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the pr eston mar k et mystery project


the pr eston mar k et mystery project john newling

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The Preston Market Mystery Project John Newling First published in June 2008 by Harris Museum & Art Gallery Market Square Preston Lancashire United Kingdom pr1 2pp harris.museum@preston.gov.uk 01772 258248 Printed as an edition of 1000 hardbacks with dvd isbn 978-1-871575-27-9 Š 2008 Harris Museum & Art Gallery, The Artist, Authors Photography Š Alexandra Wolkowicz, Kristy Noble Filming: Kevin Mahy All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without prior written permission of the publishers. British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data A British Library CIP record is available Designed by Alan Ward at axisgraphicdesign.co.uk Printed and bound by Editoriale Bortolazzi Stei, Verona


The Preston Market Mystery Project contents

Foreword

Elaine Speight .............................................................................Page 7

The Preston Mysteries

Bob Dickinson . ...........................................................................Page 9

The Preston Market Mystery Project The Insurance Stall ............................................................ Page 19 November 21st, 22nd and 23rd 2006

Voicing Mysteries ................................................................Page 29 March 2007

The Knowledge Meal ........................................................ Page 39 June 2007

280 Mysteries ........................................................................Page 49 The Propositional Stalls ....................................................Page 71 Constructing a Mystery: Mystery 281 . ........................Page 105 Acknowledgements ........................................................... Page 120


Foreword The Preston Market Mystery Project

The Preston Market Mystery Project began in 2006 when we invited John Newling to Preston, with a view to commissioning him for the, then embryonic, Here + Now temporary public art programme. Our belief has always been that artists work in the most interesting ways when offered non-prescriptive briefs and the site visit was designed to discover not only whether John would be interested in working with us, but if so which location or aspect of Preston city centre he might like to explore. Newling arrived on a typical January day and was taken on a tour of the city by In Certain Places Project Manager, Charles Quick. Despite the inhospitable Preston weather we were delighted by his enthusiasm for the project and apparent interest in the city’s Covered Markets. It is not surprising that he was drawn to these spaces. Not only is the architecture impressive; huge cast iron structures dating from 1875, but the markets are vibrant sites of social exchange. In 2005, Demos produced a report entitled ‘People Make Places’ which described the site’s bi-weekly flea market as a place of ‘diversity, belonging and surprise’, where gossip and conversation is exchanged alongside almost any item imaginable. Newling embraced this social space and from the beginning demonstrated an ability to involve and intrigue people, through processes of affiliation and exchange. During The Insurance Stall, the first event in The Preston Market Mystery Project, the artist manned a stall for three days, collecting people’s stories of mystery in exchange for a jar of coins and a specially designed certificate. Setting up and dismantling his stall each day, Newling immersed himself in the rhythm of the marketplace and, wrapped up against the stinging November wind, he and his team became colleagues to their fellow traders, set apart only by their unusual stock and Newling’s offer to insure shoppers against ‘loss of mystery’. That 280 mysteries were collected is testament to Newling’s innate talent of relating to people. Fellow stall holders who were initially suspicious became key contributors and shoppers returned again and again with evermore fantastic mysteries. The Preston Market Mystery Project did not merely infiltrate the market’s social structures, but enlivened its physical space. Voicing Mysteries was a twilight

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the preston market mystery project

performance in March 2007, in which Newling read aloud the 280 mysteries. Standing at a gold lectern, the artist transformed the empty market into a dreamlike space, captivating passers-by and prompting imaginations of how the Covered Markets could be something other than the unofficial carparks they become at night. I am aware that John Newling is uncomfortable with the label ‘Public Artist’, yet The Preston Market Mystery Project became a public art project in all the positive senses of the term. Not only was it produced for ‘the public’, but it engaged, revealed and most importantly connected a very specific public – that of the Covered Market’s stallholders and shoppers. In June 2007, Newling invited forty relative strangers to an open-air meal in the Covered Market. Each person had submitted a mystery to The Insurance Stall the previous year and was sent an invitation through the post. As the replies came in, we were interested to find that, rather than expressing suspicion or confusion towards this strange invitation, the majority of invitees were touched by what they regarded as a generous gift. The Knowledge Meal was visually stunning and socially dynamic. Relationships were initiated between diners and a new mystery was created for the city. As one guests commented ‘The meal was beautiful. Eating out that night will stay with me forever.’ Working with John Newling has been a pleasure and an adventure. When we first approached him we had imagined a single artwork or event. What we got was The Preston Market Mystery Project, a series of events which explored, represented and re-imagined a key place in Preston city centre. Newling has a way of drawing people into his work and the project was achieved through the exceptional support of Market Manager, Dave Bullock and his team, and dedicated volunteers and staff from the Harris Museum & Art Gallery. This publication has been keenly awaited by everyone involved in the project. It will serve as a valuable memento for visitors to The Insurance Stall, spectators of Voicing Mysteries and diners at The Knowledge Meal, whilst offering a secondary audience the chance to experience this unique and intriguing project. Elaine Speight Assistant curator In Certain Places

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The Preston Mysteries On mystery, place and memory By Bob Dickinson

Is it possible for a psychogeographic experiment, centred on a particular urban space, to gather together and celebrate some of our most private experiences, the ones we perhaps keep to ourselves more than any others, because they have about them a quality of mystery? I believe this is what John Newling’s contribution to Preston’s continuing programme of public art, In Certain Places, succeeded in doing. My direct observation of the Preston Mysteries project in action was at its third stage – a setpiece meal for forty, at a long table covered in a white cloth. Its setting, an otherwise-deserted, covered market, on a blustery summer evening, was almost nakedly public. This striking scene brought together people whose personal encounters with the enigmatic had found a common outlet, in the same location, several months earlier, with the day-time market in full swing. Time, location, and memory had, furthermore, come together at a significant period in the city’s history, as Preston prepares itself for £650m-worth of regeneration. It seemed important that memory, personal and collective, should be highlighted by this unusual durational work. The urban, industrial side of the English north has changed a lot in the last decade or so. Within living memory – there’s a phrase for you – the old town and city centres, frequently of blackened stone and brick, have been cleaned up, or cleared away. Former mills and factories are now flats and offices. Previously overgrown and polluted canal basins are attractive locations for restaurants or hotels. Admittedly, the changes haven’t been absolute. In the poorer outlying neighbourhoods, yes, the traditional landscapes linger on. Terraced houses, pebbledashed semis, and low-rise concrete flats are all still in evidence. But local government in the north now likes to think big about their urban centres, their image, and how to attract people into them, as economic players: consumers, residents, and tourists. Manchester, and – especially noticable this year – Liverpool, have long been preoccupied with major redevelopment projects, accompanied by the management of slick PR campaigns and media coverage. More recently, smaller urban centres from Barnsley to Barrow-in-Furness have started dreaming up visions for change. Sometimes the idealism’s highly ambitious – the north

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imagined, for instance, in Will Alsop’s ‘Supercity’ as an interconnection of conurbations and corridors of energy, stretched along motorways, across the Pennines. But even if such visions seem far-fetched, consider the reality, and the number of ‘iconic’ constructions that have sprung up, from the Angel of the North to whatever’s the latest tallest building in Manchester. They make talking points, they summon sightseers, they aim to serve as generators for a new regional pride. It’s difficult to know, though, if every iconic building or piece of public art will succeed in defining a new sense of identity by interweaving with what went before. With memory, again. To stroll around the regenerated centres of Manchester, Leeds, or Liverpool, you notice an emphasis on shopping, and in images promoting ‘lifestyle’. This crowd-pleasing quality is perhaps, only reflected negatively in the fact that so many of us live in debt. But regeneration, and the dreamlike content of the consumerised experience that flows from it, have had their critics. In particular, ideas and experiments concerning what was loosely termed psychogeography have taken root in Britain, and other countries. Those roots are as complicated as the map of a city encountered by a stranger wishing to become psychogeographically disorientated. You can go back to the activities of the Situationist International of the 1950s and 60s, or back further to the wanderings and writings of pre-war urban intellectuals like Walter Benjamin, or further still, to nineteenth century poets like Charles Beaudelaire, or novelists like Dickens or journalists like De Quincey. What they all had in common was a need to engage, ecstatically and emotionally, with the cities they knew so well, from having traversed them so often, on foot as well as on wheels. They needed to re-invent their worlds, which even then were undergoing profound change. By the 1990s, with the development of Canary Wharf in east London, and the ‘gentrification’ of neighbourhoods like Whitechapel, the works of writers like Iain Sinclair and Peter Ackroyd, and the temporary appearance of groups like the London Psychogeographic Assocation revived the idea of psychogeography as a technique, a form of intervention and activism, and potential to provoke pranks. Between the 90s and now, psychogeography began to enter the academy, as an element in the training of architects and planners, while many artists, particularly those working in public or with the public, have continued to work along psychogeographic lines. Festivals like CONFLUX and PROVFLUX, in Brooklyn and Providence Rhode Island, annually bring psychogeographic art events into the streets. While Preston only received city status in 2002, it’s old as a place of habitation and social interaction. Like many Lancashire towns, its boom years came with the cotton mills of the 1800s. The mills may have gone, but hi-tech industries, like the military aero-manufacturer BAE Systems, moved in. Culminating in

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the summer of 2007, John Newling’s Mysteries Project took place, therefore, in what the City Council proudly call ‘England’s newest city’. Though a public art project, the Mysteries never aimed to create an icon. Its focal point was already iconic: a Victorian covered market, a wonderful pair of iron and glass structures, situated in the centre of the zone the city has scheduled for regeneration in what they call the Tithebarn Project. It’s controversial, of course. Among the big plans, the city’s concrete bus station, which at its opening in 1969 was the biggest in Europe, is due for demolition – a cause for Jonathan Glancey in the Guardian newspaper to lament the loss of this “baroque cathedral for buses”. Although the covered market won’t be demolished, it will be redeveloped, but nobody’s quite sure how, as yet. “As soon as I saw the market I knew that that was where I was going to work,” John told me , “I was aware that the kind of transactions that occur in marketplaces fascinate me. And it was just a fantastic site. The space attracted me from the very beginning, because it is such a vast, semi-open place where people go to get bargains, but they can also derive – they can just wander. And I wanted a place where nothing would happen around the project other than in the actual place. So all the stuff that went on, went on inside the marketplace.” “It seemed,” John added, “Incredibly busy…” In being drawn towards the market as a vibrant space for busy-ness as well as business, for the psychogeographic walk or derive as well as shopping, John linked a known, practical building with the people who knew it through their regular practice. “There were people I got to know who were regulars,” he recalled, “whom I’d go and have a really nice cup of tea with. The local tea bloke – 50p a cup of tea. And he got to know me. And there were the people that put the market up and took it down again at the end of the day, who were quite extraordinary in their discipline and care. This was like building a shopping mall every day. Building it and taking it down. Then the people who arrived at the market – I mean, there were people who would go there and buy a hat, or a card, but you could see they were there just to be there, many of them. And many of them knew each other.” In the ebb and flow of human beings using the market, then, could be observed some of the most important dynamics and rhythms of a solid, three dimensional object with a long history. This psychogeographic insight into a given space, fed back into the Mysteries project, as it unfolded, phase by phase. “I started writing,” John remembered, “about the importance of mystery. Or the lack of mystery.” It’s fascinating that the market sparked thoughts about the mysteries locked up in its habituees. John Newling’s decision to open a stall inside the market, exchanging personal recollections of mystery for insurance certificates

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against loss of mystery, points again to the psychogeographic possibilities of the building in its lived sense, in bringing together the disparate, separate memories of individuals finding themselves drawn to one place. “We were there on three separate days in three different locations, in the market. One in the small market and two in the big market. The first day was in the small market which is a car boot, and you have a completely different group of people arrive at the car boot market than you do at, if you like, the more formal market.” “It was a long day. We’d set up at five thirty and finish about four o’clock. On the second day it was raining, and it was really quite hard work. First day was just fantastic, because I mean you get a rush … because I believe these things will never work – that we wouldn’t get anybody. We had about 120 people that day, all engaging in it, chatting about it, laughing about it. All wanting the certificates as well. Some being very cute, and with every right to be cute, saying, if I’ve lost my mystery, can I make a claim? And I said, yeah, if you want.” But in the event, many of Preston’s marketgoers hadn’t lost their mysteries, and gave permission to have them written down, by volunteers, dictated from memory. Memory – this ability humans share with animals – becomes more complex with age. Extending, diversifying, sometimes fading, sometimes returning unannounced, memory often plays games. Whereas everyone’s memories (in the way they are carried around, and re-lived) are utterly individual and personal, there are occasions when the possibility emerges of memory playing a part in a shared, communal experience. Storytelling has its roots in memory, in oral tradition, in which narratives are handed on and swapped around – binding together groups of people across a shared space and time. But in many of the resurgent northern cities referred to above, memory has been captured and preserved in museums and galleries, and therefore somehow frozen. While memorials of the iconic sort proliferate out-of-doors, memory has become a sort of memorial, too, for ears to hear and eyes to read in the permanent displays and oral history programmes detailing the north’s industrial and social heritage. The Mysteries went into more private territory, but then brought memory back to life in ritualistic but respectful ways. Next, in March 2007, came a public reading, Voicing Mysteries, which John performed inside the market one evening, from dusk until 11.00pm. It was a physical and mental challenge for the reader, as John describes: “A plan emerged, to read from a very special lecturn, because I felt it’s quite a special text – because it’s not my text, it’s people’s text – to read that in public, from dusk. I mean, dusk is there as the threshold space, but the practicality was I needed a huge empty market, with just this little guy at this gold lecturn, reading. But with a lot of amplification, so that if you were walking round from

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the Harris Museum, up to the market, you could hear what was being read. Most exhausting. I wanted to read it three times, but I couldn’t make it. It took almost two and a half hours to read through it, standing there ... so we did one further reading … got interrupted once, by some lads who were – on something. And they’d heard me reading about a mother regretting something, in one of the mysteries, and they’d interpreted, in paranoia, really, that I was talking about their mother. And they ran over. The security was quite high, really, but they got through, and they ran over to accuse me of being rude about their mother. And that was really interesting, cause I just stepped aside, and chatted to them about the project. And assured them that I wasn’t talking about their mother, it was just a mystery. And they stayed. They just sat down and listened. And it was extraordinary.” And so the mysteries, which began as unsolved episodes, volunteered from separate, personal memories, were brought together, accidentally bringing about an unsolved episode within the longer, planned ritual. The ritualistic quality of the project became further apparent in its third phase. Work on the mysteries continues, potentially for an indefinite period. “You can run these things for years and years if you want to,” John thinks, “But I wanted three events. I knew knowledge had to be a part of it. Knowledge in the sense of acknowledging what had occurred. So it was about two months, three months later that the meal happened. It was giving value to the space, which is about to be gutted. So there was also that notion of regeneration..” In the context of the earlier events, and the time elapsing between all of them, the third event – entitled The Knowledge Meal, which took place in June 2007 – can be seen on several levels. The circumstances, the white tablecloth, the waiter service and champagne reception, strengthened the ritual quality of the meal. And under the roof of Preston’s outdoor market, after-hours and once again deserted, it brought home the extent to which the surrounding buildings mostly seem to face the market, acknowledging its traditional social importance to the city. Knowledge as acknowledgement. Most of all, the meal was a celebration, and an opportunity for some who had contributed mysteries to meet one another, and the artist, exchange conversation, and share food, drink, time – and knowledge, whether spoken or silent, of the role of mystery in eveyone’s life, wherever it may wander.

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The Propositional Stalls (analysis of the mysteries)

stall 1: stall of lost items stall 2: stall of the visiting dead stall 3: stall of places stall 4: stall of animals stall 5: stall of questions stall 6: stall of the modes of transport stall 7: stall of actions


The Construction of a Mystery Market stall 1

Lost items This list of lost items is taken from the 280 mysteries obtained during The Insurance Stall event that took place on Preston Market on 21st, 22nd and 23rd of November 2006

Listed by: Items that have mysteriously disappeared 9. A set of keys. (Preston market) 12. A gold Ring. Serpent wrapped around with diamonds. (House) 15. An Ornament depicting roses. (Moving House) 16. A bag containing a pair of spectacles, hat, gloves and personal items. 18. Socks. (House) 19. £500.00. 25. Thirty plectrums. (Caravan) 31. A set of keys. (Front room, house) 32. A digital camera (House) 33. White plastic garden chairs, and 32 cardboard boxes. (Garage) 36. A grenadiers guards’ brass plaque. 37. A diamond engagement ring. 38. Six sets of house keys. 39. A Child’s jeans and winter coat. 40. A christening necklace. (House) 42. A cheque book. (House) 43. An earring. (House)

44. A jam sandwich, a pair of glasses and a watch. (House) 46. An A to Z guide. 47. A box of (collectable) postcards and two signed cricket bats. 48. A gold, diamond wedding ring. (Town centre) 52. A bracelet. (Town centre) 53. A pair of gold rimmed spectacles. 54. House keys. 55. Documents, hammers and saws. (Preston market) 56. Safe keys. (House) 57. A mobile phone. 63. Red ruby earrings. 64. A wallet containing £10. (Town) 68. A crucifix necklace. 70. A ginger cat named Arthur. 75. All the sandwiches for a children’s trip. 77. A bracelet. (House) 79. A bank card. 80. A pair of spectacles. (House) 86. A plastic toy boat blue with a white deck and red cabin. (River Tavy)

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93. A ring. (Kitchen, house) 99. Blue whale bath toy. (House) 101. Art work. (University) 103. £400. (House) 106. Mobile phone. (House) 109. An egg. 117. Toy clown. 121. Black and white cat called Kitty. 124. Socks. 132. Music on a CD. 134. Many Single socks. 138. A mobile phone, bright orange Nokia. 140. A blue cash card, RSB. (House) 142. A pair of walking boots. (House) 143. A pair of pink shoes. 144. Pens. 153. Bank card, car keys, house keys, cigarettes, wallet and T-shirt. 155. Money. 157. Mascara. 163. Clothing, skirts and underwear. (House) 167. A male fish. 171. Bank card.


stall 1: stall of lost items

172. A jam sandwich. 173. A shoe. (House) 174. A hat. (Street) 175. Two DVDs. 176. A gold plated Zippo lighter. (Preston market) 178. Money, jewellery and nana’s wedding ring. 187. A red and white head band. 191. A wallet and a mobile phone.

194. One fingerless black glove. 195. A flute. 197. Two bikes, a Raleigh Chopper and a Raleigh Grifter. 200. A blue gameboy. 203. A watch and earrings. 219. House keys. 226. A tropical fish, red honey gouramis. 227. A gerbil.

228. A playstation game, ‘medal of honour’. 231. A red baseball hat. 232. A rabbit. 238. Socks. 242. Pen tops. 247. Bank cards. 250. Rachel’s file. 256. Coins. 267. A box of roses chocolates. 271. A key to a moneybox.

Constructing a Stall of Lost Items General Analysis Number of mysteries obtained = 280 Number of lost item mysteries = 84 Percentage of lost items within the total mysteries = 30%

Analysis of the disappeared items Clothes (including socks, hats and shoes) Mystery Reference: 16, 18, 39, 124, 134, 142, 143, 163, 173, 174, 187, 194, 131, 231, 238. Percentage of the lost items ................. = 17.8%

Keys Mystery Reference: 9, 31, 38, 54, 56, 153, 219, 271. Percentage of the lost items .................. = 9.5%

Socks (clothes sub-set) Mystery Reference: 18, 124, 134, 238. Percentage of the lost items .................. = 4.7%

Pets Mystery Reference: 70, 121, 167, 226, 227. Percentage of the lost items .................. = 5.9%

Hats (clothes sub-set) Mystery Reference: 16, 174, 231. Percentage of the lost items ................... = 3.5%

Toys Mystery Reference: 86, 99, 117, 200, 228. Percentage of the lost items .................. = 5.9%

Shoes (clothes sub-set) Mystery Reference: 142, 143, 173. Percentage of the lost items ................... = 3.5%

Food (including jam sandwiches) Mystery Reference: 44, 75, 109, 172, 267. Percentage of the lost items .................. = 5.9%

Jewellery (including rings) Mystery Reference: 12, 37, 40, 43, 48, 52, 63, 68, 77, 93, 178, 203. Percentage of the lost items ................. = 14.2%

Jam Sandwich (food sub-set) Mystery Reference: 44, 171. Percentage of the lost items .................. = 2.3% Bank Cards Mystery Reference: 79, 153, 171, 140, 247. Percentage of the lost items .................. = 5.9%

Rings (jewellery sub-set) Mystery Reference: 12, 37, 48, 93, 178. Percentage of the lost items .................. = 5.9%

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Money Mystery Reference: 19, 64, 103, 155, 178. Percentage of the lost items ................. = 5.9%

Pens Mystery Reference: 242, 144 Percentage of the lost items ................. = 2.3%

Mobile Phones Mystery Reference: 57, 106, 138, 191. Percentage of the lost items .................. = 4.7%

Others Mystery Reference: 15, 25, 32, 33, 36, 42, 46, 47, 55, 101, 132, 157,175, 176, 195, 197, 250. Percentage of the lost items ............... = 20.2%

Based on the above

The Stall of Lost Items Contains

Clothes 17.8% Jewellery 14.2% Keys 9.5% Pets 5.9% Toys 5.9% Food 5.9% Bank Cards 5.9% Money 5.9% Mobile Phones 4.7% Pens 2.3% Others 20.2%

List of contents Lost Items A hat and gloves A Child’s jeans and winter coat Many single socks A pair of walking boots A pair of pink shoes Clothing, skirts and underwear A shoe A hat A red and white head band One fingerless black glove A red baseball hat A gold ring. Serpent wrapped around with diamonds A diamond engagement ring A Christening necklace An earring A gold, diamond wedding ring A bracelet Red ruby earrings A crucifix necklace A bracelet A ring Nana’s wedding ring A watch and earrings Two sets of keys Eight sets of house keys Safe keys A key to a moneybox A ginger cat named Arthur Black and white cat called Kitty A male fish A tropical fish, red honey gouramis A gerbil A plastic toy boat blue with a white deck and red cabin Blue whale bath toy Toy clown A blue gameboy A playstation game, ‘medal of honour’ Two jam sandwiches All the sandwiches for a children’s trip An egg A box of Roses chocolates Four bank cards A blue cash card, RSB £500.00 A wallet containing £10 £400 Three mobile phones A bright orange Nokia Pens and pen tops A Raleigh Chopper A Raleigh Grifter An ornament depicting roses Thirty plectrums A digital camera White plastic garden chairs 32 cardboard boxes A grenadiers guards’ brass plaque A cheque book An A to Z guide A box of (collectable) postcards Two signed cricket bats Documents Hammers and saws An art work Music on a CD Mascara Two DVDs A gold plated Zippo lighter A flute Rachel’s file

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stall 1: stall of lost items

Lost Items

Others

Rings

Clothes

Toys

Jewellery

Mobile phones

Keys

Socks

Blank cards

Hats

Food

Shoes

Money

Jam sandwich

Pets

Pens

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The Construction of a Mystery Market stall 2

Stall of the Visiting Dead This list of mysterious incidents involving the deceased is taken from the 280 mysteries obtained during The Insurance Stall event that took place on Preston Market on 21st, 22nd and 23rd of November 2006

Listed by: Deceased: Place and object of encounter (if known): Relation to the deceased

Constructing a Stall of the Visiting Dead General Analysis Number of mysteries obtained = 280 Number of visiting dead mysteries = 47 Percentage of mysteries from the dead within the total mysteries = 16.7%

Analysis of the deceased visitors The visitors (known and unknown) expressed as a percentage taken from within the mysteries from the visiting dead. Grandmother. 136, 159, 164, 183, 188, 240, 265 ...........................................................= 14.8% Mother. 26, 207, 222, 233 . .................... = 8.5% Man. 22, 127, 198, 125 . .......................... = 8.5% Girl. 6, 206, 213 .................................... = 6.3% Father. 131, 179, 234 .............................. = 6.3% Grandfather. 147, 257, 273 .................... = 6.3% Spirits. 128, 279 .................................... = 4.2% Voice. 224, 264 ..................................... = 4.2% Unknown. 162, 246 .............................. = 4.2% Aunties. 20, 170 .................................... = 4.2% Husband. 165 ........................................ = 2.1% Nephew. 71 . .......................................... = 2.1%

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Great Grandfather. 254 ........................ = 2.1% Great Grandmother. 275 ...................... = 2.1% Woman. 51 ............................................ = 2.1% Virgin Mary. 89 . .................................. = 2.1% Friend. 107 ............................................ = 2.1% Big face. 112 .......................................... = 2.1% Brown hooded cloak. 116 . .................... = 2.1% Hand. 230 ............................................. = 2.1% Halloween ghost. 274 ........................... = 2.1% Priest or Judge. 251 . ............................. = 2.1% Ice cold fog. 235 .................................... = 2.1% Silhouette. 277 ...................................... = 2.1% Shadow. 243 .......................................... = 2.1%


stall 2 : stall of the visiting dead

Based on the above

The Stall of the Visiting Dead Contains

Grandmothers 14.8% Mothers 8.5% Men 8.5% Girls 6.3% Fathers 6.3% Grandfathers 6.3% Spirits 4.2% Voices 4.2% Unknowns 4.2% Aunties 4.2% Husband 2.1% Nephew 2.1% Great Grandfather 2.1% Great Grandmother 2.1% Woman 2.1% Virgin Mary 2.1% Friend 2.1% Big face 2.1% Brown hooded cloak 2.1% Hand 2.1% Halloween ghost 2.1% Priest or Judge 2.1% Ice cold fog 2.1% Silhouette 2.1% Shadow 2.1%

List of Contents The Visitors Seven Grandmothers Four Mothers Four Men Three Girls Three Fathers Three Grandfathers Two Spirits Two Voices Two Aunties One Husband One Nephew One Great Grandfather One Great Grandmother One Woman One Virgin Mary One Friend One Big face One Brown hooded cloak One Hand One Halloween ghost One Priest or Judge One Ice cold fog One Silhouette One Shadow Places of the visits Sharston Hall A dream A building site, (a wall) A pub Rooms A sister’s house A hallway A wedding A doorway A wall Three houses Two dreams St. Georges Arcade A street A hospital room tap West Pennine Moors road House clocks A song on television Upstairs in house Hospital (time 10 to 10 pm) A bedroom The Unicorn Pub Four bedrooms A wall above a grave, (a Peahen) A railway line The Times Crossword, ‘1 across’ A bridge Inside a van The back of a wardrobe (musical advent calendar) A room in house A bedroom bell The Jamaica Inn A Living room settee, (teddy bear and spoon in cup) A mirror The fifth of June A telephone The top of the stairs The front door steps A phone call A window Subset (objects) A hospital room tap A wall House clocks A song on television A Peahen The Times Crossword Musical advent calendar A bedroom bell A settee A teddy bear A spoon in cup A mirror A telephone A window

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Subset Stall 2.1

Stall of the Visiting Dead Relatives This list of mysterious incidents involving deceased relatives is taken from the 280 mysteries obtained during The Insurance Stall event that took place on Preston Market on 21st, 22nd and 23rd of November 2006 Listed by: Deceased relative: Place and object of encounter (if known): Relation to the deceased 20. Aunty – A dream – Niece 26. Mother – Pub – Daughter 71. Nephew – Sister’s house – Aunt 131. Father – A dream – Daughter 136. Grandmother – St. Georges Arcade – Granddaughter 147. Grandfather – Street – Grandson 159. Grandmother – Hospital room tap – Grandson-in-law 164. Grandmother – House clocks – Granddaughter 165. Husband – House – Wife 170. Aunty – Song on television – Niece 179. Father – Upstairs in house – Son 183. Grandmother – Hospital, time 10 to10 pm – Granddaughter 188. Grandmother – bedroom – Grandson 207. Mother – A wall above the grave, a Peahen – Daughter

222. Mother – The Times Crossword, ‘1 across’ – Son 233. Mother – The back of a wardrobe, musical advent calendar – Daughter 234. Father – Bedroom – Daughter 240. Grandmother – Bedroom, a bell – Granddaughter 246. Unknown relative – Living room settee, teddy bear and spoon in cup – Unknown 254. Great Grandfather – The fifth of June – Great Grandson 257. Grandfather – Unknown – Granddaughter 265. Grandmother – Top of the stairs, the name Pearl – Grandson 273. Grandfather – Front door steps – Grandson 275. Great Grandmother – Phone call – Great Granddaughter

General Analysis Number of mysteries obtained = 280 Number of mysteries from deceased relatives = 24 Percentage of mysteries from the dead within the total mysteries = 8.5%

Analysis of the deceased visitors (relatives) Grandmother. 136, 159, 164, 183, 188, 240, 265 .......................................................... = 29.1% Mother. 26, 207, 222, 233 . ................... = 16.6% Father. 131, 179, 234 ............................. = 12.5% Grandfather. 147, 257, 273 ................... = 12.5% Aunty. 20, 170 ...................................... = 8.3%

Husband. 165 ........................................ = 4.1% Nephew. 71 ............................................ = 4.1% Great Grandfather. 254 ........................ = 4.1% Great Grandmother. 275 ...................... = 4.1% Unknown relative. 246 ......................... = 4.1%

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stall 2 : stall of the visiting dead

Gender Female (14 incidents) .......................... = 58.3% Male (9 incidents) ............................... = 37.5%

Unknown (1 incident) ........................... = 4.1%

Analysis of the visited (relation to the deceased relatives) Granddaughter. 136, 164, 183, 240, 257 ......................................................... = 20.8% Daughter. 26, 131, 207, 233, 234 . ......... = 20.8% Grandson. 147, 188, 265, 273 ................ = 16.6% Son. 179, 222 ........................................ = 8.3% Niece. 20, 170 ....................................... = 8.3%

Wife. 165 ............................................... = 4.1% Aunt. 71 . ............................................... = 4.1% Great Grandson. 254 ............................ = 4.1% Great Granddaughter. 275 ................... = 4.1% Grandson-in-law. 159 ............................ = 4.1% Unknown. 246 ...................................... = 4.1%

Gender Female (15 incidents) . ........................ = 62.5% Male (8 incidents) ............................... = 33.3%

Unknown (1 incident) ........................... = 4.1%

Based on the above

The Stall of the Visiting Dead Relatives Contains

Visitors Grandmother 29.1% Mother 16.6% Father 12.5% Grandfather 12.5% Aunty 8.3% Husband 4.1% Nephew 4.1% Great Grandfather 4.1% Great Grandmother 4.1% Unknown relative 4.1%

Visited Granddaughter 20.8% Daughter 20.8% Grandson 16.6% Son 8.3% Niece 8.3% Wife 4.1% Aunt 4.1% Great Grandson 4.1% Great Granddaughter 4.1% Grandson-in-law 4.1% Unknown 4.1%

List of Contents Visitors Seven Grandmothers Four Mothers Three Fathers Three Grandfathers One Husband One Nephew One Great Grandfather One Great Grandmother

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Two Aunties


the preston market mystery project

The Visited Five Granddaughters Five Daughters Four Grandsons Two Sons Two Nieces. One Wife One Aunty One Great Grandson One Great Granddaughter One Grandson-in-law Places of the visit Two dreams A pub A sister’s house St. Georges Arcade A Street A hospital room tap House clocks A house A song on television Upstairs in house A hospital (time 10 to10 pm) Two bedrooms A wall above a grave, (a Peahen) The Times Crossword, ‘1 across’ The back of a wardrobe, musical advent calendar A bedroom bell The living room settee, (teddy bear and spoon in cup) The fifth of June The top of the stairs The front door steps A phone call Combining both stalls gives a proposition for content as follows:

The Stall of the Visiting Dead Relatives Places Sharston Hall A dream A building site, (a wall) A pub Rooms A sister’s house A hallway A wedding A doorway A wall Three houses Two dreams St. Georges Arcade A street A hospital room tap West Pennine Moors road House clocks A song on television Upstairs in house Hospital (time 10 to10 pm) A bedroom The Unicorn Pub Four bedrooms A wall above a grave, (a Peahen) A railway line The Times Crossword, ‘1 across’ A bridge Inside a van The back of a wardrobe (musical advent calendar) A room in house A bedroom bell The Jamaica Inn A Living room settee, (teddy bear and spoon in cup) A mirror The fifth of June A telephone The top of the stairs The front door steps A phone call A window Objects A hospital room tap A wall House clocks A song on television A Peahen The Times Crossword Musical advent calendar A bedroom bell A settee A teddy bear A spoon in cup A mirror A telephone A window Deceased Visitors Seven Grandmothers Four Mothers Four Men Three Girls Three Fathers Three Grandfathers Two Spirits Two Voices Two Aunties One Husband One Nephew One Great Grandfather One Great Grandmother One Woman One Virgin Mary One Friend One Big face One Brown hooded cloak One Hand One Halloween ghost One Priest or Judge One Ice cold fog One Silhouette One Shadow The Visited Five Granddaughters Five Daughters Four Grandsons Two Sons Two Nieces One Wife One Aunty One Great Grandson One Great Granddaughter One Grandson-in-law

80


stall 2 : stall of the visiting dead

Visiting Dead Relatives

Grandmother

Voice

Woman

Priest or Judge

Mother

Unknown

Virgin Mary

Ice Cold Fog

Man

Aunties

Friend

Silhouette

Girl

Husband

Big Face

Shadow

Father

Nephew

Brown Hooded Clock

Grandfather

Great Grandfather

Hand

Spirits

Great Grandmother

Halloween Ghost

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The Preston Market Mysteries: John Newling