

Debrief 6p

SIM 2 COM

C

CONTROL

SIM 4

Med Surg

B

Prebrief 12p

Prebrief 12p

Prebrief 12p

STUDENT QUEUE

Student Entrance

PUBLIC CORRIDOR

Student Zone

A


Nursing Simulation The heart of the School of Nursing building is the state-of-the-art simulation space, designed to support the School’s mission to grow and advance simulation based learning opportunities across a wide range of skill sets to facilitate multiple modes of clinical learning, replicate a variety of healthcare cases, and offer interdisciplinary simulation opportunities. Unique to the layout, the traditionally embedded prebrief and debrief rooms were designed and located along the edge of the suite to double as student meeting rooms during off-hours.

A

C

These meeting spaces offer daylight, views to campus that encourage faculty and students to engage in day-to-day interaction, capstone projects, and student organization meetings that supplement nursing training, such as global health initiative trips. Additionally, simulated meds dispensing rooms are located in the center of the simulation pod to maximize students’ flow and thru-put during a simulation rotation, thus increasing the overall efficiency. The student locker area is securely located to reduce student crossover between rotations.

B

D

E


Simulation Flow Student Path Faculty / Clinical Associate Path Standardized Patient Path Secure Access

Storage

M

Server

W

Office

Office

Faculty Support

CONTROL C

Student Exit

Debrief 6p

A

Student Exit

OSCE B

C

OSCE C

OSCE D

B

B

B

B

Chart

Chart

Chart

Chart

SIM 5

CONTROL

Med Surg

Debrief 6p

SIM 7

Med Surg

SIM

Meds Dispensing

SIM 6

OB / L&D

CONTROL

SIM 1

CONTROL

SIM 8 Trauma

A

Student Exit

Debrief 6p

Med Surg

SIM 3

Med Surg

Simulation—Controlled Environment

PUBLIC CORRIDOR

OSCE A A

C

C

Support Zone

Lounge SP

Office

SIM

Meds Dispensing

A

Student Exit

Debrief 6p

SIM 2

CONTROL

COM

Prebrief 12p

Prebrief 12p

STUDENT QUEUE

Student Entrance

PUBLIC CORRIDOR

Student Zone

Prebrief 12p

SIM 4

Med Surg


“This space is phenomenal! The simulation suite is one of the nicest, if not, the nicest I’ve seen. The design and the flow of the space and the way ‘technology’ has been incorporated throughout, is cutting edge stuff. There are a lot of really nice sim labs I have the privilege of working with, but I think what makes EAGLES Center unique is its sheer size and scale along with the subtle way s­ tate-of-the-art technology has been incorporated into the architecture. I have not seen one quite like this anywhere. It truly is top notch!“ — MATT CAGLE, Client Executive, Laerdal Medical

A

B

C


“I have loved being one of the first cohorts in this beautiful building. I think it facilitates and enhances our learning to make us the best possible future nurses.” — SURVEY PARTICIPANT

Post Occupancy Results Building Use Tiered Collaborative Classroom Active Learning Classroom Building Commons Student Study Skills Lab Simulation Pre / Debriefing Faculty / Administration Faculty Meeting

Level Three

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Level Two

Level One


Ayers Saint Gross distributed a post occupancy evaluation to a balanced group of both students and faculty in order to gauge the building’s performance and the end users’ satisfaction. Nearly all of the participants spend anywhere from ten to thirty or more hours per week in the new School of Nursing. In addition to the majority of users evaluating the building at 5 out of 5 stars for overall satisfaction, 80% of participants feel the building has elevated opportunities for recruitment and retention and community outreach and engagement.

Although the new building is decentralized from the heart of campus, the results show the presence of the Nursing program on campus has been elevated through the capability of hosting campus and community events. The end users are extremely satisfied with the skills labs and simulation suites and feel they are able to replicate real-world settings. The collaborative classrooms and learning spaces are enjoyed by both students and faculty who are drawn to the openness, flexibility, ease of technology, and comfort.

Survey Says The tiered collaborative classroom and student study spaces are the most sought after spaces in the building.

23% FACULTY / ADMINISTRATION SPACES

16% FACULTY MEETING SPACES

71%

23%

TIERED COLLABORATIVE CLASSROOM

PRE / DE BRIEFING MEETING ROOMS

57% SIMULATION SUITE

29% ACTIVE LEARNING CLASSROOM

Participants’ Favorite Spaces

48% BUILDING COMMONS

55% SKILLS LAB

62%

98%

100%

94%

ARE EXTREMELY SATISFIED WITH THE SKILLS LAB.

AGREE THAT THE SIMULATION SUITE EFFECTIVELY REPLICATES REAL-WORK SETTINGS.

STRONGLY AGREE THAT SPACES IN THE BUILDING ARE FLEXIBLE AND ADAPTABLE.

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STUDENT STUDY SPACES


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Acknowledgments

AUBURN UNIVERSITY Simon Yendle University Architect Jim Carroll Former University Architect Dr. Gregg Newschwander Dean and Professor, School of Nursing Karol Renfroe Nursing Resource Center Coordinator Dr. Caralise Hunt Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Associate Professor Meghan Jones Assistant Clinical Professor, Director of Clinical Simulation and Skills Jean Dubois Clinical Professor Linda Watkins Executive Assistant to the Dean and Business Manager DESIGN TEAM Ayers Saint Gross Design Architect Stacy Norman Architects Architect of Record Newcomb & Boyd MEP and Fire Protection Engineering LBYD, Inc. Structural and Civil Engineering HNP Landscape Architecture Landscape Architect CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT Hoar Program Management ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Laura Hall, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP Senior Associate Ayers Saint Gross 410.347.8500 lhall@asg-architects.com


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Auburn University School of Nursing  

Auburn University School of Nursing