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ORIGAMI

Charming Kusudama ~Magic Spheres out of Paper~

Katrin & Yuri Shumakov


Contents

Introduction: Magic of Kusudama......... 3 Origami Symbols.................................. 5 Gallery.................................................. 6 Jasmine Sphere................................... 8 Jasmine Flower.................................... 9 Thin Flat Stalk......................................11 Kusudama ‘Pendant’............................13 2-Module Pendant................................15 Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Pendant’........17 Kusudama ‘Roses’...............................18 Pendant ‘Rose’.................................... 20 Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Roses’...........22

Kusudama ‘Star’................................23 4-Pointed Star................................... 26 8-Pointed Star................................... 26 Himalayan Poppy Sphere.................. 27 Tsuru Tama.......................................30 Lantern-like Tsuru Tama................... 36 Fairy Wings Sphere...............................38 Fairy Wings Flower................................39 Chinese Dogwood Sphere.................. 43 Chinese Dogwood Flower................... 44 Oval Pointed Leaf............................. 46 About Authors................................... 50

Book Description

ORIGAMI CHARMING KUSUDAMA of the Origami Décor Series by the Oriland creators will show you how to make magic spheres out of paper, called Kusudama, traditional ones and the authors' original designs. Kusudama ('healing sphere' in Japanese) is a decorative paper ball usually made of several modules connected together to form an attractive sphere filled with harmony and beauty. The sphere designs in this book use a common technique for making a kusudama where six modules, each folded from paper in the pure origami style, are glued together to shape a ball. The 6-module kusudama designs possess a certain charm when balancing the folding efforts and the elegance of the result. Some of these designs have a 10-module version in a form of an eye-catching lantern. Do-It-Yourself - fold these charming kusudama models - the Jasmine Sphere, the Kusudama ‘Pendant’, the Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Pendant’, the Kusudama ‘Roses’, the Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Roses’, the Kusudama ‘Star’, the Himalayan Poppy Sphere, the Tsuru Tama (or Crane Kusudama), the Lantern-like Tsuru Tama, the Fairy Wings Sphere and the Chinese Dogwood Sphere. Along with kusudama designs, there are also related decorative and floral models - the 2-Module Pendant, the Pendant ‘Rose’, 4- and 8-Pointed Stars, the Jasmine Flower, the Fairy Wings Flower and the Chinese Dogwood Flower, as well as Stalks and Oval Pointed Leaves for them. 180 detailed step-by-step colorful diagrams with written instructions and 50 photos of examples of completed projects will guide you through folding the 18 origami designs. For every project, there are recommendations on paper type and size including an indication of the size of the completed model. The designs are from simple to intermediate level of folding and are good for the novice and the expert alike. In addition, the authors' article "Magic of Kusudama" introduces the kusudama theme, shedding some light on how they were used in ancient Japan and how kusudama designs keep their charm in the present. A kusudama influences positively the mood of a person who made it or who receives it as a gift or even just looks at it. Kusudama spheres are wonderful decorations able to bring a unique atmosphere into every home. They can be a terrific gift for your friends and family too. Creative, original and beautiful! Have a wonderful and fun time with this book creating these magic spheres out of paper! Happy folding!

Copyright Notice ORIGAMI CHARMING KUSUDAMA Magic Spheres out of Paper Copyright © 2015 by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be copied or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission from the authors. The designs in this book are intended for personal use only. Any commercial use requires consent from the authors. Contact information may be found at http://www.oriland.com Origami Designs, Diagrams by Yuri and Katrin Shumakov Texts, Cover and Interior Design by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov Photography by Katrin Shumakov Kindle Edition ISBN: 978-0-9811902-9-7 ORILAND


Introduction: Magic of Kusudama

Welcome to the wonderful world of origami that allows us to do magic: turn ordinary flat sheets

of paper into amazing 3-dimensional designs from simple shapes to intricate abstract figures, majestic castles, lovely flowers, little people and just about any object you can think of, including charming and elegant kusudama! The origami designs presented in this book include some traditional ones and our original kusudama designs - the Jasmine Sphere, the Kusudama ‘Pendant’, the Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Pendant’, the Kusudama ‘Roses’, the Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Roses’, the Kusudama ‘Star’, the Himalayan Poppy Sphere, the Tsuru Tama (or Crane Kusudama), the Lantern-like Tsuru Tama, the Fairy Wings Sphere and the Chinese Dogwood Sphere. Along with kusudama designs, there are also related decorative and floral models - the 2-Module Pendant, the Pendant ‘Rose’, 4- and 8-Pointed Stars, the Jasmine Flower, the Fairy Wings Flower and the Chinese Dogwood Flower, as well as Stalks and Oval Pointed Leaves for them. A pleasure to make and an even greater pleasure to decorate any space with, these kusudama designs will please the eyes of those who see them and will fill them with harmony and beauty. Kusudama ‘Roses’

Kusudama ‘Chinese Dogwood Sphere’

Why do we call them kusudama? KUSUDAMA is the Japanese word that stands for “healing sphere”, as KUSU means “healing herbs” and TAMA (DAMA) – a ball, spherical in shape. When the words "KUSU" and "TAMA" are combined, there is a change of the sound "T" to "D" and the word "KUSUDAMA" results. Originally it was an ornamental scent bag, but now it is used generally to describe a “decorative paper ball” usually made in the origami technique out of several modules connected together with or without glue to form a sphere. We can find notes about kusudama in Japanese literature of the 10th-11th centuries. In The Pillow Book (Makura no Soshi) by Sei Shonagon, where she offers her observations and musings of court life during the 990s and early 1000s in Heian Japan, she also mentioned how they used kusudama in so many ways… Inside these colorful pendant paper spheres were put aromatic herbs and they were hung up in sleeping rooms above the pillows and on curtains, believing that they protect people from illnesses and evil spirits. During the holiday,

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people were adorned with a kusudama attached to clothes: men attached them on their belts, and women decorated their sleeves with kusudama. Just imagine how they showed off! On the seasonal holiday of the fifth day of the fifth moon in old Japan, kusudama were acceptable gifts to give to one another. And they were used as charms or talismans to bring good fortune. Also on that holiday, people usually decorated rooms with kusudama amulets and left them there until “the ninth day of the ninth moon” or “The Chrysanthemums Holiday” when kusudama balls were replaced by Chrysanthemum flowers. Kusudama balls themselves used to be embellished with tassels from threads of different colors. Sometimes, kusudama have been given as a birthday gift. Today kusudama has not lost its delightful charm as well as its healing effect - it influences positively the mood of a person who made it or who receives it as a gift or even just looks at it. Along with traditional models of kusudama, many new works have been created by contemporary artists. Very often six modules, each folded from paper in the pure origami style, are glued together Kusudama ‘Jasmine Sphere’ to shape a sphere, which is a very common technique for making a kusudama. Depending on the kusudama design, its modules can be also sewn together or just attached with the help of clever folded paper locks without any glue. Kusudama designs can be made from numerous modules and in different shapes. But still 6-module designs have a certain charm when balancing the folding efforts and the elegance of the result. Kusudama spheres are wonderful decorations able to bring a unique atmosphere into every home. Let your creativity flourish, folding the charming kusudama designs from this book. Experiment with forms, colors, and different papers to add your own distinctive touch to these magic paper spheres. Add the charm of origami to your home - hang these marvelous spheres in a special place where you live or work. You may also put dried aromatic herbs into the kusudama before you add the last module, so your delightful paper sphere will fill the place where it hangs with herbal aromas. You can use these kusudama designs to decorate for a shower, wedding reception, or birthday party. You can adapt the color and scale to make holiday decorations these beautiful spheres will bring a magic touch to your event. The origami floral spheres can be a treasured gift for your friends and family too. Creative, original and beautiful! We do hope you will enjoy making these kusudama designs for pleasure, for a gift or for any interior. Have a creative and fun time! Happy folding! Kusudama ‘Pendant’

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Origami Charming Kusudama

The Authors, Katrin and Yuri Shumakov


Origami Symbols Valley fold

Mountain fold

Valley fold and unfold

Mountain fold and unfold

Open and squash

These simple origami symbols will help you to read diagrams of folding - they show the direction in which the paper has to be folded. Look at the diagram to note which way the lines and arrows all the symbols demonstrate, and fold your paper according to the diagram. To learn more about origami basics, please visit Oriversity section at our Oriland.com site.

Helpful Tips

Turn the paper over

Turn the paper around

- Fold the paper on a smooth surface with good lighting. - Move step by step and don't skip over the next diagram. - While folding, it’s good to pay attention Following diagram is enlarged to the diagram of the following step, where the result of the folding is shown. - After the step is done, don't forget to turn the model into the position shown in the next diagram. - Smooth out the creases carefully, do not make unnecessary folds. Following diagram is reduced - If you become confused with the diagrams, don't panic! Study previous steps and see if you missed something. Also, it might be a good idea to start anew. And most importantly, have fun! Inside reverse fold

Level of folding

Step fold

Pull out Push in. Sink

Simple Simple-Medium Medium Medium-Complex Complex

Outside reverse fold

The system of levels of folding is more like a guideline and mostly depends of your skills in paper folding. If you are a novice, even the simple level can be Fold the paper over and over challenging for you. And if you are already a connoisseur even a complex X-ray view model can be simple for you.

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Gallery Thin Flat Stalk

p. 13

p. 11

Kusudama ‘Pendant’

Jasmine Flower Jasmine Sphere

p. 9

p. 8

2-Module Pendant

p. 15

Pendant ‘Rose’

p. 20

Kusudama ‘Roses’

p. 18

Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Pendant’

p. 17

4-Pointed Star

p. 26

Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Roses’

p. 22

Kusudama ‘Star’

p. 23

8-Pointed Star

p. 26

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Origami Charming Kusudama


Tsuru Tama

p. 30

Himalayan Poppy Sphere

p. 27

Tsuru Tama with Inserts

p. 33

Lantern-like Kusudama Tsuru Tama

p. 36

Oval Pointed Leaf

p. 46

Fairy Wings Sphere

p. 38

Chinese Dogwood Flower

p. 44

Fairy Wings Flower

p. 39

Chinese Dogwood Sphere

p. 43

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Jasmine Sphere by Katin Shumakov

The kusudama ‘Jasmine Sphere’ is made up of six Jasmine flowers. Use 6 squares of paper, identical in size. You will also need paper glue and a piece of line to hang the kusudama. The diameter of the finished sphere will be a little bit more than a side of the initial square as pictured.

Suggested sizes: 4-inch (10cm) squares are working good for this design. In this case, the diameter of the finished sphere will be about 5 inches (12cm). Suggested paper: Regular origami paper, copy paper, washi paper and even semi-translucent paper like Japanese Sukashi paper (pictured here).

Suggested colors: Any you like. It’s better use paper, colored on both sides. Jasmine Sphere © 1995 Katrin Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


Jasmine Flower The Jasmine flower is a lovely design that folds with a dynamic sequence of simple creases with magic action in the end when the flower opens. Of course, it can be used not only for the kusudama, but on its own to make a charming origami bouquet, for instance. The finished flower will be measuring a bit more that 1/4 of the initial square, as pictured. If using two-color paper, begin with colored side up.

2

1

Valley fold the opposite corners together, in turn, to mark the diagonal fold lines, and open them up. Then, turn the paper over.

Valley fold the upper right-hand sloping edge over, so it lies along the vertical middle line. Repeat with the left-hand sloping edge.

3

4

Valley fold the opposite sides together in both directions, and open them up.

Bring the sides together and down towards you. Press the paper down neatly, thereby making a shape that, in origami, is called the preliminary fold.

Repeat step 4. 6 5

This should be the result. Turn the model over from side to side.

7 Working with the left-hand thin triangular flap, bring the bottom edge of this flap to the left into the vertical position. Note, the future fold-line shall pass through the side corner. Repeat with the right-hand triangular flap.

Jasmine Sphere Š 1995 Katrin Shumakov

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This should be the result. Turn the model over.

9

Repeat step 7. 10

8

Open out the flaps. Repeat behind.

11 Valley fold the right-hand flap over to the left, at the same time opening out and squashing the right-hand flap down neatly.

12 Open out the 'pocket' slightly... 13 Lift the bottom edge of the front layer up, thereby making a tent-like fold, at the same time valley folding the flap over to the right.

16 Valley fold the right-hand flap over to the left, as though turning the page of a book. Repeat behind.

14 Repeat steps 11 to 13 for the remaining three flaps.

15

This should be the result. Valley fold the front layer up. Repeat behind.

Jasmine Sphere Š 1995 Katrin Shumakov

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Valley fold the front layer up. Repeat behind.

18

By holding two opposite corners, move them in the direction shown by the arrows. Repeat this action a few times consecutively for each pair of corners, thereby opening the flower.

19 The Jasmine flower is ready!

In order to insert the stalk into the jasmine, stretch the petals slightly on its back side and insert the stalk’s tip into the opening in the middle. 20 Here is the completed Jasmine with the stalk. 21

Thin Flat Stalk

Use a strip of paper, for example, measuring about 1/3 or 1/4 of the size of the square used for the flower. Valley fold the paper strip 1 in half from top to bottom.

2

Here is the completed thin flat stalk.

Valley fold the rectangle over and over, as shown.

Bend the stalk a little, thereby giving it a natural look.

3

4 Jasmine Sphere Š 1995 Katrin Shumakov

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Kusudama Assembly The 6 flowers are glued together by the little triangular surfaces between the petals so that the surface of one flower covers a similar surface of another flower. In this way flowers make a sphere, where four of the flowers take up the position on the equator and two other flowers are on the poles. Use a piece of 1 line to hang the Jasmine Sphere, for instance, making a loop around one of the connections. 2

Here is the completed Kusudama ‘Jasmine Sphere’! 3

Jasmine Sphere © 1995 Katrin Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


Kusudama ‘Pendant’ Traditional Design

The introduction to the kusudama theme couldn’t be full without this wonderful traditional kusudama design, consisting of six modules. Besides here are presented swell ideas from Oriland on how to use these modules to create fancy decorations like the 10-module Lantern-like Kusudama and the 2-module Pendant! Use 6 squares of paper, identical in size. You will also need paper glue and a piece of line to hang the kusudama.

While the completed module will be measuring one quarter of the initial square, as pictured, the diameter of the finished sphere will be a little bit more than this, about 2/3 of the side of the initial square. Suggested sizes: Use an 8-inch (20 cm) square for each module. In this case, the diameter of the finished sphere will be about 6 inches (15 cm). Suggested paper: Regular origami paper, copy paper and various special papers like Japanese Dai Chiri paper in natural tones (pictured here).

Suggested colors: Any you like. You might choose one color for the whole kusudama or a few colors, for example, a 3-color scheme works well for a 6-module sphere when each color located on opposite sides as shown above. Also note that 2 sides of paper are visible on the completed module, so you might like to play with color change too. Traditional Kusudama ‘Pendant’, diagrammed by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Module If using two-color paper, begin with colored side down. Valley fold the opposite sides Valley fold the opposite corners together in both directions, together, in turn, to mark the and open them up. diagonal fold lines, and open them up. Then, turn the paper over. Valley fold the corners into the middle. Press 2 1 the paper flat. 3

Valley fold the corners into the middle. Press them flat and unfold them. Turn the paper over.

Open out the flaps as shown. Turn the paper over.

4

5

6

This should be the result. Turn the paper over.

Along the existing fold-lines, valley fold the middle points of the right- and left-hand sides as well as top and bottom edges to the center of the paper, thereby making four small square parts. Squash them flat.

This should be the result.

7

8 Working sequentially with each small square, valley fold the inner two edges over, so they lie along the middle fold-line. Press them flat.

Traditional Kusudama ‘Pendant’, diagrammed by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


9 Mountain fold the four corners behind along the adjacent edges as shown, thereby making the little triangular flaps on the reverse side. Press the paper flat.

10

11

Open out each flap and squash it down neatly into triangles as shown in the next step.

Here is the completed module for the traditional kusudama ‘Pendant’.

2-Module Pendant You can make a charming decoration out of 2 modules! Place the two modules crosswise and back to back. Lock them together by wrapping the four little triangles of each module around the other one.

1

4 The 2-Module Pendant is ready!

2 For the best result, lock the triangles, tucking them under the upper layer. You may also shift the triangular flaps adjusting the wrapping creases a bit, so there will be no tension between the modules.

3

Use a piece of line to hang the pendant, making a loop around the top triangular flap before locking it.

Traditional Kusudama ‘Pendant’, diagrammed by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Kusudama Assembly

The 6 modules are glued together by the little triangular surfaces as Back view. The modules will shown. In this way modules make a sphere, where four of them take be glued together by these up the position on the equator and two others are on the poles. little triangular surfaces. 1

2 This should be the result. Use a piece of line to hang the kusudama, making a loop around one of the connections.

4 3

Here is the completed Kusudama ‘Pendant’!

Traditional Kusudama ‘Pendant’, diagrammed by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Pendant’ Here is another neat idea on using such modules to make a very decorative lantern-like kusudama.

Use 10 squares of paper, identical in size. You will also need paper glue.

1 The modules are glued together by the little triangular surfaces as shown. In this way modules make an oblong shape, where two of them take up the position on the poles and eight others are on sides. Use a piece of line to hang this 2 decorative lantern, making a big loop around the top module, as shown. You can make this decoration as oblong as you wish, adding a 4-module row or rows in the middle. Have fun! The Lantern-like Kusudama 3 ‘Pendant’ is ready! Traditional Kusudama ‘Pendant’, diagrammed by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Kusudama ‘Roses’ Development of Traditional Design

This delightful globe of Roses is based on the traditional kusudama 'Pendant'. The Rose module is our development of the 'Pendant' module and can be folded from one square or from 2 squares to form a double rose. Besides the 6-module kusudama you will be able to create charming decorations like the 10-module Lantern-like Kusudama 'Roses' and the Pendant 'Rose'. Use 6 squares of paper, identical in size. You will also need paper glue and a piece of line to hang the kusudama. Optionally, you can make double roses, using 6 additional squares of paper, each a quarter of the initial square in size. While the completed Rose-module will be measuring one quarter of the initial square, as pictured, the diameter of the finished sphere will be about 2/3 of the side of the initial square. Suggested sizes: Use an 8-inch (20 cm) square for each module. In this case, the diameter of the completed sphere will be about 6 inches (15 cm). If you use 6-inch (15cm) squares, the diameter of the finished kusudama will be about 4-1/2 inches (11 cm). Suggested paper: Regular origami paper, copy paper and various special papers like Japanese handmade paper Moriki Kozo (pictured here).

Suggested colors: Tones of pink, purple, red and yellow will work wonderfully. You might choose one color for the whole kusudama or a few colors. When making modules as double roses it's good to use another color for the inserts, as pictured. Also, keep in mind that two sides of paper are visible on the completed module, so probably it’s better to use paper colored on both sides. Kusudama ‘Roses’ © 1996 Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


Module ‘Rose’ If using two-color paper, begin with colored side down. Working sequentially with each small Fold first 7 steps as shown for the module 1 square, valley fold the inner two 7 of kusudama ‘Pendant’ on page 14. edges over, so they lie along the middle fold-line. Press them flat. 8

9 Mountain fold the four corners behind along the adjacent edges as shown, thereby making the little triangular flaps on the reverse side. Press the paper flat.

10

Open out each little triangular flap. The module 13 ‘Rose’ is ready.

11

12 Working sequentially with each small square, separate the front This should be the result. layer and start rolling the flap on Now, roll the middle flaps, a thin cylindrical object, for thereby shaping the rose. example, a plastic knitting needle, as far as it will go. Kusudama ‘Roses’ © 1996 Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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To make a double Rose, use the additional module, folded from a square of paper, a quarter of the initial square of paper in size. Insert the small module into the big one as shown. 14

15 Here is the completed module ‘Double Rose’.

Pendant ‘Rose’ You can make a lovely hanging decoration out of Rose-modules be it single roses of double ones! Place the two modules crosswise and back to back. Lock them together by wrapping the four little triangles of each module around the other one. 1

2 For the best result, lock the triangles, tucking them under the upper layer. You may also shift the triangular flaps adjusting the wrapping creases a bit, so there will be no tension between the modules.

4 Here is the completed Pendant ‘Rose’ with double roses.

3 Use a piece of line to hang the pendant, making a loop around the top triangular flap before locking it. Kusudama ‘Roses’ © 1996 Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


Kusudama Assembly

The 6 modules are glued together by the little triangular surfaces as Back view. The modules will shown. In this way modules make a sphere, where four of them take be glued together by these up the position on the equator and two others are on the poles. little triangular surfaces.

1

2 This should be the result. Use a piece of line to hang the kusudama, making a loop around one of the connections.

4 3

Here is the completed Kusudama ‘Roses’!

Kusudama ‘Roses’ © 1996 Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Roses’ It is a lovely decorative lantern-like kusudama that will beautify any space.

Prepare 10 Rosemodules. They can be single roses of double ones.

1 The modules are glued together by the little triangular surfaces as shown. In this way modules make an oblong shape, where two of them take up the position on the poles and eight others are on sides. Use a piece of line to hang this 2 kusudama, making a big loop around the top module, as shown. You can make the lantern longer if you wish by adding a 4-module row or rows in the middle. Here is the completed 3 Lantern-like Kusudama ‘Roses’! Kusudama ‘Roses’ © 1996 Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


Kusudama ‘Star’ Traditional Design

This traditional kusudama design consists of six modules. The star-like module also can be used to make wonderful decorations like 4-Pointed Star and 8-Pointed Star. Use 6 squares of paper, identical in size. You will also need paper glue and a piece of line to hang the kusudama. The completed module will be measuring one quarter of the initial square, as pictured; the diameter of the finished sphere will be about a side of the initial square.

You can make this kusudama blossom by opening the layers of each module.

Suggested sizes: Use a 6-inch (15 cm) square for each module. In this case, the diameter of the completed sphere will be about 6 inches (15 cm). Suggested paper: Regular origami paper works wonderful, especially for the blossoming version of the kusudama. Of course, you can use regular copy paper and various special papers like Japanese handmade paper. Suggested colors: Any you like, however shades of blue would be the best choice for stars. Note that two sides of paper are visible on the completed module with opened layers, so you might like to play with color change as well. Traditional Kusudama ‘Star’, diagrammed by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Module ‘Star’ If using two-color paper, begin with colored side down. Fold first 10 steps in the same way as the module ‘Rose’, see page 19.

1

Working sequentially with each small square, separate the front layer and open it out, so that its edges meet in the middle, as shown in the next step.

10

11

This should be the result.

12

13

Back view. The modules will be glued together by these little triangular surfaces.

You may open the layers 14 slightly as shown. Here is the completed module ‘Star’.

Kusudama Assembly

Get ready 6 modules for the kusudama.

Traditional Kusudama ‘Star’, diagrammed by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


The 6 modules are glued together by the little triangular surfaces as shown. In this way modules make a sphere, where four of them take up the position on the equator and two other stars are on the poles. 1

2 This should be the result.

Here is the completed Kusudama ‘Star’!

Use a piece of line to hang the kusudama, making a loop around one of the connections.

3

You may open out the layers of each module to get the blossoming kusudama ‘Star’.

4

Traditional Kusudama ‘Star’, diagrammed by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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4-Pointed Star This star module makes a good Christmas decoration. Hook the string loop on the little triangle on the reverse side… and the decoration for your Christmas tree is ready!

8-Pointed Star You can make an Eight-Pointed Star out of 2 modules! Place the two modules crosswise and back to back. Lock them together by wrapping the four little triangles of each module around the other one.

1

2

Use a piece of line to hang the star, making a loop around the top triangular flap before locking it.

4 3

You can make a whole garland of such stars or just unite a couple of them to receive a lovely decoration. Also you can hang this star at the The 8-Pointed Star bottom of the kusudama as a tassel! is ready! Traditional Kusudama ‘Star’, diagrammed by Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


Himalayan Poppy Sphere Development of Traditional Design

This 6-module floral sphere of Himalayan Poppies is based on the traditional kusudama 'Pendant'. Each module is folded from one square, plus one smaller square used as an insert to make the poppy center in other color. Use 12 squares of paper - 6 big squares and 6 small squares of paper, each a quarter of the big square of paper in size. You will also need paper glue and a piece of line to hang the kusudama. The completed module will be measuring one quarter of the initial square, as pictured. The diameter of the finished sphere will be about a side of the initial square. Suggested sizes: Use 6-inch (15 cm) squares of paper for modules and 3-inch (7.5 cm) squares for the inserts. Suggested paper: Regular origami paper, copy paper and various special papers, for instance, Japanese handmade paper Moriki Kozo (pictured above). Suggested colors: Any shades of blue would work wonderful for the poppy modules, while yellow is preferable for the inserts. Note that two sides of paper are visible on the completed module, so you might like to play with color change as well.

Module

If using two-color paper, begin with colored side up. Fold first 6 steps as shown for the module of kusudama ‘Pendant’ on page 14.

1

6

Place the insert into the middle of the pre-folded paper as shown. 8 Along the existing fold-lines, valley fold the center points of the opposite sides and top and bottom edges 7 into the middle, thereby making four small squares. Squash them flat. Himalayan Poppy Sphere Š 1996 Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Working sequentially with each small square, valley fold the inner two edges over, so they lie along the middle fold-line. Press them flat. 9

10 Mountain fold the four corners back along the adjacent edges as shown, thereby making the little triangular flaps on the reverse side. Press the paper flat.

Open out each flap. 11 12 Working sequentially with each sector, separate the front layer and open it out, so that its edges meet in the middle, as shown in the next step.

Here is the completed module ‘Himalayan 16 Poppy’. 13 This should be the result.

14 Open out the layers as shown.

15 Valley fold the middle corners as shown. Press them flat, thereby forming the centre of the flower.

Himalayan Poppy Sphere © 1996 Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


Back view of the module. The modules will be glued together by these little triangular surfaces as shown. Note the petals of the flowers should remain free, not glue them. 17

Kusudama Assembly Get ready 6 modules to make the Himalayan Poppy Sphere.

1 The 6 modules are glued together by the little triangular surfaces as shown. In this way modules make a sphere, where four of poppies take up the position on the equator and two others are on the poles. Use a piece of line to hang the kusudama, making a loop around one of the connections.

2

3 Here is the completed kusudama ‘Himalayan Poppy Sphere’! Himalayan Poppy Sphere © 1996 Katrin and Yuri Shumakov

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Tsuru Tama by Katrin Shumakov

This original design of the 6-module sphere is featuring flying cranes on its facets, not literally, but in a rather recognizable form. We named this kusudama TSURU TAMA, combining two Japanese words. TSURU means a 'crane', which is one of favorite subjects of origami, symbolizing hope for peace. TAMA stands for a 'sphere' or 'decorative ball' and also it is a part of the word KUSUDAMA. Besides the 6-module scheme of the kusudama, it’s possible to create an attractive Lantern-like Tsuru Tama from 10 modules.

PEACE

Use 6 squares of paper, identical in size. You will also need paper glue and a piece of line to hang the kusudama. Optionally you can add inserts to modules, using 6 additional squares of paper, each a quarter of the initial square of paper in size. While the square basis of the completed module will be measuring one quarter of the initial square, as pictured, the diameter of the finished sphere will be about a side of the initial square. Suggested sizes: Use a 6-inch (15 cm) square for each module. In this case, the diameter of the completed sphere will be about 6 inches (15 cm). For the inserts, use 3-inch (7.5 cm) squares of paper.

Suggested paper: Regular origami paper works very well, as pictured. You also can use copy paper and various special papers of your choice. Suggested colors: Since both sides of paper are visible on the completed module, it is better to use 2-color paper with one side in white. Bright contrasting colors like blue, red etc are preferable. Tsuru Tama Š 2009 Katrin Shumakov

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Tsuru Module

If using two-color paper, begin with colored side down. Fold first 7 steps as shown for the module of kusudama ‘Pendant’ on page 14.

1

7

Working sequentially with each small square, valley fold the inner two edges over, so they lie along the middle fold-line. Press them flat. 8

9 Valley fold the four corners behind along the adjacent edges as shown, thereby making the little triangular flaps. Press them flat and unfold them.

10 Open out each flap.

Working with one small square, press on its corner marked by the dot, separate the front layer and open it out, so that its edges meet in the middle, as shown in the next step. 11

This should be the result.

13

12 The result. Now, working sequentially with remaining small squares, repeat step 11 for each of them. Tsuru Tama Š 2009 Katrin Shumakov

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Separate the flap from the middle as shown and accurately fold it up as far as it will go. Press the fold flat. 14 15 This should be the result. Unfold the front flap into the initial position. Repeat steps 14-15 for the remaining flaps.

16 Working with one side, separate the layers as shown. Inside reverse fold the flap up along the fold-line made in step 14, thereby bringing it into the position shown in the next step.

This should be the result. Repeat step 16 for the remaining sides. 17

Optionally, you can make small heads at the end of the necks of the cranes, similar to making the head at the traditional crane model.

17 Here is the completed module ‘Tsuru’.

The completed module is featuring 4 symbolic cranes on its facets that are touching each other on the corners. Tsuru Tama Š 2009 Katrin Shumakov

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Insert Optionally, you may want to add an insert into each module, which could feature a picture, a text, a texture or whatever you want. The side of the square for the insert is about 1/3 of the side of the initial square in size. For instance, if you use 6-inch (15cm) squares for the modules, take the 2-inch squares for the inserts.

PEACE 1

This should be the result. 2

Insert the corners of the little square into the pockets of the module as shown.

PEACE

Create a certain mood with your inserts to give your Tsuru Tama an additional meaning. Be creative!

3

4 Here is how the completed Tsuru Tama with the inserts looks like.

Tsuru Tama Š 2009 Katrin Shumakov

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Kusudama Assembly The 6 modules are glued together by the little triangular surfaces as shown. In this way modules make a sphere/cube, where four of the modules take up the position on the equator and two other modules are on the poles. 1

Back view of the module. The modules will be glued together by these little triangular surfaces.

This should be the result. 2

Tsuru Tama Š 2009 Katrin Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


3

To hang the Tsuru Tama, take 3 pieces of line, the same length, and tide them together on one end. Locate the knot inside the kusudama and pass the strings through openings between modules as shown on the picture. Then, tide them together on other end.

Here is the completed Tsuru Tama! 4

Don’t forget that you can add inserts to each module, so that your Tsuru Tama will bear an additional meaning. Tsuru Tama Š 2009 Katrin Shumakov

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Lantern-like Tsuru Tama Use 10 squares of paper, identical in size. You will also need paper glue.

Using the Tsuru Tama module it’s possible to create an attractive Lantern-like Tsuru Tama!

The Lantern-like Tsuru Tama consists of 10 modules. 1 The modules are glued together by the little triangular surfaces as shown. In this way modules make an oblong shape, where two of them take up the position on the poles and 8 other modules are on sides.

This should be the result.

2

Tsuru Tama Š 2009 Katrin Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


3

Use a piece of line to hang the Lantern-like Tsuru Tama, making a big loop around the top module.

4 Here is the completed Tsuru Tama!

You can make this decoration as oblong as you wish, adding a 4-module row or rows in the middle. You may even do a lampshade out of this design. If you do not attach the bottom module, the lantern will have an opening. Have fun! Tsuru Tama Š 2009 Katrin Shumakov

Origami Charming Kusudama

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Fairy Wings Sphere by Yuri Shumakov

The kusudama ‘Fairy Wings Sphere’ is made up of six Fairy Wings flowers. Use 6 squares of paper, identical in size. You will also need paper glue and a piece of line to hang the kusudama.

The diameter of the finished sphere will be a little bit more than a side of the initial square as pictured.

Suggested sizes: Use 4-inch (10 cm) squares of paper. In this case, the diameter of the finished sphere will be about 5 inches (12 cm). Suggested paper: Regular origami paper and various special papers of your choice as long as it's not soft and weak. Regular color copy paper works very well too, as pictured here. Suggested colors: Any you like. It’s better use paper, colored on both sides. ‘Fairy Wings’ is a decorative plant with airy dainty four-petaled flowers and very attractive heart-shaped foliage. Its botanical name is ‘Epimedium’, but it also known as ‘Bishop's Hat’ hinting at the shape and colorfulness of the leaf or ‘Barrenwort’ alluding to its herbal usage. In Nature, depending on the species and selections, flowers are in colors ranging from white and yellow to rose and violet, as well as in different graceful shapes from star-like to even spider-like or bell-like. Of course, the paper variant of Fairy Wings flowers can be colored upon your wish. Fairy Wings Sphere © 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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Fairy Wings Flower The flower is a nice design that can be used not only for the kusudama, but on its own to make a lovely origami bouquet. The finished flower will be measuring a bit more that 2/3 of the initial square, as pictured. If using two-color paper, begin with colored side up. 1

Valley fold the opposite corners together, in turn, to mark the diagonal fold lines, and open them up. Then, turn the paper over. 2

Bring the sides together and down towards you. Press the paper down neatly, thereby making a shape that, in origami, is called the preliminary fold.

Valley fold the lower sloping edges over, so they lie along the middle fold-line. Press them flat and unfold them. Repeat behind. 4

Valley fold the opposite sides together in both directions, and open them up.

3

Valley fold the right-hand flap over to the left, as though turning the page of a book. Repeat behind.

Inside reverse fold the right- and left-hand points into the model along the fold-lines made in step 4. Repeat behind. 6

5

Fairy Wings Sphere Š 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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Return the front flap into the initial position. Repeat behind.

8 7 This should be the result that, in origami, is called the bird base with lowered flaps. Lift the front flap up as far as it will go. Repeat behind.

Valley fold the right- and left-hand points of the front layer into the middle. Repeat behind. 11 Separate the layer as shown and open it out together with the folded flap perpendicularly as shown in the next step. Repeat behind.

12

Valley fold the right-hand flap over to the left, as though turning the page of a book. Repeat behind. 9

10

Lift the front flap up as far as it will go. Repeat behind.

13 This should be the result. Turn the model around to the left into the position shown in the next step.

Continue lifting the bottom flap up along the existing fold-line.

16

15 14 Pinch the side layers and pull them apart, and lift up the bottom point‌ Fairy Wings Sphere Š 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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This should be the result. Turn the model over.


17

By holding two opposite corners, move them in the direction shown by the arrows. Repeat this action a few times consecutively for each pair of corners, thereby opening the flower.

Separate and pinch the side layers. Then, pull them apart, and lift up the bottom flap.

18

Here is the completed flower of Fairy Wings. 19

Here is the completed flower with the stalk.

Adding Flat Stalk

If you would like you can add a stalk to your flower. In this case, take a rectangle of paper for the stalk, approximately 1 to 4 in proportion, with the short side measuring about 1/2 of the side of the square used for the flower.

3

1 Step fold the tip of the flat stalk, as shown, so that the upper section is equal to the diameter of the flower center.

2 Insert the folded tip of the flat stalk into the hole on the underneath side of the flower.

Fold the Thin Flat Stalk in the same manner as shown on page 11.

Fairy Wings Sphere Š 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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Kusudama Assembly Get 6 flowers ready. The flowers are glued together by the little triangular surfaces between the petals so that the surface of one flower covers a similar surface of another flower. 1

Make a floral trio, connecting 3 flowers together as shown. Make another floral trio and then, glue two trios together by the little triangular surfaces between the petals to make a sphere. In this way flowers make a globular shape, where four of the flowers take up the position on the equator and two other flowers are on the poles. 2

Here is the completed Kusudama ‘Fairy Wings Sphere’! 4

3 Use a piece of line to hang the Fairy Wings Sphere, for instance, making a loop around one of the connections. You can add leaves hanging from the bottom of the kusudama. You also can arrange this kusudama on a green branch, if you wish.

Fairy Wings Sphere © 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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Chinese Dogwood Sphere by Yuri Shumakov

The kusudama ‘Chinese Dogwood Sphere’ is made up of six Chinese Dogwood flowers. Use 6 squares of paper, identical in size. You will also need paper glue and a piece of line to hang it.

The diameter of the finished sphere will be a little bit more than a side of the initial square as pictured.

Suggested sizes: Use 4-inch (10 cm) squares of paper. In this case, the diameter of the finished sphere will be about 5 inches (12 cm). Suggested paper: Regular origami paper, color copy paper and various special papers of your choice as long as it keeps folds well. Suggested colors: Any you like. It’s better to use paper, colored on both sides. The Chinese Dogwood is a small flowering tree or large multi-stemmed shrub. Its botanical name is Cornus kousa; it belongs to the genus Cornus, in the dogwood family (Cornaceae), native to China, Korea and Japan. The Latin word ‘Cornus’ means ‘horn’, that appealing to the strong heavy wood of representatives of this genus. Versatile Dogwoods are famous for their showy flower heads and excellent foliage. The attractive parts of the Chinese dogwood ‘flower’ are the four large, tapered, creamy white flower bracts, which surround the center cluster of yellowish-green true flowers. The Chinese Dogwood is renowned for its dark green leaves, which turn crimson-purple in autumn. Without doubt, the Chinese Dogwood deserves to be depicted in paper. In its bloom time, you do not need to cut a branch to create an unforgettable indoor display; you may just fold a flowering branch of this incredible Chinese dogwood or make a delightful paper sphere of them and enjoy it all year round! Chinese Dogwood Sphere © 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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Chinese Dogwood Flower

The flower is a nice design that can be used not only for the kusudama, but on its own to make a lovely origami bouquet. The completed flower will be measuring a bit more that 2/3 of the initial square, as pictured. If using two-color paper, begin with colored side up. 1 7

First 7 steps are the same as for the Fairy Wings flower, pages 39 - 40. Valley fold the left-hand lower triangular flap over, so its inner edge lies along the horizontal middle line. Press it flat and unfold it. Repeat the same with the right-hand flap.

Return the front flap into the initial position. Repeat behind. 9

8

10 Valley fold the right-hand flap over to the left, as though turning the page of a book. Repeat behind. 11

Lift the front flap up as far as it will go. Repeat behind.

This should be the result. Turn the model around to the left into the position shown in the next step.

Valley fold the right- and left-hand points of the front layer into the middle. Repeat behind.

15 12 Repeat step 8 for the lower flaps.

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14 Separate the layer as shown and open it out together with folded flap perpendicularly as 13 shown in the next step. Repeat behind. Chinese Dogwood Sphere Š 1998 Yuri Shumakov

Origami Charming Kusudama


16

Pinch the side layers and pull them apart, and lift up the bottom point‌

17

18

Continue lifting the bottom flap up along the existing fold-line.

By holding two opposite double flaps, move them in the direction shown by the arrows. Repeat this action a few times consecutively for each pair of double flaps, thereby opening the flower. 20

This should be the result. Turn the model over.

19

Separate and pinch the side layers. Then, pull them apart, and lift up the bottom flap.

By working with one petal, carefully form the valley fold on the convex surface of the petal. 21

22

Gently press the marked convex places down, thereby shaping the surface curving inward. The existing fold-lines will give guidance on the borders of the petal.

24

23

This should be the result. Repeat steps 21 and 22 with the remaining petals.

Slightly pinch the borders of the two petals as shown, thereby making them sharp and giving a spoon-like shape to concave petals. Repeat the same on other sides.

Chinese Dogwood Sphere Š 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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25

Pinch the corner of each petal.

26

Here is the completed flower of Chinese Dogwood.

Adding Flat Stalk You can add a stalk to your flower. In this case, take a rectangle of paper for the stalk, approximately 1 to 4 in proportion, with the short side measuring about 1/2 of the side of the square used for the flower. Fold the Thin Flat Stalk in the same manner as shown on page 11.

3 Here is the completed flower with the stalk.

1 Step fold the tip of the flat stalk, as shown, so that the upper section is equal to the diameter of the flower center.

2 Insert the folded tip of the flat stalk into the hole on the underneath side of the flower.

Oval Pointed Leaf

Use a square of paper about the same size used for the flower. It’s better to use paper, colored on both sides, for example, regular copy paper. If using two-color paper, begin with colored side up. 2 1 Valley fold the paper in half from left to the right. Press it flat.

Valley fold the left-hand side over to the right along the fold-line passing from the one-fourth of the lower sloping edge to the top point, as shown. Chinese Dogwood Sphere Š 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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1) Valley fold the upper right-hand sloping edge of the triangular flap over, so it lies along the left-hand sloping edge. Press it flat and unfold it. 2)Then, open out the paper into the position shown in the next step.

Step fold the paper along the existing fold-lines.

4

3

2 5

1

Separate the layers and valley fold the left-hand point of the front flap over to the right, so the marked dots coincide.

This should be the result. Valley fold the right-hand flap over to the left.

6

Valley fold the right-hand lower sloping edge over, so it lies along the vertical middle line.

8 7 Once again valley fold the right-hand lower sloping edge over, as shown.

Valley fold the right-hand point of the front flap over to the left along the adjacent edge, so the marked dots coincide. 12

9 Valley fold the two left-hand flaps over to the right, as though turning the page of a book.

11 10 Valley fold the left-hand lower sloping edge over, as shown.

Once again valley fold the left-hand lower sloping edge over.

Chinese Dogwood Sphere Š 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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13

Separate the layers and valley fold the front flap over to the left, thus opening the leaf plate.

Here is the completed Oval Pointed Leaf.

14

15

Mountain fold the side corners as shown, thereby shaping the leaf.

You can curve the leaf’s tip, thereby giving it a natural look. To make the patterned leaf as if with veins, you need to place the leaf on top of a napkin or a few soft sheets, then using a pointed (but not sharp) stick like a toothpick, press out and emboss the lines on the leaf as shown. 16

17

Here is the completed Oval Pointed Leaf with veins.

Kusudama Assembly The 6 Chinese Dogwood blooms make up a wonderful kusudama! Get 6 flowers ready. You will also need paper glue and a piece of line to hang the kusudama. 1 Back view. The flowers are glued together by marked surfaces on the petals. Chinese Dogwood Sphere Š 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Charming Kusudama


The 6 modules are glued together by the little triangular surfaces as shown. 2

In this way modules make a sphere, where four of them take up the position on the equator and two other modules are on the poles.

Use a piece of line to hang the Chinese Dogwood Sphere, making a loop around one of the connections.

3

5

4 Here is the completed kusudama ‘Chinese Dogwood Sphere’. You can add leaves hanging from the bottom of the kusudama or arrange this kusudama on a green branch. Chinese Dogwood Sphere © 1998 Yuri Shumakov

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Y

About Authors

uri and Katrin Shumakov - a stellar artist-duo, professional origami creators, who started their origami journey in France in 1989 and since then unfold this art in a heretofore unseen way! They have created amazing paper world ORILAND with incredible fantasy Kingdoms that impress with rich detail of majestic castles, abundance of paper flora and busy life of little paper dwellers. Their newest kingdoms Toy-ronto and Albuquerque combine fantasy and reality together, presenting a whimsical artistic rendition of iconic sights of these cities. Another beautiful and elegant aspect of origami they brought to life is ORIBANA - a marriage of two Japanese arts: Origami and Ikebana. By combining these remarkable art-forms, in early 1990s Katrin and Yuri began to create paper flower arrangements in paper vases and thought up a distinctive name for it - Oribana. Since then they designed more than 50 charming oribana-compositions with a broad variety of origami flowers, leaves and vases. Being prolific origami authors they created more than a thousand of origami designs from simple forms and cute characters to complex dinosaurs' skeletons and architecture that all have a distinctive Oriland style. Their Oriland Magic Star is a big action origami hit that amazes and dazzles with its mesmerizing effect when rotated. Psychologists by education, Katrin and Yuri Shumakov have studied how origami helps children learn. Their Ph.D scientific work shows that by doing origami, children develop better use of both hands, whether they are left- or right- handed. They also discovered that origami can improve creativity and intelligence in children ages 7 to 11. They believe that origami is "entertainment for the soul, gymnastics for the mind, and training for the hands." In 1999, Yuri and Katrin received the Silver Award in the ThinkQuest International Competition for their 'Travel to Oriland' website and it brought them and their team to Universal Studios Hollywood for the Award Ceremony! Their Oriland.com website became a winner of the Childnet Award that was given them in Paris, France. Both these projects were acknowledged as high quality creative, educational and fun websites for children and adults. Yuri and Katrin have written more than 30 origami books and instructional CDs, and their works have been exhibited in many countries including several venues in the United States, France, Spain and Canada. The Shumakovs also extend their artistic talents to the realm of photography and music. Katrin is a winner of the Toronto Photo Contest 2010; her photo art-works were recently exhibited across Canada. Yuri is enjoying music composing and sound design; he has released eight music albums in Space, Ambient, New Age and Smooth Jazz genres. Katrin and Yuri live in Toronto, Canada, love yoga and a healthy style of life. Visit their Oriland website to see what origami can be! http://www.oriland.com

Oriland’s TOY-RONTO Kingdom, Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto, ON, Canada, 2013.

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