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5 TIPS FOR HAND PIECING

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t rt ith BLOCKS MADE WITH

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GET TO KNOW DESIGNER AllPeopleQuilt.com AUGUST 2018 • ISSUE 153

KATJA MAREK

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your quilting GAMMILL COMPUTERIZATION FOR ONLY

$10,999 The Elevate is an entry-level computerized quilting system for Gammill machines. Quickly place, edit and quilt perfect patterns with Elevate’s easy-to-use tablet. Add the Elevate to your existing Gammill machine or purchase as a complete system.

PRO TIP: Combine computerized quilting and free-hand for a custom look. Learn how Gammill Quilt Artist Jodi Robinson used her pattern at Gammill.com/Elevate-Project

GAMMILL.COM/ELEVATE


FROM THE

e itor DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE PRECUT?

Like the uniqueness of the quilts we make, every quilter has an opinion on precuts. Some love 2½"-wide strips while others prefer fat eighths, fat quarters, or 5" squares. Some want bundles containing only light colors, while others would like to see bundles of only dark colors. Every so often we hear a quilter say she wants bundles of only pretty fabrics, which is an impossible request because of personal taste. We once had a quilter suggest that all precut sizes be divisible by four inches so she could mix and match her collections. In this issue we have included products and books that showcase precuts (see pages 8–10). And any project in this issue that is precut-friendly can be easily identiied by the icon, right. I would love to hear your tips for using precuts. Share your insights with us on Facebook.com/allpeoplequilt. Visit us online at AllPeopleQuilt.com/precuts for even more inspiration and to ind a slideshow of projects that use a variety of precut shapes.

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH TEAM APQ!

Audience insights manager Lindsay Mayland loves binding quilts. She was a featured block designer in the The Splendid Sampler quilt coordinated by Pat Sloan and Jane Davidson.

Graphic designer Alison Gamm shows of one of her blocks from the Sienna Burst Quilt-Along by designer Meghan Buchanan of Then Came June (thencamejune.com).

After seeing collector Karen Taylor’s toy and miniature sewing machines, editor Jody Sanders bought a vintage toy sewing machine on Etsy. Flip to “Collector’s Corner,” page 104, to see some of Karen’s treasures.

Associate editor Lisa Schumacher recently received project submissions for Quilt Sampler® Fall/ Winter 2018. Quilt Sampler Spring/Summer 2018 is on sale now; visit your local quilt shop or newsstand to get your copy.

AllPeopleQuilt.com

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co te ts AUGUST 2018

VOL. 26 NO. 4 ISSUE 153

IN THIS ISSUE 1 6 12 14 100 104

FROM THE EDITOR SEW IN THE KNOW READER TIPS DESIGNER SPOTLIGHT BACK TO BASICS COLLECTOR’S CORNER

cover photo Adam Albright

PROJECT INDEX

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APQ • August 2018

20

100% CHARMING

64

RICH TRADITION

by Amanda Niederhauser

by Sharon Tucker

26

HANDMADE MEDALLIONS

70

DOWN THE MIDDLE

by Cindy Blackberg

by Kim Schaefer


40

78

SCRAPPY BLUES by Annette Plog

TIME TO SHINE by Tifany Hayes

48

BARN DANCE

86

CONNECTING STARS

by Candy Hargrove

by Katie Hennagir

56

SUMMERTIME

92

SIGN UP

by Susan Ache

by Linda Augsburg

AllPeopleQuilt.com

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originally?

Ke i Find us online: AllPeopleQuilt.com instagram.com/allpeoplequilt facebook.com/allpeoplequilt pinterest.com/allpeoplequilt twitter.com/allpeoplequilt

Subscription help: Visit: AllPeopleQuilt.com/myaccount Email: apqcustserv@cdsfulfillment.com Call: 800/677-4876

Retailers: To order American Patchwork & Quilting, Quilt Sampler®, Quilts and More™, and other quilting magazines, email apq2@meredith.com or call 866/378-1064.

Letters & comments: apq@meredith.com

Note to readers: It is permissible to make and publicly display a single finished product of any project in this issue, including for purposes of competitive winnings up to $1,000, so long as visible credit is given to the designer and American Patchwork & Quilting magazine.

Our romise Prior to publication we cut, sew, and assemble at least four blocks of every quilt to verify the accuracy of our patterns and instructions. Then an experienced team of editors reviews the materials lists, how-to directions, and illustrations to make sure the information we provide you is clear, concise, and complete. The Staff of American Patchwork & Quilting

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APQ • August 2018

Monique Dillard, Angela Ingle, Kristine Peterson

CONTRIBUTING QUILT TESTERS Martha Gamm, Sharon McConnell, Colleen Tauke

CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR Mary Helen Schiltz CONTRIBUTING TECHNICAL EDITORS Sue Bahr, Lisa Flyr

ANSWER: It is a Florian Pinker from the collection of Martha Klatt. This right- or left-handed rotary tool has been used since the mid-1930s to make a continuous pinked edge.

Pick up Quilt Sampler® Spring/Summer 2018 for the latest 10 top shops and new projects. Buy it at local quilt shops or on newsstands.

DESIGNER Elizabeth Stumbo CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Chris Neubauer CONTRIBUTING PHOTO STYLISTS Tari Colby, Innovize Group ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Lori Eggers

MANAGING EDITOR Janet Klockenga PRODUCT EDITOR Lindsay Mayland CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

CRAFTS GROUP EXECUTIVE EDITOR Karman Wittry Hotchkiss GROUP EDITOR Jody Sanders MANAGING EDITOR Janet Klockenga EDITOR Joanna Burgarino ASSOCIATE EDITOR Lisa Schumacher AUDIENCE INSIGHTS MANAGER Lindsay Mayland EDITORIAL APPRENTICE Megan Mowery

PRESIDENT/GROUP PUBLISHER Scott Mortimer ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Amy Gates amy.gates@meredith.com

ACCOUNT MANAGER Amber Darby amber.darby@meredith.com

SALES PROMOTION MANAGER Bethany Peterson bethany.peterson@meredith.com

SALES ASSISTANT

DESIGN DIRECTOR Kimberly Morgan Metz GROUP ART DIRECTOR Nicole Dean Teut ART DIRECTOR Elizabeth Stumbo GRAPHIC DESIGNER Alison Gamm ART APPRENTICE Ashton Temple

Ashley Jacobs ashley.jacobs@meredith.com

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Lori Eggers ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer Speer Ramundt SENIOR COPY EDITOR Erika Bjorklund BUSINESS MANAGER, EDITORIAL Cindy Slobaszewski LEAD BUSINESS OFFICE ASSISTANT Gabrielle Renslow

PREPRESS DESKTOP SPECIALIST David Swain COLOR QUALITY ANALYST Heidi Parcel DIRECTOR, PREMEDIA SERVICES Amy Tincher-Durik DIRECTOR OF QUALITY Joseph Kohler DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY Reese Strickland PHOTO STUDIO SET CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR April Bracelin PRODUCTION MANAGER Debbie Reynolds ASSOCIATE BUSINESS DIRECTOR Jenna Bates BUSINESS MANAGER Lisa Carlson CONSUMER MARKETING MANAGER Blaine Rourick

Dave DeCarlo

PHOTO STUDIO BUSINESS MANAGER Terri Charter

MEREDITH NATIONAL MEDIA GROUP President JON WERTHER Meredith Magazines President DOUG OLSON President, Meredith Digital STAN PAVLOVSKY President, Consumer Products TOM WITSCHI Chief Revenue Oicer MICHAEL BROWNSTEIN Chief Marketing & Data Oicer ALYSIA BORSA Marketing & Integrated Communications NANCY WEBER SENIOR VICE PRESIDENTS Consumer Revenue ANDY WILSON Digital Sales MARLA NEWMAN Research Solutions BRITTA CLEVELAND Chief Digital Oicer MATT MINOFF VICE PRESIDENTS Finance CHRIS SUSIL Business Planning & Analysis ROB SILVERSTONE Content Licensing LARRY SOMMERS Corporate Sales BRIAN KIGHTLINGER Direct Media PATTI FOLLO Strategic Sourcing, Newsstand, Production CHUCK HOWELL Consumer Marketing STEVE CROWE ––––––––––––––– MEREDITH CORPORATION President and Chief Executive Oicer TOM HARTY Chief Financial Oicer JOSEPH CERYANEC Chief Development Oicer JOHN ZIESER President, Meredith Local Media Group PAUL KARPOWICZ Human Resources DINA NATHANSON Executive Chairman STEPHEN M. LACY Vice Chairman MELL MEREDITH FRAZIER –––––––––––––––

For editorial questions: American Patchwork & Quilting, 1716 Locust St., LN-204, Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. Advertising: American Patchwork & Quilting, 1716 Locust St., LN-200, Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. Phone: 515/284-3575. Fax: 515/284-3110. SUBSCRIBER PLEASE NOTE: Our subscribers list is occasionally made available to carefully selected irms whose products may be of interest to you. If you prefer not to receive information from these companies by mail or by phone, please let us know. Send your request along with your mailing label to Magazine Customer Service, P.O. Box 37508, Boone, IA 50037-0508. For reuse and reprint requests, contact CLpermissions@meredith.com.

PRINTED IN THE USA


WHITE CHRISTMAS

© 2018 moda fabrics • all rights reserved

PRE-CUTS, YARDAGE, AND PATTERNS IN STORES JUNE, 2018. TO SEE MORE MODERN ELEGANCE FROM ZEN CHIC VISIT MODAFABRICS.COM AND BRIGITTEHEITLAND.DE


SEW IN THE KNOW

o li e

PATRIOTIC PROJECTS Star blocks and red, white, and blue fabrics shine in these quilts. AllPeopleQuilt.com/568

PRECUT STRIPS Make fun quilts based on precut 2½"-wide strips. AllPeopleQuilt.com/569

GO SHOPPING

SUBSCRIBE

BLOCK LIBRARY

Buy your favorite patterns from past issues or get our complete magazine archive at our online store. APQshop.com

Get our best patterns and tips delivered to your in-box with our free weekly newsletter. AllPeopleQuilt.com/ newsletter

Find patterns for more than 100 quilt blocks (from pieced to appliquéd) in a variety of sizes. AllPeopleQuilt .com/blocks

FOLLOW US

search: American Patchwork & Quilting

T-SHIRT QUILTS Preserve memories in T-shirt quilts that accommodate a variety of logo sizes. AllPeopleQuilt.com/570

@allpeoplequilt

iste I ! Subscribe to the American Patchwork & Quilting® podcast, hosted by designer Pat Sloan, on iTunes or your favorite podcast app. AllPeopleQuilt.com/podcast

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APQ • August 2018

EPP Try English paper piecing for a project you can take on the go. AllPeopleQuilt.com/571


FEATURING THE ARTISAN SLIMLINE QUILTER

Your Next Quilt Design Project: Your Studio Your quilting needs are unique and that means you need a studio designed speciically for you. Look no further than a Koala studio – it compliments your unique style and creativity. Each studio is built with quality components and innovative features that suit your exact speciications. You choose the workspace, storage and even additional shelving, right down to a variety of elegant inishes that compliment your home décor. Plus, each studio is built at the just the right height for you and can be used comfortably sitting or standing, perfectly matching your working style, while a machine lit raises or lower your machine exactly where you need it. The quilting studio of your dreams is inally within reach. Visit a Koala retailer or ind one near you at koalacabinets.com/retailer.

ARTISAN COLLECTION

HERITAGE COLLECTION

STATION COLLECTION

If you’re looking for more storage, the Artisan Thread Closet holds 100 spools up to mini-king size on durable metal pegs. Each shelf holds 20 spools with shelves that tilt forward for easy access to the back rows.


SEW IN THE KNOW

ro ucts

WAFER 3 LIGHTBOX For ease in placing appliqué shapes and tracing patterns, templates, and embroidery designs, use a lightweight, dimmable LED lightbox that is large enough to accommodate fat quarters. $360 | daylightcompany.com

A ust light ox right ess ith touch.

PRECUT FABRICS Start sewing sooner with fabrics cut in sizes that will work for a variety of projects. MODA FABRICS COLOR CUTS Build your stash with six curated color sets, each featuring 12 fabrics from a variety of Moda designers. They come in three precut sizes, right. $38.98 for fat quarters; $20.98 for 10" squares; $22.98 for 5×42" strips | available at local quilt shops and online retailers

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APQ • August 2018

FAT QUARTERS (18×21")

10" SQUARES

5×42" STRIPS


FAT & FULL TOTE BAG

GOOD READS

Carry sewing supplies or everyday essentials in a sassy 19×15½" tote from Connecting Threads.

Try the patterns in these books to make the best use of your precut fabrics.

$15.99 | connectingthreads.com

EASY QUILTS FROM PRECUT FABRICS Author Sue Pfau shares tips for mixing and matching fabrics in a variety of precut sizes to get a scrappy look in 10 classic quilt patterns. $19.99 | shopmartingale.com

PRECUT WOOL PENNIES To save time when appliquéing, use precut wool pennies, available in nine diameters (ranging from ¾" to 3½") from Primitive Gatherings. Choose from black or assorted colors in quantities of 25, 50, or 100. Starting at $4 | primitivegatherings.us

CRAFTY LITTLE THINGS TO SEW Sew small projects fast using fat quarters and your scraps. The 20 projects from author Caroline Fairbanks-Critchield, including a travel iron mat and quilty irst kit, are designed to be inished in a day. $16.95 | amazon.com

MINI-CHARM QUILTS

ctu l size

Make a big impact with 2½" squares. A variety of Moda designers share their favorite projects—from pincushions to small quilts—that use these small precuts. $24.99 | shopmartingale.com

AllPeopleQuilt.com

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SEW IN THE KNOW

ro ucts or ki s

Teach children to sew using products meant just for them! photographer Marty Baldwin

1. THE FLYING SEWING MACHINE

3. AURIKIDS SPOOL-EN-DIDS

Ignite an interest in sewing with a children’s picture book by Nancy Zieman that takes readers to a magical land where everyone sews. $9.99 | shopmartingale.com

Introduce a child to embroidery and embellishing with an Auriil thread box curated by Gwendolyn Sheppard, daughter of designer Wendy Sheppard. The box includes 10 loss spools.

2. FULL-SIZE SEWING MACHINE

$50 | fatquartershop.com

This Janome lightweight sewing machine has all the features beginners need to get started, including 15 built-in stitches and a four-step buttonhole stitch. Dials control stitch selection, width, and length. It is available in three colors: Arctic Crystal, Pink Sorbet, and Blue Couture. $199 | janome.com

4. I SEW FOR FUN TOOLS Make sewing enjoyable with stylish kid-safe products designed by Nancy Zieman for Clover, including a seam guide, presser foot, heart-shape magnetic pincushion and pins, retractable seam ripper, and Wonder Clips. products start at $5.75 | clover-usa.com

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APQ • August 2018

sser he Clover re le shiel oot h s ee ers. g to rotect i


READER

ti s A CUT ABOVE Clipping curved seams can be tedious. I’ve found that using pinking shears for the task saves me time and keeps me from clipping into the seams. —Becky Magness Layton, Utah

Share your tips!

Email your original tip, name, address, and phone number to apqtips@meredith.com. For each tip we publish in the magazine, we’ll send a gift handpicked by our editors.

WITHOUT A TRACE When cutting out fabric for a quilt, I put tracing paper over the cutting instructions and use a pen to cross out each step as I complete it. This way I don’t lose track of where I am, and my book or magazine stays clean. —Shellie Moniz Johnston, Rhode Island

SNAP A PIC For extra inspiration, I use a photo of a quilt I’m working on or have just inished as the wallpaper on my cell phone’s lock screen. It makes me smile every time I look at my phone! —Dena Miller Rocky Mountain House, Alberta

GET A GRIP To keep my sewing machine pedal from sliding as I sew, I stuck small adhesive-backed grip discs (used to keep plastic rulers from slipping) to its rubber feet. —Phyllis Barry Whitman, Massachusetts

For more of our favorite reader tips, visit AllPeopleQuilt.com/tips.

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APQ • August 2018

SMARTY PANTS Because my sewing room is also our guest room, I sometimes need to put my sewing supplies away. To store my cutting mats where they won’t get bent, I clip them to pants hangers and stash them in the closet. The hanger clips are strong enough to hold two mats each. —Norma Curtis Kleinburg, Ontario


Summer Sun, Stitching Fun! Find your ray of sunshine this summer in new books from Martingale! Visit a vintage French Farmhouse, forge a new path on A Prairie Journey, grace your spaces with Table-Runner Roundup, or treat yourself to a year of inspiration with Sue Spargo’s Stitches to Savor 2019 Calendar.

Above: Projects from French Farmhouse

Find these and other exciting new books at ShopMartingale.com.


DESIGNER

s otlight

u Check It O

t!

See Fancy Florals, page 16, for another quilt inspired by Katja Marek’s hexagon designs.

Kt

rek

“I started my work life in banking and moved into quilting in 1999 when I opened Katja’s Quilt Shoppe, in Kamloops, British Columbia. In 2012, I launched a shop program using hexagons as blocks rather than units, which led to my irst book, The New Hexagon: 52 Blocks to English Paper Piece, published in 2014. Shortly after, I launched my irst online quilt-along, which I based on those 52 “fractured” hexies. In 2016, I published 365 more fractured hexagons in a perpetual calendar. My latest book, Distinctive Dresdens, released in 2017, takes a new approach to the Dresden Plate block.” Photo 1: Hex-plosion, Katja’s late2017 quilt-along. Photo 2: Katja used neutral sashing to showcase vibrant fractured hexagons. Photo 3: In Shine Katja combined triangles and 24 fractured hexagons from The New Hexagon Perpetual Calendar. Photo 4: Perpetually Hexie, Katja’s 2017 quilt-along.

CURRENT

Quilt block Circling Swallows

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APQ • August 2018

vorites

1

2

3

4

Sewing tools 18-millimeter Olfa rotary cutter and 4×8" Omnigrid ruler

Free-time activity Working in my vegetable garden

Snack while quilting Popcorn


Poorly-lit studios have met Brilliant QuiltMaster their match. Lighting System ™

(throat & needle lighting)

NEW FEATURE

#18

Meet your match with the

The new 20" longarm from Handi Quilter features pinpoint needle laser, independently-adjustable handlebars (that convert to microhandles), QuiltMaster™ servo-controlled stitch regulation and a new frame with two loading options. Read more about these and 20 other features at HandiQuilter.com/Amara or see your local, authorized HQ retailer.

HandiQuilter.com/Amara


Fancy

FLORALS


An international group of quilters create a friendship quilt for a beloved fabric designer. writer Sue Fenwick

OVER HIS NEARLY 40-YEAR DESIGN CAREER, PHILIP JACOBS of Dorset, England, has inspired thousands of quilters and home decorators with his lush botanicals and large-scale florals. His popular fabrics are part of two FreeSpirit labels, the Kaffe Fassett Collective and Snow Leopard Designs. When quilter Carolyn “Pippin” Williams of Lawrence, Kansas, discovered that Philip, one of her favorite fabric designers, didn’t have a quilt made out of fabric he had designed, she went to Facebook to talk about it. There she asked if anyone wanted to join her in making Philip a quilt. Hundreds of Philip Jacobs fans jumped on board. The group decided to make a quilt composed of hexagons from the book The New Hexagon: 52 Blocks to English Paper Piece by Katja Marek. (For more about Katja, see Designer Spotlight, page 14.) Pippin created a Facebook page devoted to the project

and put out a call for handmade hexagons. Quilters from all over the world, including Australia, Canada, Great Britain, Japan, New Zealand, and the United States contributed. In total, Pippin received more than 400 hexagons, including some from author Katja Marek. It took Pippin a month to arrange hexagons into the final quilt design, which has a center star representing Philip. A small cohort of quilters assisted with assembly of the 90×120" quilt, taking sections of hexagons to stitch together.

“We received so many hexagons that the quilt igger just got igger because I didn’t want to leave anybody out.” —Pippin Williams, project coordinator

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GROUP EFFORT Project coordinator Pippin Williams arranged all contributed hexagons on a design wall, sorting by color families. After she inalized the design, she sent sections to volunteers for hand-piecing. Pippin then stitched the sections together to complete the quilt top. Jill Coleman machine-quilted it in an allover stipple design. HEXAGON INSPIRATION Many of the blocks in this quilt were made from patterns in The New Hexagon: 52 Blocks to English Paper Piece by Katja Marek Martingale; 2014; $26.99 shopmartingale.com.

<< Makers were free to choose their own fabrics and hexagon design.

“I’m really proud of it,” Pippin says. “I am proud of the quilters all over the world that jumped in and did this. This is a quilt we all made together. It is a spiritual quilt with so much love in it. It is amazing that this project started in June 2017, and was completed in February 2018.” “It is the most enormous honor and privilege that these quilters from around the world should want to get

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APQ • August 2018

together to make me a quilt,” Philip says. “I would also like to thank Pippin from the bottom of my heart for all the work and expense that she has gone to on my behalf. Words cannot express how much I appreciate this kind gesture. I only hope I am able to repay it in the years to come by providing everyone with even more beautiful fabrics.”

Some hexagons include selvage pieces identifying the fabric collection.


100% CHARMING Combine low-volume and bright print charm squares to make a lattice-look quilt. designer Amanda Niederhauser photographer Adam Albright


5" SQUARES

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FINISHED QUILT: 641⁄2" FINISHED BLOCK: 8" square

CUT FABRICS

3. Repeat Step 2 using green print

Cut pieces in the following order:

5" squares instead of aqua to make 64 green triangle-squares.

MATERIALS

From each of 32 aqua print squares, cut: ▫ 4—2 1 ⁄2" squares From each of 32 green print squares, cut: ▫ 4—2 1 ⁄2" squares From each red print square, cut: ▫ 4—2 1 ⁄2" squares From each navy blue print square, cut: ▫ 4—2 1 ⁄2" squares From multicolor print, cut: ▫ 7—2 1 ⁄2×42" binding strips

Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Designer Amanda Niederhauser used scraps cut into 5" squares and sorted by color. If you don’t have scraps, choose precut charm packs from a variety of fabric lines. To plan this quilt in a diferent colorway, use the Coloring Diagram on Pattern Sheet 4.

▫ 64—5" squares assorted white prints (blocks)

▫ 64—5" squares assorted aqua prints (blocks)

▫ 64—5" squares assorted green prints (blocks)

▫ 32—5" squares assorted red prints (blocks)

▫ 32—5" squares assorted navy blue prints (blocks)

▫ 5 ⁄8 yard multicolor print (binding)

ASSEMBLE BLOCKS Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

1. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of each white print 5" square.

▫ 4 yards backing fabric ▫ 72" square batting

2. Layer a marked white print square atop an aqua print 5" square. Sew together with two seams, stitching 1 ⁄4" on each side of marked line (Diagram 1). Cut pair apart on drawn line; press open to make two aqua triangle-squares. Trim trianglesquares to 4 1 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 64 aqua triangle-squares total.

Diagram 2

5. Repeat Step 4 using two green print 2 1 ⁄2" squares, one red print 2 1 ⁄2" square, and one navy blue print 2 1 ⁄2" square to make a green Four-Patch unit. Repeat to make 64 green Four-Patch Units total. 6. Referring to Diagram 3, sew together two aqua Four-Patch units and two aqua triangle-squares in pairs. Join pairs to make an aqua block. The block should be 8 1 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 32 aqua blocks total.

Diagram 3

Patch units and green triangle-squares to make 32 green blocks. Diagram 1

APQ • August 2018

together two aqua print 2 1 ⁄2" squares, one red print 2 1 ⁄2" square, and one navy blue print 2 1 ⁄2" square in pairs. Join pairs to make an aqua Four-Patch unit. The unit should be 4 1 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 64 aqua Four-Patch Units total.

7. Repeat Step 6 using green Four-

5" sq.

22

4. Referring to Diagram 2, sew


“Sort charm squares into five piles: aqua, green, red, navy blue, and low volume. Don’t be afraid to mix in i ere t sh es of each color. It adds depth.” —Amanda Niederhauser, designer

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Do what you Love We created our sewing machines and notions to be intuitive, affordable and of good quality. Meet EverSewn — it’ll be love at first stitch. www.eversewn.com / 1 844-EVERSEW Exclusively distributed by Brewer, a creative sewing supplies distribution partner.


ASSEMBLE QUILT TOP

FINISH QUILT

3. Bind with multicolor print binding

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing;

strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.)

Diagram, alternate aqua and green blocks in eight rows, rotating every other block 90°. Sew together blocks in rows. Press seams in one direction, alternating direction with each row.

baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 102.)

Designer: Amanda Niederhauser (jedicraftgirl.com) Machine quilter: Kaylene Perry

2. Join rows to complete quilt top.

2. Quilt as desired. Kaylene Perry machine-quilted a feather and swirl pattern across the quilt top (Quilting Diagram).

Press seams in one direction.

Quilting Diagram

Quilt Assembly Diagram

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APQ â&#x20AC;˘ August 2018


o tio Quilt tester Monique Dillard composed four blocks in jewel-tone fabrics to create a 161â &#x201E;2"-square 100% Charming table topper or wall hanging. The gold squares placement draws the eye around the project; the red squares anchor the design. FABRICS are from the Echo Basic collection by Timeless Treasures Fabrics (ttfabrics.com).

AllPeopleQuilt.com

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APQ â&#x20AC;¢ August 2018


h MEDALLIONS m e Carefully hand-stitched pieces showcase the rich hues of Civil War reproduction fabrics. designer Cindy Blackberg photographer Adam Albright

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FINISHED QUILT: 441⁄2" square FINISHED BLOCK: 7 1⁄2" square

MATERIALS Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width.

▫ 11⁄2 yards solid beige (blocks) ▫ 25—12" squares assorted medium and dark prints (blocks)

CHOOSE STITCHING METHOD We recommend hand-piecing this quilt for optimal control and accuracy when joining its small pieces. Hand-stitching also ensures that seam allowances aren’t sewn down, allowing you to choose the direction to press after you’ve finished piecing. If you prefer to machine-piece, stitch carefully between matching points, sewing from dot to dot.

▫ 2 yards brown print No. 1 (blocks, outer border, binding)

▫ 11⁄2 yards tan print (blocks, outer border)

▫ 13 ⁄8 yards brown print No. 2 (inner border)

▫ 3 yards backing fabric ▫ 53" square batting ▫ Water-soluble fabric pen

CUT FABRICS Cut pieces in the following order. Cut inner border strips lengthwise (parallel to selvages), centering desired border motif. The patterns are on Pattern Sheet 1. To make templates, see Make and Use Templates, page 100, and refer to instructions for hand or machine piecing, depending on the method you plan to use. Be sure to transfer the dots and reference lines (and seam lines if you are hand piecing) to the templates, then to the fabric pieces. These marks will allow you to precisely align pieces for stitching. (Pattern E does not have seam allowances; trace the solid outer

line and transfer reference marks and dotted lines to make an E template.) Instead of making templates of patterns A–D, F, and G, designer Cindy Blackberg used rubber stamps she designed to mark cutting and piecing lines on the fabrics. For details, see “Tips for Great Stamping,” below. From solid beige, cut: ▫ 300 of Pattern A ▫ 300 of Pattern D From each assorted medium or dark print, cut: ▫ 12 of Pattern B ▫ 1 of Pattern C From brown print No. 1, cut: ▫ 5—21 ⁄2 ×42" binding strips ▫ 13—9" squares ▫ 112 of Pattern F ▫ 4 of Pattern G ▫ 2—3" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 4 triangles total From tan print, cut: ▫ 12—9" squares ▫ 112 of Pattern F From brown print No. 2, fussy-cut: ▫ 4—13⁄4 ×43" inner border strips

i s or re t t m i g To reduce Handmade Medallions prep time, designer Cindy Blackberg used rubber stamps to mark cutting and piecing lines for pieces A–D, F, and G. Here are the steps she followed.

1. Wash and press all fabrics. 2. Pat a stamp gently on the fabric ink pad to ink all image lines. Donʼt push the stamp onto the pad too hard or you will get ink on the center of the shape. 3. Place fabrics right side down on a rotary-cutting or crafts mat. Stamp the wrong side of the fabric. 4. Cut out the fabric shapes on the outer stamped lines. 5. Clean the stamp with a baby wipe; dry it with a paper towel.

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APQ • August 2018

To order designer Cindy Blackberg’s stamps, go to cindyblackberg.com and search Sunburst.


Can’t stop smiling? When something you love gets even better. NEW Ruler quilting has arrived! If quilting is your happy place, you know the feeling. Unlock ruler work capabilities with the all new MC9400 Upgrade Kit* and bring on the smiles! Horizon MC9400 Upgrade Kit Includes • Ruler work foot • Variable zigzag foot • Open toe darning foot • 1/4" Foot without flange • Software update USB Imagine where you want to go. Janome will help you get there. Janome.com > find a dealer *Available for Memory Craft 9400 version 2.0 and earlier


ASSEMBLE SUNBURST UNITS Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. The following steps are for hand piecing. For more information on this method, see “How to Hand-Piece,” page 33, and “Tips for Hand Piecing,” page 32. Cindy recommends stitching A, B, and D pieces with continuous seams (a method she calls sequential hand piecing) to speed up the process and avoid clipping thread at the end of each seam.

“Hand piecing has always been my passion. I love the ort ility and ease of stitching a perfect point without frustration.” —Cindy Blackberg, designer

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APQ • August 2018

1. Gather 12 solid beige A triangles, 12 solid beige D pieces, and 12 B diamonds and one C circle from the same medium or dark print.

B

B A

A

Diagram 1

2. Referring to Diagram 1, layer a solid beige A triangle atop a print B diamond, carefully aligning matching points and reference lines. Pin matching points at each corner. Beginning with a backstitch, sew together between matching points (arrow in diagram indicates stitching direction); do not stitch into the 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Backstitch at end of seam, but do not cut thread.

3. Referring to Diagram 2, pin a second print B diamond to adjacent edge of A triangle, aligning as before. Without stitching into seam allowance, sew together; do not cut thread. B B A

B

B A

Diagram 2

B

B A


“Red + Grey Christmas” 55“x55” quilt, designed by Lisa Swenson Ruble. Free pattern available!

Red + Grey Christmas Bold, graphic reimaginings of classic holiday designs are sure to warm your heart this season. This fabric collection features staples like stripes, plaid, and stars in addition to eye-catching illustrative prints decorated with snowflakes, ornaments, and even polar bears! Activities for the whole family are included too- project panels for an advent calendar,

To view the full “Red + Grey Christmas” collection, or to download the free quilt pattern, please visit our website, www.pbsfabrics.com. Paintbrush Studio fabrics can be found only at local independent quilt shops and many online retailers.

TM


i s or

Pieci g

Designer Cindy Blackberg ofers these hand-piecing suggestions based on her 25 years of experience. NEEDLE: Thin needles, such as sharps or betweens, are best. Choose a size you can thread with ease. Cindy prefers a size 10 sharps needle from Richard Hemming & Son. PINS: Use extra-fine pins. Those with large diameters can leave holes in your fabric and distort seaming. SEAM: Stitch only on marked lines, beginning and ending at marked matching points. STITCH LENGTH: “Try for stitches 1⁄8" in length, but don’t stop hand-piecing if they are a bit longer,” Cindy says. “Stitch length isn’t as important as matching corners, stitching on marked lines, and not sewing through seam allowances.” THREAD: Cindy prefers to use handquilting thread for its strength. Sew with a 12" length.

! i k c i Qu

Begin and end sewing at matching points and don’t press until pieces are all sewn together.


4. Alternating A and B pieces, continue in same manner to make a ring (Diagram 3; arrows indicate stitching direction). When you run out of thread, tie it off and continue with a new length.

B diamonds. Sew together, stitching slowly matching reference line with points of B pieces (Diagram 4).

6. Join solid beige D pieces to outer edges of ring, aligning matching

points and stitching continuous seams as before (Diagram 5; arrows indicate stitching direction). Trim points to reduce bulk, and finger-press all seams clockwise or counterclockwise to make a sunburst unit.

5. Pin print C circle to center of ring,

7. Repeat steps 1–6 to make 25

aligning reference lines with points of

sunburst units total. C

Diagram 3

D

Diagram 4

Diagram 5

STEP 1: Layer two pieces, marked on the wrong sides, with right sides together (Photo A). Align seam lines. Push a pin through both pieces at marked matching points—the ends of the marked seam lines. Add pins along the seam lines as needed.

out of the fabric along the seam line in a short running stitch. Take four to six stitches before pulling the thread through (Photo B). If desired, take a backstitch about every 3 ⁄4" along the seam. (Because she uses hand-quilting thread, which is sturdy, to hand-piece, Cindy omits these backstitches.) Turn the piece over frequently to make certain your stitches are also on the marked seam line of the bottom piece.

STEP 2: Thread your needle; make a small knot at the end of the thread. At marked matching points insert your needle from the top through both pieces and take a small backstitch (Photo A). Weave your needle in and

STEP 3: Sew to the matching points at the end of the seam line; do not sew past them as they are where future seams will intersect. Make two backstitches at the matching points. Trim the thread, leaving a 1⁄2" tail (Photo C).

How to Hand-Piece

AllPeopleQuilt.com

33


9" sq.

E

Go to allpeoplequilt .com/572 to see a video of setting in the center circle.

Diagram 6

1/4"

cut out

Diagram 7

ASSEMBLE BLOCKS

1. Fold a brown print 9" square in half vertically and horizontally. Press lightly to mark guidelines; unfold. Place E circle template on wrong side of brown print square, aligning creased guidelines with dotted lines on template (Diagram 6). Using a water-soluble fabric pen, trace template and transfer all reference lines to fabric (Diagram 7). Cut 1 â &#x201E;4" inside traced circle to make a block background.

8" sq.

2. Pin a sunburst unit to block background, aligning outer points of B diamonds with creased guidelines and marked reference lines. Sew pieces together. Press seam allowances away from sunburst unit. With sunburst unit centered, trim block background to 8" square including seam allowances to make a brown block (Diagram 8). Diagram 8

34

APQ â&#x20AC;˘ August 2018


July 27th to August 12th 2018

29 SKUS

(including 2 flannel!) Clothworks

Visit 60 of Minnesota’s Best Quilt Shops! Receive a free 5” square of this year’s fabric and an 8” finished block pattern from each shop you visit. The GRAND PRIZE is an Alaskan Cruise for 2! Plus thousands of dollars in prizes and incentives throughout the state.

Visit www.quiltminnesota.com to view fabrics, merchandise, prizes, maps and qualifying information.


3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to make 13

2. Aligning midpoints, sew brown

brown blocks total.

print 13⁄4×43" inner border strips to opposite edges of quilt center, beginning and ending seams 1 ⁄4" from quilt center corners. Add remaining brown print 13⁄4×43" inner border strips to remaining edges, mitering corners. (For details, see Miter Borders, page 101.) Press all seams toward inner border.

4. Using tan print 9" squares, repeat steps 1 and 2 to make 12 tan blocks.

ASSEMBLE QUILT TOP

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, alternate brown and tan blocks in five rows. Sew together blocks in rows. Press seams toward brown blocks. Join rows to make quilt center; press seams in one direction. The quilt center should be 38" square including seam allowances.

3. Sew together 28 brown print F triangles and 27 tan print F triangles, aligning matching points and stitching continuous seams as for sunburst

13/4×43"

13/4×43"

Quilt Assembly Diagram

F F

Diagram 9

36

APQ • August 2018

units, to make a short outer border strip (Diagram 9). Press seams in one direction. Repeat to make four short outer border strips total.

4. Referring to Diagram 10, page 38, sew tan print G triangles to ends of a short outer border strip to make a long outer border strip. Press seams in one direction. Repeat to make a second long outer border strip.


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5. Aligning midpoints, sew short outer

FINISH QUILT

border strips to opposite edges of quilt center, beginning and ending seams 1 ⁄4" from quilt center corners. Add long outer border strips to remaining edges.

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 102.) 2. Quilt as desired. Cindy hand-quilted

6. Referring to Border Corner Diagram, add a brown print triangle to each corner to complete quilt top. Press all seams toward outer border.

in the ditch of A, B, and D pieces and outline-quilted 1 ⁄4" inside B, C, and F pieces (Quilting Diagram). She stitched a crosshatch pattern in block backgrounds and a wavy line in the inner border.

3. Bind with brown print binding

Quilting Diagram

strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) Designer: Cindy Blackberg; cindyblackberg.com

G

G

Diagram 10

Border Corner Diagram

o tio Quilt tester Colleen Tauke paired 1930s reproduction prints and solids to make a three-block table runner that would add a charming touch to any seasonal gathering. “If you want your hand-quilting stitches to stand on their own, choose solid fabrics,” Colleen says. “If you want the quilting less visible, choose prints.” She added sashing and borders to the three blocks for a runner that inishes at 12×29". FABRICS are from the Hi-de-Ho! collection by Maywood Studio (maywoodstudio.com).

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APQ • August 2018


Star Shine by Bound to be Quilting

Introducing Bunnies by the Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2nd collection featuring a book panel with plenty of cute characters, making it perfect for baby quilts and nursery gifts. Select skus also available in lannel!


SCRAPPY

lues

Hone your piecing skills in a traditional Chimneys and Cornerstones block composed of blue and cream prints. designer Annette Plog photographer Adam Albright

40

APQ â&#x20AC;˘ August 2018


AllPeopleQuilt.com

41


FINISHED QUILT: 59×77" FINISHED BLOCK: 161⁄2" square

MATERIALS Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width.

▫ 5—1⁄4-yard pieces assorted light prints (blocks)

▫ 20—1⁄4-yard pieces assorted blue prints (blocks)

▫ 1 yard blue plaid (border, binding)

▫ 43 ⁄4 yards backing fabric ▫ 67×85" piece batting TO ORDER A KIT of similar fabrics for quilt top and binding fabrics for $90 in U.S. (Louisiana residents $98.78.) plus postage, contact The Quilted Owl, 504/733-0993, quiltedowl.com.

“When choosing fabrics for scrappy quilts, remember to mix in i ere t sh es of colors. Include prints in varied textures and sizes to make your quilt interesting and eye-catching.” —Annette Plog, designer

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APQ • August 2018


CUT FABRICS 2" 2" sq. sq.

Cut pieces in the following order. Designer Annette Plog used a single-fold binding on her quilt. If you want to do the same, cut 11 ⁄4 ×42" binding strips instead of the 21 ⁄2 ×42" strips specified here.

2= 5 "

2= 5 "

2" sq.

Super Bobs Cotton prewounds have a smooth, even wind with 30-60% more thread per bobbin than you can get by winding your own bobbins. Say goodbye to frequent bobbin changes and hello to a consistent, Superior stitching experience.

Diagram 2

4. Referring to Diagram 3 for strip measurements, repeat Step 3 to add second, third, and fourth rounds to make a block. The block should be 17" square including seam allowances. 2= 11" 2= 8 "

1. Gather a set of light print 2" squares, a set of blue print 2" squares, and a set of blue print 2"-wide strips in each length (5", 8", 11", and 14").

Diagram 3

5. Repeat steps 1–4 to make 12 2. Referring to Diagram 1, lay out five

blocks total.

light print 2" squares and blue print 2" squares in three rows. Sew together pieces in rows. Join rows to make a Nine-Patch unit. The unit should be 5" square including seam allowances.

AllPeopleQuilt.com

Use promo code APQ718 to save 10% on Super Bobs Cotton prewound bobbins. Offer expires August 6, 2018. www.SuperiorThreads.com

2= 14"

2= 8 "

Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

squares, blue print 2×5" strips, and Nine-Patch unit in three rows (Diagram 2). Sew together pieces in rows; join rows to make first round.

2= 11"

ASSEMBLE BLOCKS

Prewound bobbins are a guaranteed game changer for all quilters!

3. Lay out four light print 2"

2= 14"

From assorted light prints, cut: ▫ 252—2" squares (12 sets of 21 matching squares) ▫ 20—2" sashing squares From assorted blue prints, cut ▫ 31—2 ×17" sashing strips ▫ 48—2 ×14" strips (12 sets of 4 matching strips) ▫ 48—2 ×11" strips (12 sets of 4 matching strips) ▫ 48—2 ×8" strips (12 sets of 4 matching strips) ▫ 48—2 ×5" strips (12 sets of 4 matching strips) ▫ 48—2" squares (12 sets of 4 matching squares) From blue plaid, cut: ▫ 7—21 ⁄2 ×42" binding strips ▫ 7—2 ×42" strips for border

Diagram 1

43


2= 59" 2" sq.

2= 74"

2= 17"

2= 17"

Quilt Assembly Diagram

44

APQ â&#x20AC;¢ August 2018


ASSEMBLE QUILT TOP

FINISH QUILT

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing;

Diagram, lay out assorted light print 2" sashing squares, assorted blue print 2×17" sashing strips, and blocks in nine rows. Sew together pieces in rows. Press seams toward sashing strips.

baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 102.)

2. Join rows to make quilt center;

2. Quilt as desired. Sheri Mecom machine-quilted the quilt top with a Baptist fan pattern (Quilting Diagram).

press seams away from block rows. The quilt center should be 56×74" including seam allowances.

3. Bind with blue plaid binding strips.

3. Cut and piece blue plaid 2×42"

Designer: Annette Plog of Petite Quilts (petitequilts.com)

strips to make: ▫ 2—2×74" border strips ▫ 2—2×59" border strips

(For details, see Complete Quilt.) Quilting Diagram

Machine quilter: Sheri Mecom of Leave It To Me Quilting (leaveittomequilting.com)

4. Sew long border strips to long edges of quilt center. Add short border strips to remaining edges to complete quilt top. Press all seams toward border. AllPeopleQuilt.com

45


QUILTED

o tio

Audience insights manager Lindsay Mayland formulated a color wheel design that emerged at the intersection of the four blocks. The black print chain running through the blocks and a low-volume background help the colors stand out. FABRICS are from the Foundation collection by Shayla Wolf for Windham Fabrics (windhamfabrics.com).

ree P tter

AllPeopleQult.com/543

“If a quilt has a lot of straight lines, I normally machine-quilt curvy li es to soften the look of the hard edges. In this case, I decided to give it a more modern look and deine the straight lines with more straight lines. This also helped deine the color blocks.” —Vicki Hoth, Handi Quilter studio educator

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APQ • August 2018

Quilting Diagram


Detail: KALEIDOSCOPIC CALAMITY by Margaret Solomon Gunn

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN August 22–25, 2018 Hundreds of Beautiful Quilts on Exhibit

Aisles of Fabrics, Machines & Quilting Supply Vendors

World-Renowned Quiltmaking Instructors

For more information, visit QuiltWeek.com

Grand Rapids, MI

Fall Paducah, KY

Virginia Beach, VA

August 22–25

September 12–15

October 3–6 NATIONAL BRAND PARTNER


A variation of the beloved Churn Dash block is repeated in an array of traditional prints and turned on point. designer Candy Hargrove photographer Adam Albright

AllPeopleQuilt.com

49


FINISHED QUILT: 63×721⁄2" FINISHED BLOCK: 6 3 ⁄4" square

CUT FABRICS

2. Layer a marked light print square

Cut pieces in the following order.

MATERIALS

From light tan print, cut: ▫ 14—10 3⁄4" squares, cutting each diagonally twice in an X for 56 setting triangles total (you will use 54) ▫ 6—5 5⁄8" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 12 corner triangles total From red print, cut: ▫ 7—2 1 ⁄2×42" binding strips ▫ 6—2 ×42" strips for inner border From tan print, cut: ▫ 7—6 1 ⁄2×42" strips for outer border

atop a dark print 3 1 ⁄8" square. Sew together with two seams, stitching 1 ⁄4" on each side of marked line (Diagram 1). Cut pair apart on drawn line; press open to make two triangle-squares. Each triangle-square should be 2 3⁄4" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make four triangle-squares total.

Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Fabrics are from the New Hope collection by Jo Morton for Moda Fabrics (modafabrics.com). To plan this quilt in a diferent colorway, use the Coloring Diagram on Pattern Sheet 3.

▫ 13 ⁄4 yards light tan print (setting and corner triangles)

▫ 1 yard red print (inner border, binding)

▫ 11⁄2 yards tan print (outer border) ▫ 11⁄3 yards total assorted light prints (blocks)

▫ 11⁄4 yards total assorted dark prints (blocks)

▫ 1⁄2 yard total assorted gold prints (blocks)

▫ 11⁄4 yards total assorted medium prints (blocks)

▫ 4 yards backing fabric ▫ 71× 81" batting

ASSEMBLE BLOCKS Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric. For each block, designer Candy Hargrove chose one light print, one dark print, one gold print, and one medium print. These instructions result in one block. Repeat instructions to make 32 blocks total. From one assorted light print, cut: ▫ 2—3 1 ⁄8" squares ▫ 1—1 1 ⁄4×12" strip From one assorted dark print, cut: ▫ 2—3 1 ⁄8" squares ▫ 4—1 5⁄8" squares From one assorted gold print, cut: ▫ 1—2 3⁄4" square From one assorted medium print, cut: ▫ 2—1 1 ⁄4×12 " strips

1. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of each light print 3 1 ⁄8" square.

50

APQ • August 2018

31/8" sq.

Diagram 1

3. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of each dark print 1 5⁄8" square.

4. Align marked dark print squares with opposite corners of gold print 2 3⁄4" square (Diagram 2; note direction of drawn lines). Sew on drawn lines. Trim excess fabric, leaving 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Press open attached triangles. Repeat to add remaining marked dark print squares to remaining gold print square corners to make a center unit. The unit should be 2 3⁄4" square including seam allowances.

15/8" sq.

31/8" sq.

15/8" sq.

Diagram 2

5. Sew together light print 1 1 ⁄4×12" strip and medium print 1 1 ⁄4× 12" strips to make a strip set (Diagram 3). Cut strip set into four 2 3⁄4" squares, including seam allowances, for side units. 23/4" 11/4×12 " 11/4×12" 11/4×12 "

Diagram 3


6. Lay out triangle-squares, center "

1 ⁄4

unit, and side units in three rows (Diagram 4). Sew together pieces in rows. Join rows to make a block. The block should be 7 1 ⁄4" square including seam allowances.

MAKE HALF BLOCKS

1. Referring to Diagram 5, mark a diagonal line from corner to corner on four blocks.

2. On each marked block, cut 1 ⁄4" from

Diagram 4

Diagram 5

marked diagonal line to make four half blocks that have 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Discard smaller halves.

“I like to add

u ex ecte eleme ts to my traditional quilts. For this quilt I added a squarein-a-square in the center of the Churn Dash, placed the blocks on point, and then ofset them.” —Candy Hargrove, designer

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51


ASSEMBLE QUILT CENTER

2. Lay out two half blocks, five blocks,

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly

and 12 light tan print setting triangles in seven diagonal rows. Sew together pieces in rows to make Row B. Press seams toward triangles. Repeat to make a second Row B.

Diagram, lay out six blocks, 10 light tan print setting triangles, and two light tan print corner triangles in six diagonal rows. Sew together pieces in rows. Press seams toward triangles. Join rows; press seams in one direction. Add light tan print corner triangles to remaining corners to make Row A. Press seams toward corner triangles. Repeat to make three A rows total.

3. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, alternate A and B rows to make quilt center. Press seams toward A rows. The quilt center should be 48×57 1 ⁄2" including seam allowances.

61/2×63"

2×51"

Row B

2×57 1/2"

61/2×60 1/2"

Row A

Quilt Assembly Diagram

52

APQ • August 2018

! i k c i Qu

Select backing fabric that has the same care requirements as the quilt top fabrics. If fabrics for the quilt top were prewashed, fabrics for the quilt backing should be, too.


ADD BORDERS

FINISH QUILT

1. Cut and piece red print 2 ×42" strips

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 102.)

to make: ▫ 2—2 ×57 1 ⁄2" inner border strips ▫ 2—2 ×51" inner border strips.

2. Sew long inner border strips to long edges of quilt center. Add short inner border strips to remaining edges. Press all seams toward inner border.

2. Quilt as desired. Maggi Honeyman machine-quilted the quilt top with a Baptist Fan design (Quilting Diagram).

3. Bind with red print binding strips. 3. Cut and piece tan print 6 1 ⁄2×42"

(For details, see Complete Quilt.)

strips to make: ▫ 2—6 1 ⁄2×63" outer border strips ▫ 2—6 1 ⁄2×60 1 ⁄2" outer border strips

Designer: Candy Hargrove Machine quilter: Maggi Honeyman

4. Sew short outer border strips to long edges of quilt center. Add long outer border strips to remaining edges to complete quilt top. Press all seams toward outer border.

o tio Instead of setting blocks on point like in the original Barn Dance, quilt tester Sharon McConnell arranged nine blocks in three straight-set rows. Sharon did not give the 20¾"-square wall hanging a border, which adds to its modern lair. FABRICS are from the Florabunda! collection by Melanie Testa for RJR Fabrics (rjrfabrics.com).

ree P tter AllPeopleQult.com/574

54

APQ • August 2018

Quilting Diagram


s A pleasing on-point setting of blocks showcases languid summer hues. designer Susan Ache photographer Adam Albright

56

APQ â&#x20AC;˘ August 2018


2½" STRIPS


FINISHED QUILT: 691⁄4×89" FINISHED BLOCK: 13" square

MATERIALS Yardage and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. To plan this quilt in a diferent colorway, use the Coloring Diagram on Pattern Sheet 4.

▫ 2 yards solid cream (blocks, sashing rectangles)

▫ 36—21⁄2×42" strips assorted medium to dark prints in blue, tan, and red (blocks)

▫ 1⁄2 yard tan check (blocks) ▫ 7⁄8 yard red check (blocks, binding)

▫ 1⁄4 yard each dark blue, medium blue, and light blue checks (blocks)

▫ 21⁄8 yards light blue print (sashing squares, setting and corner triangles)

▫ 11⁄4 yards red loral (sashing squares, border)

▫ 6 yards backing fabric ▫ 78×98" batting ▫ Template plastic (optional)

“Sometimes a quilt says to me, very clearly, that it belongs in a certain season. This one says summertime because of the soft shades of red, tan, and blue.” —Susan Ache, designer

58

APQ • August 2018


CUT FABRICS Cut pieces in the following order. Designer Susan Ache used the EZ Quilting Easy Angle acrylic tool to cut triangles from 21 ⁄2"-wide strips for the triangle-squares. You also can trace the Triangle Pattern on Pattern Sheet 4 onto template plastic and cut it out on the drawn lines. To cut triangles, trace the template onto the wrong side of the strips, rotating the template 180° after each cut to make the best use of the fabric (Cutting Diagram). A

A A

A

Ar

Ar Ar

A A

Ar

Ar Ar

21/2×42"

21/2×42"

Cutting Diagram

From solid cream, cut: ▫ 48—1 1 ⁄2×131 ⁄2" sashing strips ▫ 72—1 1 ⁄2×6 1 ⁄2" strips

▫ 144 triangles from Triangle Pattern or EZ Quilting Easy Angle acrylic tool From each of 18 assorted medium or dark print strips, cut: ▫ 12—21 ⁄2" squares From each of remaining 18 assorted medium or dark print strips, cut: ▫ 8—21 ⁄2×41 ⁄2" rectangles ▫ 1—11 ⁄2" square From tan check, cut: ▫ 10—47⁄8" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 20 triangles total From red check, cut: ▫ 8—47⁄8" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 16 triangles total ▫ Enough 21 ⁄2"-wide bias strips to total 340" in length (For details, see Cut Bias Strips, page 100.)

From dark blue check, cut: ▫ 4—47⁄8" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 8 triangles total From medium blue check, cut: ▫ 8—47⁄8" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 16 triangles total From light blue check, cut: ▫ 6—47⁄8" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 12 triangles total From light blue print, cut: ▫ 3—22" squares, cutting each diagonally twice in an X for 12 setting triangles total (you will use 10) ▫ 2—12" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 4 corner triangles total ▫ 17—11 ⁄2" sashing squares From red floral, cut: ▫ 8—41 ⁄2×42" strips for border ▫ 14—11 ⁄2" sashing squares

AllPeopleQuilt.com

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21/2" sq.

1. Gather eight solid cream triangles, four solid cream 11 ⁄2×61 ⁄2" strips, twelve 21 ⁄2" squares from one medium or dark print, eight 21 ⁄2 ×41 ⁄2" rectangles and one 11 ⁄2" square from a second medium or dark print, and four matching check triangles. 2. Referring to Diagram 1, sew two solid cream triangles to adjacent edges of a medium or dark print 21 ⁄2" square to make a subunit. Repeat to make four subunits total. 21/2" sq.

A Ar

Diagram 1

3. Referring to Diagram 2, add a check triangle to long edge of a Step 2 subunit to make a pieced trianglesquare. The triangle-square should be 41 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make four pieced trianglesquares total.

Check It Out Susan Ache shows you how to use precut strips in creative ways in her book Start with Strips, 13 Colorful Quilts from 21⁄ 2" Strips. $25.99 | Martingale; shopmartingale.com; 2017

60

APQ • August 2018

Diagram 2

4. Use a pencil to mark diagonal line on wrong sides of four remaining medium or dark print 21 ⁄2" squares.

5. Referring to Diagram 3, position a marked square in check corner of a pieced triangle-square. Sew on drawn line. Trim seam allowance to 1 ⁄4". Press open triangle to make a center unit. Repeat to make four matching center units total.

Diagram 4

7. Referring to Diagram 5, lay out corner units, solid cream 11 ⁄2 ×61 ⁄2" strips, and medium or dark print 11 ⁄2" square. Sew together pieces in rows. Join rows to make a block. The block should be 131 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. 11/2×61/2"

Measurements include ¼" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

21/2" sq.

11/2×61/2"

Diagram 3

6. Referring to Diagram 4, lay out a center unit, a remaining medium or dark print 21 ⁄2" square, and two medium or dark print 21 ⁄2 ×41 ⁄2" rectangles in two rows. Sew together pieces in rows. Join rows to make a corner unit. The unit should be 61 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make four corner units total.

21/2×41/2"

21/2×41/2"

ASSEMBLE BLOCKS

Diagram 5

8. Repeat steps 1–7 to make 18 blocks total.

ASSEMBLE QUILT TOP

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, page 62, lay out blocks, solid cream 11 ⁄2 ×131 ⁄2" sashing strips, light blue print and red floral sashing squares, light blue print setting triangles, and two light blue print corner triangles in 13 diagonal rows. (The oversize setting and corner triangles will be trimmed after assembly.)

2. Sew together blocks and sashing pieces in rows. Press seams toward sashing strips. Add setting and two corner triangles to ends of rows. Join rows; press seams in one direction. Add remaining two corner triangles to make quilt center. Press seams toward corner triangles.


You love to

create… We have your

inspiration

by Lynn Schmitt, $29.95

Susan Ache’s guide to

SORTING STRIPS I adore scrappy quilts, and the scrappier the better. I used to organize all my scraps by size, but then realized that I’m a color-oriented person. Now I organize my scraps by color, regardless of their size, and I enjoy the process much more. I like working with precuts, especially Jelly Rolls (2½"-wide strips), because they make it easy to add a little bit of a lot of different fabrics to my quilts. As a scrap quilter, that really appeals to me. But I don’t always love playing with just one complete line of fabric. So just as with my scraps, I organize my precuts by color, too. I can practically hear you saying, “What?!”

by Carol Armstrong, $27.95

Yep, that means the minute I get a Jelly Roll home, I open up the roll, separate the strips, and divvy them up into color bins where they belong. It is far easier for me to grab a color bin to jump-start my inspiration rather than hunt through multiple bins for what I need. by Kerry Foster, $19.95

As a result, you will ind that many of the quilts I make aren’t from one or even two Jelly Rolls of the same fabric line. I love to use Jelly Roll strips; I just don’t use them the way most people do. I mix them up to create my own variety of color and prints, regardless of how they came packaged.

ctpub.com | 800.284.1114

Excerpt from Start with Strips, 13 Colorful Quilts from 2½" Strips by Susan Ache. Reprinted with permission from That Patchwork Place/Martingale.

Available at craft, fabric, & bookstores AllPeopleQuilt.com

61


×

/

×

/

"

41/2×81"

11/2"sq.

13

1 2

11 /2

1

1 2

13 1 /2

"

41/2×691/4"

Quilt Assembly Diagram

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APQ • August 2018


3. Referring to Trimming Diagram,

4. Cut and piece red floral 41 ⁄2 ×42"

carefully trim corner and setting triangles 1 ⁄4" beyond points of sashing squares. Trimmed quilt center should be 611 ⁄4 ×81" including seam allowances.

strips to make: ▫ 2—41 ⁄2 ×81" border strips ▫ 2—41 ⁄2 ×691 ⁄4" border strips

cut line seam line 1/4"

5. Sew long border strips to long edges of quilt center. Add short border strips to remaining edges to complete quilt top. Press all seams toward border. FINISH QUILT

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing;

1/4" 1/4"

Quilting Diagram

baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 102.)

2. Quilt as desired. Susan Rogers machine-quilted the quilt top with an allover design of interlocking squares and rectangles (Quilting Diagram).

3. Bind with red check bias strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) Trimming Diagram

Designer: Susan Ache Machine quilter: Susan Rogers

o Enhance your decor with a striking wall quilt made out of marbleized-look fabric. Graphic designer Alison Gamm made the 37"-square wall hanging by carefully placing gold, brown, and blue-green mottled fabrics in four blocks. She framed the piece with a 4"-wide inished border that has 4" corner squares. FABRICS are from the Oxidized Copper Gradations group of the Stonehenge collection for Northcott (northcott.com).

AllPeopleQuilt.com

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rich tr itio Showcase the beauty of 19th-century reproduction prints. designer Sharon Tucker photographer Adam Albright

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APQ â&#x20AC;˘ August 2018


FAT EIGHTHS


FINISHED QUILT: 511⁄2" square FINISHED BLOCK: 9" square

CUT FABRICS

ASSEMBLE BLOCKS

Cut pieces in the following order.

MATERIALS

From each of 13 assorted cream print fat eighths, cut: ▫ 1—2 1 ⁄2×21" binding strip ▫ 8—2 3⁄8" squares ▫ 2—2" squares From each of 12 remaining assorted cream print fat eighths, cut: ▫ 8—2 3⁄8" squares ▫ 2—2" squares From each assorted dark print, cut: ▫ 1—6 1 ⁄2" square ▫ 8—2 3⁄8" squares ▫ 2—2" squares From assorted cream print fat quarters, cut: ▫ 3—14" squares, cutting each diagonally twice in an X for 12 setting triangles total ▫ 2—7 1 ⁄4" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 4 corner triangles total

Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric. These instructions use a single cream print and a single dark print to make one block. Repeat assembly instructions to make 25 blocks total.

Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. To plan this quilt in a diferent colorway, use the Coloring Diagram on Pattern Sheet 3.

▫ 25—9x21" pieces (fat eighths) assorted cream prints (blocks, binding)

▫ 25—9x21" pieces (fat eighths) assorted dark prints in gold, orange, green, red, black (blocks)

▫ 4—18x21" pieces (fat quarters) assorted cream prints (setting and corner triangles)

▫ 3 1⁄3 yards backing fabric ▫ 60" square batting

“I was inspired to make this quilt by a mi -1800s uilt. I made test blocks in 12" and 6" square and ultimately settled on a 9"-square block.” —Sharon Tucker, designer

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APQ • August 2018

1. From one cream print, gather eight 2 3⁄8" squares and two 2" squares. From one dark print, gather eight 2 3⁄8" squares, two 2" squares, and one 6 1 ⁄2" square.

2. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of each cream print 2 3⁄8" square.


3. Layer a marked cream print square atop a dark print 2 3⁄8" square (Diagram 1). Sew together with two seams, stitching 1 ⁄4" on each side of drawn line. Cut pair apart on drawn line; press open to make two triangle-squares. Each triangle-square should be 2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 16 triangle-squares total. 23/8" sq.

Diagram 1

4. Referring to Diagram 2, sew together four triangle-squares in a row to make a side unit. The unit should be 2×6 1 ⁄2" including seam allowances. Repeat to make a second side unit. Reversing placement of triangle-squares, repeat to make two reversed side units (Diagram 3).

Diagram 2

Diagram 3

5. Lay out side units, cream print 2" squares, dark print 2" squares, and dark print 6 1 ⁄2" square (Diagram 4). Sew together pieces in rows. Join rows to make a block. The block should be 9 1 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. 2" sq.

Lighted Lines Rulers Distinctive measurement lines glow

2" sq.

Dragonskin ReSize-It Resize sewn HST and QST sections in seconds

61/2" sq.

The Slidelock Stops all ruler movement while you cut

Diagram 4

See more at AllPeopleQuilt.com

67

quiltersslidelock.com


ASSEMBLE QUILT TOP

FINISH QUILT

3. Using diagonal seams, sew together

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing;

Diagram, lay out blocks, cream print setting triangles, and two cream print corner triangles in seven diagonal rows.

baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 102.)

assorted cream print 2 1 â &#x201E;2"-wide strips to make a pieced binding strip. Bind quilt with pieced binding strip. (For details, see Complete Quilt.)

2. Sew together pieces in rows. Press seams in one direction, alternating direction with each row.

3. Sew together rows. Press seams in one direction. Add remaining cream print corner triangles to complete quilt top.

2. Quilt as desired. The featured quilt was machine-quilted in the ditch to emphasize its diagonal grid (Quilting Diagram). The block centers were quilted with lines dividing the grid horizontally; the setting triangles were quilted with lines dividing the grid vertically.

Designer: Sharon Tucker of Grass Roots Quilt Studio; grassrootsquilting.blogspot.com

Quilting Diagram

Quilt Assembly Diagram

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APQ â&#x20AC;˘ August 2018


o For her version of Rich Tradition, quilt tester Martha Gamm updated the traditional block by composing it in brilliantly colored jewel-tone prints. She straight-set the resulting lowcontrast blocks side by side without sashing. FABRICS are from the Goanna Walkabout collection by Paintbrush Studio (pbsfabrics.com).

AllPeopleQuilt.com

Hundreds of Beautiful Quilts on Exhibit Aisles of Fabrics, Machines & Quilting Supply Vendors World-Renowned Quiltmaking Instructors

FALL PADUCAH , KENTUCKY Schroeder Expo Center September 12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;15, 2018

For more information, visit QuiltWeek.com NATIONAL BRAND PARTNER

POPPIES by Melinda Bula

69


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o

the

MIDDLE

A colorful runner sets a lively tone at the dinner table. designer Kim Schaefer photographer Adam Albright

AllPeopleQuilt.com

71


CUT FABRICS

11/2×51/2"

Cut pieces in the following order. From black tone-on-tone, cut: ▫ 4—21 ⁄2×42" binding strips

MATERIALS Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Fabrics are from the Pick-Up Sticks collection by Kim Schaefer for Andover Fabrics (andoverfabrics.com). To plan this quilt in a diferent colorway, use the Coloring Diagram on Pattern Sheet 1.

▫ 3 ⁄8 yard black tone-on-tone (binding)

▫ 1⁄2 yard total assorted warm prints in red, orange, yellow, pink, and brown (A and B blocks)

▫ 1⁄2 yard total assorted cool prints in green, purple, turquoise, and blue (A and B blocks)

▫ 3 ⁄8 yard gray print (C blocks) 1 8 yard

▫ ⁄

white tone-on-tone (C blocks)

▫ 5 ⁄8 yard black print (C blocks)

ASSEMBLE A BLOCKS Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric. The following instructions result in one A block. Repeat the instructions to make a total of six warm A blocks (from assorted red, orange, yellow, pink, and brown prints) and four cool A blocks (from assorted green, purple, turquoise, and blue prints). From warm (or cool) print No. 1, cut: ▫ 1—21 ⁄2" square From warm (or cool) print No. 2, cut: ▫ 1—21 ⁄2×41 ⁄2" rectangle ▫ 1—21 ⁄2" square From warm (or cool) print No. 3, cut: ▫ 1—11 ⁄2 ×51 ⁄2" rectangle ▫ 1—11 ⁄2 ×41 ⁄2" rectangle

1. Referring to Diagram 1, sew

▫ 29×59" batting

together print No. 1—21 ⁄2" square and print No. 2—21 ⁄2" square. Add print No. 2—21 ⁄2×41 ⁄2" rectangle.

TO ORDER A KIT of quilt top and binding fabrics for $49 ppd. in U.S. (Wisconsin residents $52 ppd.), contact Little Quilt Company; 262/353-9373; littlequiltcompany.com.

21/2×41/2"

▫ 12 ⁄3 yards backing fabric

21/2" sq.

11/2×41/2"

FINISHED TABLE RUNNER: 201⁄2×501⁄2" FINISHED BLOCKS: 5" square

Block A Diagram 2

2. Referring to Diagram 2, join print No. 3—11 ⁄2×41 ⁄2" rectangle to Step 1 unit. Add print No. 3—11 ⁄2×51 ⁄2" rectangle to make Block A. The block should be 51 ⁄2" square including seam allowances.

ASSEMBLE B BLOCKS The following instructions result in one B block. Repeat the instructions to make a total of six cool B blocks (from assorted green, purple, turquoise, and blue prints) and four warm B blocks (from assorted red, orange, yellow, pink, and brown prints). From cool (or warm) print No. 1, cut: ▫ 1—1 1 ⁄2" square From cool (or warm) print No. 2, cut: ▫ 1—21 ⁄2×31 ⁄2" rectangle ▫ 1—11 ⁄2×21 ⁄2" rectangle From cool (or warm) print No. 3, cut: ▫ 1—11 ⁄2×41 ⁄2" rectangle ▫ 1—11 ⁄2×31 ⁄2" rectangle From cool (or warm) print No. 4, cut: ▫ 1—11 ⁄2×51 ⁄2" rectangle ▫ 1—11 ⁄2×41 ⁄2" rectangle

1. Referring to Diagram 3, sew 21/2" sq.

11/2

×

21/2"

Diagram 1

together print No. 1—11 ⁄2" square and print No. 2—11 ⁄2×21 ⁄2" rectangle. Add print No. 2—21 ⁄2 ×31 ⁄2" rectangle.

21/2×31/2"

11/2" sq.

Diagram 3

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APQ • August 2018


2. Referring to Diagram 4, join print No. 3—11 ⁄2×31 ⁄2" rectangle to Step 1 unit. Add print No. 3—11 ⁄2×41 ⁄2" rectangle.

11/2×31/2"

11/2×41/2"

Diagram 4

3. Referring to Diagram 5, join print No. 4—11 ⁄2×41 ⁄2" rectangle to Step 2 unit. Add print No. 4-11 ⁄2×51 ⁄2" rectangle to make Block B. The block should be 51 ⁄2" square including seam allowances.

“I separated the center blocks into co l

11/2×51/2"

11/2×41/2"

rm colors,

which is a design element I use often to create balance in a project.”

Block B Diagram 5

—Kim Schaefer, designer

ASSEMBLE C BLOCKS The following instructions result in one C block. Repeat the instructions to make 20 C blocks total. From gray print, cut: ▫ 40—11 ⁄2×31 ⁄2" rectangles ▫ 40—11 ⁄2" squares From white tone-on-tone, cut: ▫ 20—11 ⁄2" squares From black print, cut: ▫ 40—11 ⁄2×51 ⁄2" rectangles ▫ 40—11 ⁄2×31 ⁄2" rectangles

11 2" squares

together two gray print ⁄ and one white tone-on-tone 11 ⁄2" square in a row. Add two gray print 11 ⁄2×31 ⁄2" rectangles.

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APQ • August 2018

2. Referring to Diagram 7, join

11/2×31/2"

11 2×31 2" rectangles

⁄ black print ⁄ to Step 1 unit. Add black print 11 ⁄2×51 ⁄2" rectangles to make Block C. The block should be 5 1 ⁄2" square including seam allowances.

11/2" 11/2" sq. sq.

Diagram 6

11/2×31/2"

1. Referring to Diagram 6, sew

11/2×51/2"

Block C Diagram 7


ASSEMBLE TABLE RUNNER TOP

FINISH TABLE RUNNER

1. Referring to Table Runner

1. Layer table runner top, batting,

Assembly Diagram for block orientation, pair warm A blocks with cool B blocks and warm B blocks with cool A blocks. Join blocks in pairs; press seams in one direction, alternating direction with each pair. Join pairs to make table runner center. Press seams in one direction. The table runner center should be 101 ⁄2 ×501 ⁄2" including seam allowances.

and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 102.)

2. Sew together 10 C blocks to

A

B

C

C B

A

2. Quilt as desired. Susan Lawson machine-quilted parallel lines, geometric patterns, and ribbon candy designs in the A and B blocks (Quilting Diagram). In the C blocks, she stitched in the ditch along the gray print frames to give them dimension and quilted small pebbles in the white tone-on-tone squares.

A B

B A

A

make a border strip (Table Runner Assembly Diagram). Press seams in one direction. The strip should be 51 ⁄2×501 ⁄2" including seam allowances. Repeat to make a second border strip.

B

B

A

A B

3. Join border strips to long edges of table runner center to complete table runner top. Press seams toward border strips.

Quilting Diagram

B A

3. Bind with black tone-on-tone binding strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) A

B

Designer: Kim Schaefer of Little Quilt Company (littlequiltcompany.com) Machine quilter: Susan Lawson of Seamingly Slawson Quilts (seamingslawsonquilts.blogspot.com)

B

A

Table Runner Assembly Diagram

o tio Graphic designer Alison Gamm used a collection of blue and silver prints to cool of the look of Down the Middle for her 20"-square pillow. She composed the pillow top out of four A blocks, four B blocks, and eight C blocks. FABRICS are from the Imperial collection by Robert Kaufman Fabrics (robertkaufman.com).

ree P tter AllPeopleQult.com/575

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APQ • August 2018


2


TIME TO

shi e

Contrasting star blocks give a quilt vitality and amped-up interest. designer Tiffany Hayes photographer Adam Albright

AllPeopleQuilt.com

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FINISHED QUILT: 741⁄2×861⁄2" FINISHED BLOCK: 12" square

MATERIALS Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. To plan this quilt in a diferent colorway, use the Coloring Diagram on Pattern Sheet 2. Fabrics are from the Pearl Essence Scrolls collection by Maywood Studio (maywoodstudio.com).

▫ 2 yards beige tone-on-tone (blocks)

▫ 1⁄2 yard white tone-on-tone (blocks)

▫ 21⁄4 yards red print (blocks, outer border)

▫ 31⁄3 yards black print (blocks, inner border, binding)

▫ 1⁄2 yard gold print (blocks) ▫ 2 ⁄3 yard cream tone-on-tone (blocks)

▫ 3 ⁄8 yard tan print (blocks) ▫

51 3 yards

backing fabric

▫ 83×95" batting ▫ White dressmakerʼs pencil TO ORDER A KIT of quilt top and binding fabrics for $135.95 ppd. in U.S. (California residents $145.95 ppd.), contact Bolts in the Bathtub; 661-9455541 boltsinthebathtub.com.

CUT FABRICS

ASSEMBLE TRIANGLE-SQUARES

Cut pieces in the following order. Patterns are on Pattern Sheet 2. To make templates of patterns, see Make and Use Templates, page 100. Be sure to transfer dots on patterns to templates, then to fabric pieces. The dots serve as matching points. To speed the cutting process, designer Tiffany Hayes rotary-cut the A and B pattern pieces using The Goddess Tool (needleinahayesstack .biz). To use this tool, refer to the manufacturer’s instructions for cutting triangles.

Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

From beige tone-on-tone, cut: ▫ 60 each of patterns A and A reversed ▫ 71 of Pattern B ▫ 30—27⁄8" squares ▫ 60—21 ⁄2" squares From white tone-on-tone, cut: ▫ 58—27⁄8" squares ▫ 2—27⁄8" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 4 small triangles total From red print, cut: ▫ 8—31 ⁄2 ×42" strips for outer border ▫ 60 of Pattern B ▫ 15—41 ⁄2" squares ▫ 30—27⁄8" squares ▫ 60—21 ⁄2" squares From black print, cut: ▫ 9—21 ⁄2 ×42" binding strips ▫ 9—41 ⁄2 ×201 ⁄2" rectangles ▫ 2—41 ⁄2 ×161 ⁄2" rectangles ▫ 2—41 ⁄2 ×81 ⁄2" rectangles ▫ 1—47⁄8" square, cutting it in half diagonally for 2 large triangles ▫ 2—41 ⁄2" squares ▫ 71 each of patterns A and A reversed ▫ 58—27⁄8" squares ▫ 120—21 ⁄2" squares From gold print, cut: ▫ 15—41 ⁄2" squares From cream tone-on-tone, cut: ▫ 120—21 ⁄2" squares From tan print, cut: ▫ 58—21 ⁄2" squares

1. Use a pencil to draw a diagonal line on wrong sides of beige tone-on-tone and white tone-on-tone 27⁄8" squares. 2. Layer a marked beige tone-ontone print square atop a red print 27⁄8" square. Sew together with two seams, stitching 1 ⁄4" on each side of drawn line (Diagram 1). Cut pair apart on drawn line and press open to make two red triangle-squares. Each triangle-square should be 21 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 60 red triangle-squares total. 27/8" sq.

Diagram 1

3. Using marked white tone-on-tone squares and black print 27⁄8" squares, repeat Step 2 to make 116 black triangle-squares (Diagram 2).

Diagram 2

ASSEMBLE STAR POINT UNITS

1. Referring to Diagram 3, align marked matching points of a black print A triangle and a beige tone-ontone B triangle; sew together. Add a black print A reversed triangle to make a black star point unit. The unit should be 41 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 71 black star point units total. B A

B Ar

Diagram 3

80

APQ • August 2018

A

Ar


2. Using beige tone-on-tone A and

2. Align marked black print squares

A reversed triangles and red print B triangles, repeat Step 1 to make 60 red star point units (Diagram 4).

with opposite corners of a red print 41 ⁄2" square (Diagram 5; note direction of drawn lines). Sew on drawn lines. Trim seam allowances to 1 ⁄4" and press open attached triangles. Align marked black print 21 ⁄2" squares with remaining corners of red print square; stitch, trim, and press as before to make a red Square-in-a-Square unit. The unit should be 41 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 15 red Square-in-a-Square units total.

A

Ar B

Diagram 4

ASSEMBLE SQUARE-IN-ASQUARE UNITS

1. Use a white dressmaker’s pencil to draw a diagonal line on wrong sides of black print 21 ⁄2" squares.

21/2" sq.

41/2" sq.

Diagram 5

3. Using gold print 41 ⁄2" squares, repeat Step 2 to make 15 gold Squarein-a-Square units (Diagram 6).

Diagram 6

“My husband, Scott Hayes, created and executed the machine-quilting designs on this quilt. We make a great team: I iece, he uilts!” —Tiffany Hayes, designer

AllPeopleQuilt.com

81


ASSEMBLE BLOCKS

1. Referring to Diagram 7, sew together a red print 21 ⁄2" square, two cream tone-on-tone 21 ⁄2" squares, and a red triangle-square in pairs. Join pairs to make Corner Unit A. The unit should be 41 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 60 A corner units total. 21/2" sq.

21/2" sq.

Corner Unit A Diagram 7

6. Sew together a triangle unit and

21/2"

Corner Unit B Diagram 9

a black print large triangle to make Corner Unit C (Diagram 12). The unit should be 41 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make a second Corner Unit C.

4. Lay out four B corner units, four red star point units, and a gold Square-in-a-Square unit in three rows (Diagram 10). Sew together units in each row. Join rows to make Block B. The block should be 121 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 13 B blocks total.

2. Lay out four A corner units, four black star point units, and a red Square-in-a-Square unit in three rows (Diagram 8). Sew together units in each row. Join rows to make Block A. The block should be 121 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 15 A blocks total.

Corner Unit C Diagram 12

7. Lay out three B corner units, four red star point units, a gold Squarein-a-Square unit, and one Corner Unit C in three rows (Diagram 13). Sew together units in each row. Join rows to make Block C. The block should be 121 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make a second Block C.

Block B Diagram 10

5. Referring to Diagram 11, join whitetone-on-tone small triangles to a beige tone-on-tone 21 ⁄2" square to make a triangle unit. Repeat to make a second triangle unit. Block A Diagram 8

21/2" sq.

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APQ • August 2018

ASSEMBLE QUILT CENTER

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly

3. Referring to Diagram 9, sew together a tan print 21 ⁄2" square, two black triangle-squares, and a beige tone-on-tone 21 ⁄2" square in pairs. Join pairs to make Corner Unit B. The unit should be 41 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 58 B corner units total.

Block C Diagram 13

Diagram, lay out blocks in six rows; note orientation of C blocks. Diagram 11

2. Sew together blocks in rows. Press seams open. Join rows to make quilt center; press seams open. The quilt center should be 601 ⁄2×721 ⁄2" including seam allowances.


31/2×741/2"

41/2×201/2"

41/2×201/2"

41/2×201/2"

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

C

A

B

A

C

41/2×201/2"

A

41/2" sq.

41/2×81/2"

41/2×201/2"

41/2×201/2"

41/2×201/2"

41/2×201/2"

31/2×801/2"

41/2×201/2"

41/2×161/2"

41/2×161/2"

A

41/2" sq.

41/2×81/2"

Quilt Assembly Diagram

AllPeopleQuilt.com

83


ASSEMBLE AND ADD BORDERS

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, page 83, sew together one black print 41 ⁄2 ×161 ⁄2" rectangle, three black star point units, two black print 41 ⁄2 ×201 ⁄2" rectangles, and one black print 41 ⁄2" square to make a side inner border strip. Press seams open. The strip should be 41 ⁄2 ×721 ⁄2" including seam allowances. Repeat to make a second side inner border strip, noting orientation of star point units.

2. Sew together three black print

Diagram). Press seams open. The strip should be 41 ⁄2 ×681 ⁄2" including seam allowances.

4. Sew side inner border strips to long edges of quilt center. Add top and bottom inner border strips to remaining edges. Press all seams toward inner border.

2. Quilt as desired. Scott Hayes machine-quilted a variety of interlocking arcs in the blocks and outer border (Quilting Diagram). He quilted parallel lines spaced 1" apart along the black print portions of the inner border.

3. Bind with black print binding strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.)

5. Cut and piece red print 31 ⁄2 ×42" strips to make: ▫ 2—31 ⁄2 ×801 ⁄2" outer border strips ▫ 2—31 ⁄2 ×741 ⁄2" outer border strips

41 ⁄2 ×201 ⁄2" rectangles and two black star point units to make top inner border strip (Quilt Assembly Diagram). Press seams open. The strip should be 41 ⁄2 ×681 ⁄2" including seam allowances.

long edges of quilt center. Add short outer border strips to remaining edges to complete quilt top. Press all seams toward outer border.

3. Sew together two black print

FINISH QUILT

41 ⁄2 ×81 ⁄2" rectangles, three black star point units, and two black print 41 ⁄2 ×201 ⁄2" rectangles to make bottom inner border strip (Quilt Assembly

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 102.)

Designer: Tifany Hayes of Needle in a Hayes Stack (needleinahayesstack.biz) Machine quilter: Scott Hayes

6. Sew long outer border strips to

Quilting Diagram

o tio The batiks used by quilt tester Martha Gamm yielded a fresh take on Time to Shine. The brilliant turquoise and coral hues give the table topper or wall hanging a summery, tropical vibe. FABRICS are from the Illusion and Desire collections by Jacqueline De Jonge for Anthology Fabrics (anthologyfabrics.com).

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APQ • August 2018


#millionpillowcasechallenge

Make a pillowcase.

ke

i ere ce.

For people who love to sew or quilt, it’s so easy to lift spirits and provide comfort to hospitalized kids, homeless families, and others in need. Simply join American Patchwork & Quilting® magazine’s 1 Million Pillowcase Challenge and make and donate one, two, or more pillowcases. You’ll make a difference with every pillowcase you donate. Join the movement today. Find complete details, download free patterns, and be sure to record your donations online at:

AllPeopleQuilt.com/millionpillowcases How you’re making a difference As a child, Lisa Wilberding, manager of The Quilter’s Trunk, was a victim of domestic violence. Today, grateful for the support she received in response, she’s paying it forward by collecting pillowcases and quilts for A New Direction (AND), a domestic violence organization serving the Chicago area that is similar to the one that helped her. The organization says the pillowcases have helped turn its clients’ dark days into brighter ones. 2018 SPONSORS


CONNECTING No blocks are used in assembling this quilt. designer Katie Hennagir photographer Adam Albright

86

APQ â&#x20AC;¢ August 2018


FAT QUARTERS

AllPeopleQuilt.com

87


FINISHED QUILT: 591⁄2 ×751⁄2"

CUT FABRICS

ASSEMBLE QUILT TOP

Cut pieces in the following order.

Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric. Rather than piecing blocks, this quilt is pieced in units (A and B) that are joined into rows. For ease in assembly, arrange pieces on a design wall before starting to sew.

MATERIALS Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width.

▫ 9—18×21" pieces (fat quarters) assorted black prints (stars, background)

▫ 17—18×21" pieces (fat quarters) assorted cream and gray prints (background)

▫ 5 ⁄8 yard black loral print (binding)

▫ 4 yards backing fabric ▫ 68×84" batting TO ORDER A KIT of similar quilt top and binding fabrics for $84.50 ppd. in U.S. (Minnesota residents $90.73 ppd.), contact Bay Window Quilt Shop; 888/346-7275; baywindowquiltshop.com.

“I scattered 25 stars across this quilt because I designed it for the 25th

ivers ry

of the Bay Window Quilt Shop in Perham, Minnesota.” —Kate Hennagir, designer

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APQ • August 2018

From each black print fat quarter, cut: ▫ 9—31 ⁄2" squares (you will have 1 left over) ▫ 23—2" squares (25 sets of 8 matching squares; you will have 7 squares left over) From assorted cream and gray prints, cut: ▫ 63—51 ⁄2" squares ▫ 142—31 ⁄2×51 ⁄2" rectangles From black floral print, cut; ▫ 7—21 ⁄2×42 binding strips


e ture

rics

Visit your local quilt shop for these featured fabrics! Get the free patterns at allpeoplequilt.com/millionpillowcases

Stonehenge Out Of This World by Linda Ludovico

Emoji

Painted Garden by Crystal Manning

Well Said by Sandy Gervais

Cat-I-Tude by Ann Lauer of Grizzly Gulch Gallery

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Pattern uses GO! Qube 8â&#x20AC;? Companion Set-Angles (# 55789)

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1. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal

and gray print 31 ⁄2×51 ⁄2" rectangles, and 80 assorted black print 3 1 ⁄2" squares in 19 rows. For star points, on cream and gray print rectangles position marked black print 2" squares that match adjacent black print 3 1 ⁄2" squares.

line on wrong sides of 200 (25 sets of eight) assorted black print 2" squares.

2. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, lay out assorted cream and gray print 51 ⁄2" squares, assorted cream

3. Sew together pieces in Row 1. Press seams toward black print squares. The row should be 31 ⁄2×591 ⁄2" including seam allowances. Repeat to make Row 19.

31/2×51/2"

1/2" Row 1 3sq. 31/2×51/2"

Row 2

Row 3

51/2" sq.

A

A

A

Row 5

B

A

Row 8

Row 12

A

A

Row 14

Row 17

Row 18

A

A

A

A

B

A

A

A

A

B

A

A

A

A

B

A

B

A

Quilt Assembly Diagram APQ • August 2018

A

A

Row 19

90

A

B

A

A

B

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

Row 16

A

A

A

A

A

B

A

A

Row 15

A

B

A

A

A

A

A

A

Row 13

A

B

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

Row 9

Row 11

A

A

A

Row 10

B

A

B

A

Row 6

Row 7

A

B

Row 4

A

A

A

A

B

A

A


4. Remove pieces for one star point Unit A (cream or gray print 3 1 ⁄2×5 1 ⁄2" rectangle and two marked black print 2" squares) from Row 2.

5. Referring to Diagram 1 for direction of drawn line, align a marked black print square with a rectangle corner. Sew on marked line. Trim seam allowance to 1 ⁄4"; press open attached triangle. Add second marked black print square to adjacent corner of rectangle to make star point Unit A. The unit still should be 3 1 ⁄2×5 1 ⁄2" including seam allowances. Return Unit A to its place on the design wall. Repeat to make 72 Unit A star points total. 31/2×51/2"

6. Remove pieces for one star point Unit B (cream or gray print 3 1 ⁄2×5 1 ⁄2" rectangle and four marked black print 2" squares) from Row 3. Referring to Diagram 2, add squares to rectangle as before to make a Unit B star point. Return Unit B to its place on the design wall. Repeat to make 14 Unit B star points total.

FINISH QUILT

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 102.)

2. Quilt as desired. Jace Hennagir machine-quilted in the ditch around the stars and a freehand feather design across the rest of the quilt top (Quilting Diagram).

7. Sew together pieces in rows. Press seam allowances away from rectangles and star point units. Sew together rows to complete quilt top. Press seams toward odd-numbered rows.

3. Bind with black floral print binding strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) Designer: Katie Hennagir (baywindowquiltshop.wordpress.com) Machine quilter: Jace Hennagir of Strongarm Quilting

31/2×51/2" 2" sq.

Unit B Diagram 2

2" sq.

Unit A Diagram 1

Quilting Diagram

o tio Quilt tester Colleen Tauke used children's novelty prints in pastels, a bright turquoise, and the Connecting Stars pattern to create a quilt top suitable for a baby. A scrappy binding would link the coordinating prints nicely. FABRICS are from the Enchanted collection by Gingiber for Moda Fabrics (modafabrics.com).

AllPeopleQuilt.com

91


re t or retirements, moving away, travel souvenirs, exchange students, family reunions, anniversaries, graduations, and weddings!

92

APQ â&#x20AC;˘ August 2018


Whether it is for a birthday, retirement, or anniversary, a signature quilt is a great way to capture important memories in the honoreeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. quiltmaker Linda Augsburg inspired by Grand Slam by designers Elissa and Heather Willms photographer Marty Baldwin


FINISHED QUILT: 601⁄2 ×841⁄2 " FINISHED BLOCK: 6" square

MATERIALS Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width.

▫ 11⁄4 yards total assorted medium and dark batiks and prints (signature blocks)

▫ 7⁄8 yard total assorted light prints (signature blocks)

▫ 23—18×21" pieces (fat quarters) assorted medium and dark batiks (setting blocks)

▫ 9—18×21" pieces (fat quarters) assorted light batiks (setting blocks)

▫ 5 ⁄8 yard assorted blue batiks (binding)

▫ 51⁄4 yards backing fabric ▫ 69×93" batting ▫ Freezer paper ▫ Wide-point permanent marker: black

▫ Fine-point permanent marker: black or brown

“I didn’t have enough sig ture locks to make a quilt in the size I wanted so I added batik Rail Fence blocks made with light center strips to mimic the look of the signature blocks. I kept the signature blocks in the center and surrounded them with the batik blocks.” —Linda Augsburg, quiltmaker

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APQ • August 2018


Tips for writing on fabric 1. Choose a smooth-surface fabric that is 100% cotton because permanent-ink pens perform better on all-cotton fabrics than on blends. 2. Select fabric in a color that allows the ink to show. Avoid white-on-white prints because the patterns are painted on the fabric rather than dyed into it.

3. Prewash your fabric because cotton fabrics usually contain sizing, which acts as a barrier to ink penetration.

5. If you don’t care to use your handwriting or want to ensure nicely spaced letters, type your word(s) on a computer. Adjust the size and spacing to it your fabric piece; space your letters a little farther apart than normal to allow for the width of the marker tip. Print the words on paper and trace them onto fabric. 6. Practice on fabric scraps irst. Write slowly and use a lighter touch than you would when writing on paper. This allows time for the ink to flow into the fabric and lets you control the shapes of the letters.

4. Purchase pens that contain permanent ink formulated for fabric. A ine point (pen size 01, point size .25 millimeter) writes delicately and is less likely than a larger point size to bleed as it writes. Lines can be made thicker by going over them more than once. For larger letters or numbers, a size 05 (.45 millimeter) pen works well.

7. Use freezer paper to stabilize the fabric and create guidelines for writing. Use a ruler and a thick black marker to draw a line or multiple evenly spaced lines on the freezer paper’s dull side. Press the shiny side of the freezer paper piece to the wrong side of the fabric with a hot dry iron.

AllPeopleQuilt.com

October 2018

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95


ABOUT THE QUILT When quiltmaker Linda Augsburg left her job at a Florida quilt shop to move to Chicago, her quilting friends made 30 Rail Fence signature blocks as her going-away gift. To assemble them into a quilt, Linda auditioned an assortment of fabrics, eventually selecting light, medium, and dark multicolor batiks to make setting blocks that would pull together the mix of batiks and prints in the signature blocks.

CUT FABRICS Cut pieces in the following order. From assorted medium and dark batiks and prints, cut: ▫ 60—21 ⁄2 ×61 ⁄2" rectangles From assorted light prints, cut: ▫ 30—21 ⁄2 ×61 ⁄2" rectangles From assorted medium and dark batik fat quarters, cut: ▫ 90—21 ⁄2 ×21" strips (45 sets of 2 matching strips) From assorted light batik fat quarters, cut: ▫ 45—21 ⁄2 ×21" strips From assorted blue batiks, cut: ▫ Enough 21 ⁄2"-wide strips in lengths ranging from 15" to 19" to total 312" for binding

ASSEMBLE SIGNATURE BLOCKS Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right side together unless otherwise stated.

1. Referring to Diagram 1, sew together two medium or dark batik or print 21 ⁄2 ×61 ⁄2" rectangles and one light print 21 ⁄2 ×61 ⁄2" rectangle to make a signature block. Press seams away from light print. The block should be 61 ⁄2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 30 signature blocks total.

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APQ • August 2018

Quilt Assembly Diagram

the rite stu Test your pen on a fabric scrap before writing on a block. Follow the manufacturer’s directions for setting the ink, then wash the test scrap as you would a quilt.


61/2" 11/2×61/2"

FINISH QUILT

Diagram 3

2. Quilt as desired. Linda used

Diagram 1

ASSEMBLE QUILT TOP

2. From freezer paper, cut thirty

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly

2×6" rectangles. Using a widepoint black marker and a ruler, draw a heavy line on the dull side of each rectangle to act as a placement guide for the signature. If you want to write a message, draw several lines.

Diagram, lay out signature and setting blocks in 14 rows, turning every other block a quarter turn. Linda placed the signature blocks horizontally (as signed) and in the center.

2. Join blocks in rows. Press seams in

3. Place a freezer-paper rectangle,

one direction, alternating the direction with each row.

shiny side down, on wrong side of light print rectangle in each signature block. Using a hot dry iron, press each rectangle onto fabric. The black line will show through the light print rectangle.

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 102.)

3. Sew together rows to complete quilt

variegated blue thread to machinequilt a wave design across the quilt top. (If you don’t want to quilt through the signatures, stitch in the ditch along block seams.)

3. Using diagonal seams, join assorted blue batik 21 ⁄2"-wide strips to make a pieced binding strip. Bind quilt with pieced binding strip. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) Quiltmaker: Linda Augsburg

top. Press seams in one direction.

AllPeopleQuilt.com

4. Ask friends to sign their names or write messages on the right sides of light print rectangles using a fine-point permanent marker. Peel off freezer paper when ink has set.

ASSEMBLE SETTING BLOCKS

1. Sew together two matching medium or dark batik 21 ⁄2 ×21" strips and one light batik 21 ⁄2 ×21" strip to make a strip set (Diagram 2). Press seams away from light batik strip. Repeat to make 45 strip sets total. 21/2×21"

Diagram 2

2. Cut strip sets into 61 ⁄2"-wide segments (Diagram 3) to make 110 setting blocks. Each block should be 61 ⁄2" square including seam allowances.

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QUILT


back to CUT BIAS STRIPS Strips for curved appliqué pieces and for binding curved edges should be cut on the bias (diagonally across the grain of a woven fabric), which runs at a 45° angle to the selvage and has the most stretch. To cut bias strips, begin with a fabric square or rectangle; if necessary, square up the left edge with an acrylic ruler. Make a cut at a 45° angle to the left edge (Bias Strip Diagram). Handle the diagonal edges carefully to avoid distorting the bias. To cut a strip, measure the desired width from the 45° cut edge; cut parallel to the edge. Cut enough strips to total the length needed. 45° 45°

Bias Strip Diagram

MAKE AND USE TEMPLATES MAKE TEMPLATES

A template is a pattern made from extra-sturdy material so you can trace around it many times without wearing away the edges. Acrylic templates for many common shapes are available at quilt shops. Or you can make your own by duplicating printed patterns on template plastic. To make permanent templates, purchase easy-to-cut template plastic, available at quilt shops and crafts supply stores. Lay the plastic over a printed pattern. To ensure straight lines, accurate corners, and permanency, use a ruler and permanent marker to trace the pattern onto the plastic.

100

APQ • August 2018

sics For hand piecing and appliqué, make templates the exact size finished pieces will be (without seam allowances). For piecing, this means tracing the patterns’ dashed lines. For machine piecing, make templates that include seam allowances by tracing the patterns’ solid and dashed lines onto the template plastic. For easy reference, mark each template with its letter designation, grain line (if noted by an arrow on the pattern), and block or quilt name. Also mark the matching point of each corner on the seam line (these may be indicated with dots on the printed pattern). Cut out traced shapes on the outside lines. Using a pushpin, make a hole in the template at each corner matching point. The hole must be large enough to accommodate the point of a pencil or marking pen. Verify each template shape and size by placing it over its printed pattern. Templates must be accurate because errors, however small, compound many times as you assemble a quilt. To check the accuracy of your templates, make a test block before cutting the fabric pieces for an entire quilt. USE TEMPLATES

To trace a template on fabric, use a pencil, a white dressmaker’s pencil, chalk, or a special fabric marker that makes a thin, accurate line. Do not use a ballpoint or ink pen; the lines may bleed if washed. Test all marking tools on a fabric scrap before using them on pieces for a quilt. To make pieces for hand piecing, place a template facedown on the wrong side of the fabric and trace. If desired, mark the matching points on the corners of the seam lines.

Refer to these tips and techniques when you need information for making a project.

Reposition the template at least 1 ⁄2" away from the previous tracing, trace again, and repeat (Diagram 1).

Diagram 1

To make pieces for hand appliqué, place a template faceup on the right side of the fabric and trace. The lines you trace on the fabric are the sewing lines. Mark cutting lines 1 ⁄4" away from the sewing lines, or estimate the distance by eye when cutting out the pieces with scissors. For hand piecing, add a 1 ⁄4" seam allowance; for hand appliqué, add a 3⁄ 16" seam allowance. Because templates used to make pieces for machine piecing have seam allowances included, you can use common tracing lines for efficient cutting. Place a template facedown on the wrong side of the fabric and trace. Mark the corner matching points through the holes in the template; they should be right on the seam lines. Reposition the template without leaving a space between it and the previous tracing, trace again, and repeat (Diagram 2). Using a rotary cutter and ruler, cut out pieces, cutting precisely on the drawn lines.

Diagram 2


PLAN FOR CUTTING Our project instructions list pieces in the order they should be cut to make the best use of your fabrics. Always consider the fabric grain before cutting. The arrow on a pattern piece indicates which direction the grain should run. One or more straight edges of a pattern piece should follow the fabric’s lengthwise or crosswise grain. The lengthwise grain, parallel to the selvages (the tightly finished edges), has the least amount of stretch. The crosswise grain, perpendicular to the selvages, has a little more give. The edge of any pattern piece that will be on the outside of a block or quilt should be cut on the lengthwise grain. Do not use the selvage of a woven fabric in a quilt. When washed, it may shrink more than the rest of the fabric.

matching points at each end, pushing a pin through both fabric layers to check alignment. Machine-stitch precisely between matching points, backstitching at seam ends. Remove unit from sewing machine.

Diagram 4

Bring adjacent edge of angled unit up and align it with the next edge of the square (Diagram 5). Insert a pin in each corner to align matching points as before. Machine-stitch between matching points. Press seams away from set-in piece (the square).

SET-IN SEAMS The key to sewing angled pieces together (setting in seams) is carefully aligning marked matching points. Here, we use diamonds and a square—a common type of set-in seam—to illustrate the process. Whether you’re stitching by machine or hand, start and stop sewing precisely at the matching points (dots on Diagram 3); be sure to backstitch to secure seam ends. BY MACHINE

First make an angled unit by sewing two diamonds together between matching points along a pair of edges (Diagram 3).

Diagram 5

Then, with right sides together, pin one edge of the angled unit to one edge of the square (Diagram 4). Align

Diagram 7

MITER BORDER CORNERS To add a border with mitered corners, pin a border strip to one edge of the quilt top, matching centers. Sew together, beginning and ending seam 1 ⁄4" from quilt top corners (Diagram 8). Allow excess border fabric to extend beyond edges of quilt top. Repeat with remaining border strips. Press seams toward border strips.

BY HAND

First make an angled unit by sewing two diamonds together between matching points along a pair of edges (Diagram 3). Then, with right sides together, pin one edge of the angled unit to an edge of the square (Diagram 6). Use pins to align matching points.

Diagram 6

Diagram 3

Bring the adjacent edge of the square up and align it with the next edge of the angled unit. Insert a pin in each corner to align matching points as before, then pin remainder of the seam (Diagram 7). Hand-sew seam from inside corner to open end of the angle, removing pins as you sew. Press seams away from set-in piece (the square).

Diagram 8

At a corner, lap one border strip over the other (Diagram 9). Align the edge of a 90° triangle with the raw edge of the top strip so that the long edge of the triangle intersects the border seam in the corner. With a pencil, draw along edge of triangle from seam out to the raw edge. Place bottom border strip on top and repeat the marking process.

Hand-sew the seam from the open end of the angled unit to the matching point in the corner. Remove pins as you sew. Backstitch at the corner to secure stitches. Do not sew into the 1 ⁄4" seam allowance and do not cut your thread. Diagram 9 AllPeopleQuilt.com

101


BACK TO

sics

With right sides together, match marked seam lines and pin (Diagram 10). Beginning with a backstitch at the inside corner, sew strips together, stitching exactly on marked lines. Check the right side to make sure the corner lies flat. Trim excess fabric, leaving a 1 ⁄4" seam allowance. Press seam open. Mark and sew remaining corners in same manner.

Holding diagonal fold in place with your finger, bring binding strip down in line with next edge of quilt top, making a horizontal fold that aligns with the quilt edge (Diagram 16). Diagram 11

Diagram 12

Diagram 13

Diagram 10

COMPLETE QUILT Cut and piece backing fabric to measure at least 4" bigger on all sides than the quilt top. Press seams open. With wrong sides together, layer quilt top and backing fabric with batting in between; baste. Quilt as desired. Trim batting and backing fabric even with the quilt top edges. The binding for most quilts is cut on the straight grain of the fabric. If your quilt has curved edges, cut binding strips on the bias. Cutting instructions for the projects in this issue specify the number of binding strips or a total length needed to finish the quilt. Instructions also specify enough width for a French-fold, or double-layer, binding because it’s easier to apply and adds durability. Join strips with diagonal seams to make one continuous binding strip (Diagram 11). Trim excess fabric, leaving 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Press seams open. Fold one end of the binding strip under 1" (Diagram 12); press. With wrong side inside, fold strip in half lengthwise and press (Diagram 13).

102

APQ • August 2018

Beginning in center of one edge, place binding strip against right side of quilt top, aligning binding strip raw edges with quilt top raw edge (Diagram 14). Begin sewing the binding in place 2" from the folded end. Stop sewing when you’re 1 ⁄4" (or a distance equal to the seam allowance you’re using) from the corner. Backstitch, then clip threads. Remove quilt from under the sewing machine presser foot.

Diagram 14

Fold binding strip upward, creating a diagonal fold, and finger-press (Diagram 15).

Diagram 15

Diagram 16

Start sewing again at top of horizontal fold, stitching through all layers. Sew around quilt, turning each corner in same manner. When you return to the starting point, encase binding strip raw edge inside the folded end (Diagram 17). Finish sewing to the starting point (Diagram 18).

Diagram 17

Diagram 18

Turn binding over each edge to the back. Hand-stitch binding to backing fabric, making sure to cover all machine stitching. To make mitered corners on the back, hand-stitch up to a corner; fold a miter in the binding. Take a stitch or two in the fold to secure it, then stitch the binding in place up to the next corner. Finish each corner in the same manner.


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104

APQ • August 2018

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American Patchwork & Quilting® (ISSN 1066-758X), August 2018, Vol. 26, No. 4. American Patchwork & Quilting is published bimonthly in February, April, June, August, October, and December by Meredith Corp., 1716 Locust St., Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. Periodicals postage paid at Des Moines, IA, and at additional mailing offices. SUBSCRIPTION PRICES: $29.97 per year in the U.S.; $39.97 (U.S. dollars) per year in Canada and overseas. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2). NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to American Patchwork & Quilting, P.O. Box 37508, Boone, IA 50037-0508. In Canada: Mailed under Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement No. 40069223; Canadian BN 12348 2887 RT. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: American Patchwork & Quilting, 2835 Kew Dr., Windsor, ON N8T 3B7. Your bank may provide updates to the card information we have on file. You may opt out of this service at any time. Better Homes & Gardens is a registered trademark in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Better Homes & Gardens marca registrada en México. © Meredith Corp. 2018. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

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