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KALIKASAN BSCD Knowledge Series FIFTEEN

An island way of life

Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo

Iloilo Caucus of Development NGos


An Island Way of Life Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo Copyright Š 2013 by the Foundation for the Philippine Environment (FPE) and the Iloilo Caucus of Development NGOs, Inc. (ICODE). Cover Photos Front Cover: Enchanting Tangke, a saltwater lagoon in Gigante Sur. (Photo courtesy of ICODE) Acknowledgement ICODE through its Board of Directors and Executive Officer, Emmanuel C. Areùo, and FPE through its Chair and CEO Nestor R. Carbonera, the Board, the Executive Director and the Visayas Regional Office appreciate the valuable support of technical partners: The OceanBio Lab, Division of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, UP Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo headed by Dr. Wilfredo L. Campos; The Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region VI and CENRO-Sara; The Northern Iloilo Alliance for Coastal Development (NIACDEV) chaired by Hon. Juan R. Alvarez, Mayor, Municipality of Ajuy. Also the relentless support, participation and commitment of local government unit partners: The Municipality of Carles headed by Hon. Arnold A. Betita, Municipal Mayor and the Barangay Councils of Asluman, Granada, Gabi and Lantangan, Gigantes Islands led by their respective Punong Barangay. And, all those who, in one way or the other, contributed to the fullfilment of this undertaking.


Kaalamang Likas Yaman (KALIKASAN) The BCSD Knowldege Series of FPE

K

aalamang Likas Yaman or simply, KALIKASAN, is a publication series of the Foundation for the Philippine Environment (FPE) on biodiversity conservation and sustainable development (BCSD). Kaalaman is a Filipino term for knowledge while Likas Yaman is a term for nature or natural resources. Kaalamang Likas Yaman literally means knowledge about nature. As FPE’s main thrust is BCSD in key biodiversity areas (KBAs) of the Philippines, this series is essential in presenting and promoting valuable theories, case studies, site assessments, best practices and other BCSD-related information. As a major repository of the knowledge base of FPE and its partners, KALIKASAN will serve as a series of dynamic and enriching resource materials that will educate the readers, particularly those involved in the environmental protection of KBAs, and equip them with both theoretical and practical knowledge. Kaalamang Likas Yaman may also refer to the richness (yaman) of natural or intuitive knowledge (kaalamang likas). This is in recognition of a priori knowledge of the people in local communities supported by FPE, especially among the grassroot communities and indigenous peoples, in environmental protection and conservation. KALIKASAN seeks to serve as a comprehensive BCSD reference and research source while tapping and augmenting the existing knowledge base of its partners, beneficiaries and communities. This is a legacy of FPE to the next generation of Filipino environmentalists who will continue and further develop the current advocacies and endeavors of FPE and its partners.


PHOTO

Captivating and idyllic white sand beach in Gigante Sur


An island way of life

Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo

DISCLAIMER The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of the Foundation for the Philippine Environment (FPE).


Table of Contents

The Site at a Glance

1

A Common Direction in Conservation

3

Approaches and Strategies

5

Coastal Resources Assessment Results

10

Strategic Action Plan

21

Building On, Going Beyond the Plan

23

References

25

Annexes

27

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo




The Site at a Glance

G

igantes Islands is a group of islands in the municipality of Carles off the northwest tip of Iloilo province, central Philippines. It is composed of three islands with seven barangays with an estimated total population of 17,462 (see Table 1). Table 1. Gigantes Islands Population by Island and Barangay Barangay Gigantes Norte Asluman Granada Gigantes Sur Gabi Lantangan Sicogon Island Alipata Buaya San Fernando TOTAL

Population (NSCB 2010) 2,849 3,045

2,326 4,004 1,650 1,543 2,045 17,462

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo




The islands are located within the Visayan Sea, one of the most productive fishing grounds in the country. Gigantes Islands are known for their bivalve (scallop/clam) and squid fisheries. On land, notable features include limestone karst forests, caves, and pristine white sand beaches, endowments that give the area a high potential for ecotourism development. As part of the Coral Triangle, these islands contain some of the world’s most biologically diverse and richest coastal and marine resources. The importance of these waters have been recognized by the six Coral Triangle countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands, and Timor Leste), whose governments have pledged to work together to promote the sustainable management of coastal and marine resources and address issues like food security, climate change, and species protection. Mangrove and white sand beach at Cabugao Gamay Is., Brgy. Gabi, Gigante Sur.

South and North Gigante Islands have also been recognized as a key site by the Alliance for Zero Extinction because the area, specifically South Gigante, is the only known habitat of the Critically Endangered amphibian Platymantis insulates. The species dwells on limestone karst forest and caves in forested lowlands. Recognizing the importance of this area, in 2012, the Foundation for the Philippine Environment (FPE) opened its support for the conservation of Gigantes Islands. The foundation partnered with the Iloilo Caucus of Development NGOs (ICODE) to facilitate the crafting of the islands’ Biodiversity Conservation Framework and Strategic Plan, as well as an initial assessment of its coastal resources.



An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


A Common Direction in Conservation

W

ith the implementation of the Local Government Code of 1991 (Republic Act 7160), most of the powers to manage and decide over the utilization of local resources were shifted from the national to the local government units (LGUs). Responsibilities for providing health, economic, agriculture, and social services and programs were devolved to local institutions. While the law has also opened and widened communities’ access to and involvement in government systems and programs, community and municipal leaders are challenged to efficiently spend their local revenue share and address the varying and sometimes conflicting needs of their constituents. This situation tends to make LGUs heavily reliant on their available natural resources as input to development initiatives. Marine and land resources are converted into tangible revenues, economic investments and enterprise development—sometimes (if not most) with absolute disregard of the principles of responsible stewardship and sustainable development. In spite of the rich natural resources of the Visayan Sea, there has been increasing concern that the area is already being fished beyond sustainable levels and important coastal habitats are being degraded or destroyed. In Gigantes Islands, the habitats of terrestrial species are also being threatened by “shifting agriculture, human encroachment of the forest over the limestone karst and caves, guano mining, and the quarrying of limestone” (Diesmos, et al. in IUCN 2012).

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo




The town of Carles, where Gigantes Islands are located, is the second poorest municipality in Iloilo province. The act of balancing the needs of an economically challenged population and the imperative to conserve, protect and rehabilitate the area’s remaining resources is a tough one. A misguided development direction could even worsen the situation. To address this challenge, the FPE-ICODE project commenced with the following objectives:



Generate and consolidate data pertinent to the assessment of coastal, marine and land resources of Sicogon and Gigantes Islands, Carles.

Facilitate and come up with a conservation framework and comprehensive strategic development plan that are integral to community priorities and development agenda.

Increase the awareness and social accountability of the community in protecting and promoting their environmental resources through active participation in the resource assessment and conservation planning.

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


Community situation and resource assessment.

Approaches and Strategies

B

anking on the principle of local capacity and knowledge to craft plans and institute mechanisms for sustainable use of environmental resources, the project team relied heavily on building and instituting partnerships between and among communities, barangay-based organizations and local leaders. Guided by the frameworks on population, health and environment and sustainable integrated area development, conservation strategies incorporated approaches that address the community’s situations, needs and issues alongside their marine resources and health conditions. The framework for biodiversity conservation in the area called for the engagement of technical experts. Thus, this assignment involved participation of various stakeholders, national government agencies, LGUs, and the academe. The academe served as the technical and knowledge base that assisted the communities in understanding, situating and contextualizing their experiences. A combination of approaches and strategies that are integrative, inclusive and participatory were attempted such as constructive engagement; multi-sectoral, multilevel, and multi-stakeholder representation/participation in planning activities; and engagement of technical partners.

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo




MAJOR ACTIVITIES Stakeholder Engagement At the beginning of project implementation, ICODE initiated partnerships with important stakeholders in the area like the local government of Carles and Northern Iloilo Alliance for Coastal Development (NIACDEV). Partners in the academe included the Northern Iloilo Polytechnic State College (NIPSC) and the University of the Philippines in the Visayas (UPV), with UPV leading the conduct of the assessment of coastal resources and NIPSC participating in the development of the biodiversity conservation framework and strategic action plan. To ensure the cooperation and support of the barangay officials and the local people in the area, ICODE, for a period of three months, engaged the services of two community facilitators (CF) who were then involved in an ICODE undertaking to develop the capacity of barangay officials and community volunteers on participatory local governance in the area. The CFs were responsible in community mobilization work assisted by the Governance and Local Democracy Course volunteers. They also joined the technical team in the conduct of preparatory community activities leading to the strategic planning workshop. Consultations and project orientation sessions were held at the provincial, municipal and per-island levels to thoroughly acquaint stakeholders with the scope of the project and discuss their possible roles in its implementation. These ensured the participation of the following stakeholders or stakeholder groups: •

regional representatives of national agencies, i.e., Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Department of Tourism, and Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources-Department of Agriculture mayor, vice mayor and some members of the municipal council

Municipal Stakeholders’ Orientation and Consultation



An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


• • • •

representatives of concerned LGU offices such as agriculture, planning and development, environment and natural resources, tourism, public affairs, and health barangay captains and councilors civil society representatives community volunteers academe

During the meetings, the importance of the strategic framework plan in providing structure and direction for future development undertakings in the islands was emphasized. The meetings also became opportunities for presenting information on the importance of biodiversity conservation, as the program included a lecture-discussion on the concepts and principles of sustainable development, biodiversity conservation and the link of population, health and environment in the context of poverty reduction. At the community level meetings, a rapid resource inventory of the upland, lowland and coastal ecosystems was facilitated. These sessions led to further partnerships at the local level and generated information, insights, and suggestions to guide project activities. Some important inputs from these discussions include: •

Tourism is among the priority development thrusts of the local government for Gigantes Group of Islands. The local government expressed concern that it has limited information on the state of the islands’ coral reefs, seagrass, and mangrove areas. Municipal and barangay officials alike were interested and willing to participate in the project, with barangay officials even requesting the project team to hold similar orientation sessions in their respective barangays. Local stakeholders expressed concern on the importance of getting the involvement of Sicogon Development Corporation (SIDECO), a private entity said to own 80% of Sicogon Island. The company intends to develop the island for tourism purposes but there is a pending land reform issue involving the company and the farmers in the island.1

Above (Top-bottom): Early bird participants; and Structured Learning Exercise (SLE) introducing the link of Population, Health and Environment (PHE) in Gigantes Norte.

1 In spite of the project team’s efforts to reach out to SIDECO to facilitate project activities in Sicogon, the company eventually decided not to allow project activities in the island. In the meantime, the company is also is undertaking its own conservation activities and professes explicit support to the livelihood of the people in the community.

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo




Above (left-right): Awareness raising on climate change in Barangay Gabi; and facilitating a Focus Group Discussion with community residents.

Data Gathering, Consolidation, and Validation Secondary data on the terrestrial resources and socioeconomic profile of the Gigantes Islands were gathered to serve as inputs to the conservation framework and strategic plan development. Major sources of information were the report from the National Resource Inventory undertaken by PROGRESO with the assistance of Silliman University-Angelo King Research and Environmental Management (SUAKREM) as well as data gathered from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (specifically from the Protected Areas, Wildlife and Coastal Zone Management Service), the LGU of Carles (forest land use plan), ICODE-TAGPHE Project, and the Provincial Population Office. These were also supplemented by qualitative data that were gathered through informal interviews and discussions. The information gathered were presented for validation during two community gatherings held in Gigantes Norte and Gigantes Sur. These community meetings also featured a film showing on climate change and a participatory synthesis of climate change impacts and their causes. The inputs on climate change also enabled participants to be aware of climate change issues and concerns in their barangay/island while validating the results of the natural resource assessment and socioeconomic data. A discussion was also facilitated to identify initial development strategies to address identified issues and concerns, taking into account adaptation measures to the changing climate. Based on the preliminary analysis of consolidated data, it was found that there were substantial data on terrestrial resources but not on marine habitats—mangrove, seagrass and coral reef including fish and invertebrates. This also validated the earlier concerns of local officials on the lack of information on these resources, and led to the decision to tap UPV’s technical expertise to conduct a marine habitat survey and a fisheries profiling for Gigantes Islands.



An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


Strategic Planning Workshop A five-year strategic plan for Gigantes Islands was developed during a three-day workshop held in July 2012 attended by all the project partners and community representatives. The ecosystems approach for biodiversity conservation and sustainable development was used as the framework on which to build the strategic plan. As part of inputs to crafting the plan, the following were presented and considered during the workshop: • • • •

Information from the Natural Resource Inventory – presented by FPE Strategic Plan of the Influence Areas of the Visayan Sea – presented by the National Economic Development Authority Region 6 Forest land use plan of the municipality of Carles – presented by the municipal environment and natural resources office Socio-economic profiles of Gigantes Islands and the results of Community Vulnerability Analysis – presented by the project team

These information, as well as the collective insights of the workshop participants, became vital inputs to the development of the plan and served to ensure that it reflects the prevailing realities in the islands and addresses its most urgent issues and concerns. The Strategic Plan was presented to the multi-sector group representatives of the community for validation and acceptance in August 2012. The barangay LGUs also committed to present the plan in their respective general assemblies.

Issues identified by the project partners and community representatives as affecting the islands ecosystem stability.

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo




Didemnum molle

Coastal Resources Assessment Results Marine Habitat Survey

T

he surveys and profiling were conducted by a team from UPV on 20 June 2012 in Barangays Granada (Gigante Norte) and Lantangan (Gigante Sur). The assessment included only those sites not covered in previous surveys (Deocadez et al., 2003; and NRI, 2008). The resource assessment covered reef fish visual census, macroinvertebrate survey, reef substrate characterization, estimation of fish density and biomass, and seagrass habitat survey. Reef fish Reef fish assemblages were surveyed using a modification of the standard visual census technique described by English et al. (1994). For the fish density and biomass estimates, target fish were from the families Acanthuridae (surgeon fishes), Haemulidae (grunts), Lethrinidae (emperors), Lutjanidae (snappers), Serranidae (Epinephelinae, groupers) and Siganidae (rabbit fishes), selected because they are fishes that are captured for food. Chaetodontidae (butterfly fishes) were also targeted as indicators of reef health.

10

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


The surveys found that reef fish abundance and biomass is highest off Sitio Langob, Granada (Table 2), although biomass estimates are considered low (< 15 g/m2) in comparison with reefs nationwide (Hilomen et al., 2000). Overall diversity, as well as juvenile fish abundance is also highest off Langob. In contrast, Lantangan and Gabi (Deocadez et al., 2003) showed the lowest abundance, biomass and diversity in reef fish. In all four sites, over 75% of all fish consisted of pomacentrids (damsel fish), apogonids (cardinal fish), or labrids (wrasses), which represent the bulk of herbivorous fish on typical reefs. This is consistent with rather high algal cover of reefs in the area. Target species were most abundant in Langob and were represented by a single species, Cephalopolis boenak. This species represents about one-sixth of total fish biomass (Table 2) in this area. Indicator species (Chaetodontids) were most abundant in Asluman and Granada. The overall low biomass of reef fish is indicative of high fishing pressure on the reefs, although this is likely to be aggravated by other factors such as exposure to rough conditions during certain months of the year. Gleaning levels also appear to be very high and much of this activity is likely centered on the reef as well. Coral Cover The results of the survey are presented in Table 3, along with a summary of the data reported in the NRI (2010) report. Except for Sitio Langob, only live hard coral cover data are provided in the NRI (2010) report, hence only this parameter can be compared between sites. Similar to previous surveys, the reef habitat off Sitio Langob, Brgy. Granada, across from Gabi Bay, showed good coral cover, averaging 59.1%. Coral cover in the rest of the sites are considered poor (0-25%). In Sitio Dapdap, Lantangan, the reef hardly shows any slope, so the reef flat slowly grades into sandy bottom farther from the shore. Algal cover in this reef is also about three times higher than in Sitio Langob (Fig. 1). This suggests higher mortality of hard corals in Lantangan, perhaps attributable to exposure to open water, particularly to waves. Notable from the 2012 surveys is the absence of other attached organisms (e.g., sponges, fan worms) which are regular components of the reef, although this may be a coincidence brought about by branching coral

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo

11


sub-massive coral

the very limited number (two) of transects surveyed. Future monitoring activities in the area should include more transects. The hard coral genera that make up the reefs in both sites are dominated by Acropora and Porites (Table 4). In terms of life forms, branching and submassive corals were most abundant, with foliose forms making up 18% of hard corals in Granada, while encrusting forms being more common in Lantangan. Consistent with the latter are comparably lower branching and higher submassive coral cover in Lantangan, attributable to more exposed conditions.

Figure 1. Percent bottom cover of reefs in Sitio Langob (Granada) and Sitio Dapdap (Lantangan)

12

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo

13

2

1

20-Jun-12

2003

20-Jun-12

surveyed 2003

  Date

464

665

991

All 471

0

10

17

Target1 4

6

1

16

Indic2 22

All 6.3

1

141

7.1

9.8

0

0.6

1.9

Target 0.1

0.08

0.01

0.40

Indic 0.45

Biomass (g/m2)

250 11.8

Juv 80

Abundance (ind in 500m2)

25

42

51

All 40

1

6

3

Juv 6

Spp Richness

Mean ind wt

0.9

1.3

2.0

0.002

0.282

0.5

7.66

7.40

5.97

All Juv (g/ind) 0.9 0.16 6.72

Density (ind/m2)  

Cheilodipterus quinquilineatus (5.7%)

Pomachromis richardsoni (7.9%)

Pomacentrus moluccensis (11.4%)

Clupeid sp (juveniles) (20.2%)

Halichoeres melanurus (5.9%)

Apogon sp (yellowtail) (17.2%)

Stethojulis strigiventer (25.2%)

Apogon sealei (5.7%)

Neopomacentrus anabatoides (6.3%)

Plotosus lineatus (7.8%)

Apogon margaritophorus (17.6%)

 

Coris caudimacula (9.7%)

Stegastes fasciolatus (10.1%)

Pomacentridae (17.2%) Halichoeres scapularis (10.6%)

Apogonidae (17.5%)

Labridae (60.3%)

Labridae (11.6%)

Apogonidae (25.1%)

Pomacentridae (41.5%) Chromis fumea (20.5%)

Clupeidae (20.2%)

Apogonidae (26.2%)

Pomacentrus milleri (12.5%)

Labridae (14.4%)

Coris dorsomacula (7.2%)

Pomacentrus trilineatus (16.1%)

Apogonidae (20.2%)

Families 5 most abundant spp Pomacentridae (38.6%) Apogon margaritophorus (20.2%)

3 Most Abundant

target species follow definition in English et al, (1994) and includes Acanthuridae, Haemulidae, Lethrinidae, Lutjanidae, Serranidae (Epinephelinae), and Siganidae includes only Chaetodontidae

Lantangan

So. Dapdap

Gabi

Cabugao,

Granada

So. Langob,

Asluman

Site/Brgy Waydahon,

 

Table 2. Summary of reef fish parameters for sites surveyed in the Gigante Islands, Carles, Iloilo in June 2012


Table 3. Summary of bottom cover in reefs of the four barangays that make up Gigante Norte and Sur  

Bottom cover (%) Live Hard Coral

Gigante Norte So. Langob, Granada (2010)

a

(same location) (2012) mean Asluman (2010)

Live Soft Coral

Dead Coral

Algae

Abiotic

Other Biota

55

1

18

10

16

0

63.3

0.6

0.0

24.3

11.8

0.0

59.1

0.8

9.0

17.15

13.9

0.0

7

-

-

-

-

-

b

Gigante Sur Gabi (near Danao-Danao) (2010)

13.5b,c

-

-

-

-

-

17.3

0.0

0.0

59.5

23.2

0.0

So. Dapdap, Lantangan (2012)

values are those reported in NRI report only live hard coral cover was reported in NRI report c median value of range (10-17) given in NRI report

a

b

Table 4. Taxonomic composition of hard corals in the sites surveyed Taxon Porites Acropora Pavona Favites Turbinaria Fungia Pectinia Plerogyra Platygyra Diploastrea Herpolitha Ctenactis Galaxea Lobophyllia Favia

Gran 22.0 19.7 6.6 3.0 2.8 2.4 2.1 1.8 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.2

Sum

63.3

Lant 5.0 4.9 1.8

1.1 2.9

1.1 0.2 0.2 17.3

Macroinvertebrates Macroinvertebrates (e.g., crustaceans, echinoderms, mollusks) were surveyed along the same transect line as the reef fish visual census. Among macroinvertebrates, the bivalve group was found to be dominant in both sites surveyed in Barangays Granada (Gigante Norte) and Lantangan (Gigante Sur). No data on this faunal group is available from previous surveys. Bivalve abundance in Granada was about five times more than in Lantangan. Aside from higher overall abundance of all macroinvertebrates in Granada, diversity was also higher. This suggests richer physical structure of reefs in Granada, and perhaps better reef health, because of higher exposure in Lantangan. Seagrass Cover Survey methods used in the seagrass assessment generally followed those prescribed in English et al. (1997) to allow comparison of results with those of previous surveys in the area. Seagrass cover was found to be highest in So. Dapdap, Lantangan, where

14

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


seagrasses were patchy from the shore until about 300-500 meters farther out, where seagrass density was high and extensive, averaging 68.3% cover (Table 5 below). Interestingly, while reef structure in this area may be limited because of high exposure, the backreef portion with grassbed seems to be rich. It is likely that exposure of an extensive shoreward portion of the reef flat during low tide may limit seagrass growth to patches closer to the shore, hence luscious growth is concentrated closer to the reef crest. It is not known if a similar situation occurs off So. Langob in Granada, or elsewhere in the area surveyed, but it is possible that seagrass beds in the vicinity of the Gigante Islands may be more extensive than what appears from the available data. Future monitoring studies should cover a wider area and take note of indigenous information. Maps show rather extensive reef flats along the western and southeastern portions of Gigante Norte, as well as along the northern coast of Gigante Sur (Gabi Bay). If seagrasses are present in these areas, the grassbeds would cover a potentially large area. This may be the reason why relatively high juvenile fish abundances have been observed in this study (Table 2) as well as in previous surveys (NRI, 2010). Table 5. Seagrass habitat survey results in Gigante Islands Seagrass cover

 

% cover

Gigante Norte So. Langob, Granada Asluman

(2012) (2003)

Est. Area (ha)

Species composition Thal

7.85a

Enhal

Halod

Halop

x

x (dom)

x

19.5

x

x

x

x

68.3

x

x

x (dom)

 

C rot

C ser

X (dom) X

Gigante Sur Gabi (near Danao-Danao) (2003) So. Dapdap, Lantangan (2012)

Fisheries Profile Gigantes Islands are known for their bivalve (scallop/clam) and squid fisheries although no production estimates are available. While data from the National Statistics Office report that fishing is a major source of livelihood in the islands, there has been no systematic account on fisheries catch and effort. Moreover, there have been no assessments of the status of exploited resources, putting at risk their very source of livelihood on the islands. The fisheries profiling was conducted to provide the information needed for an initial assessment. Information on fisheries were gathered through focus group discussions (FGD) conducted in each island. Three to eight participants per barangay (mostly fishers and a few barangay officials) were invited to participate in the FGD, where questions and subsequent discussions focused on fishery catches, fishing gear, fishing areas and seasons. Fishing Gear A total of sixteen (16) fishing gear types with 3,820 units were identified in South Gigante Island, while eleven (11) gear types with 1,176 units were identified in North Gigante Island.

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo

15


For both islands, fishing gear types targeting squid comprised the most number of units. In South Gigante, squid jig, squid traps and hook and line with floater constituted 43.6% of the total number of gear units, followed by hook and lines (4.5%), traps (3.6%), gill nets (2.5%) and, other gear such as compressor diving and spear fishing (2.5%). In Gigante Norte, squid fishing gear comprised more than half of the total gear unitsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; 57.4% (29.3% squid jig, 23% squid trap and 5.1% hook and line with floater)â&#x20AC;&#x201D; followed by traps (20.9), gill nets (11.3), hook and lines (7.5%) and other gear (2.9%). Annex 1 illustrates some of the fishing gear used in the islands while Annexes 2 and 3 show the spatial distribution of fishing gear types according to the FGDs conducted in the islands. Fishing Gear Calendar/Seasonality Tables 6 and 7 show the fishing calendar of fishing gear types used in South and North Gigante Islands. For most of the gear, fishing is done year-round except for cuttlefish trap, which is only used from July to December. The tables also show that most of the gears have high catch rates during summer months (March to June) and northeast monsoon months (November to February) while some show no seasonality (e.g., bottom set gill net, bottom set longline, and compressor dive). However, peak months in the two islands for some gears show differences. For example, the gears catching crabs (crab gill net and crab trap) reportedly peak during the months of June to December for South Gigante Island and during summer months for North Gigante Island. This variation in seasonality could be attributed to the location and shape of the islands. South Gigante Island is more protected from the northeast monsoon compared to North Gigante Island although its southern coast is more exposed during the southwest monsoon. Whether this apparent difference is real and/or seasonal is uncertain and needs to be verified through either more interviews or fisheries monitoring. A difference in seasonality of crab catches would mean differences in the exploited reproductive/life history stage. The latter is important for the sustainability of the resource. Table 6. Fishing calendar of the various gear types in South Gigante

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An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


Table 7. Fishing calendar of the various gear types in North Gigante

Estimated Catch Contribution by Gear The estimated annual fishery production of the islands is about 5,421.2 metric tons (MT) for South Gigante and 3,201.3 MT for North Gigante. (Tables 8 and 9). Fishery in the islands includes fish, shell, crab, squid, lobster and sea cucumber, with crabs and squids as the most dominant. In South Gigante, fishing gear catching squid (squid jig, squid trap, and hook and line with floater) contribute 54.6% (2,976.15MT) to the annual production. These are followed by gill nets (12.9% or 702.6 MT), gleaning (10.3% or 558.9 MT), lines (7.8% or 426.75 MT), traps (4.3% or 233.64MT), and other gear such as compressor dive, spear fishing, and trawl (10.1% or 553.2 MT). Table 8. Catch matrix for South Gigante Island Fishing Gear (English Name)

Gear units

Catch rate (kg/trip)

Fishers/trip

Fishing days/mo

Bottom set gill net

40

45.0

3.0

25

12

624

11.4

Bottom set longline

13

7.0

4.5

18

12

118.5

2.2

Compressor dive

44

35.0

9.0

25

12

439.2

8.1

Crab gill net

37

4.0

5.0

30

12

45

0.8

Crab trap

65

5.0

4.5

30

12

117

2.1

Encircling gill net

20

14.0

5.5

10

12

33.6

0.6

Fish pot

35

4.5

2.0

30

12

57.6

1.1

Fish trap

38

4.0

3.5

30

12

59.0

1.1

Gleaning

1650

2.3

2.0

9

12

558.9

10.3

Hook and line

105

9.0

1.7

25

12

253.8

4.7

HL w/ floatera

150

9.5

2.5

30

12

612

11.2

Spear fishing

Fishing moths/yr Est. ann C (mt)

% Total annual catch

50

5.0

2.0

25

7

78

1.4

Squid jiga

1015

12.5

2.0

29

8

1845.7

33.9

Squid trapa

500

4.0

2.5

30

12

518.4

9.5

Trawl

3

50.0

13.0

20

7

36

0.7

Troll line

55

5.0

2.3

20

12

54.4

3820

 

 

 

 

TOTAL a

5451.2

1.0 100.0

fishing gears specific for catching squid

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Table 9. Catch matrix for North Gigante Island Fishing Gear (English Name)

Gear units

Catch rate Fishers/trip (kg/trip)

Fishing days/mo

Fishing moths/yr Est. ann C (mt)

% Total annual catch

Bott set GN

59

5

2

15

12

52.9

1.7

Bott set LL

58

20

2

15

12

207.0

6.5

Compressor dive

34

20

5

20

12

169.9

5.3

Crab gill net

74

15

2

23

12

248.3

7.8

Crab trap

40

15

2

27

12

194.4

6.1

Cuttlefish trap

160

5

1

30

5

120.0

3.7

Fish trap

46

30

2

27

12

494.1

15.4

30

5

1

26

12

46.8

1.5

Hook and line HL w/ floater

60

5

1

8

12

28.8

0.9

Squid jiga

345

12

1

20

12

993.6

31.0

Squid trapa

270

12.5

2

22

12

TOTAL

1175

 

 

 

 

a

a

645.6 3201.3

20.2 100.0

fishing gears specific for catching squid

In North Gigante, annual production is contributed mostly also by fishing gear catching squid (52.1% or 1,668 MT), followed by traps (25.3% or 808.5MT), gill nets (9.4% or 301.1 MT), lines (7.9% or 253.8 MT) and compressor dive (5.3% or 169.9MT). Catch rates The gear types exhibiting the highest catch per unit effort (CPUE) for South Gigante Island are bottom set gill net, compressor dive and trawl with 35-50 kilograms (kg). The volume of catch from these gear however, contribute only 20.1% of the total production (5,421.1 MT). On the other hand, bottom set longline, hook and line and squid jig showed relatively low average CPUE values of 7-14 kg/trip, but contributed much to the overall production in the area—2,863.6 MT (52.6%). For the rest of the gear types, average catch rates ranged from 2-5 kg/trip and made up the rest of the production (27.3%) (Figure 2).

Figure 2. Estimated annual production and catch rate (kg/trip) of fishing gears in South Gigante

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An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


In North Gigante Is., bottom set longline, compressor dive and fish trap had the highest CPUE (20-30 kg), but contribution to total production (3,201.3MT) is only 27.2% (871 MT). Crab gill net, crab trap, squid jig and squid trap on the other hand contributed about 65% (2,081.9MT) with CPUE ranging from 12-15 kg while the remaining gears (bottom set gill net, cuttlefish trap and hook and line) constitute 7.8% (248.5MT) (Figure 9). Total production was derived by multiplying catch rates of each gear by their respective number of units and their frequencies of fishing (days/month X months/year). For South Gigante, annual production is estimated at over 5,400 MT. If this figure is divided by the population of the island (5510; year unknown (NRI, 2010)), the daily per capita catch is 2.7 kg/person/year (at 365 days per year). At 5-6 people per household, this translates to a daily supply of 13-16kg/day for every household (total = 968 (NRI, 2010)) 365 days a year. Although based on figures gathered during the FGD, this figure seems rather high and needs to be validated. The corresponding estimate for North Gigante is 7.7-9.6 kg/day for every household (total = 989 (NRI, 2010)) for 365 days a year. The difference is almost double. While this seems to be a more realistic figure, estimates of gear units need to be validated before considering if there truly is a difference in fisheries productivity between the two islands. An overall figure for fishing frequency can be derived by dividing the total number of fishing trips in a year by the estimated number of units of all fishing gear used (i.e., weighted average). For South Gigante, this value is about 202 days, which is similar to the 228 days estimate for North Gigante. This similarity reinforces the statement that the apparent difference in annual production between the two islands is likely the result of overestimates of gear units in South Gigante.

Figure 3. Estimated annual production and catch rate (kg/trip) of fishing gears in South Gigante

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Fishing effort Effort can be expressed in various ways, from number of gear units to number of fishing days in a year, and even in their contribution to total catch. In some situations, the ranking of gear types differs widely depending on how fishing effort is expressed, giving additional insights on how the fishery as a whole is exploiting the resource. In the case of the Gigante Islands, gear types targeting squid dominate the fisheries, no matter how effort is expressed. Cephalopods are relatively fast growing and may readily dominate fishing grounds where predation pressure on them is reduced. In the case of the study area, however, the predominance of cephalopods may be natural and not necessarily a consequence of prolonged heavy exploitation of their predators. Catch Composition Most of the common species caught in South and North Gigante Islands belonged to 22 families of fish, 2 families of cephalopods, 2 families of crustaceans, 2 families of echinoderms and 2 families of mollusks. Of the 31 families, Loliginidae, Portunidae, Scombridae, Clupeidae, Engraulidae, Lethrinidae, Sepiidae and Spondylidae are the most abundant and are highly valued in the islands.

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An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


Strategic Action Plan

T

he five-year (2012-2016) strategic plan developed for the Gigantes Islands adopted the vision â&#x20AC;&#x153;Progressive, healthy and resilient communities living in a balanced island ecological system.â&#x20AC;? Towards this vision, two strategic directions were identified: 1) Habitat management for biodiversity conservation and sustainable development and 2) Development of sustainable local economic options to ease pressure on natural resources and improve living conditions. In working for these strategic directions, operational strategies identified are: 1) resource management planning, 2) constituency building, and 3) policy advocacy, formulation and enforcement. The plan identified activities under seven areas for strategic actions. It also specified the lead agency expected to take on the activities as well as the desired timeframe. Sustainable fisheries. This will be pursued through mangrove rehabilitation, marine protected area establishment and management, fishery law enforcement training and fish warden deputation, and fabrication of artificial reef modules, among others. Acquisition or construction of law enforcement equipment or facilities (patrol boat, GPS, camera, binoculars, watch tower) was also identified. Organizing fisherfolk associations and creation of barangay fisheries and aquatic resource management councils (BFARMC) is also one of the targeted activities needing implementation in the first year of the planning period.

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Community-managed ecotourism destination. The plan calls for enacting a local ordinance (by 2013) prescribing rules and regulations on tourism related activities, and at the same time pursuing activities enabling community involvement like training on community-based ecotourism development and community organizing of tourism sector subsectors like transport groups or other tourism service providers. The local government was the agency identified to lead these activities. Notably, the plan also identified the need for research and policy development on the carrying capacity of the islandsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ecotourism areas and critical habitats. Restoration of natural rainforest. Plans for this area include rehabilitation of open/degraded forests (through planting of native tree species and assisted natural regeneration), protection of remaining forests (to be pursued through effective enforcement), and promoting sustainable livelihood/enterprise options for affected persons or families). The Carles LGU will also undertake awareness campaigns on the islandsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; forest land use plan. Biodiversity conservation. Both marine and terrestrial biodiversity is addressed in this area, with efforts mainly geared towards habitat protection (through establishing critical habitats and marine protected areas), communication outreach, research, and monitoring. Improve agricultural productivity. Activities for this area include mitigation measures to address water shortage and damage caused by stray animals. Healthy communities. Specific community health needs addressed by activities under this area include life saving skills, family planning and responsible parenting, reproductive and sexual health, water system and sanitation, and solid waste. Disaster resilient communities. Along with sustainable fisheries and healthy communities, this is one of the areas with the most extensive listing of activities. Initiatives identified include various aspects of disaster risk reduction and management like preparation of hazard maps, watershed management, identification and acquisition of relocation sites, and establishing information linkages with agencies like the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology and the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. Aside from the local government, which is expected to lead most of the activities identified, critical to the successful implementation of the plan include the support of existing partners like FPE and NIACDEV, as well as national agencies like Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Department of Tourism, and the Department of Health.

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An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


THE SURVEY TEAM FROM UP VISAYAS

Building On, Going Beyond the Plan

T

he FPE-ICODE project on the Gigantes Island was able to fulfill its main objectives while also setting the stage for future initiatives that will build on the results of this initial undertaking. The assessment of coastal habitats and fishery activities provided information that can be used for developing management options that promote sustainable fishery and marine biodiversity conservation in the islands, as well as identified areas for additional research or data validation. The process of developing the strategic plan brought the islandsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; important stakeholders together, prompted them to develop a common vision, and gained their commitment to work in cooperation with one another. While challenges in this area remain (such as the non-participation of the private entity which is the main stakeholder in Sicogon Island), there is a collective recognition of the need for initiatives on biodiversity conservation and sustainable development in the islands.

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Sabellastarte sanctijosephi


References

English, S., Wilkinson, C., and Baker, V., 1997, Survey Manual for Tropical Marine Resources, 2nd Edition. (Townsville: Australian Institute of Marine Science). Deocadez, MR, Ali単o, PM, Baustista, AS, Gaite, PA, Ronquillo, BS, and Prado, VV. 2003. Reef fish community dynamics indicators: deriving lessons from Lingayen Gulf. The Philippine Scientist Vol 40: 143-163. Diesmos, Arvin, Angel Alcala, Rafe Brown, Leticia Afuang, Cynthia Dolino, Genevieve Gee, Katie Hampson, Mae Leonida Diesmos, Aldrin Mallari, Perry Ong, Liza Paguntalan, Marisol Pedregosa, Dondi Ubaldo, Baldwin Gutierez. 2010. Platymantis insulatus. In: IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. www.iucnredlist.org. Retrieved on 18 April 2013. Hilomen, V.V, Na単ola, C.L. and Dantis, A.L. 2000. Status of Philippine reef fish communities. In: Licuanan, W.Y. and E.D. Gomez. (eds). Philippine Coral Reefs, Reef Fishes, and Associated Fisheries: Status and Recommendations to Improve Their Management. GCRMN Report. Appendix B. National Statistics Office. 2010. Philippine Standard Geographic Code Interactive. Retrieved April 18, 2013, from National Statistics Coordination Board: http://www. nscb.gov.ph/activestats/psgc/municipality.asp?muncode=063014000&regcode=0 6&provcode=30 PROGRESO and SUAKCREM. 2010. Natural Resource Inventory and Resource Management Assessment in Gigante and Sicogon Island.

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Hyotissa hyotis


Annexes

Annex 1. Illustrations of some of the fishing gear types used in the Gigante Islands Annex 2. Fishing areas of some of the different fishing gear in South Gigante Island, based on interviews conducted in June 2012 Annex 3. Fishing areas of some of the different fishing gear in North Gigante Island, based on interviews conducted in June 2012

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Annex 1. Illustrations of some of the fishing gear types used in the Gigante Islands

Hook and line w/ floater (pataw-pataw) similar to hook and line but uses a floater

Bottom set longline (kitang)

Squid jig (tina-tina/lukon-lukon)

Squid trap (bubo panglukos) - same as crab, cuttlefish and fish trap, only crab and fish traps are smaller in size and deployed in shallower water.

Bottom set gill net (pukot pambulao/yabyab) - same as crab gill net (CGN), only CGN is shorter and deployed at shallower depth)

28

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


Annex 2. Fishing areas of some of the different fishing gear in South Gigante Island, based on interviews conducted in June 2012

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Annex 3. Fishing areas of some of the different fishing gear in North Gigante Island, based on interviews conducted in June 2012

30

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


Annex 4. Strategic Action Plan Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development 5-Year Strategic Plan (2012-2016) Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo

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GIGANTES ISLANDS STRATEGIC AND ACTION PLAN (2012-2016) STRATEGIC ACTIONS/Projects/ Activities

AGENCY RESPONSIBLE 2012

SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES • Habitat rehabilitation Mangrove nursery establishment PENRO/ Training on mangrove plantation Carles LGU/BLGUs X establishment, care protection and maintenance Mangrove reforestation • Fabrication of concrete artificial c/o FPE reef (AR) modules • Training on marine protected area NIACDEV/ X (MPA) establishment Carles LGU/ BLGUs • Formulation and adoption of MPA management plan • Fishery law enforcement and paraBFAR legal training • Deputation of volunteer fish c/o FPE warders • Acquisition of law enforcement c/o FPE equipment (GPS, camera, binoculars/ telescope) • Provision of legal assistance to envi’tl law enforcers • Training on rare, threatened and c/o FPE endangered coastal and marine species • Acquisition of patrol boat c/o FPE • Acquisition of communication equipments • Construction of watch tower • Enforcement of mun. fishery Carles LGU/ BLGUs X ordinance • Implementation of blue crab ordinance • Product development and/or BFAR enhancement training cum production • Organization of fisherfolk NIACDEV/ X associations Carles LGU • Creation of BFARMCs X EFFECTIVELY MANAGE COMMUNITY BASED ECO-TOURISM DESTINATION • Policy Formulation - “Ordinance IPG/Carles LGU prescribing rules and regulations on tourism related activities” (e.g. tour guiding, cave practices, diving, etc.) • Training on community based ecoDOT/DENR-PAWCZMS tourism development

32

2013

Timeframe 2014

X

X

2015

2016

X

X

X

X X X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


STRATEGIC ACTIONS/Projects/ Activities • Infrastructure development - construction of ledge in Tangke • Community organizing of tourism sector subsectors - transport groups (motorcycle/boat) - tourism service providers - Community-Based Eco-Tourism (CBET) Council • construction of tourist information and processing center in each barangay • Installation of utilities (lighting and water utilities) • Acquisition of tourism-related equipment - (life jackets, scuba gears, comm. equipment, spelunking gears)

AGENCY RESPONSIBLE 2012

2013 X

X

X

Carles LGU/ BLGUs Carles LGU

Carles LGU/ BLGUs

2015

2016

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

ILECO/PPDO BLGUs/ Private Sector

• Research and policy development PAWCZMS Academe on carrying capacity of specific ecotourism areas and critical habitats RESTORATION OF NATURAL RAINFOREST • Forest Management a. Rehabilitation of open/degraded forest - Planting of Native tree species - Assisted natural regeneration - Boundary delineation of timberland - Application of rainforest reforestation technology b. Protection of remaining forest - Organize, train and deputize Wildlife Enforcement Officers (WEO) - Prepare/implement comm plan - Develop sustainable livelihood/ enterprise options for affected persons/families c. IEC on Forest Land Use Plan BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION A. Terrestrial Biodiversity o Establishment of critical habitat o Area identification and assessment o Conduct IEC & develop comm. plan o Conduct further studies and docu o Monitoring and evaluation activities o Training and deputation of WEO

Timeframe 2014

Propose to FPE

X

X X X X

NIACDEV/ PAWCZMS

X X

NGOs X Carles LGU

X

X

Propose to FPE

X X X X

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STRATEGIC ACTIONS/Projects/ Activities

AGENCY RESPONSIBLE

B. Marine Biodiversity Propose to FPE/NIACDEV • Establishment of additional MPAs • Conduct IEC/ prepare communication plan • Establish network of MPAs • Conduct further studies (linkage with academic institution ) • Monitoring and Evaluation activities /documentation of best practices IMPROVE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIVITY LOW PRODUCTION DUE TO: • Water Shortage caused by drought Propose to FPE - Mitigation measures, establishment of rain water- harvesting, watershed management, rain forestation, training on soil and water conservation • Damage caused by stray animals BLGUs - Implementation of Barangay Ordinance and further IEC/Brgy. Assembly Healthy Communities • BHW ‘S and parents leaders (PLs) to continue the conduct of house to house visits • Barangay Council resolution BLGUs/Carles LGU requesting the LGU of Carles to enact an ordinance assign a full time RHM in Gigantes Norte and allocating budget therefor • Acquisition of sea ambulance and Propose to NAPC ordinance allocating funds for its maintenance • Formulation of policies in the utilization and management of the sea ambulance • Construction of birthing center DOH-CHD VI • Assessment of health facility needs ANIHEAD • Acquisition of needed medical DOH/MLGU equipment and supplies • Organization and trng of Community DOH/PHO Health Teams on life saving skills • Continue conduct of family planning RHM/BHWs and responsible parenting PPO/BSPOS

34

2012

2013 X

Timeframe 2014 X

2015 X

2016 X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X X

X X

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


STRATEGIC ACTIONS/Projects/ Activities

AGENCY RESPONSIBLE

Timeframe 2014

• Training of facilitators adolescent or reproductive and sexual health (ARSH) • Conduct of ARSH Sessions • Orientation of gate keepers on ARSH • Orientation on STDs/HIV AIDS for adolescent • Establishment of Teen Center in High School • Assessment and rehabilitation of existing water system Gabi • Formulate policies in the operation and management of water system • Organize water association • Continue annual allocation of barangay for toilet construction and purchase of materials • Ecological Solid Waste Management Project - IEC on 3Rs - Creation of barangay ESWM Com - Formulation of ESWM Plan - Establishment and mgt of MRF - Implementation of anti-littering ordinance - Implementation of ordinance on segregation - Training on organic fertilizer prodtn - Training in the processing plastic garbage/recycling - IEC on environmental health and sanitation in schools (Elem and HS) DISASTER RESILIENT COMMUNITIES • Training on DRRM • Formulation and institutionalization of BDRRM Plan • Creation of BDRRMC • Conduct massive IEC activities • Training on watershed management • Formulation of H2Oshed mgt plan • IEC on rain H2O harvesting technologies • Delineation/establishment of buffer zone

ANIHEAD/ POPCOM RHU/PPO/ BSPO

2015

2016

X

X

X

X X X

X X X

X

X X X X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

PENRO/OPA

X X X X X

X X X X X

Carles LGU

X

X

2012

X X X X X

PPO/DepEd

PENRO/PPDO

2013

X X

BLGUs

X

Carles LGU MENRO MENRO BLGUs BLGUs BLGUs MAO NIACDEV

X X X X X X

DepEd

Carles LGU

X X

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STRATEGIC ACTIONS/Projects/ Activities • Preparation of Barangay Based Hazard Map • Inventory of existing facilities/ equipment • Acquisition of emergency supplies and rescue equipment • Training on first aid and emergency rescue response • Training on evacuation center management • Identification and acquisition of relocation site • Training on trauma management • Forge a MOA with local suppliers • Design and installation of early warning system and acquisition of early warning device • Establish linkage to information w/ PhilVolcs,PAG-ASA) • Conduct disaster drills in schools (fire, earthquake, flood, typhoon) • Designation of 24/7 health personnel • Policies in the utilization of potable water supply • Integration of DRRM in school curriculum • Early warning to seafarers • Deputation of Barangay Captains to implement coast guard policies on voyage of sea crafts/vessels in the event of a storm signal

36

AGENCY RESPONSIBLE 2012 X

2013 X

BLGUs

X

X

BLGUs

X

X

Carles LGU

X

X

MSWDO

X

X

BLGUs

X

X

RHU/MHO BLGUs BLGUs

X X X

X X X

Carles LGU

X

X

DepEd

X

X

MLGU/LCE

X

X

Timeframe 2014

2015

2016

X

X

X

BWA

X

X

X

X

DepEd

X

X

X

X

MDRRMC MDRRMC

X X

X X

X X

X X

An Island Way of Life | Resource Assessment and Strategic Plan Development for Gigantes Islands, Carles, Iloilo


FPE PUBLICATION TEAM Editorial Advisers: Godofredo T. Villapando, Jr. Executive Director Myrissa L. Tabao Regional Unit Manager for the Visayas Publication Coordinator: Information and Communication Unit

EDITOR Corina B. De Alban DESIGN AND LAYOUT ARTIST Ryan G. Palacol

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37


Iloilo Caucus of Development NGOs, Inc. (ICODE) ICODE envisions a dynamic, responsive and empowered network of non-government organizations (NGOs) in Iloilo province that enhances a people-centered, equity-led, sustainable and integrated area development. Its mission is creation of favorable and enabling environment to strengthen the network and member-NGOs in order to promote critical partnership with government and non-government institutions at the local, national, and international levels towards the establishment of creative and sustainable initiatives for people empowerment.

FPE is the first and largest grant-making organization for civil society environmental initiatives in the Philippines. Its support went primarily to protecting local conservation sites and strengthening community and grassroots-led environmental efforts in more than 65 critical sites through more than 1,300 projects grants. The establishment of FPE on January 15, 1992 was meant to abate the destruction of the country’s own natural resources. As many as 334 NGOs and grassroots organizations, along with 24 academic institutions, helped set its course through a process of nationwide consultations. Subsequently, Philippine and United States government agencies and NGOs raised the foundation’s initial $21.8-million endowment through an innovative “debt-for-nature swap”. Today, FPE remains committed in fulfi lling its roles as a catalyst for cooperation, grant maker, and fund facilitator for biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. Know more about FPE at www.fpe.ph


For more information, please contact: Foundation for the Philippine Environment (FPE) 77 Matahimik Street Teachers Village, Diliman Quezon City 1101, Philippines Email: fpemain@fpe.ph Telephone: (02) 9272186; (02) 9269629; (02) 9279403 Fax: (02) 9223022 Website: www.fpe.ph Iloilo Caucus of Development NGOs, Inc. (ICODE) 36 D. B. Ledesma St., Jaro, Iloilo City 5000 Philippines Telephone: (033) 3203590; (033) 5086527


Kalikasan BSCD Knowledge Series Fifteen