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Applying for: MArch Architecture ARB/RIBA Part 2 at UCL

Portfolio Aya Mousa Student Number: 20154005 Selected Works: 2018-2020


Contents

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Rediscovering Esna’s Cultural Heritage Assets

Cry Over Spilt Milk: A Re-imagined Bauhaus: A Women’s School of Architecture for the 21st Century

Year Out Professional Experience, Cairo, Egypt (2019-Present)

Undergraduate Project: 2019

The main goal of this project is to improve the face of Egypt, by upgrading the built environment of the residential buildings and by adopting a sustaina-

Celebrating women in the architectural industry, commemorating their

ble and environmentally friendly solution that will contribute to the well be-

creative brilliance and their impact on art education in the twentieth century,

ing of residents and change the general outlook towards the city to one that

the scheme aims to enable today’s women to express their ideas and skills

is more positive. The result of this project will hopefully enhance the tourism

freely and with no bias. In principle, the school expresses a typology where

sector in Esna, Egypt.

divisions between workplace, home and leisure are diminished.

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Weaving Through Stilts: A Pleasure Garden for the Huguenots

Morrocan Heritage Centre and Gallery Undergraduate Project: 2018

Undergraduate Conceptual Project: 2019 An intercultural approach aims to facilitate dialogue, exchange and reciprocal The re-using, recycling, and re-making of textiles has a very positive environmental

understanding between people of different backgrounds and cultures. The spatial

impact, and the design of my proposal intends to challenge this conventional

aspects of the Moroccan heritage centre can be divided into three aspects, which

typology. The main users and clients for the pleasure garden are the Hugueonts. The

include the courtyard, the traditional workshops, and the gallery/library and archive.

pleasure garden incorporates a textile recycling plant, a series of weaving and sewing

Readers can step out of the indoor library and enjoy their reading in the courtyard,

studios, and a clothing market which is open on weekends to the public.

with cups of Moroccan mint tea.


01

Saturday Market Street

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Esna, Egypt

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The #DiscoverEsna campaign is initiated by the Rediscovering Esna’s Cultural Heritage Assets (RECHA) Project which aims to unleash the potentials of the city’s diverse cultural assets, pave the way for a sustainable revitalization process, and reposition Esna as an important cultural heritage site on Egypt’s tourism map. This is achieved through the conservation of key heritage sites in Esna’s city center, the development of proper Management Plans for these sites, the documentation and promotion of Esna’s cultural heritage to raise awareness about the city’s diverse cultural heritage, in addition to the facilitation of economic benefits to Esna’s residents from tourism development activities and the creation of improved employment opportunities.

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Approached by land or by the River Nile, Esna is a living time capsule of Egypt. The city is one of Egypt’s oldest, with its earliest roots traced back to the prehistoric era. Located 60 kilometers south of Luxor, Esna is a place best discovered on foot. Take a walk through the ages and let your imagination go as you stroll through Esna’s narrow streets, each containing their own story thousands of years in the making.

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Khnum Temple: Esna’s Main Tourist Attraction

This project is implemented by Takween In“Once upon tegrated Community Development in parta time, old nership with CID Consulting and an in collaboration with the Luxor Governorate and the merchant lived Ministry of Antiquities. The project is funded by ...” by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) with the aim of enhancing the competitiveness of the tourism sector in Egypt through improving the management, conservation and promotion of cultural heritage sites.

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“Once upon a time, an old merchant lived by...”

3


Style, Form, and Massing

Skylights, opened from the first floor to the roof, providing fair amount of natural light.

Overview of Keshk House

Internal Architecture Features

Two stair cores, opened from the ground floor to the roof, providing a fair amount of natural light.

Isometric Section showing the column as a supporting element of the construction of the house.

The hose opening provides lighting for the floors underneath, those openings were closed and partially built on.

Keshk House’s style and massing are not only unique and interesting but they also reveal the narrative of the building process. The building is composed of three stories. It has two elevations overlooking two streets. Looking at the form and plans of the house, we perceive a composition that is an intersection of a square-shaped mass with another irregular mass that recesses from the square. By comparing and contrasting the two masses, a hypothetical narrative of the building process could be unfolded. The square shaped mass is shorter in height, the walls within it conform to a grid and its balcony, oval windows and metal grilles show a stylistic reference to Ottoman architecture from the 19th century. As for the irregular mass around it, it implies that it is a spontaneous addition rather than walls conforming to a grid. It is taller in height and its balconies and windows are close in style to the residential architecture of Esna in the 20th century.

Perspective Collage of Keshk House

BAYT KESHK

The square shaped mass that was built first.

2

Key Responsibilities: Illustrations

Axonometric view with context

The irregular shaped building that was built later on.

Exploded axonometric showing the two masses connected together through the ground and second floor.

The first house I worked on was known as Keshk House. My team had already produced plans, elevations and a 3D model after visiting the site. I was in charge of producing the illustrations for the house, which mostly included the overall style and form of the building, with some drawings focusing on significant internal details in the house. Documenting this house allows others to understand the significance it plays on Esna’s heritage.


Style, Form, and Massing

Overview of Megahed House

CAD Drawings

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52 51 50 49 48 47 46 45 44

25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16

30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 15

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Ground Floor Plan

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Private

One stair core, opened from the ground floor to the roof, providing a fair amount of natural light.

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01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11

Public

First Floor Plan

Roof Plan

The mansion was built on 390m footprint, and is considered one of the few significant buildings in Esna, while also being a touristic attraction. The mansion has an irregular plan and was built on 3 stories including the ground. It has 3 facades facing north, east and south, all of them containing a number of fenestrations and rows of openings. The largest facade of them is the eastern one, which is facing the Megahdya street and directed towards the waterfront. The facade could be divided into 3 parts; the middle part is impulsive, emphasizing the doorway for the guests’ area and topped with the upper floor balconies, the rest of the facades contain rows of typically shaped and sized windows.

Perspective Collage of Megahed House

Key Responsibilities: CAD Drawings, 3D Model and Illustrations (Ongoing) Megahed House was a bigger house than the previous one I had worked on, and contained much more details. After personally visiting the house in Esna, Egypt, I worked on the plans for the house on AutoCAD. Afterwards, I was asked to make a 3D model of the house, which I did on Rhino, and used it to illustrate and highlight the architecture, typology, and internal details of the house.

Modifications

Axonometric view with context

Significance

Modifications

The documentation of these buildings was neccessary, as the practice is working on a booklet which will explain the overall significance of these homes to visiting tourists.


-Oskar Schlemmer, Head of the Bauhaus, 1919 During the Bauhaus years, it was almost impossible for women to take part in architecture, painting, metal works, sculpture and workshops other than textiles. The avant-garde design leaders developed progressive ideas in relation to art, design and architecture yet their attitudes towards women and their creativity was stuck somewhere in the middle ages. Their view, simply, was that women were home makers and their abilities lacked intellect.

02

Cry Over Spilt Milk: Re-imagined "WeAhold these truths toBauhaus: be self-evident; that all people are created equal.” -Martin Luther King, 191921st Century A Women’s School of Architecture for the I have a dream that today we will reimagine the Bauhaus as a Womens School of Architecture for the 21st century. I have a dream that one day, women will rise and live out the true meaning of their creativity. I have a dream that my little daughters will one day live in a society where they will not be judged by their gender but by the content of their abilities.

The Women of the Bauhaus “Architects, painters and sculptors are craftsmen in the true sense of the word; hence, a thorough training in the crafts, acquired in workshops and in experimental and practical sites, is required of all students as the indispensable basis for all artistic production. There would be no difference between the beautiful and the strong sex. -Walter Gropius, Bauhaus Manifesto and Program, 1919. That is a lie. “Women were not physically and genetically qualified for certain arts because they thought in two dimensions, compared to their male partners, who could think in three.” -Walter Gropius, Founder and Director of the Bauhaus, 1919. The women of the Bauhaus were marginalised, ignored and remain relatively unknown. Considered incapable of being architects, they resided in the space of home crafts: textiles, ceramics and photography. Ultimately, it was the male version of a finishing school to create perfect wives for the creative masters. “Where there is wool, there is a woman who weaves, if only to pass the time.” -Oskar Schlemmer, Head of the Bauhaus, 1919 During the Bauhaus years, it was almost impossible for women to take part in architecture, painting, metal works, sculpture and workshops other than textiles. The avant-garde design leaders developed progressive ideas in relation to art, design and architecture yet their attitudes towards women and their creativity was stuck somewhere in the middle ages. Their view, simply, was that women were home makers and their abilities lacked intellect. "We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all people are created equal.” -Martin Luther King, 1919 I have a dream that today we will reimagine the Bauhaus as a Womens School of Architecture for the 21st century. I have a dream that one day, women will rise and live out the true meaning of their creativity. I have a dream that my little daughters will one day live in a society where they will not be judged by their gender but by the content of their abilities.


Design Statement The narrative begins with a dream of the women of the Bauhaus’ vision, aiming to integrate education and industry through socialist principles. Inspired by these women, the proposal manifests a Women’s school of architecture, enabling women to find their passion and fulfill their aspirations through crafts. Female students enrolled in the school complete a postgraduate architecture programme in the span of two years. The scheme is designed for many purposes. Primarily, it will serve as an educational facility for students to learn and work. It will also serve as accommodation for students to eat, sleep, bathe, launder clothes, etc. Moreover, it will incorporate a communal area for classmates to socialise and form long-term relationships encouraging women to support one another. In principle, the all inclusive proposal aims to create a space, isolated from the maledominated world, for women to nurture and grow, away from suppressing forces.   The proposed client is the RIBA. Funds from such institutions will be of great benefit for all involved parties. RIBA’s investment in future female architects will further encourage them to achieve their fullest potential. The school expresses a typology where divisions between workplace, home and leisure are diminished. It adopts an interwoven spatial language, interspersing production spaces with gardens to create a multi-orientational experience while preserving the building’s sense of transparency. It supports the re-engaging of craftsmanship whilst overlapping it with contemporary technologies of the 21st century. Spaces that make up the scheme’s programme include six workshop buildings (Enclosure (textiles), Welding, Dramatic Arts, mechanical representation (photography), Manual Representation (painting) and Casting). It also includes sleeping units, a library and a communal dining hall. Where each production space intersects with another is a space for experimentation. Each building references the programme of the building to inform the architecture. For example, the enclosure building is an inhabited loom, where the interior walls of the building function as a vertical frame of thread for students to continuously create weavings from. For the dramatics arts building, which draws inspiration from Lilly Reich’s Velvet and Silk Cafe, curtains are used as partition walls and transition spaces throughout the building. Celebrating women in the architectural industry, commemorating their creative brilliance and their impact on art education in the twentieth century, the scheme aims to enable women to express their ideas and skills freely and with no bias.

Conceptual Collage: Representing Gender Inequality at the Bauhaus Bauhaus Women (Left to Right): Anni Albers, Marianne Brandt, Ilse Fehling, and Gertrud Arndt


Whitechapel, London As an international city, London is celebrated for its diversity in population. The East End has always been recognised for the wealth of cultures represented. Specifically, Whitechapel served as a system of this polyglot society, the ‘melting pot’ fusion of east and west. Historically, it has played host to a transient community – primarily for new immigrants. Bird Eye View of Site

Legend Site Schools

Site Location & Analysis: Whitechapel, London


6+)+*+387

6+)+*+387 Precedents

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/11=!+/).#+').+6'88.+'9.'97$+1:+8'3*"/10',+   Lilly Reich, Teacher at the Bauhaus, Velvet and Silk Cafe #.+/38+6/4675')+74,8.+6'2'8/)6879/1*/3-;+6+/375/6+*(=/11=!+/).>7$+1:+8'3*"/10',+9). #.+/38+6/4675')+74,8.+6'2'8/)6879/1*/3-;+6+/375/6+*(=/11=!+/).>7$+1:+8'3*"/10',+9). SPRL[OPZJHMLPUJVYWVYH[PUNJ\Y[HPUZPU[V[OLWYVWVZHSHSSV^Z^VTLU[VYVHT[OYV\NOMYLLÃ…V^PUNZWHJ (1927) SPRL[OPZJHMLPUJVYWVYH[PUNJ\Y[HPUZPU[V[OLWYVWVZHSHSSV^Z^VTLU[VYVHT[OYV\NOMYLLÃ…V^PUNZWHJ +78691=-+88/3-'7+37+4,8.+,'(6/)7966493*/3-8.+2 +78691=-+88/3-'7+37+4,8.+,'(6/)7966493*/3-8.+2

The interior spaces of the Dramatic Arts Building were inspired by Lilly Reich’s Velvet and Silk Cafe. Much like this /11=!+/).#+').+6'88.+'9.'97$+1:+8'3*"/10',+   cafe, incorporating curtains into the proposal allows women to roam through free-flowing spaces, truly getting a sense of #.+/38+6/4675')+74,8.+6'2'8/)6879/1*/3-;+6+/375/6+*(=/11=!+/).>7$+1:+8'3*"/10',+9). SPRL[OPZJHMLPUJVYWVYH[PUNJ\Y[HPUZPU[V[OLWYVWVZHSHSSV^Z^VTLU[VYVHT[OYV\NOMYLLÅV^PUNZWHJ the fabric surrounding them. +78691=-+88/3-'7+37+4,8.+,'(6/)7966493*/3-8.+2 6+)+*+387

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Key Spaces

1. Individual Weaving Workshops 2. Cafe+="5')+7 and Dining Hall

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Proposed Ground Floor Plan 64547+*6493*1446 1'3 ")'1+   Scale 1:200


Precedent

Precedents

Precedent

S�erre Fehn� �ordic Pa�illion in �enice The �elding and Painting building of my proposal was inspired by the �ordic Pa�illion in �enice. �ncor� porating a similar space inside my building� the internal courtyards are additional spaces where students could do welding and painting outdoors.

Sverre Fehn, Nordic Pavillion in Venice

S�erre Fehn� �ordic Pa�illion in �enice Key Spaces Precedent The �elding and Painting building of my proposal was inspired by the �ordic Pa�illion in �enice. �ncor� porating a similar space inside my building� the internal courtyards are additional spaces where students 1. Textile Studios could weldingRoof andTerrace painting outdoors. 2.do Outdoor

The Welding and Painting building of my proposal was 3. Experimenting with Textile and Ceramics inspired by the Nordic Pavillion in Venice. Incorporating a 4. Sleeping Hammocks similar spaceStudio inside my building, the internal courtyards are 5. Objectification Key Spaces 6. Library additional spaces where students could do welding and 1. Textile Studios 7. Textile Studios painting 2. Outdoor Roofoutdoors. Terrace 8. Experimenting with Costume and Textile 3. Experimenting with Textile and Ceramics 9. Sleeping Units 4. Sleeping Hammocks 5. Objectification Studio 6. Library 7. Textile Studios 8. Experimenting with Costume and Textile 9. Sleeping Units 9 7

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S�erre Fehn� �ordic Pa�illion in �enice 4

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The �elding and Painting building of my proposal was inspired by the �ordic Pa�illion in �enice. �nc Key Spaces porating a similar space inside my building� the internal courtyards are additional spaces where stude could do1 welding and painting outdoors. 2

1. Textile Studios 2. Outdoor Roof Terrace Key Spaces 3. Experimenting with Textile and Ceramics 1. Textile Hammocks Studios 4. Sleeping 2. Outdoor Roof Terrace 5. Objectification Studio 3. Experimenting with Textile and Ceramics 6. Library 4. Sleeping Hammocks 5. Objectification 7. Textile Studios Studio 6. Library 8. Experimenting with Costume and Textile 7. Textile Studios 9. Sleeping Units with Costume and Textile 8. Experimenting 9. Sleeping Units

6 Proposed First Floor Plan 9 Scale 1:200

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8 Proposed First Floor Plan Scale 1:200

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Proposed First Proposed First Floor Plan Floor Plan Scale 1:200 Scale 1:200


Precedents

Precedent

Conceptual Project, Dreaming of Electric Sheep, 2018 This particular representation helped inform the roof lecture space of the proposal.

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S�erre Fehn� �ordic Pa�illion in �enice

The �elding and Painting building of my proposal was inspired by the �ordic Pa�illion in �enice. �ncor� porating a similar space inside my building� the internal courtyards are additional spaces where students could do welding and painting outdoors. 1

Key Spaces 1. Textile Studios

2. Outdoor Roof Terrace Key Spaces

3. Experimenting with Textile and Ceramics 4. Sleeping Hammocks

1. Sleeping Units Studio 5. Objectification 6. Library 2. Sleeping Units Textile Studios 3. Roof 7. Lecture Theatre 8. Experimenting with Costume and Textile 9. Sleeping Units

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Proposed Second Floor Plan Proposed First Floor Plan Scale 1:200 Scale 1:200


Gunta Stozl, Wall Hanging, 1924 Gunta Stozl, Wall Hanging, 1924 The section of the proposal was inspired by the color palette of Gunta Stozl’s wall hanging. She was one of the earliest Bauhaus members, arriving at the school in 1919 at the age of 22. She was known for

complex patchworksof of patterns, and they usually took the form of rugs,by wall the tapestries, and coverings. The section the proposal was inspired color palette of Gunta Stozl’s wall hanging. She was one of the earliest Detail of Wall Bauhaus members, arriving at the school in 1919 at the age The internal walls of the enclosure building of 22. She was known for complex patchworks incorporate a a vertical frameof loompatterns, that allows Gunta Stozl, Wall Hanging, 1924 students to weave from. The wall is insulated and they usually took the form of rugs, wallsheet tapestries, and withofa Gunta polycarbonate layer, which alsoone The section of the proposal was inspired by the color palette Stozl’s wall hanging. She was as at a dividing wall individual of the earliest Bauhaus members, arriving at the school inacts 1919 the age of 22.between She wasthe known for coverings. weaving spaces. complex patchworks of patterns, and they usually took the form of rugs, wall tapestries, and coverings.

Detail of the Wall Detail of Wall The internal walls of the enclosure building incorporate a a vertical frame loom that allows students to weave from. The wall is insulated with a polycarbonate sheet layer, which also Gunta Stozl, Wall Hanging, 1924 acts as a dividing wall between the individual weaving spaces. The section of the proposal was inspired by the color palette of Gunta Stozl’s wall hanging. She was one of the earliest Bauhaus members, arriving at the school in 1919 at the age of 22. She was known for complex patchworks of patterns, and they usually took the form of rugs, wall tapestries, and coverings.

Detail of Wall The internal walls of the enclosure building incorporate a a vertical frame loom that allows students to weave from. The wall is insulated with a polycarbonate sheet layer, which also acts as a dividing wall between the individual weaving spaces. Thread

Polycarbonate Timber Frame

Thread

Thread

Polycarbonate Timber Frame

Thread Thread

The internal walls of the enclosure building incorporate a vertical frame loom that allows students toPolycarbonate weave from. The wall is insulated with a polycarbonate sheet layer, which also acts Timber Frame as a dividing wall between the individual weaving spaces. Proposed Perspective Section Scale 1:200

Thread

Proposed Perspective Section Scale 1:200

Proposed Perspective Section Scale 1:200

Proposed Perspective Section Scale 1:200


Sleeping Units

Roof Lecture

Key Spaces Key Spaces Sleeping Units Studio Workshops

Studios

Individual Weaving Workshops

Costume Making Shared Laundrette Auditorium Library Backstage and Main Entry

Enclosure Building

TheThe Enclosure BuildingBuilding Enclosure

Dramatic Arts Building

The Dramatic Arts Building

The Dramatic Arts Building

The Welding and Painting Building

The Welding and Painting Building

The Photography Building Painting and Metalwork/ Sleeping Capsules

Photography TheThe Pottery Building

Building

Cafe/Dining Hall

The Pottery Building Cafe/Dining Hall

Typical Craft-Making Collage: Typical Craft-Making at the Bauhaus Welding and Painting Building Studios

Hammock Beds

Dark Photography Rooms Kiln

Photography Building

Pottery Building

Main Programme

Main Programme


Physical Model of the Enclosure Building Physical Model of the Enclosure Building

Inspired by the construction of a loom, the model explores thread as a partition space as well as a weaving space for students. This model lead to the development of the proposalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s materiality. Key materials used in the proposal include timber, thread, polycarbonate, glass and rope.

Inspired by the construction of a loom, the model explores thread as a partition space as well as a weaving space for students. This model lead to the development of the proposalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s materiality. Key materials used in the proposal Proposed Axonometric include timber, thread, polycarbonate, glass, and rope. Scale 1:200

Proposed Axonometric Scale 1:200


The Enclosure Building: Individual Weaving Workshops

Courtyard

The Welding and Painting Building

The Enclosure Building: Textile Studios

Proposed Views


America.

In 1960s Mississippi, Southern society girl Skeeter returns from college with dreams of being a writer. She turns her small town on its ear by choosing to interview the black women who have spent their lives taking care of prominent white families. Only Aibileen, the housekeeper of Skeeter's best friend, will talk at ďŹ rst. But as the pair continue theStilts: collaboration, more women to come forward, and as it turns out, they have quite a lot to A Conceptual Proposal: Weaving Through A Pleasure Garden for decide the Huguenots say.

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Design Statement


Whitechapel, London Whitechapel, London As an international city, London is celebrated Asitsandiversity international city, London celebrated for in population. The is East End has for its been diversity in population. EastofEnd has always recognised for the The wealth cultures always beenSpecifically, recognisedWhitechapel for the wealth of cultures represented. served as Whitechapel served as a represented. system of thisSpecifically, polyglot society, the ‘melting pot’ a system of this society, theit ‘melting pot’ fusion of east andpolyglot west. Historically, has played fusion east andcommunity west. Historically, it has host to aoftransient – primarily forplayed new host to a transient community – primarily for new immigrants. immigrants. Bird Eye View of Site Bird Eye View of Site

Legend Legend Site Site Schools Schools

Site Location Location:&Whitechapel, London London Site Analysis: Whitechapel, Site Location & Analysis: Whitechapel, London


Who Were They? Huguenots were French Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries who followed the teachings of theologian John Calvin. Persecuted by the French Catholic government during a violent period, Huguenots fled the country in the 17th century, where they settled all over Europe, in the United States and Africa. In London, the majority of them settled in in Spitalfields and Whitechapel.They were particularly prolific in the textile industry and considered reliable workers in many fields. Essentially, they were the first “refugees” to arrive to England and introduce silk weaving.

Graffiti in French recently uncovered in a weavers’ loft Elder Street, 1725

Sundial recording the date of the building of the Huguenot Church. Fournier Street, 1725

Water head with the initials of Pierre Bourdain, a Huguenot weaver who became Headborough and had the house built for him. Fournier Street, 1725

One of London’s oldest shop fronts, occupied by Nicholas Jourdain, Huguenot Silk Mercer and Director of the French Hospital. Artillery Lane, 1720

A wooden spool, which indicates houses where Huguenots once resided. Folgate Street, 1720.

The Hanbury Hall was built as a Huguenot Church, was extended in 1864 and is now the church hall for Christ Church, Spitalfields. Hanbury St, 1719.

Brick Lane Mosque was originally a Huguenot Church named “L’eglise de l’Hopital, replacing another an earlier wooden chapel. Brick Lane, 1743.

Sandys Row Synagogue was originally built by the Huguenots as “L’eglise de l’Artillerie.” Artillery Lane, 1766. Traces of the Huguenots in Spitalfields, London


Precedents

Amy Casey: Circling the Wagons, 2008

Do Ho Suh: Home Within Home, 2015

Christo: Wrapped Trees, 1998

Design Development: Collaged Elevation from Whitechapel High Street


1:20 Axonometric Details

Stilts allow a structure or building to stand at a distance above the ground. In flood plains, and on beaches or unstable ground, buildings are often constructed on stilts to protect them from damage by water or shifting soil or sand. Since the studios in my proposal stand 20 meters above ground, the stilts need to include bracing, to ensure the studios are structurally stable. Having the most diagonal supports, the cross bracing type works best for my design.

Front Elevation Scale 1:200

Corten Steel Stilts: Detailed Drawing


Saturday/Sunday Market

View from Ground Level and Above

Sewing and Weaving Studios

Proposed Views


conceptual collage: exploring the spatial relationship between traditional and contemporary architecture

04 Moroccan Heritage Centre and Gallery An intercultural approach aims to facilitate dialogue, exchange and reciprocal understanding between people of different backgrounds and cultures. The spatial aspects of the Moroccan heritage centre can be divided into three aspects, which include the courtyard, the traditional workshops, and the gallery/library and archive. Readers can step out of the indoor library and enjoy their reading in the courtyard, with cups of Moroccan mint tea.

Conceptual Collage: Exploring the Spatial Relationship between Traditional and Contemporary Architecture


site plan and context at 1:500

Acklam Acklam Road, Road, London: London: Site Site Plan Plan and and Context Context at at 1:500 1:500


7 moroccan street food market: open saturday from 12-5 PM 8 staff entry and parking space Key Spaces 1 Reception Desk: Welcoming guests and coordinating activities and booking enquiries. 2 W.C. 3 Courtyard: An oasis of calm where users can enjoy their time outdoors and get away from the bustle of the city. 4 Ceramic tile workshop: A traditional Moroccan activity

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where users can put use to their creative sides and learn new skills and techniques to produce a unique ceramic tile. 5 Perfume workshop: An informative class where visitors can learn about the history of perfume making in Morocco, how to appropriately blend the scents, and how to make a solid perfume. 6 Cafe: Includes a traditional music performance that other visitors can hear from other areas of the centre. 7 Moroccan street food Market: A mini street food market selling tagines and couscous, Moroccan based herbs and spices, mint tea, and more. Open on Saturdays from 12-5 PM.

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Key Spaces 7 Contemporary Gallery for Hassan Hajjaj: An opportunity to experience Moroccan culture and heritage through photography and film screening. 8 Library and Archive Storage Area: Books and a collection of historical documents which visitors can enjoy reading in the courtyard.

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SECTION BB AT SCALE 1:50

Section BB at Scale 1:50


Street View

Courtyard

Street View

Proposed Views

Profile for Aya Mousa

Aya Mousa: UCL MArch Architecture ARB/RIBA Part 2 Portfolio  

Aya Mousa: UCL MArch Architecture ARB/RIBA Part 2 Portfolio