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may 2013 | serving america’s finest beer county | san Diego

SD Beer’s economic IMPACT p14

Pouring Soon:

bencHmarK

BREWING 92120

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Vol. 3 No. 6

neW coLumn:

the Doctor’s office p16

Co-owners Jim & Matt Akin Free Copy


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

North Park Festival of the Arts, 2011. The fest’s craft beer block, and perhaps this duo, return May 18

As the weather warms up, the West Coaster online event calendar — westcoastersd.com/event-calendar — fills up. This month alone the events already listed include brewmaster dinners at both Rock Bottom locations, a bacon and beer fest at Aztec, several American Craft Beer Weekthemed events, and numerous anniversaries: Cali Kebab - 1 Year, Mother Earth - 3 years, Toronado - 5 years, and Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey - 7 years. We try to keep the calendar updated, but we’re not psychic. If your beer-related business is hosting something, please help us reach your audience by submitting your event with the simple form available at westcoastersd.com/submit-anevent. Salud,

Ryan Lamb Executive Editor West Coaster


West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION Founders ryan lamb mike shess Publisher mike shess mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor ryan lamb ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director brittany everett brittany@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant tom shess thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers sam tierney sam@westcoastersd.com brandon hernández brandon@westcoastersd.com RYAN RESCHAN ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com Gonzalo QUintero drqcbt@gmail.com Contributors nickie peña kristina yamamoto Amy T. Granite

West Coaster, THE website Web Manager mike shess Web Editor ryan lamb Web Master josh everett West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location.

FEEDBACK: Send letters to the Editor to ryan@westcoastersd.com Letters may be edited for space. Anonymous letters are published at the discretion of the Editor.

© 2013 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”


writers

columnist

into the brew Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified Cicerone® exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

columnist

plates & pints Brandon Hernández is a native San Diegan proud to be contributing to a publication that serves a positive purpose for his hometown and its beer loving inhabitants. In addition to his on-staff work for West Coaster, he is responsible for communications for local craft beer producer Stone Brewing Company; an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including San Diego Magazine, The San Diego Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Ranch & Coast and U-T San Diego.

columnist

The Carboy Chronicles Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into all-grain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with occasional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he attends.

columnist

the doctor’s office Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D. is a San Diego native, three-time SDSU grad, career educator, and co-founder of the popular multimedia craft beer discussion craftbeertasters.com. An avid homebrewer, Cicerone Certified Beer Server, and seasoned traveler, Dr. Quintero takes great pride in educating people about craft beer and the craft beer culture. By approaching the subject from the perspective of a scholar and educator, Dr. Quintero has developed a passion for spreading the good word of local beer.


TABLE OF CONTENTs

16-21

CoLUMNS

The Doctor’s Office Our new columnist visits the San Diego History Center’s beer exhibit in Balboa Park

24-26

Into the Brew Sam Tierney looks to answer the question of what it means to be a nano brewer

30-31

The Carboy Chronicles Flavor training kits from Chicago’s Siebel Institute are a great way to test your palate

32-35

Plates & Pints Local hot sauce creator gives us some of his recipes for creating your own fire at home

8-10

pLUS +

Brews in the News Contract brewing by Alpine, collaboration beers with Japanese brewers and more

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Land Use in San Diego Andrew Keatts from Voice of San Diego discusses new developments for brewers in SD

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2011’s Economic Impact A new study shows $299.5 million in direct economic impact from the local beer industry

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Top 50 Craft Breweries The Brewers Association announced in April the big list, with three SD brewers onboard

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Breweries in Planning Currently there are 34 in the county, in addition to the 66 already up and running

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May Beer Events A plethora of options coming up, view more at westcoastersd.com/event-calendar

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Directory Entries E & F From CraftBeer.com’s online database we bring you beer and brewing terms

40

What’s Brewing in L.A.? A new guild has been formed by brewers in Los Angeles, led by Eagle Rock’s Jeremy Raub

42-45

Craft Beer Directory & Map Add your location by e-mailing directory@ westcoastersd.com

on tHe cover: Father and son team Jim and Matt Akin, on brewhouse and tank arrival day late March. Photo by Ryan Lamb


8 | May 2013

The beer is now flowing at Belching Beaver’s North Park tasting room. Photo by Ryan Lamb


BREWS IN THE NEWS By MIKE SHESS

More Belching Beaver

Vista’s Belching Beaver opened up a new 12-tap tasting room inside the former Motorsport Scooters building, just south of El Cajon Boulevard on 30th St. Situated between Tiger!Tiger! and Ritual Tavern, the ‘Beaver brings a relaxed garage-door appointed tasting room for growler fills, pints, and tasters. Hours: 3-9 p.m. weeknights at 3 p.m. - 12 p.m. weekends. Address: 4225 30th St. San Diego, 92104.

Modern Times Kickstarts Bike SD

Modern Times Beer earned a $2,400 donation to nonprofit bicycle advocacy group Bike SD by becoming the most-backed brewery ever on the crowdsourced microloan website Kickstarter. Seven vendors, including Premier Stainless Systems, Atlas Kegs, Coastal Automation Solutions, The Country Malt Group, Helms Workshop, Brewers Supply Group, and Beer-Con grouped together to fund the “bonus” donation if they passed over the $52,375 mark. The under-construction Loma Portal brewery wielded their Kickstarter campaign effectively, with nearly $55,000 promised at time of press, easily surpassing their original goal of $40,000. Keep up to date on the progress and/or schedule a brewery visit by signing up for their email list @ moderntimesbeer.com.

Boston Beer: More Scrooge than Fezziwig

In a move rife with irony, lawyers for Boston Beer Co. aka Samuel Adams recently contacted Fezziwig’s Brewing Co. of Carlsbad, CA. Boston Beer felt that the copyright for their seasonal Old Fezziwig Ale was infringed by the San Diegan nanobrewery. Weighing the outstanding costs of a legal battle against the behemoth brewery, Fezziwig’s owner Daniel Guy agreed to change the name of his operation. The irony? In Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Mr. Fezziwig was once the employer of Ebenezer Scrooge. Their characters were in direct contrast. Fezziwig was generous and kind; more interested in happiness than money. On the other hand, Scrooge was miserly and mean; putting business and money above all else.   After soliciting new name suggestions online, Fezziwig’s is scheduled to host two “Grand Renaming” parties Friday, May 31 and Saturday, June 1.

Alpine Looks to Contract Brew with Cold Springs

Pete Rower at the UT San Diego reports that Alpine Beer Co. is poised to ink a deal to produce 5,000 total barrels of Nelson, Duet, and Hoppy Birthday. The catch? The beer will be produced on

a contract basis in Minnesota by Cold Spring Brewery. While the prospect of seeing more Alpine Beer is exciting, there is a conventional wisdom that believes contract brewing is undesirable. Alpine owner Pat McIlhenney contends that the contract brewing setup is a means to an end, and that the profits from the contract brew sold will be used to expand operations within San Diego county. If the deal goes through, kegs, 22 ounce bottles, and 16 ounce aluminum bottles will start appearing in Fall 2013.

Ballast Point to Open in Little Italy

Last month, Candice Woo of Eater San Diego broke the news of a small Ballast Point brewery opening in Little Italy in 2013. West Coaster was pleased to learn that this brewery will focus on smallbatch research and development, and will be headed by BP’s Specialty Brewer Colby Chandler. Chandler, a former SD Brewers Guild President, is slated to expand his sour beer program and will be making the move from his current post at Linda Vista to the Little Italy brewhouse. The 9,000 square feet expansion will be located at 2215 India Street (mere steps away from Bottlecraft and 98 Bottles), and is slated to open mid to late summer 2013.


EAST TO WEST IPA COMING SOON

After a successful collaboration brew of West to East IPA with COEDO Brewery in Japan last September, the Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point team welcomed Hiromi Uetake and Shigeharu Asagiri to Linda Vista in late April for the creation of East to West IPA. This beer will be quite similar to the last, except for the use of Meyer lemons from Jamul, California malted barley and brown rice. Roughly one-third of the 60 kegs will be shipped overseas by Long Beach’s Global Craft Trading, with the rest making its way to local accounts.

Hiromi Uetake and Shigeharu Asagiri from COEDO Brewery at Home Brew Mart, April 23. Photo by Ryan Lamb

El Cajon Brewing Co. & La Jolla Brew House Shutter

Mired in internal strife and mismanagement, El Cajon Brewing Co. closed its doors April 2013 after less than two years in business. According to an April 23 article by the UT San Diego, the brewing equipment is owned by the City of El Cajon - not the owners of El Cajon Brewing Co. The City of El Cajon is seeking “someone to open a similar business using the equipment that is owned by the city’s redevelopment successor agency.” ECBC Owner Stephen Meadows applied for bankruptcy protection in October of 2012.   Across town, La Jolla Brew House has shut down after nearly ten years in business. Although technically a brewpub, there hadn’t been any house beer on tap for some time. When they were brewing, West Coaster watched as LJBH hired and then quickly parted ways with at least three brewmasters (all of whom are now pursuing other promising endeavors).


HoW laNd uSE polIcy caN MaKE oR BREaK THE Sd BEER ScENE

Thorn Street Brewery is located within a compact commercial area in North Park. Photo by Ryan Lamb

By Andrew Keatts, Voice of San Diego

B

eer has become a favorite son in San Diego. Politicians make a point of being seen at local beer festivals. The local brewers’ guild gets tax dollars to promote its annual weeklong celebration. And the City Council’s land use committee is taking a look this week at a proposal to help local brewers continue to grow.   And the local beer scene isn’t just a facilitator of fun, it’s become a legitimate economic force: The National University System Institute for Policy Research last month released a study pegging the industry’s net benefit to the local economy at nearly $300 million per year.   But San Diego isn’t alone. The industry as a whole is undergoing massive growth statewide and nationwide, and other markets are similarly carving out niches as hot beds for good beer.   For the local industry to remain competitive, said Vince Vasquez, author of the study, the city needs to address a series of land use-related constraints.   One is that new converts to good beer might be less willing to venture to industrial areas like Mira Mesa, home to many of the city’s first breweries, Vasquez said.   “I love the Spartan, grassroots feel to enjoying beer, where you’re not here for anything else but for the beer itself,” Vasquez said. “But someone like me five to 10 years from now might like something closer to work, more accommodating.”   That change is already taking place, as more breweries open in North Park and East Village, but current land use policies make a low ceiling for such expansion.   Breweries are currently considered “light manufacturing” by the city’s zoning ordinance.   Because of sound, smell and pollution concerns, light manufacturing companies usually can’t get too close to homes. And as far as the zoning ordinance is concerned, there’s no difference between a small batch brewery and one operating on a much larger scale.

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  But encouraging new breweries to open in the city’s urban core is possible with a change to land use policy.   One option, embraced by other cities, is introducing microbrewery-specific land use designations.   Doing so, however, would mean implementing the designation through the city’s various community plans, a time-intensive, costly and difficult process.   Instead, according to architect and planning expert Howard Blackson, the city should issue permits that give it more direct control over the operations that are most likely to result in neighborhood conflict.   “Our zoning treats everything as one-size-fits-all, so any brewery is seen as Anheuser-Busch, even though there are different levels of brewery,” he said. “We need something at a neighborhood scale, at a block scale, at a lot scale, so it’s based on how micro your microbrewery gets.”   The city should issue permits, he said, that carefully outline when a brewery can brew and how much beer it can produce, based on its lot’s size and proximity to housing.   He pointed to North Park’s Thorn Street Brewery, a small on-site brewing operation and tasting room located within a compact commercial area at the corner of Thorn and 32nd streets.   “We know the Thorn Street model works, so I’d hope instead of putting breweries through a horrible rezoning process, we could just manage it through a use-permit,” Blackson said.   The city’s land use and housing committee approved last month a similar item. It’ll come before the full council in the coming months.   The amendment to the city’s land development code would allow breweries of 12,000 square feet, operating in industrial areas, to open tasting rooms or restaurants of more than 3,000 square feet, which is the current limitation.   The current limitation is meant to restrict restaurant-only operations within industrial areas, but it’s having an unintended effect on breweries in the same areas looking to allow for additional space to accommodate a growing customer base. I’m Andrew Keatts, a reporter for Voice of San Diego. Please contact me if you’d like at andrew.keatts@voiceofsandiego.org or 619.325.0529 and follow me on Twitter: @andy_keatts


DIRECT IMPACT On April 22, the National University System Institute for Policy Research published a study revealing the economic impact of San Diego’s craft breweries in 2011. The study’s overall findings: • Craft breweries have a significant regional economic impact. In 2011, brewers and brew pubs generated a $299.5 million direct economic impact in San Diego County. • The economic contribution of craft brewers is more than 1.5 times greater than the economic impact of Comic-Con International, San Diego’s largest annual convention. NUSIPR also found that the industry made $680.8 million in sales, and employed 1,630 workers in 2011. • San Diego’s craft brewing community is growing rapidly. More than half of the brewery licenses in the region have been issued since 2011. Larger, more established brewers are also expanding and adding new locations. Given that expansion, when 2012 figures are released we expect to find an even larger economic impact. • Brewery tourism is an important part of San Diego’s visitor industry. Unlike seasonal attractions, brewery tourism occurs year-round, and most of the major industry events in the region occur during non-peak visitor months. Readers should note that because of data and methodological limitations, the figures above do not include the impact of beer-related tourism.

Lightning Brewery’s Scott Linnett readies kegs for delivery. Photo by Ryan Lamb

By the numbers: • 497 - Brewery Workers • 1,133 - Brewpub Workers • 1,630 - Total Brewery Industry Jobs • 2,796 - Total Jobs Created/Sustained by Brewery Industry

“San Diego’s craft brewing industry is a major economic driver in the region. That said, more partnerships and investment will be needed to advance industry development long-term. Competitor markets are also experiencing similar growth and interest in new brewpubs and breweries.” - NUSIPR Senior Policy Analyst Vince Vasquez View the full study: nusinstitute.org/assets/resources/pageResources/NUSIPR_SD_Craft_Breweries_Econ_Impact_Brief.pdf

14 | May 2013


the doctor’s office

Bottled & Kegged exhibit curator Matthew Schiff. Photos by Ryan Lamb

history brewing Inside the San Diego History Center’s local beer exhibit By Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D.

16 | May 2013


Elements from the first postProhibition beer bar, Rathskeller

M

DCCCLXVIII. The year: 1868. An eventful year in respect to the progress of these United States. President Andrew Johnson became the first president to be impeached. The University of California was founded, setting the stage for the existence of all universities in California. President Johnson became the first president to be acquitted. The 14th Amendment was adopted, granting citizenship and civil rights to all Americans. The first Memorial Day holiday was observed in the U.S., undoubtedly resulting in the first Memorial Day barbecues. Many San Diegans at the time likely took a break to enjoy this postCivil War celebration with some cold and refreshing brews from Conrad Doblier and his fermentorium: The San Diego Brewery.   Doblier was the original San Diegan craft beer brewer at our county’s first commercial brewery, producing 200 barrels of beer in Chollas Valley. Not only was this the first brewery, but it was also the largest indus-

trial operation of San Diego at the time, and one of the first companies anywhere to use large-scale refrigeration.   Despite 1868 being the true birth of San Diego beer, the late 80s is generally viewed as the period when the industry showed its first signs of bloom, through Bolt Brewing and Karl Strauss. Based on this math, the culture would still be carded at the door to prove legal drinking age.   Yet there is quite a fascinating tale spanning from 1868 to Prohibition and then through the modern age, and the San Diego History Center recently debuted a new exhibition to tell the story. “Bottled & Kegged: San Diego’s Craft Brew Culture”, which runs through January 20, 2014 in scenic Balboa Park, explores the ebb and flow of beer production in the San Diego region over the years and answers the question: Why is San Diego becoming such a nationally renowned place for craft beer production and innovation?   Beginning with the region’s earliest inhabitants, the exhibit highlights events and

individuals who built a brewing industry where once there was none, kept an industry alive during Prohibition, and managed to bring back what was, at one time, one of the region’s most robust enterprises. The exhibit features many hands-on interactive elements that help explain the brewing process, how San Diego County brewers achieve such expansive flavor profiles, and the science behind matching beers with food. Bottled & Kegged has components that speak to audiences of all ages and will educate even the most avid craft beer lover.   Recently we visited the San Diego History Center to meet a young and energetic historian, Matthew Schiff, who serves as the exhibit’s curator. “Why now?” I asked him of the exhibit’s timing. Schiff replied that in recent years the San Diego History Center was lucky enough to have Virginia Morrison, a local attorney, on its board. Aside from her many skills and capabilities, she understood that San Diego’s brewing industry had a rich history, thanks in part to the fact she’s married to Marty Mendiola,

WestCoasterSD.com | 17


18 | May 2013

PubQuest’s big brewery map adorns the western wall


brewmaster at Rock Bottom La Jolla and a former San Diego Brewers Guild president. “She helped create the Taste of San Diego Craft Brews event,” Schiff explained, “which brought in an entirely new demographic to the San Diego History Center. As we got to meet more of these people, we began looking more deeply into San Diego’s brewing history. We found a wealth of knowledge and over two million photos. As the exhibit’s curator I felt it was important to share this information, develop a clearer picture of the timeline, and answer some questions as to how and why this industry is now thriving in San Diego.”   Upon entering the hall you are immediately greeted with a wall of local bottles and growlers on display in beautifully framed shadow boxes to your right. “This is art,” I whispered to Matthew. He smiled and nodded his head assuredly and said, “This display is a piece of art. We wanted to showcase these items to remind people of the hand-crafted nature of craft beer.”   To the left, a timeline of events starts in 1868 with Conrad Doblier’s San Diego Brewery. With each step you learn more about the innovations, developments, and growth of an industry that was flourishing in our region — yes, region; not only was San Diego becoming a hub of beer brewing, but so was Mexico. In fact, during Prohibition is when San Diego first became famous for beer tourism. Long before we saw beer busses, private vans, and reappropriated military vehicles in the parking lots of breweries, people were flocking to Tijuana via San Diego for the beer. A weekend trip south of the border meant you could legally enjoy

Yeast plays a vital role in the brewing process, and you can learn more about it at the History Center

a cold one at the world’s longest bar (measuring 100 yards) by day, and lose yourself, but hopefully not your money, in the glamorous Agua Caliente casino by night. Then you could return to San Diego the next day and enjoy the weather and the beach.   During that era there were no commercial breweries in Tijuana, but there were in Baja, most notably Cervecería Mexicali, where a Czech brewmaster produced quality lagers. There was a steady flow of cash coming from the U.S. to Tijuana, and a steady flow of beer coming from Mexicali to San Diego, until a great earthquake and storm washed out the only road between Mexicali and Tijuana. It was then that the very same people who engineered Charles Lindbergh’s transcontinental marvel The Spirit of St. Louis designed and built a small cargo plane that flew beer from Mexicali to Tijuana. This was the first documented air-mail beer delivery service in the Americas, and an innovation that kept the industry alive in our region.   As you continue down the exhibit’s timeline you will learn that in 1933, just after the repeal of Prohibition, Aztec Brewing Company opened San Diego’s first post-Prohibition beer bar, Rathskeller, at 2301 Main Street in the neighborhood of Barrio Logan. On display are handcrafted murals, tables and chairs from the original tasting room, juxtaposed with an original photo showing the Rathskeller in all of its glory. At this time San Diego again began producing large quantities of beer, supplying 25% of the state’s beer in the late 1940s until national conglomerates started to


Donna & Charles Leask visit the Bottled & Kegged exhibit at the San Diego History Center

push local brands out of the market. In 1953, production ceased in the City of San Diego.   “The death of beer in San Diego was not unlike that of the rest of the country. Advances in transportation, particularly large trucks and cargo planes, made it easier to produce beer in one region and distribute it throughout others.” Schiff continued, “New-found ways of distribution, paired with mass marketing campaigns created the belief that an identity moves a product, rather than a product creating an identity. That was what edged out the local brewer, along with the muscle and money to undersell, which started a trend throughout the nation.”   However, San Diego’s proximity to Mexico led many people from our region down to Baja where they enjoyed Mexican beers. Yes, those beers were also macros, but it showed the consumer that there were other beers in the world. This kept the desire for new and different beers alive until 1978, when the federal government made homebrewing legal. California quickly followed suit when the Bates Bill, a California law sponsored by Senator Bates, an avid homebrewer, was passed into law.   Not being of the era, or familiar with the Bates Bill, I asked Schiff what made 1978 the right time for homebrewing to become legal. “Rachel Carson’s 1962 book Silent Spring shook people into realizing the need to protect the environment, the first Earth Day was celebrated in 1969, and the hippie movement of the 1960s and 70s saw people growing their own food and making their own clothes. Homebrewing was a natural progression,” Schiff surmised. “The Bates Bill tied food to the making of beer, and essentially legislated the existence of brewpubs, which placed a veil of legitimacy to brewing, taking it out of the shadows of bars and into the limelight of a family establishment with beers. If the hippies of the 60s and 70s led to homebrewing, the Bates Bill and yuppies of the 80s led to the boom of brewpubs, as well as craft beer breweries of the 80s and early 90s.”   Then from 1996 to 2001 there was a big pushback from macro brewers who focused on making low calorie beers that appealed to tastes of that era. So who got good beer back into the fighting shape it maintains today? Foodies and hipsters, in a way. “The farm-totable movement, the desire for artisanal ingredients, the way craft brewers ply their trade — these aren’t disjointed,” Schiff noted.   That explains the growth of San Diego’s craft beer community and culture, but how has the industry grown into an economic powerhouse? Schiff admitted, anecdotally, that San Diego has long been an established tourism hub. Add to that distinction the fact that it is now a brew tourism hub has not hurt San Diego’s mystique.   Perhaps not coincidentally, San Diego has been successful at the Great American Beer Festival as well as the World Beer Cup for nearly two decades, placing San Diego in the top tier of decorated beer cities.   When asked about the future of craft beer in our region, Schiff, with the reflex of a historian, referred to the cycles displayed in the exhibit’s timeline, but also returned to the word collaboration. “It is San Diego’s unique spirit of collaboration and good will within the industry that has made it grow, and will make it flourish.”

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History Happy Hour

at the San Diego History Center Last Friday of the month from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. $25 general admission, $20 members SanDiegoHistory.org May 31 – Karl Strauss cheese pairing from Melody Daversa, Certified Cicerone June 28 – Amplified Ale Works and So Rich Chocolates July 26 – Alpine Beer Company and Sea Salt Candy Co. with a special screening of Suds County, USA August 30 – Homebrewers tasting and food pairing September 27 – White Labs featuring talk from Dr. Chris White on yeast and its various effects on beer


The exhibit’s opening night, April 5


THE TOP 50

On April 10 the Brewers Association released this list of the top fifty craft brewing companies in the United States based on 2012 sales volume, and three San Diego breweries made the list. Top 50 U.S. Craft Brewing Companies: 1. Boston Beer Co. (Boston, MA) 2. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. (Chico, CA) 3. New Belgium Brewing Co. (Fort Collins, CO) 4. The Gambrinus Co. (San Antonio, TX) 5. Deschutes Brewery (Bend, OR) 6. Lagunitas Brewing Co. (Petaluma, CA) 7. Bell’s Brewery, Inc. (Galesburg, MI) 8. Matt Brewing Co. (Utica, NY) 9. Harpoon Brewery (Boston, MA) 10. Stone Brewing Co. (Escondido, CA) 11. Brooklyn Brewery (Brooklyn, NY) 12. Boulevard Brewing Co. (Kansas City, MO) 13. Dogfish Head Craft Brewery (Milton, DE) 14. Abita Brewing Co. (Abita Springs, LA) 15. Shipyard Brewing Co. (Portland, ME) 16. Alaskan Brewing Co. (Juneau, AK) 17. New Glarus Brewing Co. (New Glarus, WI) 18. Long Trail Brewing Co. (Bridgewater Corners, VT) 19. Great Lakes Brewing Co. (Cleveland, OH) 20. Firestone Walker Brewing Co. (Paso Robles, CA) 21. Anchor Brewing Co. (San Francisco, CA) 22. Rogue Ales (Newport, OR) 23. Summit Brewing Co. (St. Paul, MN) 24. Full Sail Brewing Co. (Hood River, OR) 25. SweetWater Brewing Co. (Atlanta, GA) 26. Victory Brewing Co. (Downingtown, PA)

22 | May 2013

27. Oskar Blues Brewery (Longmont, CO) 28. Cold Spring Brewing Co./Third Street Brewhouse (Cold   Spring, MN) 29. Flying Dog Brewery (Frederick, MD) 30. Founders Brewing Co. (Grand Rapids, MI) 31. Ninkasi Brewing Co. (Eugene, OR) 32. CraftWorks Restaurant & Breweries, Inc. (Chattanooga &   Louisville, TN/CO) 33. Odell Brewing Co. (Fort Collins, CO) 34. Bear Republic Brewing Co. (Cloverdale, CA) 35. Stevens Point Brewery (Stevens Point, WI) 36. Blue Point Brewing Co. (Patchogue, NY) 37. Southern Tier Brewing Co. (Lakewood, NY) 38. Lost Coast Brewery and Cafe (Eureka, CA) 39. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. (San Diego, CA) 40. BJ’s Chicago Pizza & Brewery, Inc. (Huntington Beach, CA) 41. Breckenridge Brewery (Denver, CO) 42. North Coast Brewing Co. (Fort Bragg, CA) 43. Left Hand Brewing Co. (Longmont, CO) 44. St. Louis Brewery, Inc./Schlafly Beers (St. Louis, MO) 45. Saint Arnold Brewing Co. (Houston, TX) 46. Ballast Point Brewing Co. (San Diego, CA) 47. Big Sky Brewing Co. (Missoula, MT) 48. Allagash Brewing Co. (Portland, ME) 49. Uinta Brewing Co. (Salt Lake City, UT) 50. Tröegs Brewing Co. (Hershey, PA)

Petaluma, CA’s Lagunitas jumped three spots from number nine to number six in 2012. Photo by Ryan Lamb

Brewers Association’s Definition of a craft brewer Small: Annual production of 6 million barrels of beer or less. Beer production is attributed to a brewer according to the rules of alternating proprietorships. Flavored malt beverages are not considered beer for purposes of this definition. Independent: Less than 25% of the craft brewery is owned or controlled (or equivalent economic interest) by an alcoholic beverage industry member who is not themselves a craft brewer. Traditional: A brewer who has either an all malt flagship (the beer which represents the greatest volume among that brewers brands) or has at least 50% of its volume in either all malt beers or in beers which use adjuncts to enhance rather than lighten flavor.


into the brew

nano

DIEGO A look at the risks and benefits of brewing small by Sam Tierney

T

ake a look at the recently-released Brewers Association Top Craft Brewers list and you’ll see several local names pushing the limits of beer produced locally in San Diego. Green Flash is even undertaking a new brewery location on the East Coast. Everywhere you look, there is growth and expansion. Local beer is booming, with seemingly no end in sight. Amongst this bonanza, several of the local breweries that have opened in the past few years have taken a decidedly more local and intimate focus. Since Hess Brewing and Automatic Brewing Co. first opened in 2010, an ever-growing group of brewers in San Diego have chosen to focus on extremely small-batch brewing. These nanobrewers, sometimes producing as little as 20 gallons of beer at a time, are redefining what local, artisan beer can be.   While there is no clear origin for the dividing line, most nanobrewers consider a

24 | May 2013

nanobrewery to top out at about three barrels (93 gallons) of beer per batch. On the low side, some nanobrewers still use the same 10-gallon homebrew system that they worked out their original recipes on. Sam Calagione famously started Dogfish Head of Delaware on a 10-gallon system, and they have since grown to producing over 200,000 barrels of beer a year. While still not legally recognized as a distinct class, “nano” simply came into use as a descriptor for a brewery that is, well, smaller than a microbrewery. For comparison, most brewpubs have a brewhouse that makes seven-10 barrels of beer per batch, and most distributing microbreweries start in the 1520 barrel range, with regional breweries like Stone pumping out about 120 barrels at a time from their brewhouse, typically brewing multiple times into even larger fermentation tanks.   Common industry wisdom several years

Intergalactic owner Alex Van Horne serves customers during the brewery’s soft opening phase. Photos by Ryan Lamb

ago was that if you weren’t a brewpub, you were wasting your startup cash, as well as remaining sanity, by opening with anything smaller than 15 barrels. This idea was based on the assumption that you would distribute your beer in kegs to draught accounts, and possibly also bottles to bars and stores, either by yourself or a third party wholesaler/distributor. You might have a tasting room, but it wouldn’t be very significant as far as the volume of your beer that you would move out of it. This sizing rationale is based on the analysis of fixed versus variable costs.   A batch of beer takes the same amount of time to make on a one barrel or 15 barrel system, and the amount of space needed is not significantly different between seven


and 15 barrels (though one barrel can be made in a much smaller space). So your fixed costs, including the same licensing and fees for starting up, would not change much, though your variable costs, mainly ingredients, would. At under 15 barrels per batch, the idea was that your cost-per-unit would be too high for you to charge what the market would bear and still make a profit. Your fixed costs would essentially eat your profit and you would eventually be forced to upgrade to a larger-sized brewery in order to become profitable enough to survive, or you would go under.   This economic model has changed somewhat in the past several years as brewery taprooms have become more prevalent and popular. Many locales, San Diego included, allow breweries with a certain license to sell full pints of beer and growlers to go out of their tasting rooms. This turns the old thinking on its head because small breweries can now make a survivable profit on a smaller amount of beer due to the higher margins on pints and growlers versus wholesale bottles and kegs. When going this route you are essentially a brewpub without a kitchen that may or may not also distribute some of your beer. Add on regular visits from the plethora of awesome local food trucks now doing business, and you have some of the benefit of a kitchen without the risk and cost of starting a restaurant, a decidedly more risky venture these days. Most nanos are selling all or most of their beer out of their taproom, though some, like Cold Bore Brewing Company of Jamul, are packaging all of their beer for local distribution.   Amongst brewers, there is essentially a consensus that the nano step is chosen mainly because it’s simply far less expensive than a 15-20 barrel brewery. Without a sizeable trust fund, it can be very daunting to go into massive debt or give up control to investors in order to get started. Starting small allows for more personal control and less risk. At the same time, almost all of them agree that their first brewing system is only a launching pad to larger capacity and production down the road. Dave Hyndman of Wet ‘N Reckless embodies this enthusiastic outlook. He enjoys the freedom of artistic experimentation that brewing on a 45-gallon system provides, but also acknowledges the downsides. “The disadvantage is that for every keg of beer I produce there is much more time and labor that goes into it,” he says. “It’s a labor of love but it’s also a reality of the business model.” As demand for his beers grows, he plans to expand capacity in his current space.   Vista brewpub Prohibition Brewing Company brewed 350 barrels of beer last year on a three-barrel system, though they already realized the need for more brewing capacity and have just installed a 10-barrel brewhouse built by local San Marcos

“Nano is great for starting out, getting a name, getting credit and a following. But when you start to realize it takes about the same amount of time to do 15 gallons as it does 15 barrels or 150 barrels and you have to hire 10 employees to keep up with demand on a small system, you know that nano is not sustainable. I will add one thing, San Diego is different. With the tasting room culture that is here, nano can work. Just prepare to work 80+ hours a week if you want to make it work.” - Alex Van Horne, Intergalactic Brewing Company

brewing industry equipment supplier Premier Stainless, on which they plan to brew over 1,000 barrels this year. To head brewers Matthew Adams and Jonathon Rielly, nano is less about the absolute size and more about the local distribution of beer and connection to the community. “In our minds a nano brewery is an establishment that brews beer for their friends and family in their local community,” they said, adding, “between the two of us we agree that nano signifies a connection to the community that you are brewing for. Nano is connecting with the people who drink your beer and catering your product to their tastes, even if it conflicts with style guidelines.” While many consider nano to be all about size, I do think there is something to be said for the local state of mind.   Another brewery that walks the line is Amplified Ale Works in Pacific Beach. Located inside California Kebab, they were limited by the amount of space they had to build a brewery. They were able to fit a 3.5-barrel brewhouse in a former office, and two sevenbarrel fermentation/conditioning tanks behind the bar. They double-batch on brew days, producing seven barrels at a time, so owner JC Hill is reluctant to use the nano label, preferring to call Amplified a “small craft brewery.” Right now, they can brew about 150 barrels

WestCoasterSD.com | 25


a year, a nano-amount by most measures. Hill hopes that will change. “If we can add another seven barrel fermenter and some brite tanks to carbonate in, we’ll be able to brew a lot more” he says. Even within this limited capacity, Hill and head brewer Cy Henley have already experimented with bourbon barrel aging and plan to get into more sour and wild experiments in the future. Nano or not, Amplified is exemplifying creative brewing engineered to fit the constraints of a given space. One of San Diego’s newest breweries, Intergalactic Brewing Company, is set to host their grand opening party on May 4, but owner Alex Van Horne already understands the freedom as well as constraint that starting nano has placed on them. He’s decided to start on a 20-gallon system, and would like to be able to brew 100 barrels in the first year, with expansion allowing more after that. “I am constantly changing

26 | May 2013

Intergalactic would like to be 100 barrels in the first year on this 20-gallon system

recipes and improving the beer,” he says of the advantages of brewing on a small scale. “So the more I brew, the more opportunities I will have to make my beer better.” At the same time, Van Horne has a keen eye for expanding capacity as the business grows. “I don’t think anyone starts nano with the thought that they are going to stay that way. There is always some other end goal.” He says, finishing with an assessment that I think sums up the essence of brewing on such a small scale: “Nano is great for starting out, getting a name, getting credit and a following. But when you start to realize it takes about the same amount of time to do 15 gallons as

it does 15 barrels or 150 barrels and you have to hire 10 employees to keep up with demand on a small system, you know that nano is not sustainable. I will add one thing, San Diego is different. With the tasting room culture that is here, nano can work. Just prepare to work 80+ hours a week if you want to make it work.” So all you aspiring homebrewers thinking of starting a nanobrewery in the future, get ready for long hours, mountains of paperwork, and pressure to grow. We brewers are generally a crazy-determined bunch though, and I know more than a few who are up to the challenge.

Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park


Russian River Brewpub


breweries in pl anning Current count: 34

Benchmark’s brewmaster Matt Akin received his brewhouse and fermentation tanks in late March. Follow the brewery’s progress at benchmarkbrewing.com, as they are on track for a May opening at time of press.

Bagby Beer (Oceanside)

Kuracali (San Marcos)

Ballast Point (Little Italy)

Legacy Brewing (Oceanside)

Barrel Harbor (Vista)

Magnetic Brewing (Undisclosed)

Benchmark Brewing (Grantville)

Modern Times Beer (Point Loma)

Stone Brewing Co. (Escondido)

Bespoke Brewing (Little Italy)

Mother Earth Brewing Co. (Vista)

Stone Liberty Station (Liberty Station)

Birrificio Calabria (North Park)

Nickel Beer Co. (Julian)

Taproot Brewing (Undisclosed)

BNS Brewing & Distilling (Santee)

North Park Beer Co. (North Park)

Toolbox Brewing (Undisclosed)

Border X Brewing (South Bay)

OB Brewery (Ocean Beach)

Two Kids Brewing (Undisclosed)

Devil’s Forge (Undisclosed)

Pizza Port (Bressi Ranch)

Urban Jungle Brewing (Poway)

Full Body Brewing (North County)

Plan 9 Alehouse (Escondido)

Valley Center Brewing (Valley Center)

Half Door Brewing (Downtown)

Prodigy Brewing (Undisclosed)

Hess Brewing (North Park)

Red Topper (Golden Hill)

KnB Wine Cellars (Del Cerro)

RPM Brewing (Undisclosed)

DISCLAIMER: Due to the complex nature of starting a craft brewing business, this list should be treated as an approximation. Visit westcoastersd.com/sd-brewing-industrywatch for an up-to-date version of this list.

28 | May 2013


The Carboy Chronicles

Fine Tuning

Your Palate Flavor training kits available from Chicago’s Siebel Institute By Ryan Reschan

I

’m guessing at some point in their homebrewing experience, most brewers have made a bad beer. Either through poor process, poor fermentation, and/or poor sanitization, the beer has developed aromas and flavors not acceptable for the style being created. A great way to figure out what went wrong is by identifying the offending flavors and aromas in order to link them to the source of the problem.   The BJCP (Beer Judge Certification Program) occasionally offers a sensory evaluation class to help brewers and judges learn about such flavors and their sources. At the class, a sensory evaluation kit with 24 vials from the Siebel Institute in Chicago is used to spike a light, neutral tasting base beer (a control), allowing the aroma and flavor of each sample to come through clearly.   If you’d like to get in on one of these classes, join up with a local homebrew club and find out when a BJCP judge in

30 | May 2013

their ranks can get a subsidized kit. You can also order one straight from siebelinstitute.com; it’s pricey at $250 with shipping, but if you consider that the kit serves about 20 people, that’s roughly $12 per person.   The first step in the class I attended was to get familiar with the base beer, noting the aroma and flavors present, so you know what to look for in the spiked samples. A spreadsheet was passed out to everyone listing the flavor, flavor descriptor, sources of the flavor, related terms, and the concentration of the flavor in the one-liter pitcher of beer. The class was broken up into five categories – processrelated, hops, aging/storage, fermentation, and contamination/infection.   Process-related off flavors included DMS (Dimethyl Sulfide), metallic, and grainy. DMS will produce a cooked vegetable character that is similar to creamed corn and/or cooked tomatoes, making the

This kit from Siebel contains lots of unpleasant flavors and a unique learning experience. Photo by Chris Banker

beer less sweet. DMS can occur when you cover your boil kettle while boiling, not cooling your wort fast enough, or by contamination. A metallic flavor has a tinny, blood-like character that can come from bad water sources or non-passivated brewing vessels. A grainy flavor has a stale, tannic malt character that can come from excessive lautering/sparging, lautering at too high of a pH level, or from an insufficient boil.   Hops provide many flavors to beer but the kit highlights three of them. Geraniol is a floral, rose-like flavor that adds a big perfume character to the beer. Hops can also provide a lot of bittering, and in this ex-


ample, an intense spice and herbal bitterness similar to quinine. Certainly the least favorable hop character is isovaleric, a flavor that is similar to cheesy, sweaty socks. This can occur with aged hops stored past their prime.   In the case of clear or green bottles, storing a beer is important. If left in sun for several minutes, a beer will become lightstruck and produce a skunky aroma and flavor. This is due to a chemical reaction between photons from the light and the hops in the beer. Aging a beer for a length of time can produce two types of oxidation characteristics: papery and sherry. Papery oxidation can make the beer taste like cardboard while a sherry-like (fruity, cherry-like) oxidation character can be quite pleasant in certain styles of beer.   Fermentation can produce quite a few flavors, both good and bad, depending on the yeast used. Pleasant characteristics include spicy clove and banana (found in Hefeweizen and Belgian style ales), almond (marzipan, bitter almond character), banana and pear (isoamyl acetate), flora, anise and apple fruitiness (ethyl hexanoate), and custard, cream soda-like character (vanilla). Unpleasant characteristics include(green bitter bruised apple character from staling or contamination (acetaldehyde), (oily, buttered popcorn

character from contamination or improper maturation (diacetyl), rotten, dirty diaper, sewage character from poor yeast health and autolysis, the destruction of the yeast cells from its own enzymes (mercaptan), and nail polish remover character from poor yeast health or extreme fermentation temperatures (ethyl acetate).   Contamination can occur with improper sanitization procedures. Most contaminations occur when undesirable wild yeast and/or bacteria get into the wort or beer and produce undesirable flavors ranging from vinegar-like (acetic acid), sour milk (lactic acid), bleu cheese and vomit (butyric acid), damp top soil with beets (earthy), rancid dirty diapers and body odor (indole), waxy goat cheese (caprylic acid), clove spiciness, and buttery tartness. The exception to the above will be in wild/sour ales where pleasant levels of lactic and/or acetic acid are present.   Despite some very unpleasant flavors, it was a great learning experience going through the kit. Doing the class with a large group of people highlighted how different everyone’s palate can be. Certain flavors were more intense for some and harder to detect for others. It was also enjoyable seeing everyone’s reaction to some of the horrible flavors mentioned above.

San Diego Homebrewers Alliance Participating Clubs: Foam on the Brain meet the third Saturday of the month at San Diego Brewing Company in Grantville (foamies.net) QUAFF meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at the Randy Jones All American Sports Grill in Mission Valley (quaff.org) The Barley Literates meet the third Wednesday of the month at Holiday Wine Cellar in Escondido (barleyliterate.com) The Mash Heads meet the second Wednesday of the month in the UTC/Miramar area (mashheads.com) The North County Homebrewers Association meet the first Saturday or Sunday of the month in North County (meetup.com/northcountyhomebrewers) The Society of Barley Engineers meet the first Wednesday of the month at Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens (societyofbarleyengineers.org)


plates & pints

HOT

STUFF

The how-to on making killer hot sauce at home without setting off a five-alarm house fire By Brandon Hernández Pepper photos by Brittany Everett

T

here are some things that stay trapped in one’s memory forever—your wedding day, the birth of your first child, the first time you tried to make hot sauce at home and nearly suffocated said child on capsicum-laced fumes. Haven’t experienced that last one? Well, it’s my intention that, as a direct result of reading my column, you never will. But first, let’s laugh at my (former) culinary ineptitude, shall we?   Picture it, a small apartment in Escondido. A twenty-something aspiring gastronome with a penchant for spicy food decides he’s tired of settling for the sugary, preservative-laced, substandard versions of hot sauce largely available in grocery stores. It’s time to get artisanal. It’s time to make his very own brand of kick-you-in-the-teeth, punch-you-in-the-gut, hot sauce. He even has a slew of badass-sounding names ready to affix to this sure-to-be-the-next-big-thing condiment. All he needs to do is actually make the stuff.


Clyde Van Arsdall shows off his sauces at KnB in Del Cerro. Photo by Brandon Hernández

  So, he hits the Escondido Henry’s (Sprouts for those of you who have no memory of the last iteration of the local grocery chain) and bought up pounds of chili peppers—habaneros, red and green jalapeños, white and Anaheim, then proceeds to chop them up, sauté them with some onions and garlic, cover them with a mixture of water and vinegar, and bring it all to a low boil.   Like me, my son is afflicted with a bloodlust for blood-boiling heat, so he was as excited about this spicy adventure as I was… until the part where he almost suffocated.   Being the hot sauce novice I was at the time, I took precautions to sanitize and resanitize my hands, being careful never to touch my eyes. What I did not do was open a friggin’ window!!!   Shortly after I set the temperature on the stovetop to get the liquid boiling, I received a phone call and retreated to a back backroom to take it so my son could watch his cartoons at the same blaring level of volume every red-blooded American child desires. Between the riveting conversation and the loud ‘toons, I couldn’t even hear my son coughing up his miniature lungs out in the living room until my throat began to tickle

and I, too, found myself unable to fight the urge to cough.   I headed toward the kitchen and, with each step, it got harder and harder to breathe, and my mistake became more and more evident. I turned off the burners and opened the front door and every window, then took my son outside where we spent the next 15 minutes trying to get back to good.   While the hot sauce I eventually made turned out pretty nice (not nearly the Dave’s Insanity Sauce rival I’d been gunning for, but edible and plenty fiery), the memory of that day is not. Clearly, I can’t be trusted to give you sage advice in this area, so I’ve enlisted the skills of someone who can— Clyde Van Arsdall, the man behind local craft condiment company, Chingon Hot Sauce.   Van Arsdall is a classically trained chef who has owned and operated Del Cerro’s 3 Squares Gourmet for a decade and served as executive chef at nearby KnB Wine Cellars for the past two years. His decision to get into the hot sauce business was similar to what drove me to turn my home into a caustic danger zone.   “I saw a need for a group of hot sauces

of varying heat rather than the same old middle-of-the-road stuff,” says Van Arsdall. “Our battle cry is ‘burn locally.’ We only use natural ingredients sourced locally and let the heat of the chilies, which change seasonally, speak for itself.”   Van Arsdall’s line includes three sauces—a mild sauce made with red Fresno chilies called Big Rojo, a medium jalapeño-based sauce called Máquina Verde and an aggressively spicy Stupid Hot variety fueled by habaneros. All three are made in similar fashion with lime juice added to enhance the flavor of the sauce as well as the foods it’s used on. On that front, Van Arsdall thinks they work best with pork, fish and anything fried.   Right now, Chingon hot sauces are on sale at Windmill Farms in Del Cerro and KnB, but they also grace the tabletops at Carnitas’ Snack Shack, Churchill Pub and Grille, Bistro Sixty and Longhorn Café and Saloon as well as a number of brewery tasting rooms including AleSmith, Ballast Point Brewing & Spirits and Green Flash Brewing Company. Having them on hand, he says, allows beer-centric eateries and taste spaces to offer a premium “craft” product. It also helps him expose locals to

WestCoasterSD.com | 33


his product, which is sold at most of the aforementioned locations.   But even if you stock your cabinets with Chingon, there’s something very satisfying about making spicy potions using your own two hands. “There are a bunch of different ways to make hot sauce. Most involve some degree of cooking, but ours does not,” explains Van Arsdall. “We grind the chilies with salt and let them ferment for a few days, then we add vinegar and lime juice and let it pickle.”   It’s a simple process that can be fun when done at home. Turns out kids can be helpful in the process as opposed to collateral damage. Van Arsdall is a father of three and his kids do everything including stemming mega-hot chilies. The trick, he says, is to always wear gloves and eye protection. Also, as I learned, ventilation is a must. Van Arsdall also warns, “Capsicum, the substance in chilies that delivers the heat, is not water soluble, so washing your hands with soap and water will not work. I use a light bleach solution to break down the capsicum, then I wash with soap and water.”   Now that you’re armed with some solid tips and a precautionary tale, take a stab at the recipe for a hot sauce Van Arsdall developed specifically for inclusion in West Coaster. And when it’s ready for its debut, consider adding it to a chilled pint of craft beer. He’s also hooked us up with a recipe for a spicy yet refreshing Michelada made using Ballast Point Habanero Sculpin IPA. Burn, baby, burn!

The Fire Rescue Squad The best local beers for quelling chili pepper heat While the bitterness of hops does a good job of cutting down the fiery flavor of chili peppers, it does little to extinguish the flames. Malt is the most effective spice-counteracting ingredient in beer. So, when daring to dial up the Scoville units, reach for something with serious malt backbone such as an amber ale or stout. Or, if you want to smother that burn with both malt and hops, opt for a maltier IPA veering toward the traditional British style or an imperial red ale. AleSmith Anvil ESB Arrogant Bastard Ale Ballast Point Big Eye IPA Belching Beaver Milk Stout Coronado Mermaid’s Red Ale Green Flash Hop Head Red Karl Strauss Oktoberfest Latitude 33 Breakfast With Wilford Oatmeal Stout Lightning Amber Ale Mission Amber Ale Port Shark Attack Imperial Red Ale Stumblefoot Schwarzbier 34 | May 2013


Homemade Hot sauce yield: 4 servings 1 pound fresh jalapeĂąo peppers 3 Tbsp kosher salt 2 cups distilled white vinegar Gloves, Eye Protection & Ventilation De-stem the peppers and place in the bowl of a food processor, season with salt and process until finely chopped, stopping occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula, about one minute. Transfer the mixture to a glass jar. Cover and let sit in a cool place for two days. Uncover the jar and stir in the vinegar. Cover and let sit in a cool place for five days to age and allow the flavors to meld. Set a mesh strainer over a bowl. Pour the chile mixture into the strainer and press it through the mesh screen with the back of a spoon. Discard solids and pour the sauce into a glass bottle with a tightfitting lid. Serve or store, refrigerated in the airtight container for up to six months. Shake well before each use. This is a thin sauce in its natural state. If you want it thicker you can add a 1/3 tsp of xanthan gum while blending at high speed, as xanthan gum tends to clump.

big rojo michelada yield: 1 cocktail Salt for garnish 1 cup Clamato (or alternate tomato juice) Juice of 1/2 lemon 3 to 4 dashes Worcestershire sauce 2 dashes Big Rojo Hot Sauce 1 dash soy sauce 12 ounces Ballast Point Habanero Sculpin IPA, chilled Wet the rim of a tall glass and roll the rim through salt. Pour in the Clamato, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce and hot sauce. Pour in the beer and serve immediately. NOTE: We used our mild Big Rojo hot sauce due to the chile presence in the beer, but if you’re using a non-spicy beer I would use Stupid Hot or Maquina Verde.


may CRAFT BEER EVENTS View more @ westcoastersd.com/event-calendar Port / Lost Abbey 7th Anniversary Party - May 4 Perhaps the craftiest of San Diego’s craft breweries is celebrating their seventh anniversary with two four-hour sessions. Attendees can expect to see some of the brewery’s finer draft and bottle offerings as well as some of the limited Track series beers available. Food will be provided by four different food trucks, complete with a suggested beer pairing. Each $20 ticket receives 10 tastings, a food ticket and a commemorative tasting glass. Tickets are for sale online at lostabbey.com. Morning session is 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. and the afternoon session is 4 - 8 p.m. @ 155 Mata Way #104. San Marcos, 92069. Saison Diego Release Party @ Green Flash Brewing Co. - May 7 The beer formerly known as Summer Saison makes its seasonal debut this month at Green Flash’s tasting room. This 4.2% unfiltered Belgian style farmhouse ale is tart, fruity and a bit funky - perfect for upcoming sunshine (just make sure to keep the beer in the shade). While attending this release, Tweet or Instagram @GreenFlashBeer your answer to “If you could drink a Saison anywhere in the world, where would it be, and why?” using the hashtag #beachhouseale for a chance to win a “Saison Prize Pack”. The party starts at 3 p.m. @ 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. Mira Mesa, 92121. 2nd Saturday w/ Stone Brewing Co. @ Hamilton’s - May 11 Every second Saturday of the month, Hamilton’s gets crazy. This month, the South Park bar will feature Stone Brewing Co. On tap: 2006 Double Bastard, 2010 Double Bastard aged in Bourbon Barrels, Cali-Belgique IPA aged in red wine barrels, Suitable for Cave Aging aged in red wine barrels, Sublimely Self Righteous Ale with added espresso beans, 2005 Old Guardian, and 2004 Imperial Russian Stout. On cask: Imperial Russian Stout with espresso and Cali-Belgique aged in white wine barrels. There’s free food, too: Peruvian skirt steak with ceviche, Argentine bean and corn stew with chorizo, and more. See hamiltonstavern.com/ upcoming-events for a full beer and food list. The festivities start around 5 p.m. @ 1521 30th St. San Diego, 92102. American Craft Beer Week - May 13-19 A national version of our San Diego Beer Week, American Craft Beer Week (ACBW) is organized by the Brewers Association. Essentially, craft beer businesses are encouraged to throw cool events under the auspices of the Brewers Association & ACBW. Below you’ll find a collection of events held in America’s Finest Beer Town during this week. Visit craftbeer.com for a national listing of events. Film Premiere: Crafting A Nation @ Green Flash Brewing Co. - May 13 According to the film’s website, Crafting A Nation is a feature length documentary “about how the American craft brewers are rebuilding the economy one beer at a time.” The California premiere will be hosted inside Green Flash. Thanks to a keen projector & audio setup, the brewery tasting room transforms into a movie theatre with awesome beer. More on the film at craftinganation.com. Tickets are $5 online @ greenflashfilm-estw.eventbrite.com; doors open at 6 p.m., film starts at 7 p.m. @ 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. Mira Mesa, 92121. Golden Road @ Raglan Public House - May 14 Steps from the Ocean Beach pier, Raglan is serving up Golden Road Brewing in a partial 10-tap takeover for ACBW. On cask: Hazelnut Brown Ale. Starts at 5 p.m. @ 1851 Bacon St. San Diego, 92107. American Craft Beer Week Coast to Coast Toast @ Hamilton’s - May 16 Glasses around the nation will be raised for a “simultaneous toast” to American brewing prowess. Hamilton’s will host the toast with lots of Lost Abbey / Port Brewing beer. Framboise de Amorosa, Red Poppy, Saint’s Devotion, Avant Garde, Red Barn and more will be available. Toast starts promptly at 5 p.m. @ 1521 30th St. San Diego, 92102. Sierra Nevada Total Tap Takeover @ Raglan Public House - May 16 All of Raglan’s 20 taps will be loaded with Sierra Nevada beer. While still in the works at time of printing, we were told there will be “lots of rarities and one-offs”. The beer program is impressive at Raglan, so we trust they’ll deliver. Visit raglanpublichouse.com closer to the event date for more. Starts at 5 p.m. @ 1851 Bacon St. San Diego 92107.

36 | May 2013

Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens in Escondido, along with its 1,561 SANYO HIT Power solar modules, is hosting a plethora of events this month. Photo courtesy of Stone Brewing

12 Brewers, 12 Casks, 12 Mallets @ Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens - May 16 Twelve of Stone’s brewers have augmented twelve different casks of various Stone beers. Taste brewer Cecil Menasco’s Stone Cali-Belgique IPA with aji mirasol chilies or Joel Sherman’s Stone IPA with wildflower honey, Moroccan mint and chipotle peppers. Full listing of beers online at stonebrewing.com/calendar; event goes from 5 - 7 p.m. @ 1999 Citracado Pkwy. Escondido, 92029. Craft Beer Block @ North Park Festival of Arts - May 18 This particular festival is one of our staff favorites. Taking place within the larger Festival of Arts, the Craft Beer Block takes over Ohio Street and features more than 20 San Diegan breweries. Check out http://bpt.me/e/334587 for info and tickets. Cost is $25 for12 four ounce samples. Starts @ 11 a.m. @ Ohio St. & University Ave. San Diego, 92104. 2nd Annual Bacon & Brews Cook-Off @ Aztec Brewing Co. - May 18 Think you can cook with bacon? For $25, Aztec provides up to four pounds of uncooked bacon plus cooking space. Contestants should bring everything necessary to cook, including grills, smokers, utensils, chairs tables, etc. The goal is to craft the best two-bite dish that uses bacon as a main ingredient. The bacon itself comes from Cook Pigs in Fallbrook and the pigs are fed, among other local feed, Aztec’s spent grain. Aztec beer is available to purchase, of course. Visit aztecbrewery.com/aztec_events.html to download an entry form. The event starts at 9 a.m. and judging takes place at 2 p.m. @ 2330 La Mirada Dr. #200 Vista, 92081. 5th Anniversary @ Toronado - May 24 One of the finest beer bars in San Diego, Toro is celebrating proper for their fifth with nearly a full week of great beer leading up to and including Memorial Day weekend. Expect to see The Bruery’s own five-year anniversary beer, High 5 IPA from Pizza Port Solana Beach, Alpine Keene Idea, casks from Ballast Point, plus lots more from Hollister, Kern River, Russian River and more. There will be a keg of Toronado SF’s 25th Anniversary as well. Expect to see whales, bro @ 4026 30th St. San Diego, 92104. Rough Draft BeerBQ @ KnB Wine Cellars - May 25 If you haven’t tried Miramar’s Rough Draft in a while, here’s your chance. Draft offerings will include Freudian Sip, Hop Therapy Double IPA, Barrel-aged Emboozlement Tripel, Weekday IPA and more along with food from KnB’s tasty kitchen. Starts at noon @ 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. San Diego, 92120. Karl Strauss Pro-Am Deadline - May 31 Karl is accepting entries to their annual Pro-Am homebrew competition until the end of May. First place gets to brew on Karl’s system and the beer will be placed on tap in all Karl Strauss brewpubs throughout Southern California. Plus you’ll be entered in the GABF Pro-Am competition. Visit karlstrauss.com for guidelines and rules. Entries must be delivered no later than 5 p.m. on May 31st @ 5965 Santa Fe St. San Diego, 92109


F

is for Fermentation We’ve doubled up for this month’s glossary of terms, which comes straight from the beer educators at CraftBeer.com, with Fezziwig’s added by West Coaster (in bold)

Filtration - The passage of a liquid through a permeable or porous substance to remove solid matter in suspension, often yeast. Final Gravity - The specific gravity of a beer as measured when fermentation is complete (when all desired fermentable sugars have been converted to alcohol and carbon dioxide gas). Synonym: Final specific gravity; final SG; finishing gravity; terminal gravity. Fining - The process of adding clarifying agents such as isinglass, gelatin, silica gel, or Polyvinyl Polypyrrolidone (PVPP) to beer during secondary fermentation to hasten the precipitation of suspended matter, such as yeast, proteins, or tannins.

E

Flocculation - The behavior of suspended particles in wort or beer that tend to clump together in large masses and settle out. During brewing, protein and tannin particles will flocculate out of the kettle, coolship or fermenter during hot or cold break. During and at the end of fermentation, yeast cells will flocculate to varying degrees depending on the yeast strain, thereby affecting fermentation as well as filtration of the resulting beer.

Endosperm - The starch-containing sac of the barley grain.

Fresh Hopping - The addition of freshly harvested hops that have not yet

Esters - Volatile flavor compounds that form through the interaction of or-

been dried to different stages of the brewing process. Fresh hopping adds unique flavors and aromas to beer that are not normally found when using hops that have been dried and processed per usual. Synonymous with wet hopping.

ganic acids with alcohols during fermentation and contribute to the fruity aroma and flavor of beer. Esters are very common in ales.

Ethanol - Ethyl alcohol, the colorless primary alcohol constituent of beer. Export - Any beer produced for the express purpose of exportation. For example: export-style German lagers or export-style Irish stouts.

Fusel Alcohol - A family of high molecular weight alcohols, which result from excessively high fermentation temperatures. Fusel alcohols can impart harsh or solvent-like characteristics commonly described as lacquer or paint thinner. It can contribute to hangovers.

F Fermentation - The chemical conversion of fermentable sugars into approximately equal parts of ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas, through the action of yeast. The two basic methods of fermentation in brewing are top fermentation, which produces ales, and bottom fermentation, which produces lagers. Fermentation Lock - A one-way valve, often made of glass or plastic that is fitted onto a fermenter and allows carbon dioxide gas to escape from the fermenter while excluding ambient wild yeasts, bacteria, and contaminants.

Fezziwig’s Brewing Co. - This won’t be the Carlsbad-based brewery’s name for long. On April 2, owner Daniel Guy announced on Facebook that the company would be changing their name due to a complaint by Boston Beer Company, which produces Samuel Adams Old Fezziwig Ale.

38 | May 2013

Fermentation tanks at Mother Earth Brew Co. in Vista are closely watched over


Above: Eagle Rock’s tasting room welcomes patrons on a brewery tour. Left: El Segundo Brewing’s Rob Croxall is a member of the board of directors. Photos by Ryan Lamb

40 | May 2013


what’s brewing in la la land Los Angeles brewers form guild as craft beer builds By Randy Clemens

C

ollaboration and camaraderie have become major pillars of the foundation that unites craft brewers, who’ve largely chosen to eschew the inhuman pitfalls of cutthroat competition in favor of genuine bonhomie and mutual respect for each other’s talents and successes. Taking their unified vision one step further, a cadre of craftsmen have recently announced the formation of the Los Angeles Brewers Guild, an industry group which aims “to create and foster a culture of world-class beer in Los Angeles County by promoting and protecting local craft brewers.”   “It’s great for us to be able to rally together, and to have a collective voice,” explains Eagle Rock Brewery co-owner Jeremy Raub, who is serving as the guild’s inaugural president. “It’s so important and so helpful—especially in an area as huge and spread out as L.A.—to know that you have a support network you can turn to.”   While new to L.A., brewers guilds have existed elsewhere for some time now, with an impressive 46 out of 50 states claiming their own statewide guilds, and plenty of regional associations under each of those, according to the Brewers Association. Rumblings of a potential LABG began swirling a little over a year and a half ago. Raub and several other Los Angeles-based brewers attended a meeting of the Orange Countybased Southern California Craft Brewers Guild, but respectfully decided to keep the L.A. entity separate.   “Our health codes and government entities are very different,” he acknowledged. “We thought it best to keep it as local as possible, focusing on where we live and work versus spreading ourselves too thin. Opening and operating a brewery in Los Angeles involves keeping an eye on a lot of moving targets, and we want to have the strongest support structure we can have, both for existing breweries and fledgling new ones.”   Besides enabling brewers to have open discussions and share knowledge, the guild hopes to someday host events and festivals to build a stronger community. Reflecting on the local craft beer scene, Raub beams, “We’re in this perfect time in our infancy, and the culture is growing so quickly in L.A. People ask why we’d help our competitors,

and it’s great that we’re able to say they’re not our competitors at all. Our market share is so small that there’s enough room for us to grow and flourish together. Like they say: ‘A rising tide lifts all boats.’”   Many restaurants, bars, vendors, suppliers, and even consumers have expressed interest in becoming members or otherwise supporting the guild, but so far, only breweries and brewpubs with facilities in Los Angeles can join. “It’s been great to get so much validation of what we’re doing, but we’re not ready to handle associate members just yet... perhaps in the future,” Raub suggests.

Reflecting on the local craft beer scene, Raub beams, “We’re in this perfect time in our infancy, and the culture is growing so quickly in L.A. People ask why we’d help our competitors, and it’s great that we’re able to say they’re not our competitors at all. Our market share is so small that there’s enough room for us to grow and flourish together. Like they say: ‘A rising tide lifts all boats.’”   Raub also hope that in the next quarter, the guild will be able draw up lots of materials to help its members, with important items such as best practice guidelines, quality control policies, and general tips on staying in compliance and avoiding unnecessary fines. “Things I wish we had access to when starting Eagle Rock Brewery,” he lets on with the slightest of grins.   Moreover, Raub hopes the guild can also act as a catalyst for change. And while the LABG just became official at the end of January, they’ve already found themselves pushing for some solutions to better serve their thirsty customers.

  As anyone who owns a handful of growlers from different breweries can attest, the laws regarding refilling them can be tad prohibitive. The California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) hath decreed that breweries may only refill growlers from their respective establishments, which must be clearly labeled as such. While I enjoy collecting beer ephemera as much as the next geek, it’s rather easy to quickly amass more growlers than you have room for. Wouldn’t it be easier to have one vessel that you could fill virtually anywhere? (Yes. Yes it would.) At a California Craft Brewers Association workshop in February, a representative from the ABC stunned beer industry attendees when he very plainly announced that it wouldn’t be a problem for a brewery to fill any container so long as it contained approved labeling, even if that was some kind of sticker placed over the existing graphics on another brewery’s growler. A well-meaning industry member in attendance immediately took to Facebook asserting that there’d been some kind of policy change and now people could go to their local brewery with any growler and expect to get it filled.   “It caused a lot of confusion,” Raub laments. “Customers were coming in and getting upset that we wouldn’t fill another brewery’s growler. And we tried to explain that it still wasn’t that easy, but they’d get upset and reference that Facebook post. The guild members got together to discuss what all of this meant—and didn’t mean—for us. Ultimately, we decided that it was too early and presumptuous of us to make any changes without fully understanding what we can legally do. We issued a statement explaining that LABG members wouldn’t fill other breweries’ growlers until we were able to meet with ABC representatives to ensure that we’re in full compliance with their regulations.”   “It really felt good to have us all come together at that meeting,” Raub continues. “Many of the brewers brought up potential issues that others hadn’t thought of, and lots of creative solutions were presented. Being able to unite like this is really going to help brewers and benefit consumers for years to come.”

WestCoasterSD.com | 41


Craft Beer Directory & Map

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LA JOLLA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Eureka! 4545 La Jolla Village Dr. Ste E-25 858.546.8858 | www.EurekaBurger.com 2. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 3. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 4. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 5. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 6. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 7. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 8. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306

619.857.8023 | www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

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PACIFIC BEACH MISSION BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 3. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 4. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 5. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 6. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 7. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 8. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com 9. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com 10. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com 11. The Bar Key 954 Turquoise St. | 858.488.8200 www.BarKeyPB.com 12. Turquoise Cellars 5026 Cass St. | 858.412.5377 www.Facebook.com/TurquoiseCellars

42 | May 2013

13. Woodstock’s Pizza 1221 Garnet Ave. | 858.642.6900 www.WoodstocksPB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Heidi’s Liquor & Deli 980 Turquoise St | 858.488.7474

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

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POINT LOMA OCEAN BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Fathom Bistro 1776 Shelter Island Dr. | 619.222.5835 www.FathomBistro.com 2. Gabardine 1005 Rosecrans St. | 619.398.9810 www.GabardineEats.com 3. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 4. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 5. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 6. OB Kabob 4994 Newport Ave | 619.222.9700 www.OBKabob.com 7. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 8. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 9. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 10. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 11. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 12. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 13. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 14. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 15. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com

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MISSION VALLEY CLAIREMONT BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Dan Diegos 2415 Morena Blvd | 619.276.2100 www.DanDiegos.com 2. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.SanDiego.edu/Dining/LaGranTerraza 3. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net

4. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 5. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 | www.RJGrill.com 6. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Coronado Brewing Co. (Knoxville) 1205 Knoxville www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com 3. Helm’s Brewing Co. 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. | 858.384.2772 www.HelmsBrewingCo.com 4. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.SocieteBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

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CORONADO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Park Place Liquor 1000 Park Place | 619.435.0116

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

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MISSION HILLS HILLCREST BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 2. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 3. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 4. San Diego Brew Project 1735 Hancock St. | 619.234.5757 www.SDBrewProject.com 5. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 6. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 7. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 8. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

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DOWNTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com 3. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 4. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 5. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 6. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 7. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 8. Ogawashi 1100 5th Ave. | 619.358.9170 www.Ogawashi.com 9. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 10. Queenstown Public House 1557 Columbia St. | 619.546.0444 www.BareBackGrill.com/Queenstown 11. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 12. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 13. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com 14. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 15. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 16. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bacchus Wine Bar & Market 647 G Street | 619.236.0005 www.BacchusWineMarket.com 2. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 3. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 401 G St. | 619.231.7000 www.RockBottom.com/San-Diego 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

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UPTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com 2. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com

3. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com 4. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 5. El Take It Easy 3926 30th St. | 619.291.1859 www.ElTakeItEasy.com 6. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 7. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 8. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 9. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 10. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com 11. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 12. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com 13. The Linkery 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.TheLinkery.com 14. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 15. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 16. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 17. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 18. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 19. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 20. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Bottlecraft 3007 University Ave. www.BottleCraftBeer.com 3. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 4. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 9. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

BREWERIES 1. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com 2. Thorn St. Brewery 3176 Thorn St. www.ThornStreetBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com


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Craft Beer Directory & Map

I

NORTH COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. 83 Degrees 660 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.7904 www.83Degrees.net 2. Board & Brew 201 Oak Ave. | 760.434.4466 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 4. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 5. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 6. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy. | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 7. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 8. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 9. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com 10. Tap That Tasting Room 3207 Roymar Rd. | 760.529.5953 www.TapThatKegNow.com 11. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.Facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.BeerOnTheWall.com 2. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 3. La Vista Liquor 993 S. Santa Fe Ave. | 760.758.8900 4. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Bottle-Shop 5. Stone Company Store-Oceanside 301 N. Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 6. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com 7. Vista Wine & Spirits 755 Shadowridge Dr. | 760.727.2017

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet 2. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. Ste C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 3. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 4. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com 5. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E. Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com 6. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. Ste 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 3. Fezziwig’s Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.FezziwigsBrewing.com 4. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 5. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Wy. Ste 101 760.216.6500 | www.IronFistBrewing.com

44 | May 2013

6. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. Ste 104 760.913.7333 | www.Lat33Brew.com 7. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 8. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 9. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 10. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real Suite G www.OTTBrew.com 11. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Wy. Ste 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 12. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Ave. | 760.481.3141 www.RipCurrentBrewing.com 13. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 14. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com 2. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 3. Smokin Beaver 348 State Pl. | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

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ENCINITAS DEL MAR BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Bier Garden 641 S. Coast Hwy. | 760.632.2437 2. Board & Brew 1212 Camino Del Mar | 858.481.1021 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 4. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com 5. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Country Rd. 858.481.7883 | www.DelMar.Oggis.com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 7. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 8. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 9. The Regal Seagull 996 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.479.2337 www.RegalSeagull.com 10. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 9430 Scranton Rd. | 858.458.4290 www.KegNBottle.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

BREWERIES 1. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 2. Ballast Point Brewing and Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 3. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com 4. Hess Brewing 7955 Silverton Ave. Ste 1201 619.887.6453 | www.HessBrewing.com 5. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. Ste D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 6. Saint Archer Brewing Co. 9550 Distribution Ave. | 858.225.2337 www.SaintArcherBrewery.com 7. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. Suite 132 858.480.9381 | www.WetNReckless.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

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POWAY RANCHO BERNARDO BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 2. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com 3. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855 4. Welldeck Liquor 14168 Poway Rd. | 858.486.5552

BREW PUBS

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. 858.592.7883 | www.CMR.Oggis.com

1. Farr Better Spirits 398 N. El Camino Real | 760.753.7137 2. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. Ste 105 858.513.8070 | www.LightningBrewery.com

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

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SORRENTO VALLEY MIRA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Best Pizza & Brew 9172 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 858.566.9900 www.BestPizzaAndBrew.com 2. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. Ste G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com 3. Woody’s Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com

BREWERIES

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ALPINE BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

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RAMONA BREWERIES

1. ChuckAlek Independent Brewers 2330 Main St. Ste C | 513.465.9768 www.ChuckAlek.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Ramona Brew Supplies 369 Main St. | 760.440.7727

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JULIAN BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

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SOUTH BAY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 2335 Highland Ave. | 619.474.7255 www.KegNBottle.com 2. South Bay Liquor 1355 Broadway | 619.422.1787 3. Sprouts Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

BREWERIES 1. Mad Lab Craft Brewing 6120 Business Ctr. Ct. | 619.254.6478 www.MadLabCraftBrewing.Wordpress.com

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COLLEGE LA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 2. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 5. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 6. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd. 7. Woodstock’s Pizza 6145 El Cajon Blvd | 619.265.0999 www.WoodstocksSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com

2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

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EAST COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Find us on Facebook! 2. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 3. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 4. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com 4. Windy City Liquor 701 Broadway | 619.588.8404 www.WindyCityLiquor.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. Manzanita Brewing Company 10151 Prospect Ave. Ste D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. Ste G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION? Send submissions to:

directory@westcoastersd.com


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West Coaster  

May 2013

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May 2013