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CON T EN TS VOL. 37 |

NO. 3 |

MARCH 2016

John Petrucci at Guitar World HQ, December 15, 2015

FEATURES

46

JOHN PETRUCCI Led by the ferociously fleet-fingered John Petrucci, Dream Theater launch the most massive undertaking of their impressive career—the sprawling, 34-song epic The Astonishing.

58 RUSH It’s possible that Rush have parked their tour bus for the last time, leaving 40 years of epic gigging and an unparalleled body of work in their wake. To help celebrate the release of R40 Live, Guitar World catches up with Alex Lifeson and Geddy Lee to talk about some of the choice cuts that found their way into the band’s career-spanning 2015 set list.

68 ORANGE TINY TERROR The story of how the Tiny Terror from Orange Amplification unknowingly spearheaded the “lunchbox style” amp revolution a decade ago—and a look at what lies ahead for the groundbreaking product line.

74 VIVIAN CAMPBELL Vivian Campbell’s relationship with his past as Ronnie James Dio’s first solo axman hasn’t been all warm and fuzzy in the 30 years since he and the legendary frontman parted ways—but now, with his former bandmates, he’s once again embracing his Dio heritage. Here the guitarist talks about his Last in Line project, his battle with cancer, and the classic metal music he and Ronnie James produced in the early Eighties.

COVER PHOTOGRAPH JIMMY HUBBARD

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GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

PHOTO BY JIMMY HUBBARD


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CON T EN TS VOL. 37 |

NO. 3 |

MARCH 2016

C.J. Pierce

DEPARTM ENT S 18 WOODSHED 20 SOUNDING BOARD

Letters, reader art and Defenders of the Faith

23 TUNE-UPS

Drowning Pool, Ihsahn, Prong’s Tommy Victor, Savages, Craig Goldy and more!

83 SOUNDCHECK

83. Fractal Audio Systems FX8 multieffect pedalboard 85. Dean Guitars Rusty Cooley 6 String Xenocide electric 86. Fender Jimi Hendrix Stratocaster 88. PRS S2 Singlecut Standard Satin electric 90. Henriksen Bud amplifier 92. Earthquaker Devices Acapulco Gold pedal 92. Truetone 1Spot Pro CS7 and C12 power supply

94 COLUMNS

28

Drowning Pool

94. Emmanuel Dexterity by Tommy Emmanuel 96. Holcomb Mania by Periphery’s Mark Holcomb 98. String Theory by Jimmy Brown 100. School of Rock by Joel Hoekstra 102. Acoustic Nation by Dale Turner 104. In Deep by Andy Aledort

146 IT MIGHT GET WEIRD Vincent Guitars Star Wars models

“Interstate Love Song”

“The Dark Eternal Night”

“512”

“Bad Blood”

by Stone Temple Pilots

by Dream Theater

by Lamb of God

by Ryan Adams

PAGE

106

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PAGE

110

PAGE

128

PAGE

136

C O LT C O A N

TRANSCRIBED


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Rev


WOODSHED VOL. 37 |

NO. 3 |

MARCH 2016 EDITORIAL

LEMMY TELL YOU SOMETHING JUST AS WE were going to press with this issue, we heard the news—Motörhead legend Lemmy Kilmister had passed away four days after his 70th birthday. Given the rocker’s well-documented health struggles of late the news didn’t come as a total shock, but just because you see a freight train coming right at you, it doesn’t make it any less painful when it hits. The influence of Motörhead and Lemmy in particular is immeasurable. Countless bands and musicians—Metallica and Dave Grohl among them—regularly hail Motörhead as a primary source of inspiration. And the legacy of 22 albums and nearly 250 original songs, not counting Lemmy’s early output with Hawkwind, will leave our eardrums bleeding forever more. “Overkill,” “Iron Fist,” “Killed by Death,” “Bomber,” “Stone Dead Forever,” “Orgasmatron” and of course the singular “Ace of Spades”—the list of classic screamers Lemmy left behind is seemingly endless. And while Lemmy’s musical accomplishments alone would certainly be enough to earn him legendary status, I’m going to take the opportunity to acknowledge him for who he was: a true rock star. Lemmy drank. He smoked. He had no qualms talking about the countless numbers of women he bedded. He lived in the same nondescript two-bedroom West Hollywood apartment just around the corner from the Rainbow, his favorite haunt, for years, surrounded by a dizzying collection of war memorabilia and didn’t care what you thought about his hobby. Despite his failing health, Lemmy soldiered on with barely a gripe and lived life up until his final day…ready to die onstage if that’s what had to happen. He was Lemmy…go fuck yourself. As sad as it is to see Lemmy the musical legend leave the planet, it’s equally sad when you think about the fact that another true rock star is gone forever. Here’s to hoping the younger generation of rockers takes a page from Lemmy’s rulebook and does what he did: show no fear, crank up the amps, speak your mind (even if it costs you a few Facebook followers), and live life like each day was your last. Lemmy, we salute you. Cheers, mate.

—Jeff Kitts Executive Content Director

EXECUTIVE CONTENT DIRECTOR Jeff Kitts EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brad Angle TECH EDITOR Paul Riario ASSOCIATE EDITORS Andy Aledort, Richard Bienstock, Alan di Perna, Chris Gill CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Joe Bosso, Dan Epstein, Greg Evans, Randy Har ward, Peter Hodgson, Mark Holcomb, Joe Satriani, Dale Turner, Jon Wiederhorn SENIOR VIDEO PRODUCER Mark Nuñez

MUSIC SENIOR MUSIC EDITOR Jimmy Brown MUSIC TRANSCRIPTIONIST Jeff Perrin MUSIC ENGRAVER Patricia Corcoran

ART CONTRIBUTING ART DIRECTORS Andrea von Bujdoss, Sandie Burke ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Natalie Skopelja

ONLINE MANAGING EDITOR Damian Fanelli EDITORS Brad Angle, Jeff Kitts

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION MANAGER Nicole Schilling

BUSINESS VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL MANAGER Bill Amstutz bamstutz@nbmedia.com GROUP PUBLISHER Bob Ziltz bziltz@nbmedia.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR - WEST Jason Perl 646-723-5419, jason@guitar world.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR - EAST Scott Sciacca 646-723-5478, scott@guitar world.com ADVERTISING MANAGER Anna Blumenthal 646-723-5404, anna@guitar world.com GROUP MARKETING DIRECTOR Christopher Campana 646-723-5423, ccampana@nbmedia.com SR. MARKETING MANAGER Stacy Thomas 646-723-5416, sthomas@nbmedia.com

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EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING OFFICES 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016 (212) 768-2966; FA X: (212) 944-9279 GUITAR WORLD (ISSN 1045-6295) is published 13 times a year, monthly plus Holiday issue following December issue, by NewBay Media, LLC, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Phone: 212.378.0400. Fax: 917.281.4704. Web Site: www.nbmedia.com. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and additional mailing offices. Newsstand distribution is handled by Time Warner Retail. Subscriptions: One-year basic rate (12 issues) US: $14.95. Canada: US$29.95. Foreign: US$49.95. Canadian and foreign orders must be prepaid. Canadian price includes postage and GST #R128220688. PMA #40612608. Subscriptions do not include newstand specials. POSTMASTER: Send change of address to Guitar World, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039. Ride-along enclosure in the following edition(s): none. Standard enclosure: None. Returns: Pitney Bowes, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2, Canada. Entire contents copyright 2012, NewBay Media L.L.C. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited. NewBay Media L.L.C. is not affiliated with the companies or products covered in Guitar World. Reproduction on the Internet of the articles and pictures in this magazine is illegal without the prior written consent of Guitar World. Products named in the pages of Guitar World are trademarks of their respective companies. PRODUCED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: Guitar World Magazine Customer Care, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039. Online: www.guitarworld.com/customerservice. Phone: 1-800-456-6441. Email guitarworld@ pcspublink.com. BACK ISSUES: www.guitarworld.com/store REPRINTS: NewBay Media, LLC, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Phone: 212.378.0414

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SOUNDI NG BOARD Got something you want to say? EMAIL US AT: Soundingboard@GuitarWorld.com

guitar arrangement of the first half of Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” in his Holiday issue String Theory column. I’ve seen versions of it on the internet and have even tried to make my own from piano sheet music, but his is the best by far. Love the video instruction for it as well. He always explains music theory in a way I understand. Jimmy’s DVDs are the best! —Scott Brackett

Trey Magnifique Just wanted to thank you for putting Trey Anastasio on the cover of the January 2016 issue. I thoroughly enjoyed the interview with Trey by Alan Paul, but the icing on the cake was the excerpt from Blair Jackson and David Gans’ new Grateful Dead book, This Is All A Dream We Dreamed. I always love it when Guitar World offers content like this to balance out the metal. —Andrew Smith

Brown Sound Thanks for Jimmy Brown’s

Good Thinking I’ve always been accepting of the various styles of music and bands you have chosen to feature in your magazine. Although the genre or style of music featured may not be my cup of tea, I always find some merit in reading or practicing something new. In recent months, you’ve chosen to feature the band Ghost, with an article in the September issue and tabs in the November and January issues. The November 2015 issue also featured Slayer on the

GU I TA R WOR L D • JA N UA RY 2016

In this exclusive excerpt from This Is All a Dream We Dreamed, Jerry Garcia, Phil Lesh, Bob Weir and other principal players discuss the earliest days of the Grateful Dead and how they all joined forces to become the godfathers of the American jam-band movement. FROM THIS IS ALL A DREAM WE DREAMED BY BLAIR JACKSON AND DAVID GANS. COPYRIGHT © 2015 BY THE AUTHOR AND REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF FLATIRON BOOKS, A DIVISION OF MACMILLAN PUBLISHERS LTD. (from left) Phil Lesh, Bob Weir, Bill Kreutzmann, Jerry Garcia and Ron “Pigpen” McKernan perform as the Warlocks, circa 1965

DDEAD EAD OONN AARRIVAL RRIVAL

front cover with a member wearing a pentagram on his T-shirt. If your editor is choosing to predominately feature bands who quite openly think the dark arts and the glorification of the devil are art, I would challenge you to feature some Christian artists in your magazine. In recent memory, and please correct me if I’m wrong, I’ve yet to see Skillet, Lincoln Brewster, Chris Tomlin, Matt Maher, Crowder or Paul Baloche on your cover, let alone a tab or lesson. An artist that promotes a positive message might be a welcome change and could open your magazine up to another demographic of readers. Please consider your target audience when choosing songs and bands to cover. I have been reading your magazine since the Eighties— I have stacks of them and consider your publication to be the solid foundation upon which my guitar playing and knowledge has been built. Thank you for your thoughtful consideration. —Jim Munster

is just not getting it. Would it be possible for whomever is in charge of writing articles to create an article that supports my point? If this can be done, it would be greatly appreciated. —Matthew Shepard

Ink Spot I recently added on to my first tattoo from almost 10 years ago, which was Steve Vai’s logo. Everything around the logo is new, done by Heather Maranda of Area 51 Tattoo in Springfield, Oregon. I gave her all of Vai’s album cover art and asked her for an interpretation of it. This is what she came up with, all freehand! —Keith Homel

Board of Ed Thought I would send a pic of my old-school snowboard from the late Eighties/early Nineties. Only 150 were made…keep rockin’ from Colorado! —Eric Mendoza

Grunge Match I am currently in the middle of an argument with one of my friends over why Alice in Chains is better than Nirvana, and he

GOT A TATTOO of your favorite band or guitarist you want to share with us? Send a photo of your ink to soundingboard@guitarworld.com and maybe we’ll print it or post it on our Facebook page!

SEND LETTERS TO: The Sounding Board, Guitar World, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016, or email us at Soundingboard@guitarworld.com. All subscription queries must be emailed to guitarworld@pcspublink.com. Please do not email the Sounding Board with subscription matters.

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GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016


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If you created a drawing, painting or sketch of your favorite guitarist and would like to see it in an upcoming issue of Guitar World, email soundingboard@ guitarworld.com with a scan of the image!

KURT CO BA I N B Y J O S H J A M I S O N

DEFENDERS

RIC HIE KOTZE N B Y D E A N C A M PA N A R O

of the Faith

Rob Kobrzynski

Mavi Mendoza

Rick Silva

AGE 45 HOMETOWN Tafton, PA GUITARS Gibson Les Paul Standard, American Fender Stratocaster, Charvel Jackson Model 6, PRS Tremonti SE, Epiphone Zakk Wylde Les Paul Custom Bullseye, Dean Stylist Deluxe SONGS I’VE BEEN PLAYING Zakk Wylde “Machine Gun Man,” Led Zeppelin “Ramble On,” Alter Bridge “Rise Today” GEAR I MOST WANT Jackson USA RR1

AGE 36 HOMETOWN New Orleans, LA GUITARS Gibson Snow Falcon Flying V, Gibson Les Paul Studio, 1986 Gibson Les Paul Classic, ESP EC-1000, Jackson Custom Shop Soloist, Fender American Stratocaster, Takamine EF341SC SONGS I’VE BEEN PLAYING Boston “More Than a Feeling,” Jimi Hendrix “Little Wing,” Stone Temple Pilots “Interstate Love Song” GEAR I MOST WANT Marshall JCM800

AGE 47    HOMETOWN Woonsocket, RI GUITARS Ibanez JEM7, Jackson Pro Dinky DK2, EVH Striped Series SONGS I’VE BEEN PLAYING Ozzy Osbourne “Over the Mountain,” Van Halen “Drop Dead Legs” and “Feel Your Love Tonight,” Led Zeppelin “The Rover,” Slash “Anastasia” GEAR I MOST WANT EVH 5150 Overdrive

Are you a Defender of the Faith? Send a photo, along with your answers to the questions above, to defendersofthefaith@guitarworld.com. And pray! guitarworld.com

21


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TUNE-UPS DROWNING POOL

28

IHSAHN

30

PRONG

32

“All my guitars were stolen. Like an idiot I used the insurance money to not do anything for a year.”

DWEEZIL ZAPPA

36

CRAIG GOLDY

SAVAGES

38

42

tktktktkt

Shred Alert A BEVY OF A-LIST AXMEN, INCLUDING ZAKK WYLDE, STEVE VAI AND PAUL GILBERT, RUSH TO THE AID OF LEGENDARY SHREDDER TONY MACALPINE AS HE BATTLES CANCER.

TO N Y M A C A L P I N E : A L E X S O LC A ; TO M M Y V I C TO R : N E I L Z LO Z O W E R

By Richard Bienstock

Tony MacAlpine

ON DECEMBER 12 in Los Angeles, some of rock’s greatest guitar slingers got together at the Wiltern Theatre to pay tribute to one of their own—Tony MacAlpine. The 55-year-old MacAlpine, who was diagnosed with colon cancer this past summer, may not be a household name, but within the instrumental guitar world he’s something of a giant. Even if you’ve never heard MacAlpine play, a glimpse at the concert’s lineup, dubbed the Benefit for Tony MacAlpine, would tell you more than a little bit about his standing. Among the guitarists who took the stage at the Wiltern that night were Steve Vai, Paul Gilbert, John 5, Zakk Wylde, Richie Kotzen, Tom Morello and Nuno Bettencourt. In most cases, the players were backed by an all-star rhythm section of bassist Billy Sheehan, drummer Mike Portnoy and keyboardist Derek Sherinian. In addition to being admirers of MacAlpine’s playing, many of these men—among them Vai, Sheehan, Portnoy and Sherinian—have also been his bandmates. guitarworld.com

23


NEWS + NOTES

Zakk Wylde performing onstage at the Wiltern on December 12

MacAlpine himself did not attend the event (which was paired with an auction featuring items donated from a slew of artists, including Kiss’ Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley, Joe Bonamassa and John Petrucci) as he was in Spain, where he currently lives part time, undergoing cancer treatments. But, he says, “It was amazing to have all those guys come together to support me in that way. They’re true brothers. I was honored.” Among the highlights of the evening were a full-lineup jam on Jimi Hendrix’s “Little Wing,” as well as a duo performance by Vai and Gilbert of MacAlpine’s signature instrumental, “Edge of Insanity,” the title track of his 1986 debut (that album also featured Sheehan on bass). “It was really cool hearing that go down,” MacAlpine says of the “Edge of Insanity” performance, which he watched on video after the fact. “I haven’t heard a lot of people playing my stuff, and to hear it done by those two was really amazing. The only unfortunate thing is that I wasn’t on that stage with them. I would have loved to have been a part of it, but I couldn’t do it.” MacAlpine may not be performing at the moment, but for the past three decades he has been a constant presence on the instru-

24

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

mental guitar landscape. He first came to wide recognition with Edge of Insanity, released on the Shrapnel label—ground zero for shred in the mid to late Eighties. The album demonstrated his mastery of the neoclassical style (indeed, this magazine once named Insanity one of the top 10 shred albums of all time), but MacAlpine was

“It was amazing to have all those guys come together to support me.” —T O N Y M AC A L P I N E

more than just another speed freak looking to play as many notes-per-bar as possible— he was also a highly accomplished pianist, as demonstrated by that album’s solo piano piece, “Chopin, Prelude 16, Opus 28.” Explains MacAlpine, “I felt very much a part of the shred movement, but I also felt it was restricting in a way. Because I was play-

ing a lot of different styles besides shred. And piano was actually my first instrument. So I started doing classical pieces on keyboard on my albums and my live shows just to offer something a little different.” Since the mid Eighties MacAlpine has released roughly a dozen solo albums—his most recent is 2015’s Concrete Gardens. Additionally he has played in myriad collaborative projects, including Planet X with Derek Sherinian, PSMS (Portnoy, Sheehan, MacAlpine, Sherinian) and the Grammynominated jazz-fusion combo CAB. In the early 2000s, he also spent several years as a musician in Steve Vai’s live band, backing Vai on both keyboards and guitar. But in mid 2015, as he was scheduled to play some international solo dates in support of Concrete Gardens, MacAlpine suddenly fell ill. “I just wasn’t feeling right at all, so we did some checks and discovered what it was,” he says of being diagnosed with colon cancer. “We got into it right away and I had an operation and had some things removed.” Compounding the severity of the situation was the fact that around the same time, MacAlpine’s wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. “You don’t hear about that too much, a couple getting sick

LIVE PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE CABRAL


NEWS + NOTES

INQUIRER WITH

SCOTT HEDRICK OF SKELETONWITCH What inspired you to first pick up a guitar?

It was the MC5 that really put me over the edge. I heard that playing from Wayne Kramer and Fred “Sonic” Smith and thought, Holy crap. I wanna do that. What was your first guitar?

A Vantage. I’m a lefty, so it’s a little tricky to find guitars. I’d been playing the saxophone in the school band, but I sold it to get a guitar. I went guitar shopping and the guy kept telling me I was holding it the wrong way. And I said, “No. That’s the way I hold it.” And he was like, “Oh,” and gave me the one left-handed guitar in the place. I still have it, too. Ever had a disaster show? Tom Morello showing his support for MacAlpine, (below) Steve Vai and Billy Sheehan trading licks

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GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

What’s your favorite guitar?

the Wiltern—are anxiously awaiting. “I’m incredibly appreciative of the community of players I’ve been surrounded by throughout my career,” MacAlpine says. “Because you’re friends first, and then the thing you have in common in music. Being able to understand that is an important aspect of life. In general, I just like to be extremely creative, and to surround myself with creative people. So I’m looking forward to getting back to it.”

Dan Erlewine, who is a really awesome luthier, had one of his apprentices build me an Albert King lefty Flying V. It’s set up as metal guitar, but he used the same schematics as the Albert King Flying V. And two other guys who work at StewartMacDonald [with Erlewine] built me a custom Explorer. It’s got a ridiculous hand-carved deer skull inlay. They were nice enough to build it for me relatively cheap. I used to bring those guitars on tour, but now I don’t because I don’t want to lose them. Any advice for younger players?

Yeah, listen to [fingerstyle guitarist] John Fahey! —RANDY HARWARD

LIVE PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE CABRAL

MAGDALENA WOLINSKA

like that together. But that’s the way it went down,” he says. “Fortunately, my wife is on the road to recovery.” As is MacAlpine, it seems. “I’m getting stronger and better each day,” he says. “We caught the thing early, so that was very important. It’s going to take some time, but every day is a gain in the right direction. But I have quite a ways to go.” As for where he is with his music, he says, “I practice guitar a little bit and I play piano fairly regularly. My fingers haven’t been affected. It’s just that the treatment saps your energy level—basically, you have no energy level at all.” That said, MacAlpine is already looking forward to the follow-up to Concrete Gardens. “As I sit here with a lot of time on my hands I’m actually writing things down with pencil and paper and coming up with various ideas,” he says. “When I’m up and about again we’re going to go to L.A. to record an album. I’d like to get started on that as soon as I’m ready to roll.” That moment is something MacAlpine’s fans—not to mention all the musicians who showed up to pay respects to him at

Of course! We’ve had shows where you play to the sound guy and his girlfriend. I’ve unplugged myself onstage; that’s an excellent rock move. Equipment failure is always fun, trying to troubleshoot an amp in the middle of a set at a festival in Germany in front of 20,000 people. It’s bound to happen. Don’t let it get you down.


NEWS + NOTES

C.J. Pierce

Drowning Pool

WITH THEIR SIXTH STUDIO ALBUM, THE DALLAS ROCKERS ARE SIMPLY HAPPY TO HAVE THEIR HEADS ABOVE WATER. By Dan Epstein

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heaviest effort yet. “We spent a lot of time on guitar tones,” says Pierce. “I had 17 different heads to choose from, and Jason and I spent about two weeks at his studio, 15 hours a day, trying different combinations of amps, guitars, mics and even strings. We got really kind of insane about it, but I’m glad that we did it. In the end, the combination of a Marshall JVM210 head and my B.C. Rich custom Eagle totally won out.” In order to break up the usual monotony of the recording process, Pierce and his cohorts spent their weekends during the making of Hellelujah playing fly-in dates around the country. “We got to field test the songs while we were recording, which was great,” says Pierce. “We played one show with Slayer, and when a bunch of Slayer fans started slamming around to some of our new songs, we knew we were

on the right track.” Still, Pierce says, the weekend gigs presented some unexpected logistical issues. “The Orlando airport during the summer, with Disney World? Ugh!” he laughs. “We had to get there like three hours early every time we flew out; it would always be us—a bunch of tattooed guys smelling like alcohol—and a bunch of kids in Mickey Mouse shirts!”

AXOLOGY • GUITARS B.C. Rich Pro X Eagle signature model • AMPS Marshall JVM210 head, Marshall 4X12 with Celestion Vintage 30 speakers • EFFECTS DigiTech GSP 1101 multi effects rack • STRINGS DR .012–.060

C O LT C O A N

“It’s just a miracle every time we finish a record,” says Drowning Pool guitarist C.J. Pierce with a laugh. “That’s why we called our new one Hellelujah— we’re celebrating the fact that we made it through hell!” Pierce is only half-joking; since Sinner, their 2001 debut—which featured the smash hit “Bodies”—the Dallas, Texas, hard rockers have parted ways with three lead singers (including original vocalist Dave Williams, who died on their tour bus during OzzFest 2002) and gone through several label and management changes. But they’ve continued to push forward; Hellelujah, their second album with Jason Moreno on vocals, is the sixth Drowning Pool studio album, and seventh overall. Produced by Jason Suecof (Death Angel, Deicide, Motionless in White) at his Audio Hammer Studios near Orlando, Florida, Hellelujah may also be the band’s


NEWS + NOTES

Ihsahn

THE NORWEGIAN BLACK METAL VIRTUOSO CONTINUES HIS EVOLUTION WITH HIS SIXTH SOLO ALBUM, ARKTIS. By Jon Wiederhorn

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Ihsahn in Norway with his Aristides 080 loaded with Seymour Duncan Pegasus/Sentient pickups

AXOLOGY • GUITARS Ibanez RGA 121 six-string, RG8 eight-string custom and Darkstone Custom; Fender Telecaster • AMPS Blackstar Series One 200 with matching cabs, Series One 412 • EFFECTS Blackstar HT Distortion, MXR M169 Carbon Copy delay, Electro-Harmonix Small Stone Nano Analog Phase Shifter • STRINGS Rotosound

H E I D I S T V E I TA N

After taking a daring leap into the abyss with the chaotic, improvisational Das Seelenbrechen in 2013, Ihsahn (Emperor, ex-Peccatum) has returned to earth with his sixth solo outing Arktis., a structured yet diverse album that pingpongs between black metal, prog, power metal, alt-industrial and melodic death metal. Those who have watched Ihsahn shift and evolve since his 2006 debut, The Adversary, shouldn’t be surprised by the sonic twists and turns of Arktis., yet musical diversity wasn’t the goal. “To be honest, I wanted to make my version of a strict pop rock–style album with very clear hooks and easily recognizable melodies,” Ihsahn says from his home studio in the backwoods of Norway. “I wanted to stay focused and keep it short and clean.” For inspiration, Ihsahn listened to Prince, ABBA and modern R&B, little of which is reflected on Arktis. Far more evident is his affinity for Enslaved, Nine Inch Nails and Randy Rhoads, who Ihsahn channeled for the Eighties metal of “Until I Too Dissolve.” “The main riff for that song so simple, but at the same time it’s so naked that you have to play it perfectly,” he says. “You need to have the right feel and get the groove right or it sounds terrible. It took a lot of time to get that one right.” An even greater challenge was transposing keyboard melodies to guitar on songs like the precise, choppy “Frail” and the textural, haunting “South Winds.” “The instruments have totally different voicings,” he says. “But I actually find it refreshing and it always drives me to play other, more creative things.” Arktis. might sound like it was strung together from many late-night sessions, but it was methodically created during the same hours many professionals spend in the office. “I have kids, so I work from 8 to 4 every day,” he says. “That kind of routine is very good for me. Knowing that I have this certain block of time to write and make music makes me more focused than I’ve ever been. Arktis. is a reflection of that. It’s been a long time since I’ve had so much fun making an album.”


DEAR GUITAR HERO

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P H O T O B Y J AY S E N M I C H A E L


TOMMY VICTOR OF PRONG

Before he founded industrial/thrash metallers Prong, and lent his six-string skills to Ministry and Danzig, this NYC native cut his teeth as a sound engineer at CBGB in the Eighties. But what Guitar World readers really want to know is… Interview by Brad Angle

LOVED YOUR SONGS FROM THE BLACK HOLE COVERS RECORD. I READ THAT YOU PICKED TRACKS THAT FIT THE THEME OF “URBAN DECAY AND DESOLATION.” ARE YOU WORKING WITH ANY OVERALL THEMES FOR PRONG’S NEW RECORD, X (NO ABSOLUTES)?—CASTOR

That’s an interesting question. World fear is a big one right now for me, and then personal fear. I think everyone’s afraid. Fear of our personal future and world future. There’s a lot of insecurities. That’s why the new record is called No Absolutes.

Is it true you were a CBGB soundman in the Eighties? I bet you saw a lot of wild things. Any particular memories stick out from that time? —Larry Ullman There’s a huge amount of memories. I worked there as a soundman from 1986 to 1990. Through that period I worked all the hardcore matiness, which were on Sunday afternoons and all ages. The craziest show I ever worked was [what became] Agnostic Front’s Live at CBGB [album, recorded on August 21, 1988]. I recorded the show with a two-inch machine, and got engineering credits. I recorded countless other hardcore tapes off the board, from Supertouch, Underdog and Breakdown to Crumbsuckers and Ludachrist. There were a lot of good bands from back then, and I was really into underground tape trading. One band I liked was called Rest in Pieces, which featured the drummer from Sick of It All, Armand [Majidi], as the singer. Rest in Pieces are one of the

bands that Prong stole stuff from. That Beg to Differ sound we took from Rest in Pieces. There was a band called Sheer Terror, and I produced a couple of their records. I recorded Just Can’t Hate Enough at CBGB. We used their tape machine and that record still sounds pretty brutal. But as far as the big shows, the one that stands out was when we recorded that Agnostic Front show. It was oversold and there were 400 people outside. It was complete pandemonium. You posted an old photo on Facebook recently of you with a Brooklyn Dodgers shirt and an old Charvel guitar. What’s the story of that guitar? —Stanley Unfortunately all my original guitars were stolen out of a storage space in Hollywood. There were some nice ones, and they were never retrieved. That guitar was from ’90, but I don’t remember the model. It was a single pickup, 22-fret maple neck, and I used it on Beg to Differ, and in the “Beg

to Differ” video, too. It was one of the ones stolen. And like an idiot I used the insurance money to live on and not do anything for a year. [laughs] As for the shirt, it was sort of precognitive. The photo was taken before I moved to Los Angeles, and I don’t think I was really a Dodgers fan back then. I was more of a Mets fan, but I liked the shirt. But now I’m a Dodgers fan! Danzig’s Circle of Snakes album is one of the most underappreciated albums of the early 2000s. The guitar tones are so brutal and sinister! What was your main guitar and amp for that record? —Jason Hayes It was a Schecter. I believe it was one of their baritone guitars, a Demon model I think. I don’t think the guitar had active pickups, either. But there were a lot of heavy strings rolling around on that record. The riffs are really simple, but really beefy. The amp was a Marshall 8100 Valvestate, which I’ve used for a lot of records.

I love the discordant sounding chords you always use, like the intro to “Snap Your Fingers, Snap Your Neck.” What are the secret “Tommy chords”? —Jason Hammond It’s the simplest thing possible. This friend of mine [former Guitar World senior editor and Grim Reaper guitarist] Nick Bowcott had to do tablature of that. This guy’s like a major shredder and he was like, “What the hell is that thing! I can’t figure it out!” [laughs] Essentially when you think about my chords think about using your index finger to fret the root, and the rest is usually open. There’s a lot of that. Being a singer/guitar player I always try to use these ultimate cheats. And back in that era of Prong there weren’t too many people doing the drop tunings. When I went in with [producer] Terry Date to do The Cleansing, he was also like, “What the hell is this? It’s dropped, and it’s in C. I don’t think we can do this.” And I was like “Well we’re gonna have to because it’s how all this stuff is written!” [laughs] He was scratching his head about it. So usually most of the stuff is in a standard drop tuning, and it ranges from drop D to C to As. And that particular dissonant chord on “Snap Your Fingers, Snap Your Neck” is a fourth fret on the fifth string and the rest of it’s open. My singer and I are always disagreeing. You’ve played with Glenn Danzig, and Al Jourgensen from Ministry, so I’m confident you’re qualified to answer this question: As a guitarist, what’s the key to dealing with big-personality frontmen? —Boyd Tuttle

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DEAR GUITAR HERO You know, that’s a fantastic question. But I probably have more problems in dealing with guitar players than with frontmen. Al is always great to work with. You just have to have respect, and work together with them. You don’t disagree with them. I do that with Glenn all the time. If he wants me to do something, even if I don’t particularly agree with it, I just try and make it happen. I don’t argue with people. I try to make their dreams come true. And that sounds so fruity and so Californian. But I really do. When you’re dealing with vocalists they’re trying to write a song. And when you’re dealing with guitar players they’re just trying to show off, usually. It’s always, “Oh what’s my buddy gonna think of my phrasing on this part.” Usually they divert from the song’s main intention. To the average listener the guitar is the complement to the vocals in rock music. At least that’s how I was brought up, with old metal like Sabbath and Deep Purple.

HOW MUCH INPUT DO YOU HAVE IN THE DESIGN OF YOUR SCHECTER CUSTOM GUITARS? ANY PLANS FOR A NEW MODEL? —DYLAN JONES

There are no plans for a new model. The body shape comes from this Devil Custom that I really like that Schecter discontinued. I really like the body shape and headstock. It has an SG feel to it. I wanted something that was all mahogany, and I definitely needed the EMG 81/85s in it. Of course I wanted a Satin black finish. I didn’t want to have L.A. Kings logos on it or whatever. Those are all my ideas. I had a lot to do with the design, but essentially it’s an older model that they discontinued that I liked and wanted to bring back. do it!” So he came down and was amazing, and the rest is history. “Inner Truth” is my all-time favorite song. It makes me think about when the real truth comes out from

I’m a long-time Killing Joke fan, and discovered you guys when [bassist] Paul Raven joined Prong. And I’ve loved you guys ever since. How did he end up in Prong? —Catherine Because I’m a huge Killing Joke fan! Killing Joke changed my life. I had a few incidents where I’ve seen bands where I was like, “This is it!” I saw Sabbath as a young kid at Madison Square Garden, and the next was Killing Joke. They were unbelievable, and I was hooked. When we came to the mixes for the Prove You Wrong record I noticed Raven was doing remixes. I contacted him to do a remix for Prong. I was afraid, but he was so cool. He had heard of us and liked us. He did a great remix of “Irrelevant Thoughts,” which came out on the EP Whose Fist Is This Anyway? I stayed in contact with him, and when he’d be in New York we’d go have a couple beers. One time he was like “What’s going on with the band, man?” And I’m like, “Dude, [bassist] Troy [Gregory] quit and we’ve been auditioning all these guys.” And Raven’s like, “Why didn’t you fucking call me? I’ll

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people that lie constantly. And the freaking riff is one of the most powerful you have created! Did the inspiration of that song come from a particular occurrence in your own life? —Spacemanluther

Yeah, usually that’s where all the lyrics come from. I tend to backslide and come back to selfrealization. Playing in a band and being a lyricist, it’s like a journal of your life…without having to write books! The lyric of that song says, “Inner truth to the surface.” Whatever I am is sorta God’s will and I have to accept it. That’s what that song’s about. Sometimes a lyric will inspire me to write a certain kind of riff. A lot of times with Prong the guitar parts are so simple and direct, it’s almost a guttural inner type vibe with some of the riffs. I’m not too worried about where my fingers are and trying to impress people. It almost goes back to the Beavis and Butt-head vibe of like, “Yeah, that’s cool!” And that’s it. That riff on “Inner Truth” is like that; it’s really basic. One of the classic riffs of all time is in “Smoke on the Water.” When we were kids and heard that it was like the coolest thing on earth. And I always try and do that.

Tommy Victor


AN OPENING SLOT AT ONE OF VINCE GILL’S U.S. TOUR PERFORMANCES A SINGLE PRODUCED BY GRAMMY AWARD-WINNING PRODUCER AND ENGINEER JUSTIN NIEBANK

A MEETING WITH UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP GEAR FROM TOP MUSICAL INSTRUMENT BRANDS

(VINCE GILL, SHERYL CROW, TAYLOR SWIFT, KEITH URBAN AND MORE)

A FEATURE WITH GUITAR WORLD MAGAZINE

$10,000 CASH

AND MORE


NEWS + NOTES

Dweezil Zappa

“LEARNING TO PLAY my dad’s music for Zappa Plays Zappa was like training for the Olympics—it took years to build up the chops and understanding to do it justice,” says guitarist/composer Dweezil Zappa, son of the legendary Frank Zappa. Dweezil has spent the last 10 years presenting his father's highly complex, occasionally impossible music to audiences all over the world with Zappa Plays Zappa. As fulfilling as it has been to keep Frank’s music alive, Dweezil has also sought to create music of his own design. “Back in 2006, just before I started Zappa Plays Zappa, I was working on my last solo album, Go with What You Know,” says the 46-year-old. “At that time, I was moving toward doing film scores and was playing everything myself via MIDI tracking. But once I started to work on Zappa Plays Zappa, it took a tremendous amount of time and dedication. Go with What You Know was very different from Automatic, the record before it, but, in retrospect, that was really a small step as compared to what I’ve learned over the last decade with Zappa Plays Zappa.” When asked how this has changed him as a musician, Dweezil says, “For one thing, it’s completely changed my view of where I’d like to go with my own music. One aspect is the role of the guitar itself in the music. As compared to my previous releases, my new solo album Via Zammata’ presents a different musical landscape altogether. On all of the records up to this point, if the music was a house, a giant guitar would be sitting on top of the house. Now, the guitar is just one of the rooms in the house, and I’ve been able to explore many more facets of musical expression beyond the guitar.” The album’s title has a special relevance to Dweezil. “This music evokes the feelings of a trip I had taken to Partinico, the area of Sicily where my dad’s family emigrated from. The street they lived on was called Via Zammata’, which later was renamed Via Frank Zappa. That journey was about finding my roots, and I feel I’ve done the same

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thing, musically speaking, on this album.” The opener, “Funky 15,” gives a glimpse of the broad musical spectrum that is to follow over the disc’s 12 tracks, with its orchestral opening that settles into an angular funk/rock groove in 15/8. Songs such as “Truth” and “Nothing” showcase Dweezil’s extraordinary abilities as a soloist, the latter featuring the guitar once owned (and burned) by Jimi Hendrix that was a gift from Jimi to Frank. The album also includes “Dragon Master,” the only song Dweezil ever co-wrote with father. “Back in 1986, Frank wrote the lyrics for ‘Dragon Master’ as a parody of heavy metal,” Dweezil explains. “He played a version of the song for me at a soundcheck in Sweden, but he wanted me to re-write the music to go with his words. Metal was on the charts then, and I come from a background of listening

to bands like Iron Maiden, Judas Priest and Black Sabbath. Over the years, I’d worked on it in different ways, and even played it in my band Z back in the early Nineties. “The lyrics are preposterous, so instead of making the music equally preposterous, I wanted it to be true to the metal idiom. The result is a powerful metal track with lyrics about some metal-appropriate entity known as the Dragon Master, with all of the over-the-top-isms of the vocal style of Ronnie James Dio and Bruce Dickinson as essential ingredients of the composition. I want metal fans to say, ‘That’s legit metal!’ ” The album also features contributions from Beatles producer Geoff Emerick and a recitation by actor John Malkovich. Dweezil will be presenting the music of Via Zammata’ in nine exclusive shows slated for early 2016.

H R I S TO S H I N D O V

THE SON OF FRANK TAKES A TEMPORARY BREAK FROM HIS ZAPPA PLAYS ZAPPA TRIBUTE PROJECT TO FOCUS ON HIS OWN MUSIC, AND GOES "BEYOND THE GUITAR" IN THE PROCESS. By Andy Aledort


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NEWS + NOTES

ANDREW BENGE/ WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES

Gemma Thompson performing at The Ritz in Manchester, England, on November 9, 2013

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Savages

THE BRIT-FRENCH POST-PUNKS STRENGTHEN THE BOND BETWEEN GUITAR AND VOICE ON THEIR SOPHOMORE RELEASE, ADORE LIFE. By Alan di Perna

S

AVAGERY IS IN ALL OF US.” ¶ This statement,

which she’d come across in a book, became guitarist Gemma Thompson’s guiding mantra when she put together the Anglo-French band Savages in 2011. By that point, she’d already spent several years playing with bassist Ayse Hassan in a number of indie bands and art projects, performing, as she puts it, “at every little toilet venue in London.” In recruiting drummer Fay Hunter and singer Jehnny Beth, Thompson was adamant that their commitment to savagery was as absolute as her own.

“I thought I could reach deep down inside, pull that out and use it,” she says. “We very much wanted to write for the stage— this cathartic idea of ‘nothing else matters when you’re onstage.’ It was about our connection with each other and the volume and the physicality. We put everything into that energy—working with energy, repetition and loudness. It’s a very primal thing, what we were trying to do.” And a very successful one. Savages’ 2013 debut album Silence Yourself, won critical raves, and they quickly became known for their relentlessly intense, brutally loud live performances. The band is often compared with ground-breaking groups of the post-punk early Eighties, such as Siouxsie and the Banshees, Joy Division and Wire. Beth’s lead vocals do bear an uncanny resemblance to Banshees singer Siouxsie Sioux. But Savages’ music is no mere exercise in Eighties nostalgia. Instead, it offers a more contemporary take on the post-punk’s dedication to unfettered experimentation and scrupulous avoidance of rock clichés. The band’s new album, Adore Life, builds on the strengths of Silence Yourself— preserving the ferocity of the band’s live attack, but adding evocative layers of elec-

“Led Zeppelin inspired us a bit in that kind of relationship between the guitar and the voice.” —GEMMA THOMPSON

tric guitar texture and melody. Thompson is adept at generating miasmas of echoey feedback and sustain that swarm, dwell and swell—often bursting into snaky lead lines that suggest some kind of missing link between Dick Dale and Robert Smith. “After we recorded basic tracks, I had a whole week at RAK Studios in London with a lot of nice vintage amps, including a Fender Vibrolux and an early Sixties Vox AC30,” she elaborates. “And I brought all my principal guitars. The main one is a 1966 Fender Duo-Sonic II. And I had a Jaguar, which is heard a lot on the record, and a beautiful Gibson ES-125 hollowbody.” In assessing the band’s development from Silence Yourself to Adore Life, Thompson says, “We weren’t afraid to use melody

this time.” This melodic impulse gave rise to both outright guitar hooks, as on the track “Evil,” as well as some deft interplay with Beth’s vocal lines. “We’ve evolved a real kind of communication between the guitar and the voice,” Thompson explains. “It’s always about keeping space for the voice, but also echoing the voice with the guitar. Or echoing the meaning of the lyrics. Led Zeppelin inspired us a bit in that kind of relationship between the guitar and the voice.” Thompson describes herself as “very much a self-taught guitarist,” and says she came to the instrument almost by accident. “I was living in a household full of musicians when I first came to London,” she says, citing her migration from the Manchester suburb of Hindley to the U.K.’s capitol. “I was following a band that lived there, taking photos for them and painting backdrops. Guitars were lying around everywhere. I was trying to make a soundtrack for a project, and just picked up a friend’s guitar. I was just doing divebomb noises with a bunch of Russian fuzzboxes and recording it. Another friend of mine said, ‘Join my band as the lead guitarist’—almost as a joke. And I did. So it was more kind of the experimental side at first, to make noise through the melody. Then I became more interested in how melody and noise could really work together.” As for guitar influences, Thompson cites Blixa Bargeld (Einsturzende Neubauten, Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds), Rowland S. Howard (The Birthday Party), Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Mark Lanegan (Screaming Trees, Kurt Cobain, Layne Staley, Queens of the Stone Age). An impeccable alt-guitar lineage. In 2010, Thompson joined the French avant-pop duo John and Jehn as their touring guitarist. John is Johnny Hostile (Nicholas Conge), who would become Savages’ producer. And Jehn is Jehnny Beth (Camille Berthomier), the film actress and vocalist who would become Savages’ lead singer and lyricist. It was also on this tour

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that Thompson acquired the aforementioned Daphne Blue 1966 DuoSonic II that would become her main ax. “It’s kind of a ‘falling in love’ story with the DuoSonic,” she notes. She found it in a vintage guitar shop in France where a friend of John’s was working. “He said to me, ‘I have this guitar which is currently being played by my eight-year-old daughter. But you can play with it for a few days.’ So he lent me the guitar and I just had to have it. “I’ve always kind of believed in a person having just the one instrument,” she adds, “and knowing everything about that instrument—exactly when it’s going to feed back, how many steps you need to take from the amp to get it to feed back…everything about it. The DuoSonic is a fun little guitar to manipulate in such a way that the whole instrument can be played. You can make a sound with every part of that guitar.” But Thompson recently broke her own “one person, one guitar” rule by acquiring a 1963 Fender Jaguar. She’d been smitten by the one she’d rented to record Adore Life, and just had to have one of her own. “The Jag is very much the opposite from a DuoSonic, which is a very simple instru-

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ment,” she says. “It’s almost like a different world hooked up to it.” Speaking of hooking up, stomp-box effects are also a key element in Thompson’s textural approach to the electric guitar. She’s particularly fond of the Mooger Fooger MF Drive pedal and MF-104M analog delay. “They both have a very, very warm analog sound,” she says. “And then I’ve got just a really simple Boss DD-20. I’m probably not using it right, but you can store different delays on it and have sound-on-sound effects. It’s not a very warm delay, but if you mix that with other analog sounding delays, you can get quite an interesting sound. You can take a pedal and work it to your own way. Just make it your own.” Along with saying that Savages weren’t “afraid of melody” on Adore Life, Thompson declares “and we weren’t afraid to sing about love.” It’s an odd topic for a stridently minimalist, militant post-punk group, but Beth’s lyrical take on love ranges from ambivalence to eroticism to cynicism—“Love is a disease/the strongest addiction I know.” “But within the context of Savages,” Thompson adds, “what it means is to be singing about more of a worldwide kind

of love, rather than just the clichéd love between one person and another. We thought, Maybe this is how we communicate with our audience—to show love and respect back to our audience.” That love and respect were tested to an extreme degree in the aftermath of the Paris terrorist attacks of November 13. A band with deep French roots, Savages were greatly affected by the massacre that took place during an Eagles of Death Metal gig at the Bataclan Theater. The Wednesday right after the shootings, Thompson was up onstage at the Parisian venue La Maroguineire, supporting singer/songwriter Chelsea Wolfe. “The show was packed,” she says. “Everyone came out to support each other. It was a very beautiful, heavy and emotional night. The attacks were a very direct hit on our art form. Life and freedom—this is what music is. And this has really reminded me how important this is to all of us involved in music and other art forms. That freedom is so important to keep. All we can do is carry on with the music. There’s a kind of resilience in all the musicians I’ve spoken to. No matter what, this is what we have to do—sending out love to people.”

DUSTIN COHEN

Savages (from left) Ayse Hassan, Fay Milton, Gemma Thompson and Jehnny Beth


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NEWS + NOTES

What's on My iPod?

PLAYLIST

CRAIG GOLDY

1 Burn

Deep Purple “As a teenager I was always listening to the radio to try and find the music I liked most—but I couldn’t stay on just one station because I liked jazz, classical, blues, rock and R&B. Then one day at a friend’s house I heard ‘Burn,’ and I was blown away because it had everything that I loved—jazz drumming, classical keyboards, some funk-like bass, gruff bluesy vocals and of course Ritchie Blackmore’s amazing tone and eclectic, avant-garde staccato solo style. I was hooked for the rest of my life!”

2 Stargazer

Rainbow “This song changed the course of my entire life. The music and lyrics just spoke to me—the fact that it wasn’t one of those songs that talked about ‘cruising down the highway with a beer in my hand’ followed by a mediocre riff. I just didn’t want to be subjected to that type of songwriting, even if the rest of the world loved it and treasured it. ‘Stargazer’ was the total opposite of that.”

3 Rat Bat Blue

Deep Purple “The main riff and keyboard solo says it all.”

4 Still of the Night

Whitesnake “This song and this album are the perfect example of how the music business and talent can coexist with one another successfully without canceling each other out.”

5 Black Sabbath “This song is the perfect example of the merge of strengths between Ronnie James Dio and Tony Iommi.” FORMER DIO GUITARIST CRAIG GOLDY’S LATEST PROJECT, RESURRECTION KINGS, ISSUED ITS SELF-TITLED DEBUT ON JANUARY 29 VIA FRONTIERS RECORDS.

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lets out a warm, self deprecating laugh when I remind him of his opening remark in his first cover story in November 2013: “Complacency is the enemy.” “Clearly, I live by those words,” he says. “This album is the realization of that quote. It’s like, ‘What could happen if you had this very big idea?’ And the funny thing is, having the big idea is the easy part; seeing it through is where the hard work comes in. Fortunately, everybody in kept their goals in mind and stayed focused, and we achieved what we wanted to do.” He pauses, then re-emphases, “It was a lot of work, though.” The album that Petrucci refers to is The Astonishing, which even by Dream Theater standards is something of a megaton explosion in both size and scope. Over the course of their 30-year career, the five-piece progressive-rock titans (Petrucci, singer James LaBrie, bassist John Myung, keyboardist Jordan Rudess, along with still-relative new guy, drummer Mike Mangini) have always done things in a big way—“Illumination Theory,” from their 2012 self-titled album, clocked in at over 20 minutes, and the title track of their 2002 double album Six Degrees of Inner Turbulence came in at just over 42 minutes—but The Astonishing is something else altogether, a sprawling, 34-song concept album spread out over two hours and 10 minutes on two CDs, one that Petrucci, who also produced, envisioned as a standalone show to be performed live in its entirety. “It’s a lot to take in,” Petrucci says with a chuckle. “You have to kind of sit down and clear your mind, like you’re going to watch Lord of the Rings. But you know, when I presented the idea to the guys, right from the getgo, they weren’t daunted. They were like, “Yeah, this is awesome. Go for it. Let’s do it.” Not one person said, “Eh, I don’t know about this…” That was very encouraging to me, because I knew I was going to be asking a lot from

everybody. They saw me in the back of the bus, in hotel rooms and on planes, writing every second I could, working on the story. Their support was just incredible.” Petrucci weaves a bold and elaborate fantasy-oriented plot throughout The Astonishing—the CliffsNotes version is that it’s set in a retro-futuristic post-apocalyptic dystopia in which a group of oppressed rebels rises up to overthrow an evil empire. (And in true rockopera tradition—with even an unintentional nod to Footloose, too—music is banned in Petrucci’s grand narrative.) “It is a complicated story,” the guitarist admits. “Part of the big idea was that it always could be more than just an album or a Dream Theater show. It could be a novel. It could be a movie or even a stage musical. It could be all of these different things. That’s part of this creative vision that I had, to make something that was bigger than we’ve ever done before.” One might approach any concept album, particularly something this enormous, dreading clunky set pieces and bloated, cheesy fillers that smack of the worst kind of musical theater. Astonishingly (just had to go there), the record is a brilliantly sustained and compelling experience, and for Dream Theater’s legion of loyal fans who cheer on every second of the band’s epic, fleet-fingered excursions, it’s a bona fide treasure trove of chops-orama riches. Bravura musical phrases volley from player to player with dizzying, almost unbelievable flair and

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A FEW YEARS AGO, YOU SAID THAT YOU WERE WORKING ON A SOLO ALBUM. DID THAT FALL BY THE WAYSIDE BECAUSE OF THE ASTONISHING?

Totally. As soon as we were done with the previous world tour, Jordan and I started writing for this album. There was no hole in the schedule, so I couldn’t continue with the solo record. It wasn’t for lack of material or interest. Anything that’s recorded for the solo album is still in demo form. In fact, I played three of the songs on the last G3 tour I did in South America. Hopefully, one day I can get into the studio and get it done.

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Dream Theater (from left) Jordan Rudess, John Myung, James LaBrie, Mike Mangini and John Petrucci

EVEN THOUGH YOU SEEM LIKE A PRETTY DRIVEN GUY, DOES SOMETHING AS BIG AS THE ASTONISHING TAKE OVER YOUR LIFE? DID YOU DRIVE YOUR WIFE CRAZY WHEN YOU WERE WORKING ON IT?

[laughs] Well, I’m lucky because Rena, my wife, is extremely supportive and helpful to me. I mean, sure, this record was a big undertaking, and I…I wear it, you know? But Rena’s a musician too, and because we’ve known each other for so long, she’s very intuitive to what I’m thinking and feeling, and she helps out so much. If I come home and I’m stuck on something and want to bounce it off of her, you know, she’s there. Even in the case of finding the artist who did the artwork for this album, she helped out there, too. For me to have that teamwork and support in my own home from Rena is really amazing. Like you said, it can take over and consume you. She gets that and understands it. PETE TOWNSHEND WANTED TO FOLLOW TOMMY WITH A ROCK OPERA CALLED LIFEHOUSE . HE WOUND UP SCRAPPING IT, AND THE WHO RECORDED WHO’S NEXT

AS A REGULAR RECORD. DID SOMETHING LIKE THIS EVER OCCUR TO YOU?

It didn’t occur to me during this process, no. Once I dove in, there was no turning back. There were several moments when I thought, What? Are we out of our minds? I kept using the phrase, “It’s like climbing a mountain.” It’s like you’re at the bottom of Everest and you need to get to the top. It’s daunting. But no, there was never a thought of “Let’s turn back.” It was always forward thinking. That said, after this whole thing, when everything is said and done and this album is out and the world tour is over, yeah, we might do a regular album. WHAT DO YOU DO TO BLOW OFF STEAM WHILE RECORDING? DO YOU EVER SAY, “I’VE GOT TO DO SOMETHING ELSE. I HAVE TO GET AWAY FROM IT ALL”?

I do, sure. One of the things I love to do is just play music. Music is such a great outlet for that type of thing, for expression. It’s totally therapeutic. And also, I got new some gear, like these new Boogie prototypes. I’d plug them in and just crank them in the studio, to

J I M M Y F O N TA I N E

precision as the band traverses a myriad of song styles and forms. There’s pulverizing instrumentals (“Dystopian Overture,” “2285 Entr’acte”), spirited prog workouts (“A Life Left Behind,” “Life of Betrayal”), widescreen power ballads (“When Your Time Has Come,” “Chosen”), stately symphonic rockers (“Act of Faythe,” “Begin Again”), and more than a handful of cuts (“The Walking Shadow,” “A New Beginning” and “Lord Nefaryus,” among others) that combine elements of art rock, classical, jazz, fusion and heavy metal in ways that defy easy attempts at categorization. The cinematic gestalt of the album is bolstered by lush orchestral and choir arrangements courtesy of David Campbell, a renowned composer and conductor whose extensive credits include films such as Foxcatcher and Brokeback Mountain and records by everyone from Pink to Rush. “Everything David delivered blew us away,” raves Petrucci. “Listening to what he did with our music was so gratifying and thrilling. It’s like, you have an idea of what it can be, and then there it is, fully realized in front of you and sounding just incredible.” In many ways, the writing and recording of The Astonishing was phase one of the project; phase two is the world tour, which kicks off February 18 at the London Palladium. “A whole new adventure is about to begin,” Petrucci says thoughtfully. “We’re going to be playing multiple nights in a lot of cities, and we’ve booked some incredible theaters and symphony halls. We’re doing Radio City Music Hall, too, which will be pretty special. There’s a lot to work out before the first show, but we should have everything figured out by then.”


The way that we did this was, we would work five days a week and take off on weekends. The weekends always ended up being time to do more normal things. I like to use my smoker a lot—you know, for cooking. Sterling Ball turned me

on to this a few years ago, and I got totally hooked on it. It’s become a cool hobby of mine. So yeah, I would do that on weekends, just normal family things to unwind and let go. RUSH’S CLOCKWORK ANGELS HAD A DYSTOPIAN SCI-FI PLOT TO IT. WHAT IS IT ABOUT THAT SETTING THAT CAPTURES MUSICIANS’ IMAGINATIONS?

I think it’s the idea that dystopia is a product of something that went wrong now. The idea of the way we’re living now and taking some specific aspect of that and thinking, What would happen if this got out of control? Fast forward 100, 200, 300 years, and that’s where that dystopia comes from. I think it’s a really interesting premise, and there’s so many movies that come into play. A Clockwork Orange, The Hunger Games, Mad Max, Escape from New York—there’s tons of them. In this case, this story is set about 300 years into the future, and there was a societal breakdown and things go back to the way they were back in feudal times. If you take just where we live in North America, instead of there being countries and states, now there’s empires and tyrants who rule over the land. Everybody else is a peasant, and they work for the emperor. My dystopian premise was in the way that robotics are taking over a lot of human jobs—everything from just assembly-line stuff to even self-driving cars. I thought, What if that happened with music and art? It’s like, humans don’t make music anymore because it’s made by machines. That’s what’s on the cover, the ‘NOMACS,’ or noise machines, and that’s what led to the breakdowns. In the story, in a far-off area of this new empire, somebody is born who has the gift of music, and that’s the character Gabriel. He prompts a revolution, and that’s where the story begins. HOW DID YOU SEEK OUT DAVID CAMPBELL TO CONDUCT THE ORCHESTRA AND CHOIR?

We knew that we wanted to have a real orchestra and choir. I didn’t want to use synth and sample libraries. I wanted this to have the organic impact from real instruments, not only the orchestra and choir, but Jordan would also be playing a real Steinway piano, B3 organ and so on. We needed to get somebody who could handle a big project like this,

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the point where they were rattling the building. The guys in the band would walk in like, “Oh, my God!” [laughs] That would just be my way of just getting back to the core primal feeling of playing guitar loud through a Boogie, and that definitely helped me escape the bigger concept.


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not only from the standpoint of somebody who had the cinematic sensibility, but he also had to know how to work with rock bands. I didn’t know who that might be, but one day I was watching a making-of thing that came on a Muse album, and it showed the band in the studio working with this guy conducting strings and brass and working with scores. I was like, “This would be the ultimate guy.” As it turned out, [engineer and mixer] Rich Chycki had worked with David Campbell on a Rush song. We called him up, and he took the call and took the gig. He was really interested right from the get-go. It was pretty amazing.

The first time I actually heard it all together was during the mix process, and David is just hearing it all…now. [laughs] He hadn’t heard vocals or drums; he hadn’t heard any real guitars or solos or anything. He just had these demos. I haven’t spoken to him yet since I sent them. He and his team are in for a big listening surprise.

I HEAR A CERTAIN STEVE HOWE INFLUENCE IN BOTH THE ACOUSTIC AND ELECTRIC PLAYING IN “A LIFE LEFT BEHIND.” DO YOU GET THAT, OR IS THAT JUST ME?

Definitely. There’s something about the whole intro to that song. I’m not sure if I’ve ever done it before, but it’s all played on acoustic. Even though it’s progressive and there’s a lot of notes and it’s moving, I would normally tend to play that on electric. I think that guitar sound definitely has a Yes/Steve Howe influence, for sure, especially how it’s coupled with the piano and the kind of vocal sounds coming from the synth. Even the singlenote arpeggios done in harmony with the piano, that’s a very Yes sound.

WHAT DO YOU GIVE DAVID TO WORK WITH? AND WHAT DOES HE GIVE YOU BACK? CAN YOU EXPLAIN THE PROCESS A BIT?

Yeah, sure. After I shared the whole concept with the band, Jordan and I started to collect ideas—we did that for months. Then we finally decided, “Okay, let’s officially sit down, flesh out the story, break it into parts and organize everything.” So that’s when we started the demos. We did that partly at my house, partly at Jordan’s house, and then we eventually moved into Cove City and did it officially in February. We were just going to lay down guitar and piano and send that to David. But we started putting down string parts, putting down brass, putting down choir. We’d have these pretty elaborate and complete demos. No vocals, no drums, but just guitar, piano and sample library orchestral and choir parts. By the time we shared this with David, he had a really good idea of what we wanted, and he started to organize it and figure it all out. Sometimes we needed specialty things, a marching band or bagpipe or whatever, and David would say, “Oh, I know the perfect guy…” We spent hours with him on Skype working out all the details. James went to Rich’s studio in Canada to record vocals. Simultaneously, the orchestra was being recorded in Prague in the Czech Republic, and choirs were done in L.A. There was a lot going on all at one time. We would listen in to David’s sessions via streams or Skype, and we’d make comments. We never actually got together in person. In the end, he sent a huge drive with all of his arrangements.

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the way I wanted it, but the crux of the riff came right as soon as I had the melody and the conceptual idea. Actually, in a bigger sense, having the story to write music to was really liberating, because sometimes you might sit down to write a song and you have no idea what to do. There was never that case here—I knew exactly what to do.

AND THERE’S NO GUITAR SOLO.

No guitar solo on that song. [laughs] There are 34 songs on the album, and not all of them have guitar solos. Of course, you’ve got to have guitar solos… because you just have to. It’s fun. It’s a big part of what I do as a guitar player. But in this case, there’s no solo. The beginning makes up for it because it’s all that acoustic playing, and that’s very challenging.

LET’S GET INTO SOME OF THE SONGS. “THE GIFT OF MUSIC” FEATURES A VERY LIVELY INSTRUMENTAL SECTION, BUT THE BACKBONE OF THE SONG IS THE RIFF.DO YOU GO THROUGH VARIOUS ITERATIONS OF A RIFF BEFORE YOU SAY, “THAT’S THE ONE”?

A little bit. That riff is based off of what was happening in the story. I thought at that point, if you heard the overture, and you hear all of the different themes that are going to happen, this is the first vocal introduction from the narrator, Arhys. So I thought that the riff had to be energetic, lively and positive. I just picked up the guitar and played that riff. It took a little crafting to get it exactly

AT A CERTAIN POINT IN “A NEW BEGINNING,” YOU DO A SERIES OF PICK SCRAPES, WHICH GIVES WAY TO A DRAMATIC SECTION OF SUSTAINED NOTES. IT’S NOT OVERLY TECHNICAL; RATHER, IT FEELS LIKE YOU’RE PLAYING WITH PURE SOUND THERE.

Yeah, yeah. Totally. The demos we were doing were very stripped down. I said, “All right, I want to have this extended out where I just play over a vamp.” So we put down this little drum machine, and I laid down an impromptu guitar solo, and started doing this pick scrape and the noises. I ended up redoing the whole thing, diving deeper over the changes, but one of the things that I wanted to make sure I kept was the improvised pick scrapey thing, so I did another version. That’s what you hear in


Dream Come True John Petrucci is beaming over his new JP2C amp, the first signature model offered by his longtime pals at Mesa/Boogie. OHN PETRUCCI’S RELATIONSHIP with Mesa/Boogie goes back 30 years. In fact, Doug West, Director Of Marketing and R&D, remembers receiving a call from the guitarist, then a student at the Berklee College of Music in the mid Eighties, when he was looking to order a Studio preamp. “We started talking, and I just immediately liked him,” West recalls. “John told me he and bassist John Myung were starting a band and that he had just found this drummer who turned out to be Mike Portnoy. The whole thing was just beginning.” Petrucci got his preamp, and he later ordered a Quad preamp, and after that, West says, he and the guitarist kept in regular touch. “John was always looking to try our newest amps, and he often got first run stuff, just as it was coming out,” West says. “He was always a great customer, and then he became a great friend to everybody here. His feedback over the years has been very helpful.” Out of the many Mesa/Boogie amps he’s played, Petrucci’s favorite remains the Mark IIC+, introduced in 1983. “There’s something about that amp that’s so special and musical,” says Petrucci. “It’s been on many Dream Theater albums over the years.” And so it came as no surprise that when Petrucci approached the folks at Mesa/ Boogie to produce a signature amp—a company first, save for a limited-edition run of Carlos Santana King Snake tribute models—his goal was to create a splashy, high-performance update of the Mark IIC+. Even the name would have a bit more kick: the JP2C. The guitarist loaned West and Mesa founder, designer and president Randall Smith his favorite Mark IIC+ for reference. “Over the years, I’ve learned a few more tricks about identifying individual sources of magic in different amps from different eras,” says Smith, “and more importantly, how to take those elements and reproduce them repeatedly. Part of that involves locating and identifying the result of ‘happy randomness’ that occurs in part values and wiring and making sure it can be duplicated accurately in every amp we make.” “I wanted the same circuit and transformer as the C+,” says Petrucci, “but at the same time I wanted to take it into the future based on some performance requirements that I had. One of the limitations

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of the original amp is that it’s basically two channels that share the same EQ and input gain, so right away we changed that.” The guitarist’s request for three channels—one for clean tones and two dedicated to lead sounds—with two graphic EQs, effects loop and reverb controls proved at first to be quite a challenge. “Especially in a smaller 17-inch chassis to make rack mounting possible,” says Smith. “John threw down the gauntlet.” According to West, the JP2C’s clean channel has more headroom than the IIC+ did. “It also has a bunch of tricks from the Mark V and even Carlos Santana’s King Snake.” Breaking down the lead modes, he says, “They’re identical in a way—the first is set for crunch rhythm, but the other is a hair hotter, so it feels creamier and more fluid. We put pull-pots on the Gain and Presence controls in the two Lead Channels as well, so you can even bump them up the equivalent of one number on the Gain and re-voice the Presence.” The JP2C features MIDI Channel and Feature select capabilities as well as Mesa/Boogie’s CabClone speaker cabinet simulator, and for good measure it packs on an additional new twist called “Shred,” which can also be triggered via MIDI. “This allows you to shift the upper harmonics and mids,” Petrucci explains. “If you’re playing a seven-string or a low-tuned guitar and you’re doing some low riffs, when you kick on ‘Shred’ it adds more clarity and shine, so you can really hear the notes. It’s pretty cool.” Production models of the JP2C roll out in February, but Petrucci offers listeners an early preview of the amp on Dream Theater’s The Astonishing. “I use protos of the amp on the new record,” he says. “I’m really so happy with how it turned out. Boogie’s never done a signature amp, and this one was designed by Randy himself, so it’s pretty exciting. I couldn’t be more proud.” That goes double for Smith, who says, “From the very first notes out of the very first prototype, the JP2C had the same urgent, fiery attack, the voice-like envelope and liquid sustain, the same layered harmonics and all of the other sought-after characteristics of the greatest IICs we ever made, and then some. The JP2C is the IIC+ aficionado’s wildest fantasy fulfilled.” —JOE BOSSO

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the song. When it was being mixed, Rich actually took that off, but I said, “Aw, man, you’ve got to put that back.” THERE’S A SPOT IN “MOMENT OF BETRAYAL” WHERE YOU AND JORDAN LINK UP IN A CRAZY-ASS UNISON PASSAGE IN THE SOLO. WHO LEADS WHEN YOU’RE DOING THIS? ARE THERE ANY POINTS WHERE ONE OF YOU GUYS GO, “YOU LOST ME”?

First of all, when we’re writing, that could come from either of us. It might be something that I write that Jordan harmonizes, or sometimes he comes up with it and I have to harmonize or play in unison. I learned my lesson a long time ago that this can be tricky; there are things that are easy to play on the keyboard that aren’t so easy to play on the guitar. You want it to be challenging, but it has to sit in a friendly way on the guitar. That kind of challenge is what pushes me. “THE PATH THAT DIVIDES”—ARE YOU THE FIRST GUY TO PLAY GUITAR DURING A SWORD FIGHT?

[laughs] Yeah, right? It’s very possible. Again, every song correlates to a part of the story. There are several areas on the album where we put sound effects in to try to illustrate what’s going on in the

story. This is a big moment where Arhys is killed. We spent a lot of time working on all of those sword hits. We were like a little movie-producing sound effects studio for a couple of days. We put time aside to find the right grunts and swishes. You can hear the sword going into flesh, coming back out and somebody falling on the floor. “OUR NEW WORLD” IS CENTERED AROUND A BIG, BEAUTIFUL QUEEN-LIKE CHORDAL RIFF.

That riff is actually based off of the guitar motif theme in another one of the new songs, “A Savior in the Square,” but played in a heavy way. I did a dropped D tuning, and I had the chorus set a certain way—very Van Halen. I wanted it to be a positive, majestic and uplifting rock riff. SPEAKING OF “MAJESTIC,” DID YOUR NEW MUSIC MAN SIGNATURE GUITAR THE MAJESTY PLAY A BIG PART IN THE RECORD?

Absolutely—a huge part. In fact, the Majesty is basically on the entire record. Except for “The Path That Divides,” on which I used a JP15, the Majesty is the only guitar—the six- and seven-string models. Aside from that one track, this album is all about that one guitar.

MATCH GAME

John Petrucci teams up with Ernie Ball for the ULTIMATE online competition. H I N K YO U ’ V E G O T W H AT I T TA K E S to play like John Petrucci? Well, now’s your chance to prove it—and if you’re as good as you think, you may just walk away with some incredible prizes, or even a private master class with the man himself. To participate in Ernie Ball’s new Match the Master online competition, head over to music-man.com/matchthemaster to study exclusive videos of Petrucci performing 10 passages from Dream Theater’s new album, The Astonishing. Contestants can then upload a video submission of their best solo impression. The competition begins January 29 and one winner will be chosen each week to receive a weekly prize pack, and at the end of the contest one grand prize winner will be selected to win the ultimate John Petrucci experience. Weekly winners will receive a Sterling by Music Man JP60 Series guitar as well as new gear from Ernie Ball, TC Electronic, DiMarzio, Dunlop, Mesa/Boogie, Fractal Audio System and others. The Match the Master grand prize winner will receive a private master class with Petrucci backstage at a Dream Theater concert, a VIP trip for two to see Dream Theater live, an Ernie Ball Music Man Majesty guitar, a year’s supply of Ernie Ball strings, and new gear from the aforementioned manufacturers.

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SO AT NO POINT DO YOU SAY, “LET ME PICK UP AN ES-335” OR SOMETHING?

No, not at all. I can get everything I need not only from my Music Man guitars, but specifically the Majesty. The Majesty is like this album: It took a couple of years in the planning and making, and we took chances in the design and direction. I’m really proud of it. The relationship I have with Sterling, Brian and Scotty [Ball] at Music Man, and Drew [Montell] is very special. Everybody is so dedicated. Oh and I am debuting a new Music Man JP16 at NAMM, which is going to be really cool. We brought back the forearm scoop, the contour, and it’s my first guitar to have a Floyd Rose. WHAT ACOUSTICS DID YOU USE?

I’ve been playing Taylors for years, and for this album I got a brand-new 916. It’s got this really warm, deep, full sound. Check it out on “A Life Left Behind,” how in the opening it has more of a lead role. I also used a Taylor 12-string—you can hear that on the beginning to “Heaven’s Cove.” That guitar sounds gorgeous. EFFECTS-WISE, I ASSUME YOU USED YOUR SIGNATURE TC ELECTRONIC DREAMSCAPE TONEPRINT PEDAL?

That’s the pedal I went to for flange or chorus. Any time the effect goes through the front of the amp, that’s that pedal. I also used the TC Helix phaser—I don’t know if it was a prototype, but it was one of the first ones. I also used my Dunlop wah pedal. Any solo that you hear the wah on is my signature Wah pedal, which is coming soon. It’s really exciting because I’ve been using Dunlop wahs forever. Doing a signature wasn’t really something that came up until now, and the one I used, a prototype, was fantastic. YOU’RE GOING TO PLAY 34 NEW SONGS ON TOUR. ISN’T THAT A LOT TO REMEMBER?

[laughs] It’s going to be absolutely insane. It’s over two hours and 10 minutes of new music. Visuals will be a big part of the show. There will be animation playing during this whole thing to illustrate what’s going on in the story. It all needs to be synched up, and part of that video will be playing back the orchestra and choir that David recorded. As a band, we have to be right on the money with everything or else it could be a total nightmare. It’s what I talked about—climbing up a mountain. Right now we’re staring up at it, but we’ll get there.


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L D 2 0 1 6 R O W C H R R A A T I M G U

It’s possible that RUSH have parked their tour bus for the last time, leaving 40 years of epic gigging and an unparalleled body of work in its wake. To help celebrate the release of R40 LIVE, Guitar World catches up with Alex Lifeson and Geddy Lee to talk about some of the choice cuts that found their way into the band’s career-spanning 2015 set list.


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ON AUGUST 1, 2015, RUSH PLAYED THE LAST DATE OF THEIR

career-spanning 40th Anniversary R40 tour at the Forum in Los Angeles. The run was brief by Rush standards—only 35 dates—and bassist-singer Geddy Lee recalls the final concert as being a particularly tough one to get through. “It was the most emotional show I’ve ever been a part of,” he says. “I don’t think I ever choked up at the end of a show like I did in Los Angeles that night. I felt a lot of pride, but I was also wondering if I’d ever be doing that again with these folks that I’ve shared over 40 years with.” Lee is seated on a couch inside a suite at New York’s tony Peninsula Hotel. Beside him, his lifelong friend and Rush mate, guitarist Alex Lifeson, nods thoughtfully. Owing to a few nagging health concerns, not the least of which has been drummer Neil Peart’s chronic tendonitis, speculation has hung in the air recently that the R40 tour signaled Rush’s unofficial retirement from the road, or at least major hauls. Asked to predict whether fans can expect to see an R50 tour a decade from now, Lee shakes his head and says, “Not at this point. But you never know. As of right now, it’s a little unpredictable.” Rush have issued their fair share of live albums (the 1981 set, Exit…Stage Left, is generally regarded as a classic concert recording), but they’ve never released anything as

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expansive and elaborate as R40 Live. Recorded and filmed in the band’s hometown of Toronto at the Air Canada Centre on June 17 and 19 of 2015, the package is available in various CD, DVD and Blu-ray configurations, and it’s a richly detailed, wildly entertaining top-to-bottom chronicle of their musical de-evolution, from the raucous, steampunk-inspired fantasy of “The Anarchist” (from Clockwork Angels) to the bare-bones, British blues-influenced “Working Man” that kicked things off in 1974. “Our live albums have always marked a period in our history and development,” says Lifeson. “This set is probably one of the most important markers in that regard.” To which Lee adds, “Plus, it shows us at the top of our game as players. Sonically, we really know who we are—there’s no struggle with that. Sometimes a live show or tour can be marred because you’re not happy with your sound. This tour was very straightforward in the sense that we know our sound; we’ve got our individual shit together, and all we have to do is go out and play our asses off. More often than not, we did that.” As a guided tour through the highlights of their musical history, R40 Live covers most of the epic essentials. There are, however, a few surprises: Neither “Losing It” nor “How It Is” (both sounding killer here) had been performed live before, and “Limelight,” a concert staple since 1981, is nowhere to be found. “It’s always a struggle—what to put in and what to leave out,” Lifeson explains. “In the case of ‘Limelight,’ we’ve played it on every tour since

“Xanadu”

( from A Farewell to Kings, 1977) LEE It’s much harder on our backs these days because of the doublenecks. It’s a lot of fun to play, though there are moments that feel a bit dated—lyrically, more than anything. It can be strange at first going back to being “that guy” you were so many years ago, but you just give yourself up to it. LIFESON There was a time when the only pictures I always saw of us were with the doubleneck guitars. Before we started doing it, I think the only other guitarist I ever saw with a doubleneck was Jimmy Page. LEE That shot of us with the doublenecks is, for a lot of people, the classic Rush moment. I saw so many of our fans tweeting their own pictures, trying to reproduce a shot that they’ve seen. They’re like, “Yes! I got it!” I think they love when our backs are breaking.

O P E N I N G S P R E A D : R I C H A R D S I B B A L D ; T H I S PA G E : F I N C O S T E L LO/ G E T T Y I M A G E S

Alex Lifeson (left) and Geddy Lee performing in 1977

we wrote it. If something was going to get the shove, that was a candidate.” “Some of the decisions were based on albums that didn’t fit the design of the show,” notes Lee. “We were covering our career in these broad strokes, so that left out records like Presto and Hold Your Fire. The present transforming into the near-present into the early Eighties in set one didn’t leave time for records that we deemed less essential. And we also considered what we’d presented on the last tour. We did a lot from Permanent Waves in that show, so we didn’t do so much from it on this tour.” While both Lee and Lifeson admit that retrospection occasionally elicits a cringeworthy moment or two (“You listen to songs you did so long ago, and it’s a little like hearing another person,” says Lee), there are also revelations and epiphanies. “It’s a very funny thing when you listen to your early work,” Lifeson says. “A lot of times I’m struck by how good the older songs are. Even if it’s a little innocent and naïve, the effort feels totally honest, and I love that. So when we play live, it’s our way of saying, ‘Okay, that was good; now how can we make it better, or at least different?’ ” And on that note, Lee and Lifeson settle back with Guitar World to weigh in on a selection of the cuts on R40 Live.


“Roll the Bones”

( from Roll the Bones, 1991 ALEX LIFESON It’s got a little more life now, as do a lot of the songs that we’ve brought back. It feels like a fresh new version. Same thing with “Jacob’s Ladder”—you feel a nice little lift with some things. “Roll the Bones” was a lot of fun, especially doing the video section with all of our friends doing the rap. The audience really responded to that. [The video features celebrity cameos such as Paul Rudd, Peter Dinklage, Tom Morello and Chad Smith.] GEDDY LEE That song has always been great to play, especially on this tour. I could feel in the house that it was very affecting. The video of the rap was done over a few months. We sent out letters to our buddies and even people we didn’t know—we just thought they’d be cool additions. Most of the people who were allin from the start were our friends. The video was difficult to put together because there were so many hilarious takes.

There’s a little bit of danger in playing a song we’ve never done live before, but it’s also very satisfying.”—ALEX LIFESON “Losing It”

( from Signals, 1982, featuring violinist Ben Mink) LIFESON There’s a little bit of danger in playing a song we’ve never done live before, but it’s also very satisfying to get through, especially in the way that we did with “Losing It.” It was never meant to be performed live. Ged didn’t play bass on the original, and there was such a serious violin part on it. LEE How are you going to play it without a violin? That was the main reason why we never did it. Ben Mink is a great player, so it was wonderful to have him join us onstage. We’re so happy at how this one turned out. The whole thing really came together nicely.

“Jacob’s Ladder”

“Animate”

LIFESON We played it when the album came out and brought it back. You make room for certain songs, and it felt right to feature it. We talked about doing it before, but we never felt excited about it. Once we started rehearsing it for this tour and refreshed it a bit, it became a favorite to play.

LIFESON Another challenging song to play live. The choruses are a real stretch from a positional standpoint, and the punky nature of the verses were always kind of tricky for me in the past. This is the first time that I felt more settled with the song—I was feeling what Ged and Neil felt.

( from Permanent Waves, 1980)

LEE Alex’s playing is spectacular. For me personally, I didn’t want to play it at first because I thought some of the keyboard sounds were a little dated. I just wasn’t sure I could get behind it live in an authentic sense. Once I freshened up the sounds, it kind of came together for me. I think it helped the melody and made everything sound more interesting. Our programmer, Jim Burgess, really did a great job with the new textures and sounds. I credit him with saving the song.

( from Counterparts , 1993)

Before, I was thinking of the beat as being more syncopated, and I played across it. So I had to become more aware of the way Neil and Ged were feeling it, and I kind of sat on the beat more. That was a big thing for me, to get in the pocket with them. Playing across it created a certain kind of tension, which was good, but being locked in with them made it feel really great.

“The Story So Far…” (Neil Peart drum solo)

LIFESON I was going to say the exact same thing. When I listened to one of the test pressings of his drum solo, I was struck by how nuanced his playing is. You don’t always catch that in the moment—you’re kind of distracted by everything going on around you. But hearing it here, I was amazed at how interesting all the moments are.

Lifeson (left) and Lee onstage in 1986

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LEE Neil’s drum solos evolve. On this tour, and on this particular solo, he found a balance between being a highly compositional player and an improvisationalist. More and more, he likes to go out there without a plan. You’ve got to tip your hat to that. That’s true jazz.

PA U L N AT K I N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

LEE We’re spoiled when it comes to Neil. Having worked with him for so many years, we’re sort of used to his amazing abilities. He’s pretty much Superman. He’s always great, but there are those nights when he’s really incredible. You notice it, too—how he turns it up a notch.


TIM SULT ~ CLUTCH


Alex wanted to play ‘Lakeside Park,’ and I was kind of against it. But I gave in, and he was right.” —GEDDY LEE

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“How It Is”

( from Vapor Trails , 2002) LEE We were listening to some albums and the song came on. It was one of the songs that were remixed for the re-release of Vapor Trails. I think Neil suggested it, and we were like, “Fuck yeah. Let’s do it.” It’s one of those overlooked songs—we’ve got a few of those. Sometimes you want to do a song to give it some justice. LIFESON There was a lot of material on that record, and we’ve covered most of it. I think we might have felt at one time or another that putting that song in would have been too much. So it never got played till now. It felt great—it’s got a lovely feeling throughout.

“Lakeside Park”

( from Caress of Steel , 1975)

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LIFESON It’s got an unusual guitar part in the chorus. I thought that the song was very representative of a time, and our fans really connect to it in some way. It reminds them of a summer, or being somewhere like Lakeside Park. Somewhere in their lives, there is that place. I thought it would touch people.

“Anthem”

( from Fly by Night , 1975) LEE I’ve always loved “Anthem,” but it’s always been hard to sing. It’s very high LIFESON And there’s a lot of words. LEE It’s hard to catch your breath in it. LIFESON I have a great time playing it. A paisley Tele and a wah-wah? You can’t beat it. On the recording I used an Echoplex. Now I use a Fractal system, which is loaded with all kinds of effects. I use that for the whole show for chorus, delay, reverb, flanging, phasing, all of that stuff.

RICHARD SIBBALD

BASS DRUMS KEYBOARDS VOCALS

LEE I’ll be honest: I still don’t think it’s a great song. [laughs] Musically, we were in our derivative stage. Some of those early guitar moments feel very Genesis-y to me—they would get low and quiet with the guitar parts. But I think the song is very representative of a period, and there’s a particular sentiment in it that I thought really worked in the context of the show. Al wanted to play it, and I was kind of against it. But I gave in, and he was right.


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“Working Man” ( from Rush , 1974)

“What You’re Doing” ( from Rush, 1974) LEE It’s got a great riff. Back then, it was just a heavy song, and the lyrics are kind of naïve. It’s a little cringe-worthy. In the fresh light of day and bringing it back now, I loved playing it. I found this fantastic old Hofner solid bass, a really rare one. You don’t see many of them—I think they date back to ’61. It’s got a phenomenal amount of bottom end, and when I played it along with Al, because we’re playing the exact same riff, it’s like the bass and guitar became one giant instrument. I never had a sound like that.

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LIFESON And that’s coming from all of us at the same time. It’s a funny thing doing certain older songs. You’ve learned more, but you don’t have the same physicality as when you were younger. Compositionally, things do improve over time. The structure of the solo is better now than it was in the past. A lot of that is because of Geddy, because I’m playing off of what he’s doing, and vice versa. Every night it was a bit improvisational, and we don’t always have that kind of freedom. LEE It was a real release. It’s the end of a set, so we just become a jam band.

RICHARD SIBBALD

LEE It’s got a great bluesy vibe. That’s always been one of my faves to play. It’s such a jam song, and we just let it all out. We turned back into that band that was just starting out, when we were trying to play as fast as we could. Nothing is held back. It’s just fiery playing.


OF

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BY CHRIS GILL

ROR

The story of how the Tiny Terror from Orange Amplification unknowingly spearheaded the “lunchbox style” amp revolution a decade ago— and a look at what lies ahead for the groundbreaking product line.

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YPERBOLE is probably more rampant in marketing today than it ever has been, but it’s not an exaggeration or overstatement to describe the Orange Tiny Terror as one of the most popular and influential guitar products of the last 10 years. This diminutive 15-watt all-tube amp head, housed in a lightweight but sturdy metal chassis that inspired the “lunchbox amp” nickname, was an immediate success that instantly changed the way that guitarists and the musical instrument industry viewed small, low-wattage amps. Whereas most previous small amps were novelties or toys that were only useful for practice at best, the Tiny Terror proved that a tiny tube amp could compete with much bigger models when it came to output and tone. The Orange Tiny Terror made its debut back in 2006, and the initial production run sold out before the first models arrived at retailers. Demand was so high that the amp was continuously back ordered for its first few years of existence. “The Tiny Terror exceeded all our expectations,” says Orange CEO and founder Cliff Cooper. “Worldwide sales in its first year were beyond what we could have possibly imagined. It quickly became a ‘must have’ item. The amp’s design was so innovative—it really changed the face of the industry. It laid down the marker for small, affordable valve amplifiers and set the trend that still continues today.”

Although the Tiny Terror had only three controls (volume, tone and gain) and a switch for selecting either 15 or seven watts of output power, professional players were impressed by its versatile range of tones and its ability to produce rich, ballsy power amp distortion at volume levels that were ideal for studio recording. Paired with a 2x12 or 4x12 cabinet, the Tiny Terror was even loud enough to gig with. Key elements behind the Tiny Terror’s impressive tones include its circuit utilizing a pair of EL84 tubes to drive the power amp section, a pair of ECC83 (12AX7) tubes for the preamp section, and its output transformer, which proved that a small transformer could provide the dynamics and full-range tone of bigger amps without the excess weight and bulk. The Tiny Terror’s designer, Orange technical director Adrian Emsley, says that EL84 tubes are the main source of the amp’s character. “I love output valve distortion,” says Emsley. “For me, EL84s have the most musical saturation, and 15 watts cranked is the perfect volume to achieve it. The circuit I came up with for the Tiny Terror was designed with that in mind. It has only three controls, but it gives you everything from clean to pretty ridiculous distortion. It’s a real musician’s amplifier, so when you play softly you get glistening cleans, and when you dig in it crunches up into rich overdrive—all with the touch of your hands.” As a result of its success and acceptance, the Tiny Terror led to an overwhelming influx of mini amps. Over the last decade it seems that every major amp company, as well as many

Orange’s 10th Anniversary Edition Tiny Terror half stack; (right strip) components of the original Tiny Terror prototype

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boutique builders, has offered their own variation of the lunchbox amp design. Even Orange Amplification introduced several successful spin-off products that either expanded upon the Tiny Terror’s features (Dual Terror, Dark Terror, and #4 Jim Root Terror) or further downsized the Tiny Terror’s dimensions (Micro Terror and Micro Dark). While Orange’s new Terror and Micro models have expanded upon the first Tiny Terror model’s features and capabilities, the original has remained a mainstay of Orange’s product lineup for the last decade. In celebration of the Tiny Terror’s tenth anniversary, this year Orange announced the 10th Anniversary Edition Tiny Terror half stack. Orange’s UK Cus-

Adrian Emsley with the Orange 10th Anniversary Edition Tiny Terror amp

“The TINY TERROR provided guitarists with A PROPER TUBE AMP that they could carry in a gigbag to the show, borrow a 4x12 cab from another band on the bill, AND BLOW EVERYONE AWAY.” — ADRIAN EMSLEY Orange Technical Director

tom Shop is building a limited edition run of only 110 half stacks, which consist of a point-to-point hand-wired version of the original head housed in a mirror-polished stainless steel chassis and an exclusive custom 2x10 birch plywood speaker cabinet housing specially developed Celestion G10 Gold alnico speakers. The amp head’s control panel and the speaker cabinet’s vinyl covering are British racing green to celebrate Orange’s British heritage and origins. Nicknamed the “Shiny Terror,” the 10th Anniversary Edition amp head offers a more refined version of the original Tiny Terror’s beloved tones. Only the finest quality components, heavy-gauge copper wire, and true point-to-point wiring on a strip (instead of a tag or turret board) were used for its construction. “The more traditional components add a certain character to the sound,” says Emsley. “Carbon comp resistors pass a signal in a certain way, and with a proper hand-wired amp you’re effectively soldering solid core legs of

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components together. As a result, the top end is even sweeter and more defined.” Emsley also collaborated with Celestion on the design of the G10 Gold alnico speakers for the 2x10 cabinet (the cab will only be available with the 10th Anniversary Tiny Terror head and not sold separately). “I’ve worked with Celestion for nearly 15 years,” says Emsley. “I had a lot of input into the development of the G10 Gold speakers, which were designed from the ground up. There really hadn’t been a proper British 10-inch speaker since the Sixties. This model has the classic alnico ring magnet, which is the most musicalsounding magnet. Celestion even had the basket re-tooled as the initial one lacked

articulation in the finished sound. We went over every detail carefully and even improved the power handling. I think it’s the best 10-inch alnico speaker in production today. “The original idea behind the Tiny Terror was to make a small amp that didn’t sound like a small amp,” Emsley concludes. “I wanted to make something that was alltube and sounded tight and punchy, so that’s what I designed. The Tiny Terror provided guitarists with a proper tube amp that they could carry in a gigbag on a train or bus to the show, borrow a 4x12 cab from another band on the bill, and blow everyone away. The Tiny Terror is probably the amp I’m most proud of.”


ROSS HALFIN

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VIVIAN CAMPBELL’S relationship with his past as RONNIE JAMES DIO’S first solo axman hasn’t been all warm and fuzzy in the 30 years since he and the legendary frontman parted ways—but now, with his former bandmates, he’s once again embracing his Dio heritage. Here the guitarist talks about his LAST IN LINE project, his battle with cancer, and the classic metal music he and Ronnie James produced in the early Eighties. RICHARD BIENSTOCK by

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OR YEARS AND YEARS I had

put great distance between myself and the Dio catalog,” says Vivian Campbell, speaking about his time with legendary singer Ronnie James Dio’s band, during which he recorded classic metal platters like 1983’s Holy Diver and 1984’s The Last in Line. Following his stint with Dio, Campbell spent several years playing with acts like Whitesnake and the Riverdogs before landing his present gig as co-guitarist, alongside Phil Collen, in Def Leppard. And while he’s been with the Leps for more than 20 years now, Campbell happily says, “I’m also embracing my Dio heritage again.” Just how Campbell has opted to embrace that heritage is by looking back—and also forward. In 2012 he formed Last in Line, an outfit dedicated to celebrating his old Dio music. The group, which also features his Eighties-era Dio bandmates, drummer Vinny Appice and bassist Jimmy Bain, as well as new singer Andrew Freeman, has played select shows over the past few years, performing avowed metal classics like “Rainbow in the Dark,” “Holy Diver” and “Stand Up and Shout.” Now, Last in Line have also recorded Heavy Crown, a studio album of new, original music that recalls the band members’ shared history while also updating it for a modern era. The album’s 11 tracks are redolent of the glory days of Eighties heavy metal, full of crushingly regal riffs, hooky melodies and huge choruses, not to mention the type of flashy guitar shredding that Campbell—who was just 20 when he joined Dio’s band—made his name on, but that he also hasn’t done much of over the past 25 years. Now, he’s returning to his roots. “That style of playing is truly the essence of who I am—I’m an angry fucking guitarist!” Campbell says with a laugh. “I need to play like that. So it’s very cathartic to me to play this kind of music with Vinny and Jimmy again.” It also provides a sort of closure for Campbell in the wake of the tragic death of Ronnie Dio, who passed away in 2010 at the age of 67 after a battle with stomach cancer. Campbell, who for the past few years has been waging his own war against Hodgkin’s lymphoma, had a famously bitter breakup with Dio during the

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tour in support of their third album together, 1985’s Sacred Heart, and the two never had the chance to fully mend their relationship. As a result, Campbell says, “I didn’t even listen to the music I did with Ronnie for decades, because the split between us was so acrimonious. I didn’t actually own the albums. I very much disassociated myself from all of it because it was a very painful kind of thing for me. But with the passage of time and, unfortunately, Ronnie’s passing away, I found myself revisiting the music with a whole different perspective.” As for what that perspective is currently, he says, “I have to give all due respect to Ronnie, because I think he was the best of his genre and the best of his generation. And the music we made together was very, very real. So I would never try to replace that. And

in fact, if Ronnie was still alive, and Dio the band existed in some form or another, I would never have done this project. It just wouldn’t have been appropriate.” But now, Campbell affirms, “Last in Line seems to be a fitting way to carry on the legacy of what we all did together, as a band. And it’s great to be able to continue to bring this music to the people—not just the old fans, but new ones, too.” How did Last in Line as a band come to be?

Back in 2011, Def Leppard was taking about a year and a half off, and so I spent a few months playing guitar for Thin Lizzy. And to be onstage with [guitarist] Scott Gorham and [drummer] Brian Downey, playing those great riffs and solos, it reignited

Last In Line (from left) Andrew Freeman, Campbell, Jimmy Bain and Vinny Appice

ROSS HALFIN

F


It took a long time for me to realize that I shouldn’t let all the bullshit from the past stand between me and this great music”

my passion for that kind of fiery electric guitar. It really reminded me of my youth. I came back from that tour wanting to play that type of guitar again, and I don’t know why, but I just called Vinny and Jimmy and I asked them if they would want to go into a room and just play. At that point, it had been 27 years since we’d played together, but the chemistry was immediate. It could have been 27 minutes. We were just jamming songs from the early Dio albums. Then Vinny suggested calling a guy he knew, Andrew Freeman, to complete things. Andrew came down and started singing, and he was powerful and passionate enough to sing the material, yet he didn’t sound like Ronnie. So I had a bit of an epiphany at that moment. I thought, Let’s go and do some shows… And you know, the fact that Andrew came in and sounded completely different from Ronnie in terms of tonality, that was what actually planted the seed for me. If Andrew had just sounded like a Ronnie clone, we wouldn’t even be having this conversation today. But it felt like we had something worth exploring. Because those early Dio albums are Jimmy’s and Vinny’s and my heritage just as they are Ronnie’s, even though it was his name on them. We created those records together. We all wrote those songs. It might have been that Dio was the name of the band—and obviously Ronnie was the focal point of the whole thing—but the music was a collaborative effort. Which was what Ronnie wanted. How did you approach the music on Heavy Crown?

We wanted to write and record this record in exactly the same way we had approached Holy Diver. And that was to have Jimmy and Vinny and myself go into a rehearsal room and kick around some things and mold them into what we thought were good ideas for songs. Back in the Dio days, we’d basically get together and work up a structure, and then in the evening Ronnie would come in and we’d play him what we had. Sometimes he’d make suggestions and ask us to edit parts of the songs, and then he’d open up his lyric book, listen to it a few times and step up to the mic and start singing. And frequently, at

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least for the Holy Diver record, we’d have a song written this way in 24 to 48 hours. So we approached Heavy Crown in exactly the same way. Vinny, Jimmy and I went into a rehearsal room and kicked around riffs. We worked very, very quickly, because it’s always been a very easy and organic process between the three of us. Then we’d send what we had to Andrew and he’d add his ideas. When we went into the studio with [producer] Jeff Pilson, we recorded very quickly as well. We did the guitar, bass and drums live, just like in Dio. Then I put on some minimal embellishments and Andrew came in and sang. It was very straightforward. What was your guitar and amp setup for the album?

pretty confident it would be the title track. After that, we booked Caribou Ranch [a recording studio in Colorado], because we knew we could write the rest of the record when we were up there. So that song’s a big one for us. And it was very much a collaborative thing. I wrote the intro at my parents’ old house in Belfast, in the kitchen. And Jimmy came up with the parts for the verse. Then Vinny put in the backbeat. It was a real joint effort. But by the time we got to the next album, Sacred Heart, things had become a lot less easy. For starters, Ronnie was trying to embellish a lot of the music

promise that by the third album it would be an equitable situation. So we were all toiling together to make these great records because we believed we were sharing in a common cause. And when we got to Sacred Heart, I was the most vocal one to say to Ronnie, “Here we are—we have two successful records, we’re making a third…” I kind of held him to his promise. I wanted him to make it an equitable situation. But he kept putting it off. And I didn’t say anything about it again until we were on tour. And again, he put it off. Then we finished the first leg of the Sacred Heart tour, and after that we had

Vivian Campbell (left) and Ronnie James Dio performing in 1984

I had a very simple rig—a [Gibson] Les Paul and an Engl Ritchie Blackmore [Signature] head. I would use the Engl for the main rhythm track, and then try a different amp for the second one—Jeff had a [Friedman] Naked, which is basically a clone of a Marshall JCM, and also an original JTM 45 that I used on a couple tracks. So we would kind of mix and match. Then for my solos I used the Engl as well, and sometimes I threw a Dunlop Cry Baby wah in the mix.

With Holy Diver, I showed up in L.A. with one guitar and one amp. The guitar is the same one I used this time—the Les Paul I bought when I was 15. I had to work really, really hard to pay for that guitar, so it means a lot to me. If my house was on fire that would be the one guitar I would grab. So it felt appropriate to get it out of storage and use it on the Last in Line record as well. I used that guitar on Holy Diver, and I ran it into a Marshall JCM 800 amp. But the 800 didn’t quite break up enough, so on the Holy Diver tour I added one of those yellow Boss overdrive pedals [a Boss Super OverDrive SD-1] in between to give it a bit more gain. Then by the Last in Line era of the band I was using Charvels in addition to my Les Paul. With Last in Line you revisit much of the classic Dio catalog onstage. Do you have a favorite song from those days?

One would be “The Last in Line.” That’s a song that I think really allowed us to make that record. We started writing in L.A., and we’d come up with a couple tracks, but nowhere near enough for a record. And then we came up with “The Last in Line.” Once we had that song we knew we had the showpiece of the album. Ronnie was also

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with keyboards, which we felt complicated the arrangements. It wasn’t like the first two records at all. For the first two records we were a gang, a team. That was gone by Sacred Heart. You did your parts and you left the studio. Nobody wanted to be there. Halfway through the Sacred Heart tour, you exited the band. What was the source of the tension between you and Ronnie?

Well, the first record we made together, Holy Diver, that came off the solo deal Ronnie was offered when he was still in Black Sabbath. And when we went to L.A. to record, there were two songs Ronnie had already written—“Holy Diver” and “Don’t Talk to Strangers.” The rest of the album we wrote collaboratively. Same with the next two. But when the band was first formed Ronnie made us a

a couple weeks between the end of the U.S. dates and the start of the British ones. During that time I received a contract that offered me a couple hundred dollars more per week, and that also said if I didn’t return the contract immediately it would be construed as my no longer being in the band. I tried calling Ronnie on the phone about it but he wouldn’t answer. And the next thing I know, the band shows up in England with [guitarist] Craig Goldy. But the thing I want to make clear is that for me, it wasn’t about the money. It was about the principle. We had an agreement. And when a man looks me in the eye and shakes my hand I take him at his word. So that was my issue with Ronnie. What happened after that?

Well, Ronnie and Wendy [Dio, Ronnie’s wife

W I L L I A M H A M E S/AT L A S I C O N S

What were you using on the classic Dio stuff?


㈀⼀㈀㘀 ⴀ 䘀琀⸀ 䰀愀甀搀攀爀搀愀氀攀Ⰰ 䘀䰀 ㈀⼀㈀㜀 ⴀ 伀爀氀愀渀搀漀Ⰰ 䘀䰀 ㈀⼀㈀㠀 ⴀ 䄀琀氀愀渀琀愀Ⰰ 䜀䄀 ㈀⼀㈀㤀 ⴀ 一愀猀栀瘀椀氀氀攀Ⰰ 吀一 ㌀⼀㈀ ⴀ 䐀愀氀氀愀猀Ⰰ 吀堀 ㌀⼀㌀ ⴀ 一攀眀 伀爀氀攀愀渀猀Ⰰ 䰀䄀 ㌀⼀㐀 ⴀ 䠀漀甀猀 ㌀⼀㐀 ⴀ 䠀漀甀猀琀漀渀Ⰰ 吀堀 ㌀⼀㔀 ⴀ 匀愀渀 䄀渀琀漀渀椀漀Ⰰ 吀堀 ㌀⼀㠀 ⴀ 倀栀漀攀渀椀砀Ⰰ 䄀娀 ㌀⼀㤀 ⴀ 䰀愀猀 嘀攀最愀猀Ⰰ 一嘀 ㌀⼀㄀  ⴀ 嘀攀渀琀甀爀愀Ⰰ 䌀䄀 ㌀⼀㄀㄀ ⴀ 刀愀洀漀渀愀Ⰰ 䌀䄀 ㌀⼀㄀㈀ ⴀ 䰀漀猀 䄀渀最攀氀攀猀Ⰰ 䌀䄀 ㌀⼀㄀㌀ ⴀ  ㌀⼀㄀㌀ ⴀ 匀愀渀 䨀漀猀攀Ⰰ 䌀䄀 ㌀⼀㄀㐀 ⴀ 䌀漀渀挀漀爀搀Ⰰ 䌀䄀 ㌀⼀㄀㔀 ⴀ 刀攀渀漀Ⰰ 一嘀 ㌀⼀㄀㘀 ⴀ 刀攀搀搀椀渀最Ⰰ 䌀䄀 ㌀⼀㄀㜀 ⴀ 倀漀爀琀氀愀渀搀Ⰰ 伀刀

㌀⼀㄀㠀 ⴀ 匀攀愀琀琀氀攀Ⰰ 圀䄀 ㌀⼀㄀㤀 ⴀ 嘀愀渀挀漀甀瘀攀爀Ⰰ 䈀䌀 ㌀⼀㈀㈀ ⴀ 䐀攀渀瘀攀爀Ⰰ 䌀伀 ㌀⼀㈀㐀 ⴀ 䴀漀漀爀栀攀愀搀Ⰰ 䴀一 ㌀⼀㈀㔀 ⴀ 匀愀瘀愀最攀Ⰰ 䴀一 ㌀⼀㈀㘀 ⴀ 匀琀⸀ 䌀栀愀爀氀攀猀Ⰰ 䤀䰀 ㌀⼀㈀㜀 ⴀ 䌀栀椀挀愀最 ㌀⼀㈀㜀 ⴀ 䌀栀椀挀愀最漀Ⰰ 䤀䰀 ㌀⼀㈀㠀 ⴀ 䐀攀琀爀漀椀琀Ⰰ 䴀䤀 ㌀⼀㈀㤀 ⴀ 吀漀爀漀渀琀漀Ⰰ 伀一 ㌀⼀㌀  ⴀ 䴀漀渀琀爀攀愀氀Ⰰ 儀䌀 ㌀⼀㌀㄀ ⴀ 䰀漀渀搀漀渀搀攀爀爀礀Ⰰ 一䠀 㐀⼀㄀ ⴀ 伀琀琀愀眀愀Ⰰ 伀一 㐀⼀㈀ ⴀ 倀漀甀最栀欀攀攀瀀猀椀攀Ⰰ 一夀 㐀⼀㐀 ⴀ  㐀⼀㐀 ⴀ 䴀愀渀栀愀琀琀愀渀Ⰰ 一夀 㐀⼀㔀 ⴀ 匀攀氀氀攀爀猀瘀椀氀氀攀Ⰰ 倀䄀 㐀⼀㘀 ⴀ 倀椀琀琀猀戀甀爀最栀Ⰰ 倀䄀 㐀⼀㠀 ⴀ 䴀攀氀戀漀甀爀渀攀Ⰰ 䘀䰀


and manager] portrayed it in the press for years afterward that I had turned my back on the band, which was totally untrue. And I was fortunate in that I very quickly moved on to joining Whitesnake, because I didn’t want anything to do with my Dio history for many years. Then later on there was a bit of a mudslinging match in the press between Ronnie and I, which was never a good idea. I said a lot of things that were very inappropriate. Ronnie said a lot of things that were equally inappropriate. It took a long time for me to realize that I shouldn’t let all the bullshit from the past stand between me and this great music.

www.

858 GUITARS KieselGuitars

.com

I was very devoted to guitar—it’s all I did, all day, every day. To the extent that I was very antisocial.

always made in GU I TA R WOR L D America

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The old Dio music, as well as the new Heavy Crown, is more guitar-heavy than what you do in Def Leppard. Has it been fun for you to go back and revisit this style of playing?

Oh, fuck yeah! That was the whole reason for doing it—to get back to being angry with my Les Paul again. After that stint with Thin Lizzy I really wanted to play. And so it’s been an absolute godsend to me to do this. The other thing is I’ve been dealing with cancer for the last three years, and I’ve found that working more and more has helped me deal with that whole process. I kind of look at it as my Les Paul saving my life for the second

time. Because when I was a teenager in the Seventies, Belfast was a very ugly place, and a very violent place. So I immersed myself in music. That’s how my friends and I kept our heads on. We were distracted by music. And I was very devoted to guitar—it’s all I did, all day, every day. To the extent that I was very antisocial. Guitar playing was my salvation. And it seems kind of ironic to me that it’s sort of come full circle back to that. For the second time in my life the guitar is taking the focus off this other bullshit that’s going on and bringing me tremendous joy. It’s truly the essence of who I am. Are you planning to do much touring in support of Heavy Crown?

We’ll do what we can. We’re limited by two factors: One is money and the other is time. Time-wise, we have a limited window of opportunity where Def Leppard isn’t going to be working. And then the money limitation is pretty obvious. It’s unrealistic to think that we’re going to jump on a bus and do an extensive club tour. It’s just not financially feasible. But we’ll do whatever highprofile shows we can to help promote the band and help promote the music. Interestingly, Last in Line isn’t the only act out there celebrating your Dio-era music. There’s also Dio Disciples, led by your one-time replacement, Craig Goldy. Why do you think this music has endured so well, and there remains an audience for it all these years later?

I guess because it was always authentic. It was always real. And I’m not too sure what’s happened to modern metal. A lot of modern music is heavily detuned and it’s…I must confess, I’m an all-around music fan, but I’d be telling an untruth if I were to say I live and breathe hard rock. I don’t follow it too closely. But from my casual observance, a lot of modern hard rock is too focused on the technical aspects—on trying to be wilder and faster than the next guy. That’s not what it’s about to me and that’s not what it was about for the original Dio band. We liked to play fast, hard, aggressive music, but we also liked to have a lot of air around it. For instance, on Heavy Crown, some people have been complaining that certain tracks, like the leadoff song “Devil in Me,” aren’t aggressive enough, and aren’t fast enough. But aggression and speed was never the point. You can have a lot of power in music without being so overt about it. There’s something to be said for nuance and subtlety. And I think the original Dio band and the original Dio records had that. I’m not so sure that’s something that’s apparent in a lot of modern bands, you know?


Jam Along With Your iTunes® Songs

Guitar Tunes™ is an app for any guitar player that lets you play along with your favorite iTunes® songs. As your iTunes® song plays, watch the fingering for the guitar parts light up on the fretboard in real time. Available for desktop and mobile devices.

guitartunes.com Guitar Tunes™ is a trademark of Optek Music Systems, Inc. iTunes® is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. Wicked Game Copyright (1989) by Chris Isaak All Rights Reserved


yamahaguitars.com


MARCH 2016

the gear in review

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DEAN GUITARS Rusty Cooley 6 String Xenocide

86

FE N DE R Jimi Hendrix Stratocaster

88 PRS

S2 Singlecut Standard Satin

90

H E N R I K SE N Bud amplifier

92 EA R T H QU A K E R DE V I C E S Acapulco Gold pedal

92

T R U E T ON E 1Spot Pro CS7 and C12 power supply

GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD EX

CELLENCE

Full Effect

FRACTAL AUDIO SYSTEMS FX8 By Chris Gill

WITH ITS COMBINATION of realistic-sounding amp and cabinet simulations and incredibly sophisticated virtual effects, the Fractal Audio Axe-Fx II has become the new standard for guitarists who want a streamlined, powerful, and versatile modern digital rig without sacrificing the classic sounds they know and love. However, Fractal Audio realized that not everyone can afford to invest in a system like this and that many guitarists refuse to give up their favorite amp rigs. The FX8 is

the perfect alternative for players who love the sound and versatility of the Axe-Fx II’s effects but don’t need the amp and cabinet models. By far the most advanced multieffects pedalboard on the market today, the FX8 comes in a rugged, gig-worthy chassis and provides up to eight simultaneous effects per preset. Designed to complement your amp rig rather than replace it, the FX8 provides the sophisticated, studio-quality sounds of a professional rack effect rig but is as simple to use as a standard pedalboard.

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SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

CHEAT SHEET LIST PRICE $1,949.95 MANUFACTURER Fractal Audio Systems, fractalaudio.com

FEATURES Featuring 11 footswitches, a large graphic LCD, and five knobs and six buttons for navigating settings on the LCD, the FX8 has a streamlined control configuration that is simple and intuitive to operate even though it provides some rather deep programming capabilities. The rear panel is outfitted with a versatile array of input and output jacks, which include instrument input, stereo unbalanced Pre outputs with Humbuster, balanced stereo Post inputs, unbalanced Humbuster Post outputs, a pair of TRS 1/4inch relay jacks for controlling an amp’s channel or effect switching, another pair of 1/4-inch jacks for optional expression pedal or footswitch controllers, USB, MIDI In, and MIDI Out/Thru. The unit’s memory stores up to 128 different virtual pedalboards with up to eight simultaneous effects that can be arranged in any order. Individual effects can be assigned either Pre (signal is routed to the FX8’s output to the amp’s input, like a traditional stomp box pedalboard) or Post (signal is routed from a separate set of outputs to an amp’s effect loop), and effects in each preset can be configured in series or parallel audio routing. A stompbox mode allows guitarists to switch any of the eight effects in a preset on or off individually using the footswitches, or the footswitches can be configured to switch instantly between eight different pedalboard setups. Pretty much any effect a guitarist could ever want is available from the comprehensive selection. Even better, chorus, compressor, delay, drive, filter, flanger, graphic EQ, parametric EQ, phaser, reverb, and wah effects can each be assigned twice to a pedalboard preset, allowing players to switch between or stack an overdrive and fuzz drive effect, for example. In addition

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to the eight pedalboard effects, each preset also includes a looper that records up to four minutes in stereo or eight minutes in mono. PERFORMANCE Before I even played the first

note through the FX8, I was already impressed by how it removed the noise that previously existed in my setup. The system is absolutely noise free. But that was just an appetizer for the outstanding, professional-quality sounds that came from the expertly programmed presets, all of which have the immaculate tone of a well-crafted recording. The effects sounded so good that I was hesitant to program my own sounds, as I wasn’t sure that I could improve upon any of them. Unlike most pedalboard multieffects units, there are no silly (and unusable) sound effects, but instead a multitude of awesome tones and textures that should inspire guitarists’ creativity for many years. Best of all, the FX8 was a natural match to any amp I tried it with (a Friedman, an EVH 5150III, etc.), with its Drive effects complementing the amp’s inherent tone and with everything else sounding rich, full, and expressively dynamic. I’m the type of guitarist who only consults manuals when I need to, but while the FX8 is quite deep and sophisticated I found it very easy to operate and program. The footswitches require only a minimal amount of tap dancing when selecting presets during live gigging situations, and being able to switch individual effects on or off in the virtual pedalboard configuration was both empowering and fun. Programming individual effects requires a few button presses and knob adjustments, but the routine is easy to remember. Users can program each effect in very fine detail without compromise.

Provides 128 presets that each contain an entire pedalboard setup consisting of up to eight simultaneous effects that can be arranged in any order. Effects can be individually assigned to the unit’s Pre (in front of the amp) or Post (to an amp’s effect loop) outputs. Each preset also includes a looper that records up to four minutes in stereo or eight minutes in mono. FX8-Edit software allows users to program presets via a computer connected to the FX8’s USB, which also can be used for downloading firmware updates.

THE BOTTOM LINE The FX8 integrates perfectly with any amp, providing an expansive universe of dynamic, expressive, professional-quality effects, noise-free performance, and comprehensive control of both its own effects and amp functions.


For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

Kill ’Em All

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

ER

FORMANC

E

DEAN GUITARS RUSTY COOLEY 6 STRING XENOCIDE By Pau l Ria rio

BETWEEN RECORDING WITH his band,

Day of Reckoning, and being a sought-after clinician and teacher in extremely fast guitar techniques, Rusty Cooley may be one of the hardest-working super-shredders in the country. His disciplined work ethic, talent and popularity haven’t gone unnoticed either, because Dean Guitars currently offers nine Rusty Cooley signature model guitars for aspiring fleet-fingered players who wish to follow in his speedy footsteps. While his signature guitars are primarily seven- and eight-string offerings, the Dean Guitars Rusty Cooley 6 String Xenocide is his first and only six-string model available for players who want a more traditional guitar that’s built for speed. FEATURES The Xenocide features the same super-strat design with contoured neck heel and a deeply sculpted lower cutaway as his other signature guitars, facilitating wide interval stretches and easy access to the higher fret register. The body is made of alder with a H.R. Giger–inspired “Xenocide” graphic on its top that also matches the headstock. The bolt-on maple neck features a satin finish, 25 1/2–inch scale length, 16–inch fretboard radius, and ebony fingerboard with 24 extra jumbo frets. The double locking Floyd Rose Pro tremolo is recessed and is set up flush to the body allowing for absolute playing comfort and efficiency for your picking hand. The guitar features a single volume knob and three-way blade

CHEAT SHEET

STREET PRICE $899.99 MANUFACTURER Dean Guitars, deanguitars.com

switch to control the sonic firepower of the direct-mount EMG active pickups (an EMG 81 in the bridge and an EMG 85 in the neck). PERFORMANCE The Xenocide is a textbook

example of a guitar designed for the sole purpose in attaining maximum speed and performance for hard rock and metal styles. The combination of its alder body and maple neck with an ebony fretboard contributes to a thicker midrange for rhythm and brighter attack for soloing, all of which are the ideal elements for true metal guitar tones. Also, having the EMG active pickups directly mounted to the body intensifies the overall sound. Used with EVH 5150 III and Engl amp heads, the Xenocide didn’t disappoint in accomplishing sheer aggressive power. The EMG 81 and 85 pickups were superb at delivering detailed clarity and complex definition in high-gain chug for metal. Playing past the 12th fret was equally fun, because the neck carve is evenly tapered to a slim “D” profile that feels comfortable without feeling wimpy. Best of all, the guitar is setup perfectly with low action and a flat radius where you can bend notes two whole steps without fretting out. Add in the recessed Floyd Rose tremolo for all the requisite whammy tricks, and the Xenocide is a beast.

The recessed Floyd Rose Pro locking tremolo system is set up flush to the body, with the fine tuners angled back, allowing a smooth and efficient playing surface for your right hand.

The guitar’s slim maple neck is designed for comfort and performance, which makes it a fast-feeling neck profile for soloing and fretting complex chords.

THE BOTTOM LINE For speed and precision, the Rusty Cooley 6 String Xenocide is a flawlessly executed six-string shred machine with super-sleek contours, effortless playability and killer metal tones.

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Machine Gun

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

ER

FORMANC

E

FENDER JIMI HENDRIX STRATOCASTER By Ch ris G ill

THERE ARE MANY reasons why Jimi Hendrix did not sound like other guitarists of his time, including players who also favored a similar Strat and Marshall setup. The most obvious reason is simply that no one else played the same way that Jimi did, from his distinctive chord voicings to his unique phrasing and touch. But strictly from the perspective of his gear, there’s another important reason why Jimi’s Strat sounded like no other—he took a standard right-handed Strat, flipped it over, and re-strung it for left-handed playing. This setup provides several changes that affect a Strat’s tone in somewhat subtle but still notable ways. The “reverse” six-on-a-side headstock changes the length of the strings behind the nut, which also changes overall string tension, and reversed angle of the bridge pickup now places the pole piece closest to the bridge under the low E instead of the high E while also changing the placement of the staggered pole pieces. Fender’s new Jimi Hendrix Stratocaster incorporates several distinctive features of Jimi’s “flipped over” setup while still maintaining the comfort and playability of a standard right-handed guitar. While the model is

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essential for Hendrix enthusiasts who want to accurately cop his distinctive tone, the Jimi Hendrix Strat is also a great choice for players seeking a Strat with familiar look and feel but a slightly different voice.

FEATURES Featuring an alder body and a 21-fret neck with a C-shaped profile, 9.5-inch radius, and oversized headstock, the Fender Jimi Hendrix Stratocaster is clearly inspired by the late-Sixties Strats that Hendrix favored. Color options for the gloss polyester body finish are black or Olympic white, and the model is only available with a one-piece maple neck with contrasting “skunk” strip on the back. Vintage-style tuners, the master volume/neck pickup tone/middle pickup tone control setup, and control knobs, pickup covers, and switch tip made of aged white plastic further enhance the model’s classic late Sixties vibe. However, a few features like the medium jumbo frets, five-position pickup selector switch, vintage-style synchronized tremolo (shipped with a floating setup), and American Vintage ’65 Single-Coil Strat pickups are provided to satisfy the preferences of today’s Strat players. The model also includes an engraved neck plate with Jimi Hendrix’s likeness and Hendrix’s signature on the back of the headstock to celebrate its inspiration— Jimi would certainly approve. PERFORMANCE I’ve tried to cop genuine Jimi tone by taking a left-handed Strat


For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

Yamaha

REVSTAR SERIES

CHEAT SHEET and flipping it over like Hendrix did with his Strats, but the results weren’t exactly ideal. The setup causes the cutaway horn to impede access to the high E string above the 17th fret, the controls are awkwardly placed, the neck profile is uncomfortable, and the reversed tremolo is just plain wonky (sorry Stevie Ray, but I also found it made no difference to tone or whammy effects either). The Fender Jimi Hendrix Stratocaster incorporates the most important tone-influencing attributes of Hendrix’s flipped-over setup—the bridge pickup’s reversed angle and the reversed behind-the-nut string length on the headstock—while maintaining the familiar feel and comfortable playability of a right-handed guitar. The reversed pickup angle makes a big difference in tone, with the low E string delivering a crisp, percussive attack and enhanced metallic twang, while the high E string sounds slightly mellower and fuller while also providing longer sustain. The reversed staggering of the polepieces also changes the string-to-string balance, making the D more prominent than the G and slightly bringing down the level of the A string. This setup sounds great when playing Wes Montgomery-style octaves using the low E and D strings.

The new Yamaha Revstar lineup of seven solidbody electric guitar models exude a hip, sexy vibe reminiscent of the café-racer style of motorcycles popular in Tokyo and London in the Sixties. The RevStar guitar series are meticulously crafted with painstaking attention to detail, and come in stunning colors and finishes to complement the sleek body contours. The guitars feature hand-wound pickups and materials that perfectly match each instrument’s character. A proprietary Dry Switch enhances the tone of six guitars in the series, offering the versatility of a coil split and helping to deliver a roaring tone that distinguishes Revstar from the rest of the pack. LIST PRICE RS820CR (shown), $1,549 yamahaguitars.com

STREET PRICE $899.99 MANUFACTURER Fender, fender.com The reversed angle of the bridge pickup and the reversed oversized headstock provide key tonal attributes of Jimi Hendrix’s “flipped over” Stat setup. American Vintage ’65 SingleCoil Strat pickups provide classic Strat tone, while a five-position pickup selector makes it easy to access Jimi’s favorite tonal flavors.

THE BOTTOM LINE The Fender Jimi Hendrix Stratocaster provides the critical tone-shaping elements of Jimi’s distinctive “flipped over” Strat setup while retaining the familiar feel of a standard Strat setup.

Electro-Harmonix 720 STEREO LOOPER

The EHX 720 Stereo Looper features 720 seconds (12 minutes) of stereo recording time on 10 independent loops and unlimited overdubbing. The compact EHX 720 Stereo Looper provides guitarists with an intuitive tool that’s perfect for practice and live performance. Undo-Redo, Reverse and Half speed effects are all available at the touch of a button. Audio is high quality, uncompressed and the pedal features 24-bit A/D/A converters as well as a 44.1kHz Sample Rate. Stereo in/out yields enhanced usability and enables the looper to record two instruments at once. LIST PRICE $185.40 ehx.com

guitarworld.com

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For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

Working Class Hero PRS S2 SINGLECUT STANDARD SATIN By Ch ris G ill

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

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FORMANC

E

PRS MAKES SOME of the most beautiful guitars in the world, featuring exquisitely figured woods and finishes with vibrant colors that glow like a Van Gogh masterpiece. But for most working guitarists who play at dive bars instead of Carnegie Hall, these instruments are a bit “overdressed,” like wearing an Armani tuxedo and a diamond Rolex watch to a dinner at Shake Shack. The PRS S2 series offers a wide variety of “dressed down” models that are still made in the USA to the same high standards of quality that PRS is known for, and they’re sensibly priced so those of us who are still playing for beer money can afford one. The new S2 Singlecut Standard Satin, which has a low-key satin finish, may be the least flashy model in the entire S2 lineup, but it gets attention where it counts—playability and tone.

FEATURES The S2 Singlecut Standard Satin is essentially the same guitar as the S2 Singlecut Standard with the exception of its satin finish, which leaves the woodgrain pores open and provides resonance similar to unfinished wood. It has a two-inch thick body made from a single slab of mahogany with beveled edges along the entire top and a back belly contour for playing comfort. The neck, which is also mahogany, has a 25-inch

CHEAT SHEET

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STREET PRICE $1,049 MANUFACTURER PRS Guitars, prsguitars.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

The satin finish provides the tone and resonance of unfinished wood while still protecting the guitar from the elements.

scale, 22 medium jumbo frets, rosewood fretboard with dot inlays, and the comfortable PRS Pattern Regular profile. Electronics consist of PRS S2 #7 Treble and Bass humbuckers, individual volume and push/pull coil-tap tone controls for each pickup, and a three-way pickup selector toggle, while the nickel-plated hardware includes a PRS Stoptail bridge and PRS S2 locking tuners. PERFORMANCE The PRS S2 Series guitars

are testimony to the power of simplicity, and the Singlecut Standard Satin really drives this point home with its bold, powerful tone that originates with its lively, responsive natural acoustic resonance. When plugged in that tone just gets bigger and better. The bridge pickup produces an aggressive snarl that loves overdrive and distortion, and the neck pickup provides a throaty, sonorous wail. The coil taps produce true singlecoil tones and textures (not wimped-down humbucker tones) that sound big and meaty while also delivering gnarly twang. While the body is quite impressively thick, the contours make the guitar very comfortable to play for extended periods. And when the neck feels as sleek and luxurious as the PRS Pattern Regular profile, trust me, you won’t be putting this baby down for a while.

The PRS S2 #7 Treble and Bass humbuckers deliver powerful, aggressive tone and authentic singlecoil tones when the coil-tap switches are engaged.

THE BOTTOM LINE The PRS S2 Singlecut Standard Satin may look demure or understated compared to other PRS models, but it’s a hard-rocking, blues-busting beast that working class guitarists can afford.


The RV-6 employs the latest tech and legendary BOSS know-how to envelop your tone in lush ambient spaces that endlessly inspire.

BossUS.com


SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

Righteous Bud HENRIKSEN BUD By Chris Gill

E

LECTRIC GUITARISTS HAVE

enjoyed the benefits of small amps that can effectively compete with much bigger amps for nearly a decade now. However, acoustic-electric players or anyone who wants a compact amp with cleaner than clean tone and volume output that’s loud enough for playing gigs have been forgotten for the most part. The Henriksen Bud amp resolves that oversight in a grand fashion. The Bud is a 135-watt, two-channel combo amp with features that put many full-size acoustic guitar amps to shame, yet it comes in a cube-shaped box that measures 9x9x9 (that’s inches, not feet, Nigel) and weighs less than 17 pounds.

FEATURES The small, cube-shaped housing of the Henriksen Bud may look cute, but this is a serious, professional-quality amp. The 135-watt solid-state amplifier drives a 6.5-inch Eminence Beta speaker as well as a fluid-cooled, high-yield neodymium tweeter that can be switched on or off. The cabinet’s deep, cube shape and bottom port produces impressive low-end output. The two channels provide an identical set of controls—input gain, volume, reverb, and an EQ section with 80Hz, 420Hz, 1.6kHz, 3.5kHz, and 7.2kHz knobs—as well as their own 48V phantom powered 1/4-inch/XLR combo input jacks. Channel 1 also features a 1/8-inch auxiliary input jack, and channel 2 has a bright switch. The rear panel offers an male XLR line output, 1/4-inch headphone output, and a 1/4-inch extension speaker output for connecting an 8- or 16-ohm speaker cabinet.

CHEAT SHEET

90

STREET PRICE $999 MANUFACTURER Henriksen Amplifiers, henriksenamplifiers.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

PERFORMANCE The Henriksen Bud is

designed primarily for solo performers who need to amplify a guitar and vocals, but it’s more than loud enough to play in a band or ensemble setting. With the input gain properly dialed in, the Bud’s tone remains clean all they way up to the volume control’s highest setting. The EQ section is fine-tuned to frequencies ideal for most acoustic (steelstring and nylon) and archtop (acoustic and electric) guitars, and it provides a wide range of natural-sounding tones without any weird

A 135-watt solidstate power amp drives a 6.5-inch Eminence Beta speaker and fluidcooled, high-yield neodymium tweeter.

frequency spikes. The bottom-ported cabinet produces tight, full bass frequencies, and the front-mounted 6.5-inch speaker spreads the sound around the room quite effectively. The built-in reverb is digital, providing a relatively conservative room reverb effect that sounds warm and natural. Gigging guitarists will love how the Bud lightens their load, providing the performance of a full-size sound system in a package that requires just one trip from the car (or subway or bus) to the venue.

Two independent input channels provide five-band EQ, reverb, and 48V phantom powered 1/4-inch/XLR combo inputs for amplifying guitars and vocals.

THE BOTTOM LINE This surprisingly compact nine-inch cube-shaped combo amp performs like a full-sized sound system, making it a great choice for solo acoustic guitarists and singe-songwriters who value portability as much as performance.


SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

Sunn Burn

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

ER

FORMANC

E

EARTHQUAKER DEVICES ACAPULCO GOLD By Chris Gill

THE PEDAL MARKET is overcrowded with

an abundance of great overdrive, distortion, and fuzz stomp boxes that for the most part are variations on one theme or another. The Earthquaker Devices Acapulco Gold comes from an entirely different place and is truly unlike any other distortion device out there. Earthquaker describes it as a power amp distortion effect that’s designed to sound like a fully cranked Sunn Model T, and to my ears it sounds a lot like fuzz Jim, but not as we know it. FEATURES Featuring just one, solitary big honking knob that’s the size of a channel changer on a 1965 Philcomatic color TV, the Acapulco Gold pedal is as simple as it gets. Earthquaker didn’t even bother giving the knob’s function a name, probably because it does several different things simultaneously as you turn it up. Similarly, the 1/4-inch input and output jacks aren’t labeled either, but it doesn’t take a genius to figure out which is which. A bright white LED lets you know when the effect is engaged, and the pedal operates with a standard 9VDC power adapter or nine-volt battery. PERFORMANCE The Acapulco Gold is an

unusual device. With the big knob all the way down it produces no sound at all, but as you turn it up the volume gradually increases (unity is around 9 o’clock), a layer of fuzzy distortion emerges, and the tone gets big and warm. At about 12 o’clock the guitar signal begins to compress, but unlike traditional fuzz it never sputters or gets raspy, instead

CHEAT SHEET

92

STREET PRICE $117 MANUFACTURER Earthquaker Devices, earthquakerdevices.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

delivering remarkably smooth, violin-like tone that seems to sustain forever. Turning down the guitar’s volume control cleans up the tone, but that big, luscious character remains even as the distortion is tamed. For many connoisseurs of crunch, this could be the ultimate fuzz.

THE BOTTOM LINE Don’t let the single big knob fool you—a rainbow of dark and dirty fuzz-like tones with massive bass and singing sustain exist within the Acapulco Gold, and dialing in the sounds you want couldn’t be any easier.

Buzz Bin

Truetone 1 Spot Pro CS7 and CS12 For years I’ve been a devoted user of the Truetone (formerly Visual Sound) 1 Spot power supply and their multi-plug cables, which allow me to daisy chain and power the pedals on my pedalboard for hum-free performance. Recently, I’ve added a whole lot more effects, mostly higher voltage digital ones, to my board, and I’m now faced with needing a more robust power supply with isolated outlets that is also dead quiet. After listening to a growing number of players like myself, Truetone has responded with the incredibly versatile 1 Spot Pro CS7 and CS12. The 1 Spot Pro CS7 comes in a power brick-style shape, with all the necessary cables and converter plugs, and features seven fully isolated outputs, with one 18V DC (100mA), four individually switchable 9-12V DC (200mA), and two 9V (500mA). For even more juice and outlets, the CS12 features 12 isolated outputs with two 18V DC (100mA), four individually switchable 9-12V DC (100mA), individually switchable 4-9V DC (100mA), two 9V DC (250mA), two 9V DC (500mA), and a 9V AC (800mA). I won’t bore you with any more specs but I can tell you once you start adding power-hungry pedals like Strymon and Line 6, the CS7 and CS12 work magic at keeping them noise free and powering them and the rest of your pedals efficiently. Both units come with mounting brackets and feature switchable, worldwide input voltage in case you hit the road. —Paul Riario STREET PRICE CS7, $119.95; CS12, $179.95 MANUFACTURER Truetone, truetone.com

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016


FREE YOUR

CREATIVITY

Ditto X4 Looper is the pedal that’ll let you turn a single moment in time into something truly spectacular. By perfectly merging ease of use with stellar creative features like dual loop tracks, 7 loop FX, loop decay and MIDI sync, Ditto X4 Looper will instantly become the canvas on which you paint your multi-layered sonic masterpieces. If you can dream it, you can loop it!


by Tommy Emmanuel

SPANISH THEMES

Thematic development, and the bridge of “T.E. Ranch”

bridge q = 154 1 Am

 

4 1

E+5

let ring throughout

1 2 2 0

1 0 2 2 2 2 0

D(7)/F#

0 3 1 2

3 3

C/G 0 1

1

4 4 0 3

3

Fmaj7/A

3 1 X X X

2 2

5 5 5 7 8

5 5 5 7 8 8 5

5 5 5 7

7

5 5 5

5

D/F#

0

4

3

Am

3 1 2

2 2

F#m7 5 2

5 2

0 2

2

4

E+5

1 2 2 0

2

1 0 1 0 1 2 2 2 2 0 4 4 0 3

Gadd9 5 2

2 2 2 2

4

C/G

5 0 0 0

G7 B¨(#4)

5 3 0 0 0 0

3 3

3 0

3

3

1 0

1 3 3 3 1 0 1

0

Th

8

Am 1 0 3 1 3 3 3 1 1 1 1

12 1 3 0 3

0 1 3 3

3 3

0 3

0

1

Fmaj7/A

0 1

5 5 5 7 8

3 1 0

2

2

D(7)/F#

3 2 2

E+5 0 1

C/G

D(7)/F#

0 1

1

4 4 0 3

3

0

4

3

2

3 1 2

2 2

F#m7

5 5 5 7 8 8 5

5 5 5 7

7

5 5 5

5

2

2

1 2 2 0

E+5

2

5 2 2

5 2 2

5 0

C/G

1 0 1 0 1 2 2 2 2 0 4 4 0 3

Gadd9

5

4 0 2

5

Am

G7 B¨(#4)

5 3 0 0 0

2

2 3

3

0

(play 3 times) 0 0 0

3 0 0 3

1 0 0

1 3 3 3 1 0 1 Th

16

1 0 0 0 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

 

E 0

0

0 1

0

Fsm7 to G(add4) to Bf(s4) and keep the picking articulation crystal clear, so work through these bars slowly at first and gradually build up speed. In bars 7 and 8, I change the picking pattern again, now picking the sixth string on each downbeat, alternating with the higher strings on the eighth-note upbeats. Bars 9–16 are basically a recap of bars 1–8 with slight improvised variations. In bar 17, I introduce a fast picking pattern played in straight 16th notes: after first striking the sixth string with my thumb, I pick the first and second strings with my middle and index fingers, respec-

0

0 2

0 3

0

2

 

Fmaj7#11 G

00 0 0 2 3 3 1

3 0 0 0 2 0



GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

FIG. 11 FIGURE



LAST MONTH, I demonstrated how to play the main theme to my tune “T.E. Ranch,” from my latest release, It’s Never Too Late. This month, I’d like to show you the tune’s bridge section. As I’ve detailed in previous columns, I often rely on what’s commonly known as the “Merle Travis” picking style (“Travis picking,” for short) in the performance of many of my tunes, wherein the bottom three strings are always picked in an “alternating bass” fashion with the thumb, and melodic lines that fall on the higher strings are picked with the index and middle fingers and occasionally the pinkie. Essential to each performance is absolute precision in defining the song’s melodic line rhythmically: some notes fall squarely on the downbeats, in sync with the bass notes, and some fall in the spaces between the bass notes, on the upbeats. I like to play as freely as possible, and oftentimes a bar is a little bit different than its predecessor, so focus on each bar individually. The bridge section features a modulation from A major to A minor, and additionally I switch from the verse’s alternating bass approach to a “pumping” bass-notes attack in order to create more tension and drama in the musical story. In bars 1–4 of FIGURE 1, I spend a significant amount of time picking straight eighth notes on the low E string, specifically in the second half of bars 1, 2 and 3 and on each beat in bar 4. Starting in bar 5 and through bar 6, I switch to a “triplet”-type picking pattern, in that I pick the bottom three strings in succession in straight eighth notes, additionally plucking the top three strings along with the D string. Utilizing a picking pattern based on this kind of repeating three-note contour played in a straight-eighths rhythm is known as a “threes on fours” pattern. It can be tricky to move smoothly from the Fmaj7/A to

94

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

tively, and then pick the third string with my thumb. The top two strings are picked again in a similar manner, and then I introduce a melody on the fourth string that moves from E, the root note, to F, the f9 (flatted ninth), to D, the f7 (flatted seventh) and then back to E. This pattern must be executed very quickly, so to me this is the most challenging part of the tune to master. The 16th-note pattern is played three times and is followed by half-note chord hits on Fmaj7s11 and G, after which we return to the tune’s “head,” or verse section. Hope you have fun with this one!

Australian-born virtuoso fingerstyle guitarist Tommy Emmanuel is world renowned for his brilliant acoustic performances, arrangements and compositions. His latest studio album, It’s Never Too Late, is available through his website, tommyemmanuel.com, and iTunes.

A D A M G A S S O N / G U I TA R I S T MAGAZINE VIA GETTY IMAGES

COLUMNS

EMMANUEL DEXTERITY


To create a reverb as immersive as BigSky required tremendous feats of sound engineering and artistic imagination. BigSky gives you twelve studio-class reverb machines, with simple and powerful controls. Hear the floating particles of the Cloud machine. Defy the laws of physics with the Nonlinear reverbs. Unleash the multi-head reverberations of the Magneto machine. BigSky. Lift your sound into the stratosphere.

strymon.net/bigsky


by Mark Holcomb of Periphery

JAGGED EDGES

Angular rhythms and unusual chord voicings, and more on “Mile Zero” THIS MONTH, I’D like to continue our look at the Periphery song “Mile Zero,” recorded for 2012’s Periphery II: This Time It’s Personal. Last time we looked at the tune’s 16-bar primary riff, and I’d now like to move on into the second half of the verse and pre-chorus riffs. For this song, I’m tuned to drop-D, down a whole step, which is the tuning I use most of the time with Periphery. Low to high, the notes are C G C F A D. I prefer to think of this as a “transposing” tuning, meaning I think of the note and chord names as if the guitar were tuned to regular drop-D at concert pitch, as this facilitates the indication and recognition of chord and note names. For example, if one were to strum the bottom three strings open, the actual chord sounded would be C5 at concert pitch, but I think most players would more readily think of it as D5, thus the term “transposing.” FIGURE 1 illustrates the verse riff, following the initial 16-bar phrase. This figure is another example of my penchant for writing riffs and patterns that are based around a chord progression: I came up the progression first—Fsm7-Dmaj7-Bm7—and then went about formulating an interesting and unexpected way to connect the chords while also incorporating unusual and unexpected rhythmic syncopations. The first chord is actually Fsm7sus4, and I love the way the notes on the D, G and B strings sound when played next to each other like this. The chord tones are the minor third, fourth and flatted seventh, and then there’s the ninth, Gs, sounded on the first string. The fourth and ninth are sometimes referred to harmonically as “tensions,” or “extensions,” and they add a lot of character to a chord voicing. I then use a sliding-sixths lick, sounded on the D and B strings, to set up the Dmaj7 accent that falls squarely on beat four of bar

96

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

Drop-D tuning, down one whole step (low to high, C G C F A D). All notes and chords sound one whole step lower than written.

FIG. 11 FIGURE 1

 4

F#m7sus4



P.M.

4 5 4 7 4 4

Dmaj9

D6

5 7 6 7 0 0

7 4 7 0 0

9 0

7

9

0 0

0 0

Bm7add2 7 10 7 11 9 0 9

7 10 7 11 9 9

7 4 7 0 0

7 10 7 11 9 9

7 10 7 11 9 9

7 10 7 11 9 9

7 10 7 11 9 9 0 0

let ring

P.M.

4 5 4 7 4 4

0

0

FIGURE 2 1

  

0

7 9 X

0 3 6 0 4 0

 0 3 6 0 4 0

1.

4

P.M.

0 3 6 0 4 000

0 3 6 0 4

0 3 6 0 4



0 12 3 10 6 13 0 4 0

 

0 7 4 7 0 0

12 12

2 2

2 2

0 3 6 0 4 00 00 0

0 3 6 0 4 0

0 3 6 0 4 0 0 0 0 0

1. To spice things up, I immediately lower the major seventh two frets, to the sixth, changing the chord to D6, again in order to provide more musical color. The next chord, which falls in bar 4, can be difficult to fret, especially in the manner I prefer: I like to hook my thumb over the top side of the neck to fret both the sixth and

0 7 4 7 0 0

P.M.

0 10 9 11 0 0 0 0 0 0

P.M.

0

0 7 4 7 0 0

 N.H..  0  2 10  2 5 11900 A  222 

F#m7sus4

5 A

2.

0 3 6 0 4 0 0 0

  

let ring

12

0

0 3 6 0 4 00 00 0

0 10 9 11 0 0

9

0 7 4 7 0 0

0 0

Dmaj9

Dmaj7add2 P.M.

7 4 7 0

E5

12

10

13 0

0 0

F#m7sus4

Dadd9#11 7

7 4 7 0



COLUMNS

HOLCOMB-MANIA



4

  

00000

B5 9 9 9

5 4 7 4 4

5

6

0 3 6 0 4 0 00 00

F#5

9 9 9

 9 9 4 9 4

0 3 6 0 4 0

0 3 6 0 4 0 00



F#m7sus4

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

4 5 4 7 4 4

fifth strings at the ninth fret, then use my pinkie on the fourth string, with the index finger barred across the top three strings at the seventh fret, and my ring finger at the B string’s 10th fret. If you find that unorthodox fingering too difficult, you can instead use your middle finger to barre across the bottom two strings at the ninth fret.

Mark Holcomb plays guitar in Periphery, whose latest pair of albums Juggernaut: Alpha and Omega is out now.


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COLUMNS

STRING THEORY

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

By Jimmy Brown

HOWLING AT THE MOON

The conclusion of my wailing, David Gilmour-style “Moonlight Sonata” melody

FIGURE FIG. 1 1 “Moonlight Sonata,” 1st movement, melody, conclusion (from bar 42) Elec. Gtr. (w/heavy dist.)

29

I NOW PRESENT the final part of the mel-

ody from my two-guitar arrangement of the first movement of Ludwig van Beethoven’s famous piano piece, “Moonlight Sonata,” which I play in a wailing, Seventies British hard-rock lead style, inspired chiefly by David Gilmour, as well as Jimmy Page and Brian May. As I mentioned last month, I call this arrangement “Shine On You Crazy Moon: A Study in Feeling and Control” because it features lots of polished string bends and vibratos that require a seasoned musical ear and refined touch to execute well and achieve the desired voice-like quality and pitch accuracy. We pick up at bar 42, where the lead guitar melody re-enters after a 13-bar rest (see FIGURE 1). The first phrase here is identical to the piece’s opening theme that we learned last month, with the “mute, rake, bend-and-shake” stylistic decorations, but it then veers off into new musical territory in bar 46, as Beethoven further develops his melody with some cool new musical twists. As we did last month, lightly rest your frethand index finger across the middle strings as you drag the pick across them in a downstroke sweep, to create a percussive, pitchless grace-note rake into the first bend, which you’ll want to fret with your ring finger, supported by the middle finger one fret lower for added “push power.” Again, as you play through this first phrase and the rest of the figure, focus on precisely nailing each bend’s target pitch, be it a whole step, half step or one and one half steps, and, once the target pitch is firmly established, apply a wide, even finger vibrato, as indicated, repeatedly dipping about a quarter step below it and restoring it to full pitch to produce the desired rhythmic beating. A good amount of distortion and sustain will help you develop a consistently wide and even vibrato technique, as you won’t be in such a hurry to “get your shakes in” before the note decays. The final 10 bars feature some haunting, low half-step bends on the bottom two strings, all of which are performed by pulling the string inward, away from the edge of the fretboard, as Page does in his “Dazed

98

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

C#m



 E 4

4

4

4

D/F#

 13

13

7

7 x x

  10  10 ! x x

10

x

  13 13

F#m

7 !

7



7

E/B

x x

1

7 5

C#

x x

5



10

14

F#m

 13 13 ! 1

13

7

1 T

1

1/2 1/2

F#m F#m/A

1/2



  C#m 

 10 13 13 13 ! x x

10

7

B7

G#7/D# C#m G#7/B#

1 hold bend

 13 13 13 ! C#m

1/2 1/2

C#m

1 hold bend

E

1 hold bend

 10

G#7 1

7 x x

 7 !

B7(no3)

x

50



1/2

46

42

G#7/B#

1 hold bend

14

14

14

C#

  13 13 ! x x

1/2

1/2

13 13

1/2

13

F#m/A F#m C# E Amaj7/C# D#dim7 G#7/B# C#m  F#m  B7/D#       13 13 13 ! 13 12 12 10 10 9 9 9 7 7 7 ! ! x! x x F#m

54

1

1/2

1/2

1

x



x

 7 G7  7

F#m6/A G#sus4 F#m6 C#m/G# G#7 58



1

5 !

1

x

x

7

8

7 !

G#7/B#

  6 !

5

C#m

G#7¨9

3 !

3

C#m

G

3

3 !

1/2

66 3

3

 ! 3

G

3

 3 !

3

 ! 3

and Confused” main riff, as opposed to the pushing technique we used for all the previous bends. There are no vibratos here, as the goal is to precisely nail the target pitch of

G

3

3

G#7¨9

3

3

3 !

1/2

3

3

hold bend

1/2

3 !

3

1/2

3

1/2 hold bend

3

1

hold 1/2 bend

1/2 hold bend

C#m

1/2 hold bend

1

x

3

62

1/2

C#m

1

1

1/2

1

 ! 3

1/2

3

3

3 !

each bend and hold it steady. Again, a generous amount of hall reverb will enrich the sound of this part and create a cool chorusing effect with each bend.

To download Jimmy Brown’s Mastering Arpeggios 3 DVD and others—as individual chapters or the complete disc—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.


COLUMNS

SCHOOL OF ROCK

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

by Joel Hoekstra

OCTAVE TAPPING

“Mirroring” fretboard shapes 12 frets higher with taps

FIG. 1

FIGURE 1G blues scale

 4

AS MOST ROCK guitarists are well aware,

fretboard tapping is a highly useful technique for playing fast, fluid phrases that quickly move across the fretboard. Eddie Van Halen thrust the technique into the limelight with his tapping tour de force, “Eruption,” released in 1978 on Van Halen, and ever since then guitarists have been experimenting with various tapping approaches and devising new and different ways to apply them, often with breathtaking results. One of my favorite twists on the standard one-note tap is to take a fretboard shape for a given note sequence, such as a scale pattern, and “octave mirror” it by “previewing” each note an octave higher. This is done by first tapping with the pick hand exactly 12 frets above the conventionally fretted (or open-string) note, followed by a pull-off to it. In FIGURE 1, the fret hand ascends and descends through one octave of a thirdposition pattern for the G blues scale (G Bf C Db D F), with each conventionally fretted note preceded by a tap and pull-off from 12 frets above, in what looks like the same shape moved up to 15th position. I begin by tapping G on the low E string’s 15th fret with my pick-hand index finger, which I then pull-off in an upward flicking movement to the G note one octave lower, fretted with the index finger at the third fret. The same approach is employed for every note in the scale as it ascends, using the pinkie to tap Bf at the 18th fret, followed by a pull-off to Bf at the sixth fret. I then use my pick hand’s index, middle and ring fingers to tap and pull off notes on the A string and then the index and ring fingers on the D string, after which I move back down the pattern. Now let’s try doing the same thing across all six strings and two octaves, as demonstrated in FIGURE 2. A useful approach here is to tap with the same finger that the opposite hand uses to fret the note one octave lower, so that all four pick hand fingers are employed for tapping at some point. The pattern, however, may alternatively be performed with just a single tapping finger, which would need to continually shift, or any combination of fingers. Try various ap-

100

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016



T T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

FIG. 22 FIGURE



T T



T

T

T

T

T

T

15 3 15 3 17 5 15 316 4 17 5 15 318 6

 

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T 15 3 18 6 15 3 15 3 18 6 18 6 15 3 17 5 18 6 18 6 17 5 15 3 17 5 15 3 17 5 16 4 15 3 13 1 15 3 13 1 15 T T



T T

T T

18 15 6 3

T T

T T

T T



T T T

17 15 5 3

T T T T 18 15 6 3 18 15 6 3

FIG. 55 groups of five FIGURE T T T

FIG. 44 FIGURE

T T

16 15 4 3 17 16 5 4

17 15 5 3 18 17 6 5

T

15 3 17 515 3 15 316 4 17 5 17 5 16 4 15 3 15 318 6 18 615 3

FIG. 33 FIGURE

T

T T T



T T

T T

18 15 6 3

T T

T T

16 15 4 3 17 16 5 4

17 15 5 3

T T T T T T T T 18 15 6 3 18 17 6 5 17 15 5 3 17 15 5 3

T T T

17 !

T T T T T T 15 18 15 6 3 15 18 15 6 3 15 17 15 5 3 17 18 17 6 5 T T T

15 17 15 5 3 15 16 15 4 3 16 17 16 5 4 15 18 15 6 3



T T T



5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T 15 18 15 6 3 17 18 17 6 5 15 17 15 5 3 15 17 15 5 3 16 17 16 5 4 15 16 15 4 3 13 15 13 3 1 13 15 13 3 1 15

!

5

5

FIG. 66 groups of seven FIGURE

T T T

T

T



15 18 15 18 15 6

T

T

T

T

7 T

15 17 15 17 15 5

3 T

5

5 T T T

5

T

T

T T T

15 16 15 16 15 4 T

T

T

7

5

T

3 17 18 17 18 17 6

5

T

5 T

T T T

3 16 17 16 17 16 5 7 T T T T T 15 18 15 18 15 6

4

3

7 7 7 T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T 15 18 15 18 15 6 3 15 18 15 18 15 6 3 17 18 17 18 17 6 5 15 17 15 17 15 5 3

7

7

7

proaches and see what works best for you! FIGURES 3–6 expand on this concept with patterns that have you consecutively tapping two or more notes with the pick hand before pulling off to the fret hand. In FIGURES 3 and 4, two descending tapped notes are followed by pull-offs to the same two notes fretted an octave lower. In

7

5 T

T

15 17 15 17 15 5

3

7 T T T T T 15 18 15 18 15 6

3

  15 17 15 17 15 5 3 ! 17 7 T T T T T

T

7

FIGURE 5, three tapped notes are sounded

before pulling off to two fret-hand notes, forming a quicker quintuplet rhythm. FIGURE 6 simply “doubles up” the approach shown in FIGURES 3 and 4, as the two tapped notes are both repeated before pulling off to the lower notes, resulting in an exciting and even faster septuplet rhythm.

New York City guitarist Joel Hoekstra plays for Whitesnake, the Trans Siberian Orchestra and his new side project, Joel Hoekstra’s 13, who recently released their debut album, Dying to Live.


YOUR SOUND. OUR TECHNOLOGY. at your FINGERTIPS. NO PEDAL BOARD REQUIRED

the

REVPAD™

a WIRELESS, MULTI EFFECTS system IS COMING TO A STAGE NEAR YOU www.gtcsound.com


COLUMNS

ACOUSTIC NATION

For audio of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

by Dale Turner

SLEIGHT OF HAND

FIGURE FIG. 11 E



0 0 1 2 2 0

0 0 1 2 2 0

The unorthodox, percussiveslapping style of singing guitarist Raul Midón

THIS PAST MONTH, cyber-savvy guitar-

FIGURE FIG. 22

Am7

0 0 2 3 3 0

0 0 2 3 3 0

0 0 2 3 3 0

0 0 2 3 3 0

0 0 2 3 3 0

X X X X X

 5

Palm slap

0 0 2 3 3 0

0 0 2 3 3 0

0 0 4 5 5 0

Fmaj7(#11)/E E 0 0 4 5 5 0

5 5 5

X X X X X

X X X X X

G7 *

** 7

X X X 7 X X

X X X X X

5 5 5 7 5

0 0 2 3 3 0

0 0 2 3 3 0

X X X X X

3 4 3 5 3

X X X X X

0 0 0 1 2 2 0

Dm7

3

Palm slap

3 4 3

X X X X X

*

6 5 7 5

X X X X

5

Palm slap

6 5 7

 

X X X X

*Strum a downstroke with index, middle and ring fingers. **Hammer-on “from nowhere” with fret-hand ring finger.

Em7

let ring *

**

7

 7 8 7 9

 

  

Bm7

let ring

Palm slap 7 7 7 7

7

0 0 0 0

9

Palm slap N.H. 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 9 7

Palm slap 7 7 8 7 7 9 7

FIG. 44 FIGURE

  

7

 

*Hammer-on “from nowhere” with fret-hand index finger. **Strum w/fingers

FIG. 55 FIGURE

Bm7

Palm slap

0

Palm let ring slap

     7

muted strings, akin to Midón’s “Invisible Chains” (from 2010’s Synthesis). To get a grip on this groove, it’s essential that you perfect bar 1’s “Am7” quarternote rhythm. Repeat numerous times until you’ve coordinated palm slaps on beats one (Am7), two and four (muted notes), with a finger strum of Am7’s top notes on beat three. (This same groove is used for G7 and Dm7 in bars 3 and 4.) The most complicated move lies in bar 2, where the strings are slapped in steady quarter notes while the fret-hand ring finger quickly hammers, “from nowhere”—the note is sounded by the impact of a fretting finger slamming the string into the fret—onto the fourth string on the “and” of beats one and two. The remainder of this lesson is reserved for the “mother load” of Midón’s repertoire,

7 8 7 7 9 7

7 8 7 9

Bm7

Palm slap 7 0 7 0 7 9 0 7 7 0 7

7 7 7 9 7

 

N.H. 7 7 7 7

 

3

Em7

5 5 5 5

FIGURE 6

3

0 0 0 7 0 5

 N.H.

Em7



let ring Palm slap N.H. 7 7 0 7 0 7 0 9 0 7

Am7

0 0 1 2 2 0

  

FIG. 33 FIGURE

0 0 1 2 2 0

G6/E

*Aggressively “pat” guitar strings with pick hand’s extended index, middle and ring fingers.

Palm slap *

0 0 1 2 2 0

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

0 0 1 2 2 0

102

0 0 1 2 2 0

ists rejoiced in yet another exciting guitar video gone viral, this one featuring blind acoustic picker Raul Midón ripping though John Coltrane’s “Giant Steps” (in all 12 keys!), playing chords beneath his trademark “mouth trumpet” one moment, and the next dropping the jaws of jazz connoisseurs with his unaccompanied single-note lines, unleashed on his Traugott Model BK ax. Not your first visit to Raul Midón’s world? Perhaps it was this one-man band’s mind-blowing network television debut, on The Late Show with David Letterman in 2005, where his signature song, “State of Mind,” an infectious mix of percussive slaps, harmonics and quasi flamenco techniques, supporting unique vocal improvisations, brought the audience to their feet, including members of the Letterman band. Midón, whose career began as a background singer for Shakira, Julio Iglesias and Jose Feliciano before his guitar talents became known, has since collaborated with legends Stevie Wonder, Herbie Hancock, Dianne Reeves and (on 2014’s Don’t Hesitate) Bill Withers. Let’s examine this eclectic fingerstylist’s signature techniques, which Midón serves up in songs that seamlessly meld flamenco, R&B, soul, jazz, blues, classical, folk and pop influences. Midón first picked up a guitar at age six and grew up in a household where modern “classical” music was heard just as often as flamenco and Argentine folk. One key ingredient in Midón’s percussive guitar style points directly to these roots, a palm slap approach derived from flamenco techniques and Argentinian rhythms, where the open hand is used to rhythmically “pat” the guitar strings over the sound hole. FIGURE 1 shows a basic example, the same “open E” voicing moved up the neck to create other sounds; Midón uses this approach almost exclusively in “Tembererana” (2007’s World Within a World). Meanwhile, FIGURE 2 adds more ingredients to the palm-slap mix—pick-hand strums intermingled with

Fmaj7(#11)/E

*Palm slap

7

the main passage in his signature song, “State of Mind.” FIGURE 3 simplifies the Em7 portion of the tune’s groove into steady quarter notes, making it easier to focus on the tricky mechanics involved: an index-finger hammer-on (again, “from nowhere”) on the fifth string (on beat one), a palm-slapped seventh-fret barre (beat two), followed by hammer-ons to Em7 (beat three) and a finger strum of the chord’s top notes (beat four). FIGURE 4 presents similar technique combinations for Bm7, albeit with more palm slaps and a natural-harmonics strum for punctuation. FIGURE 5 features some triplet hammer-ons similar to what Midón sprinkles throughout the track. These examples are combined in FIGURE 6 and supercharged with a rhythm similar to that of Midón’s actual performance.

To download Dale Turner’s Secrets of the Great Acoustic Songwriters DVD—as individual chapters or the complete disc—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


INTRODUCING THE NEWEST MEMBER OF THE KYSER速 QUICK-CHANGE速 FAMILY

ROSEWOOD Guaranteed for life. www.kysermusical.com

KYSER速 MUSICAL PRODUCTS

MADE IN USA


COLUMNS

by Andy Aledort

WORLD VIEW

How to solo on the Grateful Dead’s classic jam song, “Eyes of the World” LAST MONTH, WE explored a few dif-

ferent approaches to rhythm guitar jamming and soloing on the classic Grateful Dead song “Eyes of the World.” The song is played in the key of E major and begins with an extended one-chord vamp and groove on an Emaj7 chord, over which guitarist Jerry Garcia adds solo improvisations based on the E major scale (E Fs Gs A B Cs Ds). Later in the tune, during the guitar solo section, this one-chord vamp is broadened to a two-chord vamp—Emaj7 to Bm—and then for the song’s outro, the band adds a third chord and plays Emaj7Bm-A for Garcia to solo over. In all three instances, the guitarist demonstrates incredible inventiveness and a clear sense of melody, relying heavily on the E major scale to play over Emaj7. We’re confining our focus here to soloing over the Emaj7 vamp, and last month we left off by combining two positions and patterns of the E major scale: the first, or “open,” position and second position. This month, we’ll venture further up the fretboard and explore the E major scale patterns in fifth, seventh and ninth positions. For all three of these patterns, I mostly use a three-notes-per-string fingering approach, except on the G string, for which only two notes are fretted. Some of the fingerings span four frets, so some stretching and reaching is required, but nothing too crazy or arduous. FIGURE 1 illustrates the E major scale played in fifth position, descending and ascending. I begin on a high Cs note, fretted with the pinkie, and then descend to B and A, fretted with the middle and index fingers. As I move across to each lower string, I try to maintain the pinkie-middle-index fingering as much as possible. Use alternate (down-up) picking throughout, striving for clear articulation of each note. FIGURE 2 shows the E major scale played in seventh position, starting on a high Ds note at the 11th fret, fretted with the pinkie. Descend through two and a half octaves down to the low B note on the sixth string’s seventh fret, then ascend back to the high Ds, striving to keep your fret hand relaxed throughout (minimal tension). FIGURE 3

104

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Mar2016

IN DEEP

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

FIGURE FIG. 11 E major scale, fifth position



9 7 5

8 6

9 7 6

9 7 6

9 7

5 7 9

6 7 9

6 7

9

5 7 9

6 8

5 7

9

  !

E major scale, seventh position

FIGURE FIG. 22



9 7 5

11 9 7

10 9 7

98

11 9 7

11 9 7

7 7 911 !

11 9

7

7 911

911

7

89

910

7 9 11

FIGURE FIG. 33 E major scale, ninth position



13

6

12 11 9

9 11

7 9

12 10 9

9 10 12



11

9

12

9

11 9

7 12 11

11

11 11 9



11

12

3

9

13 11 9

12 11 9

12 11

FIGURE FIG. 44

!

9 11

6 7 9 11 9

12 12 12

11

11 9

 11

11

8 9 8

11 12 11

11 9 7 9 11

9

9 11

8

11 9 7 6

9

6 7 6

11

11

12

9

12

7 7

11

9

7

8

9 11

12 9

 11

8 9 11

11

9

8 11

3

19 8

11 9 7

3

illustrates the E major scale played in ninth position, starting on the high E root note on the high E string’s 12th fret. Play this pattern descending and ascending, and be sure to memorize all three scale positions/patterns. Now let’s focus on combining these scale positions while soloing. FIGURE 4 presents an 11-bar improvised solo over the Emaj7 vamp, starting in ninth position but immediately shifting down to seventh and then fifth-

9

9

6 9 7

9

9 10 10 12 12

9 10 9

11



9 7 7

4

G4

6

9 7 6 9 7 3

7 0 3

9

11 9

0 0

0 0 0

11 9

9

1

12

11

9 11

Emaj7

  9 11 9 

9 11 12

9 11 12

11

 9

7

7

 ! 0

0

sixth position by beat two of bar 1. On beat two of bar 2, I shift positions again, by sliding my pinkie up the D string from the ninth fret to the 11th, and then remain in ninth position throughout bars 3–7. Bars 7–10 shift the rhythm of the lines from straight 16th notes to more syncopated melodies while also moving more quickly between the various scale positions. Try experimenting with these approaches in your own solo improvisations.

To download instructional guitar DVDs by Andy Aledort— as individual chapters or complete discs—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


TRANSCRIPTIONS

INTERSTATE LOVE SONG Stone Temple Pilots

As heard on PURPLE Words and Music by SCOTT WEILAND, DEAN DeLEO, ROBERT DeLEO and ERIC KRETZ • Transcribed by PATRICK MABRY C m7 E Asus2 G sus4 G A F m/E E C 5 G /B C /B A m7 5 C m 4 fr

4 fr

C m7

13121

E

231

4 fr

13121

A Intro

Asus2 23

231

4 fr

G sus4 144411

23

5 fr

G

134211

4 fr

144411

A

134211

4 fr

134211

341

41

341

41

C 5

14

4 fr

3 fr

G /B

1432

4 fr

14

4

2413

1213

2413

1213

C m

13421

4 fr

13421

4

4

6

4

(6)

4

4

6

4

(slight vib.) 6 6

6

6

2

4

2

(2)

4

2

4

2

(2)

4

let ring

4

4

4 4 4

4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5

0 (0)

T A B T A B

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

T A B Bass

4

*repeat 4 4 previous chord

(4)

T A B

4

4

(4)

4

4 4

1

let ring

4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5

* *distorted gtr. w/volume knob rolled back 4 4 5 5 Gtr. 3 (acous.) 4 4 6 6 * 4 4 5 5 4 4 6 6 4 4 *repeat previous chord Bass

G sus4

Asus2

(slight vib.)

(6)

Gtr. 3 (acous.)

0

0

(0)

0

0

(0)

0 (0) 1

0 0 1 (1) 1

0

0 0 1 (1) 1

0 0 0

2 2 0

2 2 0

2 2 0

4 6

7

7

(7)

4 6

7

7

(7)

7 7

7 7

6 6

2 0

0 0 0

0 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 2 2 0

2 2 0

G

0

G sus4

G

4 6

(6)

4 6

(6)

4 4 6 4 4 6 4 4 6 6 6 4 4 6 6 6 4 4 4

5

(5)

5

(5)

4 4 5 6 4 4 5 6

4 4 5 6 4 4 5 6

4 4 5 6 6 4 4 5 6 6 4

4 4 5 6 6 4 4 5 6 6 4

3 6 3 6

6 (6) 6 6 (6) 6

4

4

4

6 6

6 6 6 6

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

4

6 6

A 5 5

0 0

0 (0) 2 0 (0) 2

0 0

0 0 0 0 X 2 (2) 2 2 X X 0 0 0 0 X 2 (2) 2 2 X X

0

0

0 0 0

2 2 0

2 2 0

0 0 0

2 2 0

2 2 0

5

5

(5)

0 5

5

5

(5)

0 5

7 7

A

0 2

0 0 2 2 0 0 2 2 0

7 7

E (slight vib.)

4

3 fr

A m7 5

Asus2

E

5 5 5 5 5 5 T Gtr. 1 (*clean 4 elec.)4 A 4 4 4 4 4 4 B 5 5 5 5 5 5 T 4 4 A B *distorted gtr. w/volume knob rolled back

4

4 fr

C /B

1432

E

T A 1 B T 4 6 A B Gtr. 1 (*clean elec.)

106

4 fr

E

(0:00)

(slight vib.) Gtr. 2 (elec. w/light dist. and slap-back echo) 1 w/slide vib.) 4 (slight 6

4

5 fr

134211

Moderately = 80 A IntroC(0:00) m7 Gtr.Moderately 2 (elec. w/light dist.=and 80 slap-back echo) w/slide C m7

4

4 fr

F m/E

4 4

grad. slide

(Gtr. 2 out) (Gtr. 2 out)

E (slight vib.) 6

(6)

6 grad. slide

6

(6)

6

5 5 6

0 0 0 0

5 5 6

0 0 0 0

5 5 6 7 7 5 5 6 7 7 5

0 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 2 2 0

(vol. swell) (vol. swell)

(Gtr. 3 out)

X X X X X X X X

7 7 5

7 7 5

7 7 5

7 7 5

4

5

5

(5)

0 5

4

5

5

(5)

4 7 AND MUSIC BY 0 WORDS 5 0SCOTT WEILAND, DEAN DELEO, ROBERT DELEO AND ERIC KRETZ

4 7

(Gtr. 3 out)

0

COPYRIGHT © 1994 MILKSONGS AND TRIPLE KAUF NOPLATE MUZAK ALL RIGHTS ADMINISTERED BY UNIVERSAL MUSIC CORP. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED USED BY PERMISSION REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF HAL LEONARD CORPORATION


“ INTERSTATE LOVE SONG” B B

(0:17, 1:48) (0:17, N.C.1:48)

*Gtr. 1N.C. (w/dist.) ½ 7*Gtr. 1 (w/dist.) 0 ½ 0 2 2 (2) (2) 7 0 0 2 2 (2) (2)

E E

let ring

0 0 0 0

0 let ring0 0 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 1 2

0 0 0 0

0

0 0 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 2 0

0

2 4

0

2 4

0

*doubled

F m/E E F m/E E let ring

let ring let ring0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 2 2 2 2 0 0

2 2 0 2 2 0

1 2 2 1 0 2 2 0

0 0

1 2 2 1 0 2 2 0

1 2 2 1 0 2 2 0

0 0 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 2 0

0 0 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 2 0

X X X 0 X X 0

2 4 4 2 0 4 4 0

0 X X 0 X 0 X X 0

2 4 4 2 0 4 4 0

let 0 ring0 0 0 4 4 0 0 6 6 0 0 X 4 4 0 0 6 6 X 0 0

0 0 4 0 6 0 4 6

0

0 0 4 0 6 0 4 6

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0

Bass *doubled Bass 4

5

4 (4)

4

5

4 (4)

C Verses C1. Verses Waitin’

2. 1. 3. 2. 3. 10 10

7

(7) 5

0 4 5 7

7

(7) 5

0 4 5 7

(0:34, 0:53, 2:04)

on like on is like is 4 6 4 6 4

5 4 6 5 4 6 4

4

4

4

4

4

4

6 4 6 4

6 4 6 4

4 4

X X X X

X X X X

6 4 6 4

4 4

(0) 4

5

6 7

0

4 (4) 7

0

(0) 4

5

6 7

0

4 (4) 7

4 4 4 4

4 4

1

1

1

1

1

X X X X

2 1 2 1

2 2

0 0 X 0 X 0 X 0 X X 0

0 0 X 0 X 0 X 0 X X 0

0

4

7

0

4

7

0 0 4 0 6 0 X 4 0 6 X 0

4

3

3

3

3

4

3

3

3

3

7

(7)

7

(7)

7 7

7

7 6

7

7 6

7 7

4 6 4 6 0

0

0

7

(7)

7

(7)

0 0 4 0 6 0 X 4 0 6 X 0

0

4 (4)

7

7 7

0

4 (4)

7

let ring 0 0 0 0 4 4 0 0 6 6 0 0 X 4 4 0 0 6 6 X 0 0

7

(7)

7

(7)

4 4

2

1

0

2

1

0

7

7 6

7

7 6

½

0 2 0 2

7 7

0

0 0 4 0 6 0 X 4 0 6 X 0

7

7 6

7

7 6

0

7 7

4 4 3

2

2

2

2

4 4 3

2

2

2

2

X X X X

0 2 0 2

(2) (2) (2) (2)

4

5

4 (4)

4

5

4 (4)

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

F m/E E F m/E E

0 0 X 0 X 0 X 0 X X 0

0 0 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 2 0

0 0 2 0 4 0 4 2 0 4 4 0

0 0 2 0 4 0 4 2 0 4 4 0

0

2

4

0

2

4

X X X X

3 2 3 2

1 3 2 2 1 3 2

0 0 0 0

2 2

2 2 2 2

2 2

2 2

let ring

0 0 4 0 6 0 X 4 0 6 X 0 2 2

let ring 0 0 4 0 6 0 X 4 0 6 X 0

0 0 4 0 6 0 4 0 6

0

0

0

0

(0) 4

0

(0) 4

E E

let ring

0 let ring0 0 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 1 2

7

(7) 5

0 4 5 7

7

(7) 5

0 4 5 7

7 7

0 0 4 0 6 0 X 4 0 6 X 0

0 0 0 0 0

5

6

7

5

6

7

0 0 4 0 6 0 X 4 0 6 X 0

0 0 0 0 0

let ring

0

0 0 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 2 0

0

2 4

0

2 4

0

2 0 2 0 2 2

let 0 ring0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 2 2 2 2 0 0

0 0 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 2 0

0 0

0

(0) 4

5

6 7

0

(0) 4

5

6 7

(1:20, 2:28) (1:20, 2:28)

let ring throughout 6 6 6 6 4 4 4 6 6 6 6 4 4 4

7

P.M.2

1 3 2 1 3 2

E E

C m Leavin’ C m throughout let ring

7

between the lines or does itthe lines cry between and cry or all does that’s it dead and all that’s dead

P.M.

1 3 2 1 3 2

Asus2 Asus2

2

0 0 4 0 6 0 X 4 0 6 X 0

read laugh read said laugh said

3rd time, skip ahead to E

2

F m/E E F m/E E let ring 0 0 2 0 4 0 4 2 0 4 4 0

6 3 6 3

I Iyou I’ve you I’ve

3rd time, skip ahead to E

D Chorus DLeavin’ Chorus

0 0 2 0 4 0 4 2 0 4 4 0

X X X X

N.C. N.C.½ 0 0 4 0 6 0 4 0 6

what do what all do C /B all C /B

0 0 0 0

3

1 2 1 2 1

F m/E E F m/E E 0 0 2 0 4 0 4 2 0 4 4 0

X X X X

5 6 4 3 5 6 3

6 3 6 3

0 0 2 0 2 0 0 2 2 0

1

X X X X

for So for with So with

shame do shame do P.M.

P.M. 2

1

0 X X 0 X 0 X X 0

0

afternoon rusted afternoon thing rustedto thing to

P.M.

1

1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 2 0

2

6 3 6 3

3

1 2 1 2 1

19 0 19 0

2

P.M.4

1 2 1 2 1

0 0 X 0 X 0 X 0 X X 0

Sunday hand Sundayin hardest hand in G /B hardest G /B

Your lies Reply Your lies You Replylied You lied

for you A m7 for 5 you 13 A m7 5 2 13 2

E E

a aa the a the

P.M. P.M.

1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 2 0

7

(0:34, 0:53, 2:04)

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16 0 16 0

7

6 6 4 6 6 4

on a on a 4 5 6 4 6 5 6 6

southern E southern E

4 5 6 4 6 5 6 6

4

4

4

4 (4) 4

(4)

4

4

4

4 (4) 4

(4)

4 4

train train

1 2 2 1 0 2 2 0

0 0 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 2 0

only only 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 0 0

2 0 2 0

2 0 2 0

1 2 2 1 0 2 2 0

4 6

7

7

7

7 (7) 7

4 6

7

7

7

7 (7) 7

7 7

7 7

6 6

7 7

guitarworld.com

107


TRANSCRIPTIONS

22

yesterday Asus2

you

0 2 2 0

5

0 0 2 2 0

0 2 2 0

0 2 2 0

5

5

seemed E

25

“ INTERSTATE LOVE SONG”

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0

5 (5) 5

to

0 5 5

7

lied G sus4

G

6 6 6 4

4 4 5 6 6 4

4

4

be

Promises A 4 4 5 6 6 4

6 (6) 6

3 6

4

only

7

7

7

(7)

7

by 27

All

G sus4

G

6 6 6 4

4 4 5 6 6 4

4

4

E

4

6

4 4 5 6 6 4

6 6

4 4 5 6 6 7 4 5

6

4

0 0 1 2 2 0

0 0 X X X 0

0 0 2 4 4 0

0 0 2 4 4 0

4 (4)

0 0 4 6 X 0

7

4

108

5

4

5

5

5

5 (5) 5

these

7 5

7 5

5 5 6 7 7 5

5

5

5

7 5

7 5

5

5

5

5

(1.) things you (2.) things I

5 (5) 5

0 5

4

6 6 4

(5)

5

0

4 7

5

7

5

1st time, go back to B 2nd time, skip ahead to F Outro

said to me said to you E

0 0

let ring

0 0 4 6 X 0

0 0 4 6

0 0 4 6 X 0 0

0

7 (7)

7

E 0 0 1 2 2 0

0 2 2 0

7 7 6

7

0

F m/E E 0 0 X X X 0

0

0 0 1 2 2 0

0

0 0 2 4 4 0

0 0 2 4 4 0

2

4

0 0 4 6 X 0

2

E

F m/E

E

let ring

0 0 4 6 X 0

0 0 4 6 0

0

0 0 4 6 X 0

0 (0) 4 5

0 0 0 0 4 0 0 6 0 0 X 0

0 0 1 2 2 0

6

0

7

E

0 0 X X X 0

0 0 2 4 4 0

0 0 X X X 0

4

0 0 X X X 0

7

0 0 4 6 X 0

0 0 4 6

7 (7)

F m/E E

(2) (2)

4 (4)

0 0

7

0 0 0 2

(7) 5

0 1 2

0

0 4 5 7

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

0

0 0 1 2 2 0

0

2 4

0

7

0 0 1 2 2 2 2 0 0

2

0

0 0 1 2 2 0

(0) 4

0 0 1 2 2 0

0

5

1 2 2 0

6 7

0

X X X 0

0 0 2 4 4 0

4

0 0 2 4 4 0

0 0 4 6 X 0

7

0 0 4 6 X 0

0 0 4 6

7

7

0

0

0 0 4 6 X 0

7

7

4 6

0

let ring

let ring 0 2

0 5 7

go

(2:56)

½

0 2

7

of

Goodbye Asus2

N.C. 34

7 5

go back to D Chorus

F m/E E

0

F Outro

6 4

6 (6) 6

3 6

4 4 5 6 6 4

6

5 5 6 7 7 5

A 4 4 5 6 6 4

6 6

7 5

(2:17)

E 30

6

7

7

6

7 5

5 5 6 7 7 5

what I

watched the time A

0 0 1 2 2 0

7

4

of

7

6

7


TRANSCRIPTIONS

THE DARK ETERNAL NIGHT Dream Theater

As heard on SYSTEMATIC CHAOS Words and Music by JOHN PETRUCCI, MIKE PORTNOY, JOHN MYUNG, KEVIN LABRIE and JORDAN RUDESS • Transcribed by JORDAN BAKER, RYAN MAZIARZ and JEFF PERRIN

Guitars 1 and 2 are 7-string guitars in standard tuning, w/low B string. 3 and - 6 are 6-string guitars in standard tuning. Guitars 1 2 are 7-string guitars in standard tuning, w/low B string. Bass is a35-string in standard tuning. Guitars - 6 are 6-string guitars in standard tuning. Bass is a 5-string in standard tuning. A Intro (0:00) Intro (0:00) q = 106 A Moderately Moderately N.C. q = 106 Gtrs. 1 and 2N.C. (elec. w/dist.) P.M. 1Gtrs. 1 and 2 (elec. w/dist.)light P.M. P.M. light P.M. 1

      

 

7 6 0 7 6 0

4 5 4 0 0 6 7 4 5 7 4 6 0 0 0 6 7 7 6 0

 

7 6 0 7 6 0

5-string bass (w/light dist.) 5-string bass (w/light dist.) (enters on repeat) (enters on repeat)

   

 

7 6 0 7 6 0

1. 1.

4 4

 

4 3 0 4 3 0

  7

 

  9 9

   

110

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(0:28) (0:28) P.M. on

11

6 6

3 3

9

9 0 10 9

4 4

5 5

0 0

P.M. on P.M. on

0 0 6 7 9 10 9 7 6 0 0 0 6 7 9 10 9 7 6 0

P.M. P.M.

  P.M. on     11 9 0 10

B B 7

 

 

4 4

0 0

0 0

    11  11  10  11  10   0 11 10 10 

0 0 0

3 3

0 0 0 0

P P 13 12 13 12

3 3

9 9

4 4

7 7

2 2

0 0

0 0

9 9

7 7

4 4

2 2

4 3 0 4 3 0

4 3 0 4 3 0

0 0

0 0

7 7

7 7

4 4 4 4 5 0 3 4 3 4 3 0 3 4 3 4 3 0 6 5 6 0 3 3 3 0 3 3 3 0 6 6

Bass Fig. 1 Bass Fig. 6 1 6

6 6 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 8 8 7 5 6 5 6 5 7 5 6 5 6 5 7 8 7 8 7 7 7

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

7 6 0 7 6 0

2. 2.

 13   13 12  12  

 

6 6

6 6

   

5 5

P.M. P.M.

6 5 0 0 0 0 6 5 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

*P 8 *P 7 8 7

4 0 4 2 0 0 2 0

7 6 0 7 6 0

7 6 0 7 6 0

 3.        3  3 3.

7 5 0 0 7 6 0 0 5 0 0 6 0 0

7 5 0 0 7 6 0 0 5 0 0 6 0 0

  11

    3  3

9 9

3 3

4 4 4 4 7 0 3 4 3 4 3 0 3 4 3 4 3 0 6 7 6 0 3 3 3 0 3 3 3 0 6 6

   

   

 

 

0 0

0 0

5 5

4 4

0 0

4 4

2 2

0 0

0 0

3 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 2

4 4

7 7

P.M. P.M.

3 3

4 4

6 6

0 0

4 3 0 4 3 0

 

0 0 3 4 6 7 4 6 3 0 0 0 3 4 6 7 4 6 3 0

11 12 10 11 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 10 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

7 7

 

0 10 9 0 10 9

 

4 3 0 4 3 0

 

1 2 1 0 0 3 4 1 2 4 1 3 0 0 0 3 4 4 3 0

P.M. P.M.

9 9

5 5

11 9 9

 

* “Pop” strings w/fingers. * “Pop” strings w/fingers.

P.M. P.M.

0 0

4 0 4 2 0 0 2 0

 

6 6 6 6 9 5 5 5 5 5 5 8 8 7 5 6 5 6 5 7 5 6 5 6 5 7 8 9 8 7 7 7

0 0

0 0

P P 13 12 13 12

3 3

7 7

7 7

6 6

6 6

P.M. on P.M. on

5 5

5 5

 

 

0 0

0 0

P P 14 13 14 13

 

4 4

4 4

3 3

3 3

 12    12 11  11  14   14 13   13   

2 2

2 2

0 0

0 0

   

1 2 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 3 4 3 0 3 4 4 3 4 3 0

Bass Fig. 2 Bass Fig. 2 1 2 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 3 4 3 0 3 4 4 3 4 3 0

WORDS AND MUSIC BY JOHN PETRUCCI, MIKE PORTNOY, JOHN MYUNG, KEVIN LABRIE AND JORDAN RUDESS COPYRIGHT © 2007 WB MUSIC CORP., YTSE JAMS, INC., WARNER-TAMERLANE PUBLISHING CORP. AND KEY WIZ MUSIC ALL RIGHTS FOR YTSE JAMS, INC. ADMINISTERED BY WB MUSIC CORP. ALL RIGHTS FOR KEY WIZ MUSIC ADMINISTERED BY WARNER-TAMERLANE PUBLISHING CORP. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED USED BY PERMISSION REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF HAL LEONARD CORPORATION


“THE DARK ETERNAL NIGHT”

P.M. on

12

3

1.

1

4

2

4

1

3

4

3

0

6

4

7

5

7

4

6

7

6

0

6

4

7

5

4

7

6

7

6

 

0

end Bass Fig. 2 3

4

2.

15

P.M. on

6

6

1

2

4

1

3

4

3

0

6

4

7

5

7

4

6

7

7

4

5

4

5

7

7

4

4

6

6

7

7

6

0

6

0

6

6

7

7

4

5

4

5

7

7

4

4

6

7

6

7

6

6

7

6

C

(0:58)

0

 

0

3

0



0

3

B5

6

 

6

 

18

0 3

0 3

D

4

4

3

3

4

4

4

4

3

4

3

3 0 6

3 0 6

speak of the terrible out of the blackness

F#5 F5 B5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 21 4 3 2 1 2 0

Bass



3 0 3

4

7

7

 

0

4

7 6 0

N.C.

P.M.

0 0 0 3 0 0

F#5 F5 B5

0 0 0 3 0 0

4

4

3 2 3

3 2 3

4 3 2 1 2 0

4

 

Gtr. 1





4 3 2 1 2 0

7 6 0

0

3

3

0

3

0 0

0 3 0 0

3

4

3

7

7

6 5 6

6 5 6

4

4

7

6

0

3

0

6

3

0

6

No

5

5

6

6

one

0 0 0 3 0 0





6



P.M.

4

3 2 0

1.

forged in the void of

warnings

F#5 F5 B5

0 3 0 0

4

N.C.

4

7

3

P.M.

0 0

4

3

N.C.

4

3

ancient the hideous the last of the prophets

danger chaos

7

5

F#5 F5 B5

(Drum fill)

2 0

6

1st Verse (1:12) dared to risen up

 

3 0 3

0

4

4

4

2 3 0

3 0

N.C.

P.M.

0 0 0 3 0 0

0 0 0 3 0 0

4

4

3 2 3

3 2 3

guitarworld.com

111


TRANSCRIPTIONS 2.

night F#5 F5 B5 24

He P.M.

P.M.

7

0 0

7 6 0

7

0 0

5

6 0 0

4

a sickening

2 3 0

0 0 0 3 0 0

sight F#5 F5 B5

monstrous

4

4 3 2 1 2 0

3 2 3

N.C. P.M.

0 0 0 0

4

3 0

0 0 0 3 0 0

4

3 2 3

7 6 0

3

0 0 0 0

0 0

stifling endless

the

Climbing

(2.) Restless

crowds on

Shadowed

 



1.

P.M. on

11

6

9

0 10 9

4

5

0

0

7

4

4

(1.) moon (I

9

0

2

0

draw a

0

burned

 

2.

slight P.M. on

0

0

2

2

 

112

4

4

2

4

2

2

2

0

0

0 2

0 2

4

4

2

2

4

4

4

2

2

2

3

3

 13  12

3

0

0

a

2

2

3

3

2

2

heat stairs

underneath leading

the to

near screen

nameless yellow

hooded evil

forms faces

appear

9

7

4

7

7

6

5

0

6

5

0

 11 

2 0 2

2 0 2

3

3

2

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

3

3

2

2

0 10 9

4

0

5

4

to

ruins

grotesque

4

4

2

2

0

0

3

3

 

0

2

0

2

his

monuments

2

6

9

thirst

explore

to

(Vacant

slight P.M. on

7

fallen

(1.) room (Eager (2.) leer

31

4

9

with

(2.) (Amidst

29

 11  10

Pre-chorus (1:30, 2:32)

(1.) Through

27

P

13 12

3

E

11 10

0 0

3

  3

5

6 0 0

sinister B5

    3

N.C.

4 3 2 1 2 0

is

4

4

0

4

4

2 0 3

2 0 3



0 2

0 2

4

4

7

4

seek

2

2

4

4

2

2

0

0

2

2

most

2

2

4

4

of

2 0 2

2 0 2

3

3

0

2

0

corpses



pale the

2

2

0

9

7

4

2

0

7

0

6

5

0

6

5

0

things not

yet

creatures

battle)

3

3

green

choking

2

3

2

3

2

2

4

4

4

2

2

0

0

3

3

4

4

mysteries)

dead worlds

left

3

2

2

4

4

2 0 2

2 0 2

2

0

3

2

0



seen)

shocking

3

3



3

3

3

3

2

2

0

 

0

 

behind)

2

2

3

3

2

2

4

4

2 0 3

2 0 3

 


“THE DARK ETERNAL NIGHT”

F

Chorus (1:51, 2:52, 6:54) Drifting

beyond A(11)

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/dist. and chorus effect) Rhy. Fig. 1 let ring throughout 33

  44 

7

7

6

time Esus2

all

Bm

6 4

2

2

2 2

4

Out

of a

churning A(11)

Bm

4

2

4 4



7

7

6

6 4

2

sky G5

0

2

2 2

0 0

Gtrs. 1 and 2 let ring throughout

  2 0

2 2

5

5

4

4

2

5

0

4 4

4

2 0

2 0



2 2

5

5

4

4

2

5

Bass



0 0

0 0 0 0

0



 2 0

7 7 6 6 4

2 2

5 5 4 4

5 7

0

Drawn to the

4 4

 2

5 !

0

0 !

beckoning light of a Esus2 A(11) 2

2 2

4 4 5

2 4

0

2 0

2

4

4

0 0

0 3

6 6

 2

4 4

4

2

0

3

0

0

5 7

0

5

0 0 0 0 0

7 7

0

2nd Verse (2:11) forces F#5 F5 B5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 42 4 3 2 1 2 0

Bass

7 6 0

5 7

0

5 !

0 !

raged in the vortex

N.C.

night A/C# B5 end Rhy. Fig. 1

A5/E

2 2

0

2

0 0 3

5

2 2

2

 4

0 0 5

2

0 0 0 3 0 0

4

4

3 2 3

3 2 3

4 3 2 1 2 0

7 6 0

swallowing

N.C.

P.M.

0 0 0 3 0 0

B5

0 0 0 3 0 0

7

7

6 5 6

6 5 6

4

4

2 3 0

3 0

Black

4

0

2

0

2 2

0 0

5 555 5 5552 222 2 222

waves of destruction

fighting

P.M.

0 0 0 3 0 0

7 777 7 7773 333 3 333

F#5 F5 B5

3 !

5

On 2nd and 3rd Choruses, skip ahead to H (bar 50)

eternal D5

dark F#5

4

0 0 0 0

end Bass Fig. 3

G

4 4

Bass Fig. 3

Bm 37

3 0 0

0

4 4 2

2 2 0

0 !

4 4 2

2 2 0

0



 12

12 12

the echo of the universe N.C.

P.M.

0 0 0 3 0 0

0 0 0 3 0 0

4

4

3 2 3

3 2 3

guitarworld.com

  113


TRANSCRIPTIONS I F#5 F5 B5 45



4 3 2 1 2 0

N.C.

am the G#/D

P.M.

P.M.

0000 0 0 3



7 6 0

11 10

13 12

0000 0 0 3

F#5 F5 B5



  

3

P

4 3 2 1 2 0

14 14 13 13

7 6 0

to unleash this

sent 48

  

12 12 11 11

3 P

0 0

last F#5 F5 B5

P.M.

4

0 0 0 3 0 0

the ultimate god of a rotting creation N.C.

P.M.

P.M.



3 2 3

4

0 0 0 3 0 0

4

0 0 0 3 0 0

2 3

3

2 3

4 3 2 1 2 0



0 0 0 3 0 0

7 6 0

N.C. P.M.

4 3 2 1 2 0

3



5 7 9

0 0 6 7 9

7 6 0

4

0 0 0 3 0 0



3 2 3

7 6 0

12 14 16

13 14 16

0 0

7

E

4

6 5 6

3 2 3

4

6 5 6

13



3 2 3

Pre-chorus (bar 27)

8 9 11

3





7 9 11

7

11 9 8



3

14 16 18

6

H

7

P.M.

6

6



0 0 0 3 0 0

Go back to

curse F#5 F5 B5

N.C.

4 3 2 1 2 0

born of the blood of the pharaohs N.C. F#5 F5 B5

15 16 18

3

14



18 16 15

3

(3:11. 7:12)

night Trapped in a N.C.(B5) D/F# F#5 B5/F# Gtr. 3 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 simile (see bar 33)

hellish A(11)

Gtrs. 1 and 2 P.M. 50





dream Esus2

Spinning

N.C.

past

let ring throughout

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5 2

5 2

7

7

4 2

4 2

2 2

5

7



5

4

0

4

4

2 0

0

2

2

0

0

5

5

7

7

4

4

2

Bass

worlds A(11)

5 !

0

unseen G5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 53

5

0

4

0

4

0 !

and

frightfully

5

5

0

0 3

2 0



2

2

0

4

4

2

5

4

5

0

vanishing A(11)

B5

3 0 0

0

into Esus2

0

4

7

0

the

4

2 0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 3 (see bar 36)

56

dark F#5

2

114

On 3rd Chorus, skip ahead to

eternal D5

4

4

2

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

3

A5/E

0

0 3

5

S

(bar 182)

A/C#

0

0 5

2

0

0 2




“THE DARK ETERNAL NIGHT”

I

(3:29)

Faster q = 130 night B5

Gtr. 3 58



 



0 4 4 2

Gtrs. 1 and 2





 

0 2 2 0

Bass



62



 0 !

 



0 4 4 2



 

0 2 2 0



 0 !

J

4 4 2

 ,



 ,



4 4 2

2 2 0

2 2 0

G

0

 

 , 

2 2 0

2 2 0

G

0

 

0

0 2 2 0

2 2 0

0 !

 

(pick scrapes)

 

0 2 2 0

X

  0 !

 0

 

0 4 4 2

 

0 4 4 2

  0 !

 0

 4  ,42 

4 4 2

 

0 4 4 2

 ( X )  X

0 !

X



Instrumental Interlude (3:39) N.C.

 

66



Gtrs. 1 and 2

9

0

8

7

0

6

0

3

0

0

0

0

Bass

9

8

7

7

6

3

0

0

0

0

 

9

0

8

7

0

6

0

3

0

0

 9

8

7

7

6

3

0

0

 

9

9

0

8

8

7

7

0

7

6

6

0

3

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

guitarworld.com

  115


TRANSCRIPTIONS 1.

69

2.

 

  

3

0

3

0

0

3

0

3

76

0

0

0

  

11

10

9

9

8

6

5

4

4

3

10 10

7

7

7

5

2

2

2

5

1.



3

0

3

6

0



73

 

0

   

0

6

 11 

0

6

0

3

10

9

9

8

5

4

4

3

10

7

7

5

2

2



3



10 10

7

7

7



5

2

2

2

0



 11 

6

10

9

9

8

5

4

4

3

5



2.

10

7

7

10

7

7

8

    10

9

*

7

8

7

10

8

7



*Note played by Gtr. 1 only.



K

5

2

2

5

2

3

2

  

4

2

5

 

3

 

(4:01)

Slower q = 108 Bm 81

  

  116

3

5

0

0

2

2 0

0

5

G3

3

4

5

G

5

 

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

2

9

4

11

 

2

9

 5

12

4

4

 16 16

    

5

2

4

7

4

6

3

5

0

7

   

7

  

7

4

4

6

6

5

5

7

7

 


“THE DARK ETERNAL NIGHT” 1.

Bm/E



Gtr. 4 (elec. w/dist.) 85

  

7 11 7 10

9

G

C#7

G7

1/4

15 12

10

10 11

11 12

12

13

 

21 19 13 18 19

fret-hand fingering: 1



Gtrs. 1 and 2

  

0

0

1

2

G3

3

Bass

 

0

0

2.

1

2



3

G3

3

3

2



2

G7#11

88

   

L

21 18

19

13

19

4

5

3

4

5

3



N.C.

2

4

4

4

1

16 10

3

1

4

4

 3

4

3

4

15

2

 14 

12

11 13

14 12

 

2

 

 

4

5

2

4

5

2

4

14

12

11

7

5

4

7

5

4

5

5

3

 

3

 

N.C. 15

3

3

16

6

6

 

10

12

 14     

11

13

14

12

7 5

2

4

7

4

6

5

3

7

5

4

6

7

5

13

11

6

4

6

4

  

(4:20)

Faster q = 130 N.C.

Gtr. 1

92



Bass



Riff A

w/wah

9 0 8 7 0 6 0 3

Bass Fig. 4 11

7

10 9

0

0 0 0

8

10 10 7 7 7



9 0 8 7 0 6 0 3 0 0

 

9 0 8 7 0 6 0 3

  11 10 9  8   11 10 9  8 7 10 7 7 7

0

0 0 0

10 10 7 7 7



3 0 0 3 0 0 6 0 7 0

 10 7

7 10 7 7

8

9

guitarworld.com

117


TRANSCRIPTIONS Gtr. 1 plays Riff A (see bar 92) Gtr. 2 w/wah 96 12 0 12 12 0 12 0 12 0



0

0

 12

0

0 12 12 0 12 0 12 0

0

12 

0 12 12 0 12 0 12 0

0

0

 

0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 4 (see bar 92)

G#dim

Gtr. 2 99

 

9

0 10 0

0

6

0

0

0

7

7

 

Gtr. 1

 

7

 

Bass

 

Gtr. 2

104

 

8

9

7

 

(wah off)

9

0 10 0 12 0

6

0

 

8

0

9

7

7

9

0

11

7

0

0





 

 





 

 





 

Ddim

w/flanger effect

3

0

0

3

0

0

6

0



7

Bass

 

3

0

0

3

0

0

3

0

0

6

Ddim7

(wah off)

7

N.C.

3

Bdim7

(piano)

Cdim

N.C. 1/4

Gtrs. 1 and 2

(piano)

 



7

Ddim7



9

9

8

8

7

7

7

7

G#5 G5 F#5 107

9

9

118

8

8

7

7

7

7

6

6

3

3

3

3

0

0

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

0

0

0

0

 

3

3

0

0

0

0

3

3

0

0

0

0

6

6

0

7

7

0

  11 9



9

6

3

6

3

F5

D5

3

0

3

0

0

0

0

 

0



(play 3 times)

10 9 8 7

8

7

9 7

7

8 6

6

5 3

3

5 3

3

0

0

0

0

0

   

0

  


“THE DARK ETERNAL NIGHT” N.C.

Gtr. 1 110

 

9

0

10

0

 

0

Gtr. 2

 

6

0

7

0

0

7

7

 

Bass

 

M

8

9

7

 

9

6

8

0

10

0

0

7

0

9

7

12

9

11

7

0

0

0

0

7

7

     

10

7

0

12

0

9

7

0

9

11

 

0

0

0

7

7

   

10

7

9

0

12

0

7

0

9

14

0

11

0

10

12

7



0

0

0

7

7

��� 

(4:49)

Slower q = 108

Gtr. 4 (w/clean tone) 114 16  17 16



Gtr. 3 (w/clean tone)



9

10

9

  16 14

14

16

15

 

7

9

9

7



0

2

0



Gtr. 6 (w/clean tone) 117 21 22 21 14 14  15



5

5

 

19 21 12 14

21 19 14 12

6

7

Bass

13

14

7

15

7

17 19 19 10 12 19 11 11

5

2

   19  12 18 10



9

10

9

7

 

9

9

Bass



0

0

2

5

5

7

7

2

6

4

7

7

  6   9 

2

5

 

14

15

17

14

16

15



16

Gtr. 3

6

 10  9

7

7

4

7

9

4

6

7



9

5

7

Gtr. 5 (w/clean tone)

 

4

17 10

18 19 10 11

Gtr. 4 Gtr. 3

14

  6   9 

4

2

  14  16 

7

4

6

 14 

21 17 19 10 12 19 11 19 12

5



7



Gtr. 3

6

7

7

 4

4

 10  7

7

9

4

6

7 5

9

10 7

9

7

6

4

7

7 5

9 7



Gtr. 5

 

7

4

6

5

7

 guitarworld.com

 119


TRANSCRIPTIONS

N

(4:58)

Faster q = 130

Gtrs. 1 and 2 121 16 15 14 14 13



19 18 17 17 16

15 15 12 12 12

18 18 15 15 15

22 21 20 20 19

 15 

21 21 18 18 18

Bass



6

5 4

4

Gtr. 1 125 15 0 18 0

3

5

5

9

2 2 2

0

8 7

0

Bass 8

10 7

129

O

22

21

7

7

20

20

19

19

18

17

17

16

12

11

10

10

9

6

8

8

5 5 5



16

15 14 14 13



13

12 11 11 10



6

5

Gtr. 2 15 0 18 0

7

21

21

18

18

18

18

18

15

15

15

11

11

8

8

8

4

 15   

16

  10

4

12

13

7

12 11 10 10 9

15 15 12 12 12

3

15

15

8

12 12 9

9

9

5

5

2

2

12

15

18

15

13

16

19

16

7

7

2

8

7

  10

11 11 8 8 8

19

18 17 17 16

16

15 14 14 13

9

8

16

18

11

7

7

8

7

7 7

18 18 15 15 15

15 15 12 12 12

6

8

15

18

21

18

16

19

22

19

7

7

11

0 18 0 0

8

19

21

5

5

18

21

19

22

7

7

9 7

5

  

(5:10)

Slower q = 110

Gtrs. 1 and 2 P.M. on 133

  

3 4

1 2

1.

4

1

3 4 3 0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 (see bar 11)

120

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

6 7

4 5

7

4

6 7 6 0

 

2.

6 7

4 5

7

4

6 7 6 0


“THE DARK ETERNAL NIGHT”



Gtrs. 1 and 2 138

  

 

2

1

2

1

3

 

0

0

 

Bass

144

 3

0

0



 

7

5

7

5

6

0

 6

 

0

 

0

0

 2

1

2

1

10 12

Gtr. 2



11 13

12

11 13

7

5

7

5

12 14

P.M.

4

13

P.M.

5

6

7

6

5

7

6

8

7

Bass



4

5

6

7

6

5

7

6

 

3

8

7

4

  3  

Gtr. 1 P.M. 150





 

6

3

4



  6 

3

3

0

 

0

 

4

3

0

4

0



 

 

5

4

5

4

6

0

 6

 

0

 

0

0

 6

7

6

7

 5

5

0

 

0

 

0

0

 5

4

5

4

 

6

6

7

6



6

7

8

9

8

8

7

7

8

9

8

9

 10

9

 10

9

8

8

7

7

9

9

8

8

6

7

6

7

5

8

6

6

  

7

7

9

7

  5 



7

6

0

 

0

 



13

8

7

  6 

 12 14 13 15 14 13 15 14  16 15 14 13 15 14 13 12 14

6



8

7

12

6

6

7

6

0

7

11 13

5

7

5

7

 

0

12

6

6

11

10

5

5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 153 Riff B

 



0

3

4

3

4

3

0

3

4

3

4

3

0

6

5

6

0

3

4

3

4

3

0

3

4

3

4

3

0

6

7

0

3

3

4

3

0

3

4

3

4

3

0

6

5

6

0

3

4

3

4

3

0

3

4

3

4

3

0

6

7

4

6

 

6



Bass plays Bass Fig. 1, first time (see bar 9) Bass Bass Fig. 5 4

4

guitarworld.com

121


TRANSCRIPTIONS

P

(5:53)

Faster q = 114 B5

Gtr. 1

155

Riff C P.M.



4 5 4

4 6 7

7 6 4

6

Gtr. 2





7 6 4 6 7 9 0 0 0 0 0 0

6

2 2 0

Bass

7 5 4

0

6

Bass

6

9 7 5

9 7 6 7 9 10 7 6 4 6 7 9

6

6

2 2 0

0

0

6

4 2 1 1 3 4 4 3 1 1 2 4

2 2 0

7 6 4

N.C.

Gtr. 1 plays Riff C (see bar 155) Gtr. 2 157

6

4 3 1 1 2 4

4 5 4

4 6 7

2 2 0

 

0





2 2 0

2 2 0

0

2 2 0

0

0

P.M.



7

6

4

6

7

9

6

7

9

6



7

6

4 6

Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Riff C (see bar 155) Bass 159 Bass Fig. 6



4 5 4

4 6 7 6

Q

7 6 4

7 5 4

7 6 4 6 7 9 0 0 0 0 0 0

6

6

6

Guitar Solo (6:10) Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Riff C twice (see bar 155)

x

x

10



13 16 14 13

10

3

16

3

9 7 6 7 9 10 7 6 4 6 7 9

6

6

16 14 12

14

14

1 hold bend -4

12

14

6

12

3

20 20



T

T

12



6

(vib. w/fret-hand) Gtrs. 3 and 4 (w/dist.)

14 13

Bass plays Bass Fig. 6 twice (see bar 159)

9 7 5

161 

7 6 4

6

 w/bar

Gtr. 3 (w/dist.) 1

4 6 7

4 5 4

14

19

3

14 13 13

3

Gtr. 4 w/wah T T T 163 T T T T T 22 20 18 16 14 16 18 20 22 20 18 16 14 16 18 20 22 20 18 23 21 19 23 21 19 23 21 19 23 21 19 24 22 20

Gtr. 3 w/wah T

9 T

T

18 16 14 12 10 12 14 16 18 16 14 12 10 12 14 16 18 16 14

T

T

19 17 15

9

122

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

9

19 17 15

T

19 17 15

T

T

19 17 15

9

20 18 16


“THE DARK ETERNAL NIGHT”

 12

 Gtr.(wah3 off)   15  15  14 14

Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Riff B (see bar 153)

Gtrs. 3 and 4 164 18 18 14 14

18 18 14 14

17 17 13

10 13

12

12

10 13 19

16 19 16

18

18

16 19

18

16

18

Bass plays Bass Fig. 5 (see bar 153) 166

18

1622

21

6

168

19

18 9 7

9 7

6

15  6 4  3

10 9

5 3

3

111011

9 10 9

111011

6

9 101213

6

9

1312 1012 13  14 14

6

10 11 12

3

Bass plays Bass Fig. 6 twice (see bar 159)

T

13 11

4

169

21

Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Riff C twice (see bar 155)

18

1922

19

1619

9

2

11 13 11 13 14 13 11 16 14 13 14 16 14 16 17 16 14 19 17 16 17 19 17 19 21 23

1

2

4

1

T

3

T

4

3

1

4

T

2

25:14 1

T

2

4

1

3

4

T

3

1

4

T

2

1

T

2

4

1

2

4

T

19 23 19 17 14 23 19 23 19 17 14 23 19 23 19 17 14 17 21 17 14 13 21 17 21 17 14 13 17 11

4

170

10

9

6

7

6

 

12

4

8

6

6

10

11

6

9

10

3

1

13

9

5

4

10

9

6

10

11

 12

17

13

3

14

14

3

15

16

12

5

171 Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Riff B (see bar 153) 14 17 20 17 14 17 20 17 14 17 20

15 18 21 18 15 18 21 18 15

20 17 14 17 20 17 14 17 20

15

30

Bass plays Bass Fig. 5 twice (see bar 153) 172 18 21 18 15 18 21 18 21 18 15 18

173

19

22

19

21

19

22

7

174

19

22

19

22 19 16 19 22

21

19

7

22

19

21

21 24 21 18 21 24 21 18

19

22

19

22

19

21

7

21

19 22 19

7

21

18 21 24 18 21 21 24

22

19

21

19

22

19

24 21

22

7

(grad. bend)

19

19

19

1

19 22 19 22 19 19 19 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22

7 guitarworld.com

123


TRANSCRIPTIONS

“THE DARK ETERNAL NIGHT”

R Interlude (6:40) Slower q = 106

B5



N.H. (pitch: C)

*w/bar

Gtr. 3 175

-1½



Gtr. 4

4 4

4 4

-2½

*w/bar

(to slack)

 

X X

(to slack)

N.H. (pitch: F#)

*Depress bar prior to picking note.

Gtr. 1

Gtrs. 1 and 2





0 2 2 0

7 6 0

0 0 6 7

4 5

7

4

P.M.

 6 0

7 6 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Bass



Gtrs. 1 and 2

slight P.M.



0 !

3

760

0000

6 5

0

4

 20

760

slight P.M.

0034

12

4

1

 30

Bass

430

760

P

0000

0

4

20

760

 

7 6 0

7 6 0

0034674630

430

4 5

0 0 6 7

7

4

6 0

0 0 6 7 9 10 7 9 6 0

S

3rd Chorus (bar 33) P.M.

11 10

00



12 12 11 11



 

 P

0000 0 0 3

P



14 14 13 13



182

3

13 12

(7:30)

night B5

3

T

F

0000 0 0

 8 7



3

P.M.

3

Gtr. 3

P

0 0 0 0 0 0

Go back to P.M.

 

13 13 12 12

3

Gtrs. 1 and 2 P.M. 179



11 11 10 10

slight P.M.





0 2 2 0

 2  ,20 3 12  12 

0 4 4 2

0 !

Outro/Continuum Solo (7:34)

Gtrs. 1 and 2

183

P.M.

P.M.

P.M.

P.M.

P.M.

2 2 2 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0



*P.H. (Begin fade ninth time)

P.M.

2 2 7 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 6 6 5 0 3

 

(play 10 times and fade out)

 

pitch: C

Bass

*Play pinch harmonic simile on repeats. w/dist. w/pick

5 6

7

6 5 0 3



3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 (play repeats simile)

124

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

3 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 6

7

6 5 0 3




Our Love Affair for the Guitar and Grape Just Became a Reality

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the world’s loudest podcast A BRAND-NEW EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK WITH EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS AND MUSIC! RECENT GUESTS INCLUDE:

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TRANSCRIPTIONS

512

Lamb of God As heard on VII: STURM UND DRANG Words and Music by CHRIS ADLER, DAVID RANDALL BLYTHE, JOHN CAMPBELL, MARK MORTON and WILL ADLER • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

Guitars are in drop-D tuning, down one half step (low to high, Db Ab Db Gb Bb Eb). Bass is in drop-D tuning, down one half step (low to high, Db Ab Db Gb). All music sounds in the key of Db minor, one half step lower than written. Dm

D5

Dsus2/A

10fr

9fr

3

A

E¨5

G5

B¨5

5fr

3

D5

C5

11

11

12fr

11

11

22

33

10fr

11

D5

 

*Gtr. 1 (elec. w/dist.) (Mark Martin) Riff A 1 11 11 14 14 14 14 12 12

F5

8fr

Intro (0:00) Moderately q = 96 Dm



E5

11

  14 14

11 12

  14 14

10 12

  13 13

10 12

  13 13

(repeat previous bar)

12

*doubled throughout

*Gtr. 1 (elec. w/dist.) (Willie Adler) Rhy. Fill 1



0

(pick scrape) P.M.

 

0

10 0 0 0

10 0 0 0

*doubled throughout

   !0

  X  0   0

Bass

0 !

Dsus2/A

5

  11 14 14

128

12

  11 14 14

0

0 0

  

9 0 0

0

0

0 !

0 !

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

9 0 0

13

12

 0 0

0

10 10 12

7 0 0

0 0

5

0

0

0

13

0 0

0

7

5

7

5

5

0

0

0

0 !





end Riff A

10 10

12

13

 

0

0 !

0 !

5

0 !

0 7

9 0 0

**w/fdbk. (pitch: G) when recalled as Rhy. Fill 1

D5

12

0

7

 ,75 

**

7 5

10 10 12

13

10 10

12

17

12

WORDS AND MUSIC BY CHRIS ADLER, DAVID RANDALL BLYTHE, JOHN CAMPBELL, MARK MORTON AND WILL ADLER COPYRIGHT © 2015 SONY/ATV MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC AND SUBTLE ARTS OF PUBLISHING ALL RIGHTS ADMINISTERED BY SONY/ATV MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC, 424 CHURCH STREET, SUITE 1200, NASHVILLE, TN 37219 INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED ALL RIGHTS RESERVED REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF HAL LEONARD CORPORATION


“512”

B

(0:20)

Six One

bars careless

D5 Gtr. 2 plays Riff A (see bar 1)

laid across word you lose G5 D5 E¨5 D5

the

sky your

life N.C.(G5)

(F5)

Gtr. 1 Rhy. Fig. 1

9

 

P.M.

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

5 5

0 0

1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

5 5

5 5 5 5 5 5

3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

5

3

3

3

Bass Bass Fig. 1

 

0

0

0

Four grave new

A

0

empty world

D5 11

to

walls

0

fill

the time awaits

5

3

inside N.C.(B¨5)

G5 D5 E¨5 D5

(G5)

end Rhy. Fig. 1

P.M.

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

5 5

0 0

1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

0 0

0 0

0 0

8

8 8 8

8

8 8 8

 

8 8 8 8

 

end Bass Fig. 1 0

C

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

8

8

5

5

5

5

5

Chorus (0:40. 1:30, 2:30, 3:45) (No vocals on 1st Chorus)

D5

I

My hands can’t recognize

10

8

7

are

painted myself

red

I’ve

become someone

else

Gtr. 1 13 Riff B

 

0 0

0

0

7

7

7

7

7

7

5

5

5

5

5

5

7

8

7

7

7

5

5

5

0

5

8

7

7

7

5

5

5

0

4

8

0 0

0

0

7

7

7

7

7

5

5

5

5

5

0

0

0

0

10

8

7

7

7

7

7

5

5

5

5

8

7

7

8

7

7

7

5

5

5

7

8

0

5

8

7

7

7

5

5

5

5

8

0

4

8

7

7

7

5

5

5

4

8

0

Gtr. 2

 

Bass substitutes Bass Fill 1 on repeat of 2nd-4th Choruses (see below) Bass Bass Fig. 2

 

5 0

0

0

8

7

0

7

8

0

5

8

0

4

8

5

Bass Fill 1 (1:40. 2:40, 3:55, 4:15)

   

0

0 0 5 3 2 0 2 3 0 0 3 0 0 3

0

0

0

  guitarworld.com

129


TRANSCRIPTIONS

My My

B¨5

future’s painted black hands are painted

8 8

8 8 8 10 8 8 8 8

7

7

8

8

hands are

8

8 12

8

8 11

5 5

G K

(bar 24) (bar 47)

painted end Riff B

P.M.

P.M.

5 5 5 10 8 5 5 5

8

7

7

7

7 8

8 10

10 8

7

 

Gtr. 2 substitutes Rhy. Fill 2 (see bar 50) on repeat of 4th Chorus

light P.M.

8 8

My

red G5

P.M.

P.M.

15

No repeat on 1st Chorus 2nd time on 3rd Chorus, skip ahead to 2nd time on 4th Chorus, skip ahead to

light P.M.

8 8 8 8 8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

5 5

5 5 5 5 5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5 5 5 5 5

5 5

5 5

   

end Bass Fig. 2 8

D

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

7

7

7

(0:50, 1:50)

red D5 Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 (see bar 9) Gtr. 3 plays Fill 1 (see below)

*Gtr. 1 (2nd time only) 17 18 17 17 17

17

G5 D5 E¨5

18

17

19

18

17

19

D5

G5

18

17 18

19

17

19

17

18

F5

18

19

17

18

17

19

17 19

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 9) *Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 first time (see bar 9)

D5 19

G5 D5 E¨5 D5

17 18 17 16 18 16

17 18 17 16 18 16

17 17 17 16 16 18 16

19 19

E

N.C.(B¨5)

19

Verses (1:00, 2:00) 1. Lycenthropic Awake the primal

D5 Gtr. 2 plays Riff A (see bar 1)

that

survival sleeps

G5 D5

16 19

instincts inside

amnesia you know that E¨5 D5

life

17 17 17 18 16 16 19

one

2. Schizophrenic forget the only

(G5)

outside N.C.(G5)

(F5)

0 0

3

Gtr. 1 21 P.M.

 

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

5 5

0 0

1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 9)

Fill 1 (1:50)

Gtr. 3

 130

Dm

 10 0 0

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

Dsus2/A

w/fdbk.

0 0 0 0 10 0 0

9 0 0

9 0 0

5

5 5 5

3 3 3

3 3 3 3


“512”

Or

Embrace the shiver

feel

the beast and

Bid goodbye to They bought the ticket

all

you

D5 23

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

loved

ride N.C.(B¨5)

(G5)

0 0

5 5

0 0

1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

8

8 8 8

5

5 5 5

5 5 5 5

 

Pre-chorus (1:20, 2:20) 1., 3.

The But

time is slipping the teeth of time E5 E5 F5 E5

E5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 25 2 2

2 2

Bass 2

2

by

No peace

in

sight

E¨5

G5

 

P.M.

2 2

2 2

2

2

2 2

2 2

2

2

2.

2 2

2 2

2

2

2 2

hold

E5

2 2

2

Go back to

still

2

C

2 2

2 2

2

0 0

2

2 2

0

2

3 3

2 2

3

their

bite

2

2

2

2 2

2 2

2

2

2 2

1 1

2

(pick scrape)

12

1 1

1

G

1

1 1

5 5

1

5 5

5

5 5

5

5 5

5

 

5

(2:50)

bite

red D5

(Gtrs. 1 and 2)



1 1

1

Chorus (bar 13)

C

hold their

(Gtr. 2 only) 11 14 14

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Gtr. 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 2

E5

C# A

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2

2 2

still

N.H. pitch:

2 2

2 2

Go back to

Gtr. 2

P.M.

2 2

2

Chorus (bar 13) 4.

E¨5

27

H

the

P.M.

(Take 3rd and 4th endings on second pre-chorus.)

 

and take

know Now you E¨5 D5

G5 D5

0 0 0 0 0 0

F

the weak through your spine

shun running

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

(pick scrape)

29 Gtrs. 1 and 2 12



0 0

0

0

0 !

0 !

0 0

X



Guitar Solo (2:55) N.C.(D5)

Gtr. 2

31

(w/wah) * 22 15 15 22 22 15

3

3

*repeat previous beat

17 16 17 19 20 3

3

17 19 20

18 19

3

17 18 20 18 17 18 17

3

3

19

17

3

19 18

20

3

18

20

3

Gtr. 1 Rhy. Fig. 2 P.M.

P.M.

P.M.

P.M.

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 12 12

3

3

3

3

Bass

0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

3

3

3

3

3

0 1 0 0 0 3

3

3

0 10 12 12 3

3

P.M.

P.M.

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

 0

3

3

3

3

12

15 14 12 11 14 15 14 12 11 12 14 3

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

3

3

3

3

0 1 0 0 0 3

3

3

0 0 3

0 3

guitarworld.com

131


TRANSCRIPTIONS

33

Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 2 three times (see bar 31) Gtr. 2 1½ slight P.H.



20 20



20

12 10 10

Bass Bass Fig. 3

0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Gtr. 2 1 35 13

3

13

3

13

13

12 10

12

10

3

3

3

13

37 5

5

3 3

I

5

5

12 10

3

12 11 10

3

12

10 11 12

3

10

12

3

10

3

15 14 12 11 14 15 14 12 11 12 14

3

3

3

3

3

  0 12

P.H.

10

12 10

0

10

13

13 12 10 12 10

12 10

pitch: G



1

5

5

3

5

12 10

3

12

10

12 10 12 10

3

3

12

5

5

5

Another

5

3

quickly waits to

P.M.

learns point at

P.M.

3

3

3

3

3

3

the

rules you

P.M.

A A

P.M.

0 0 0 0 0 0 12 10 12 0 0 0 10 12 13 0 2 3 0 2 3 5 3 2

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

0

0 0 0 0 12 10 12 0 3

subtle Talk isn’t N.C.(D5)

Gtrs. 1 and 2 41 P.M.

0 0 0 0 0 0 12 10 12 0

3

3

3

gesture cheap D5 C5 D5 N.C.(D5)

here

0 0 0 0 0 0 12 10 12 0

3

3

you’re

and

3

3

3

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

3

ventilated Bleed out

3

in

3

3

3

pavement

P.M.

12 10 12 12 10 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 10 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 10 12 0 0 0 3

10 12 13 0 2 3 0 2 3 5 3 2

 

D5 C5 D5 N.C.(D5)

P.M.

Bass plays Bass Fig. 4 (see bar 39)

3

 

3

Bass Bass Fig. 4

3

132

10

3

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 12 10 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 10 12 0 0 0 3

 

5

number burner

Gtrs. 1 and 2 (wah off) 39 P.M.

 

3

12

Bridge (3:15) hidden

 

0 0

13 12 10 12 10

3

3

pitch: B

0

1

5

12 10 3

10 13 10 12

13

1

P.H.

10

3

Bass plays Bass Fig. 3 twice (see bar 33)

1

12

3

0 10 12 12



1

12 10

12 10 3

0 1 0 0 0 3

 13

P.M.

3

3

3

3

P.M.

12 10 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 10 12 0 0 0 10 12 13 0 2 3 0 2 3 5 3 2 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

 


“512”

J

(3:35)

Go back to

Six bars Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fill 1 (see bar 1)

 

Gtr. 2 43 11

 

11

14 14

14 14

12

Bass

laid across the sky

12

 K

Four empty walls

10

0

  13 13

0

0

10 12

0

 

10

13 13

12

0 !

  13 13

Chorus (bar 13)

C

to

fill the time

12

 

0 !

(4:05)

Red

red can’t recognize

I

red myself

red

D5 Gtr. 2 plays Riff B (see bar 13)

I’ve

become

someone

else

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/dist.) 47

 

8

0 0

0

0

0

12 10

10 12

0

8 12

0

0 11

12

8

0 0

0

0

12 10

0

10 12

0

8 12

7 12

0

Gtr. 1

 

14

14

14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14

12

12

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 simile (see bar 13) Bass substitutes Bass Fill 1 second time (see second page) 1.

My

future’s

black G5 Rhy. Fill 2

painted

B¨5 49

P.M.

P.M.

8

8 8

8 8 8

15 13

15

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

7

7

13

13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13

5

5

8 8

P.M.

P.M.

8 8 8 8

12 10

8

10 12

P.M.

8

8 12

8 14

red G5

My hands are painted

B¨5

Gtr. 3 51

P.M.

5 5 5

8

8 12

P.M.

5 5

8

10 12

P.M.

12

2.

12 10

P.M.

My

8 14

7

10

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

hands are

painted

Freely red

P.M.

slight P.H.

Gtrs. 2 and 3

P.M.

5 5

5 5 5

10 8 7

8 7

10

9 10

6 7

8 7

10

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

12

12

12 12 12 12 12 12 15 15 15 15

15 15 15

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

10

10

10 10 10 10 10 10 13 13 13 13

13 13 13

Bass 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

7

7

8

8

8

7

10 10

8

6 7

10 8

Gtr. 1 8

9 10

10

   

(fade out)

P.M.

12

8

slight P.H.

5 5 5 5 5 5 3

10 8 7

8 7

7 8 10

7

10 8 7

0 0 0

 w/fdbk.

0 0 0

pitch: A

0 0 14 12

14 12

0 !

0 !

3

guitarworld.com

133


TM


ad_replicator_7.25x4.875_GW_Layout 1 2015-09-10 3:48 PM Page 1


TRANSCRIPTIONS

BAD BLOOD Ryan Adams

As heard on 1989 Words and Music by TAYLOR SWIFT, MAX MARTIN and SHELLBACK • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

All guitars are capoed at the 4th fret. All chord shapes and tablature positions are relative to the capo. All music sounds in the key of E, a major third higher than written. Csus2

G5

2

Dsus2

2

3

34

A

Intro (0:01) Moderately Slow q = 81 Csus2 G5

Em7

13

1

3

 B



3 3 0 0 0 3 0 3

3 0

3 0

3

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Dsus2/G

21 3

Dsus2

Gtr. 1 (acous., capo 4) let ring throughout

1

Cadd9

3 0 2 0 0

2

13

12

Em7

0 3 2 0 0 0

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

Did

21

Csus2

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

have to have to

you

this me

do hit

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

3 3 0 0 3

I where

fine think we’d be through you all Did think it Csus2 G5 Gtr. 5 plays Fill 2 on repeat, 2nd Verse (see below) Gtrs. 1 and 2 Rhy. Fig. 1 5

D/F#

Dadd4

1

32 1

21

Dsus2

Em7

T

G5

3 3 0 0 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

G6

Cmaj7

3

21

Gtrs. 1 and 2 (acous., capo 4) 3 0 0 0 2 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 3

3 0 0 3

3 0 0 3

3 0 0 3

0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/clean tone, capo 4) let ring throughout 1 2

3

1

3

0

0

0 3

3

3

thinkin’ that you could be weak baby I couldn’t

was I’m

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

trusted breathe and

my back from your knife Got scars on to All these things will catch up Dsus2 Em7 Gtr. 5 plays Fill 1 first time, 2nd Verse (see below)

2. Baby

 

C

Verses (0:12, 1:11) 1. Baby

 

Em

0 3 2 0

0

0 3 2 0

2

2

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

3

3

0

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

0

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

0

0 2 0

3

3 0 0 2 0

2

2

you

3 0 0 2 0

0

3 0 0 2 0

0 2

(play repeats w/ad lib variations)

 

7

(B5)

(F#sus2)

9

7 !

7

(play repeats simile) *Chord names in parentheses reflect concert-key harmony.

Fill 1 (1:14)

Gtr. 5 (elec. w/clean tone and delay effect, capo 4)

Em7

 136

 

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 0 3 0 0 2 0

(G#m7) 9

11

11

11

Fill 2 (1:23, 1:35) Csus2

Gtr. 5



0

(w/delay effect)



* Bass (Esus2)

3 3 0 0 3

WORDS AND MUSIC BY TAYLOR SWIFT, MAX MARTIN AND SHELLBACK COPYRIGHT (C) 2014 SONY/ATV MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC, TAYLOR SWIFT MUSIC AND MXM ALL RIGHTS ON BEHALF OF SONY/ATV MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC AND TAYLOR SWIFT MUSIC ADMINISTERED BY SONY/ATV MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC, 424 CHURCH STREET, SUITE 1200, NASHVILLE, TN 37219 ALL RIGHTS ON BEHALF OF MXM ADMINISTERED WORLDWIDE BY KOBALT SONGS MUSIC PUBLISHING INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED ALL RIGHTS RESERVED REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF HAL LEONARD CORPORATION


“ BAD BLOOD”

7

it

Don’t Time Csus2

think it’s in the past These kinda wounds they always last can heal but this won’t If you’re G5 Dsus2 Em7

3 0 0 3

3 0 0 3

3 0 0 3

2 3

3 0 0 3 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 3 3

3

3 3

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 0

2

0

0

0 3

(Esus2) 7

what was shiny

have to ruin in so deep

0 0

C

1.

Baby rub

0

3 3 0 0

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

0

0

0

7

3 0 2 3

3 3 3 0 0 2 0 3 3

(Eadd9)

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3

3

3 3

0 3 2 0

(B5)

Bass Bass Fill 1

 

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

0

2

2

11

0 3 0 0 2 0

0

4

0 3 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

(G#m7)

     

comin’ my way Dsus2 0 3 2 0

 

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

0 0

3 0 2 3

 

0

0

0 3

3

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

2

(let ring into next bar) 0 3 3 2

0 3 2 0

3

2

2

used to have think we can Dsus2

0 3 0

2

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

2 !

3 0 2 3

G5

3 3 3 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 3

You

and

I

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3

3

3 3 3

’Cause baby D5

0

3 3 0 0

3 2 0

(B5)

(F#5)

0 2

don’t

(F#sus2)

(Eadd9)

You know we I don’t

0

0 3 2 0

3

0 22

just

end Rhy. Fig. 1

0 3 2 0

Chorus (0:47, 1:46, 2:28) now we got bad blood Now we got problems C G Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 1 (see bar 5) Gtr. 6 plays Riff A (see below) *Gtr. 4 (12-string elec. w/clean tone, capo 4) 14 3

0 3 0 0 2 0

Salt in the wound like you’re laughin’ right at me

think about the good times Em7 Cadd9

(F#sus2)

D

2

0 3 0 0 2 0

2

 

7 !

 

0

11 11

Pre-chorus (0:36, 1:35) It’s so sad to Cadd9 G5 Dsus2 Gtr. 5 plays Fill 2 simile, second time (see first page)

 

0 3 0 0 2 0

(G#m7)

9 9

7 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 2 2 0

(F#sus2)



0 3 0 0 2 0

3

3

7 7

Gtrs. 1 and 2 10 3 3 0 0 2 2 3 3

0 3 0 0 2 0

2 2 0

(B5)

7

0 3 2 0

2.

Now it’s all rusted

mad solve

 love

So take a You made a

them

Em7

0 3

0

0 2 2 0

0 0

3 0

0 2 2 0

3 0

3 0

0

2

*Doubled simile by Gtr. 3

(E)

Bass  0 

(B)

G2

2

0

(F#sus2) 2

0

2

2

(G#m7)

0

4

4

4

Riff A (0:47, 1:46, 2:28, 2:51)

Gtr. 6 (elec. w/clean tone, capo 4)

(C)

  

(G)

let ring throughout

8 8 10

9

7 0

G

1.

 7

0 0

8

(Dsus2)

0

 12 10 10 12

(Em7) 12 12 12

2.

 12 12 12

(Dsus2)

0

 

12

10

10 10 12

(Em7)

!

12 12

(play repeats w/ad lib variation)

guitarworld.com

137


TRANSCRIPTIONS

“ BAD BLOOD”

2nd time on 3rd Chorus, skip ahead to

16

look at what you’ve done really deep cut Cadd9 G5

3

0

2

3

3

0

3

(Esus2) 0

E

3

F

(bar 25)

1.

’cause baby now we got bad and baby Dsus2 2

3

2 4 0

2 0

2

0

2

2

1st Chorus, go back to B 2nd Verse (bar 5) 2nd Chorus, continue to E Breakdown (bar 19)

blood

Em7

0 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 0

(F#sus2)

 2

G

2

2

0 3

2 0

3

(B5)

0

2.

0 3 3 0 0 0 0 2 2 0

(G#m7) 0

4

4

4

3 0 0 2 0

3 0 0 2 0

now we got bad D5

 

3 0 0 2 0

2 0



3

2 0

3

blood

2

3

 (F#5)   ! 2

2

3 0 0 3

3 0 0 3

don’t fix bullet Dsus2/G 3 0 0 3

3 0 0 3

holes

You say sorry D5 Em

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

0 3 2 0

3

3

3

3

3

 

just for show

You

live like that C

0 0

2 3

You live with ghosts D/F#

Gtr. 2 3 2 0

0 2 2 0

0 2 2 0

Bass plays Bass Fill 1 (see bar 10)

X X

X X

X X

2 3

0

2 0

0 0

2 0

2

2

Go back to

You

Dadd4

your G5

3 0 4 5

2 3

blood

G

now we got bad blood D5 Em7 Gtrs. 3 and 4 25 3 2 2 2 0 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

(F#5)

2

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 0 4

3

Cadd9 3 0 2 3

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

  23

0 3 0 0 2 0

2

0

0 3

0 3

0 3

0 0 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 3 3

3

4

(Eadd9)

 4

 0

4 2 2

0

0

0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3

3

3

3

2

2

0 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0

2

4

(F#sus2)

3 3 3 0 0 0 2 0

0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0

0 3 0 0 2 0

4

GU I TA R WOR L D • M A RCH 2016

4 0

2

2

0

4

4

Em7

3 0

2

0 4 5

0

0 4 5

3

0 2 0

2

2

0

2

2

0 2 0

3 0 0 2

3 0 0 2

0

2

0

(G#m7)

0

4

4

4 2 2

Cmaj7

3

(F#add4) 2

4

(G#m7)

(play 4 times)

(B5)

0

0 0 0 3 3 2 2 2 0

(B5)

Dadd4

3 3 0 0

(Eadd9)

3 3 0

(play repeats w/ad lib variation)

G5 3

Outro (2:51)

(play repeats w/ad lib variation)

28

0

0

3

 

Cadd9 G6 Dsus2 Em7 Gtrs. 1 and 2 play first four bars of Rhy. Fig. 1 simile (see bar 5) Gtr. 6 plays Riff A simile (see previous page)

(G#m7)

Bass

2

0 3 0 0 2 0

And baby

3 0 4 5

0 0

*Gtr. 3 w/delay effects.

(2:48)

Chorus (bar 14)

C

cold

Dadd4

0 0

2 3

runs

4

4

4

4

 

*Gtrs. 1-4

0



F

love like that C *Gtrs. 2 and 3

 

0 3 0 4 5

138

2

Breakdown (2:10)

Bandaids Csus2 Gtrs. 2 and 3 19

22

3 2 0

2

0

0

 

0 0 2 3

*Gtr. 3 w/delay effects

(Emaj7) 0 !

0 3 0 0 2 0


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STAR GUITARS Vincent Guitars Star Wars models

W

ITH THE RELEASE of Star Wars: The Force Awak-

ens, the market has become flooded with a deluge of Star Wars–related products. We’ve seen everything from a Kylo Ren–inspired black Dodge Viper to artisanal ice creams crafted in dark- and light-side flavors, but our favorite so far is this pair of Star Wars–inspired guitars built by luthier Vincent Uijtendaal of Vincent Guitars in the Netherlands. The Vincent Star Wars guitars started out as a Death Star game board that Uijtendaal wanted to build for his son. “When the board was finished, I wondered what else I could use it for,” Uijtendaal says. “Then the voice of Ben Kenobi whispered in my ear, ‘Use it for your guitars, Vincent!’ ” The first Star Wars guitar that he built was the Imperial Caster, which is based on a Telecaster body shape and has its top covered with Death Star tiles repurposed from the game board. “I glued the resin top to a red alder body, which I used because its warmer tone compensates for the crisp sound of the resin top. The Imperial logo is placed only at the 12th fret position on the ebony fretboard since the Imperials like to keep things plain and simple. The

For more information, visit vincentguitars.com

neck is flamed maple, but you can’t see it anymore since it turned to the dark side.” Uijtendaal next built a light side guitar to go with the Imperial Caster. “I decided to make a rebellion guitar, so I chose the Jaguar shape because it looks very rebellious,” he says. “I call it the Rebel Jag. Like ships in the rebel fleet, it looks as if it’s a combination of different parts. I also did some heavy weathering and gave it a few blast marks to look like it’s been attacked by Darth Vader himself.” The Imperial Caster and Rebel Jag each come with their own custom stomp boxes with complementary graphics. The Imperial distortion pedal is custom built by Vincent’s “electrical Jedi wizard friend” and offers two distinct distortion tones, while the Rebel pedal produces four different tremolo and “astromech droid sounds.” “These are the only two models in existence,” says Uijtendaal. “How many I make depends on how many people would want one, although my intention for now is to keep them exclusive and unique.” Should Vincent Guitars offer these models, Uijtendaal estimates they would sell for 7,700 Euros (Imperial Caster) and 5,700 Euros (Rebel Jag), both including pedals and case. — By Chris Gill

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GUTHRIE GOVAN – THE ARISTOCRATS

GUTHRIE GOVAN

After two years in meticulous development, Charvel is pleased to introduce the ultimate ultra–pro guitar—the Guthrie Govan Signature model.

Hear Guthrie on The Aristocrats’ latest release Culture Clash. Photo: Tara Stewart

charvel.com © 2014 JCMI. Charvel® and the distinctive headstock designs commonly found on Charvel® guitars are registered trademarks of Fender Musical Instruments Corporation and used herein under license to JCMI. All rights reserved.

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Guitar World march 2016