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APRIL 2014 | SERVING AMERICA’S FINEST BEER COUNTY | SAN DIEGO

Chicks for Beer with Maui @ The High Dive

PLUS: More Ladies of Local Beer Bottle Trading Historical Beer Recipes AleSmith Expansion Plans Brewing a San Diego IIPA

Vol. 4 No. 5

FREE COPY


WHAT’S YOUR LEGACY?

Oceanside’s Neighborhood Brewery

erience. p x e s r a ye with 25ion screen. e g a t i r e t erman hom with projec G f o r e ing brew ng ro Skilled Spacious tasti plenty of searts-to-go groups. e g r a l , growlesports parties pintsand etings, more! e m r o f e d availabl live music an e c a p s Event

760-705-3221 | legacybrewingco.com 363 Airport Road Oceanside, CA 92058


Erika Davies Live Jazz Weds 4.2 7pm Lunar Eclipse Weekend with Butcher's Brewing Tower Blackout Fri 4.11 Keep the Glass Night Sat 4.12 Meet the Brewer and Full Lunar Eclipse Tues 4.15 Dining Out For Fo Life Thurs 4.24 benefit for The Center HIV/AIDS services


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Dear Local Beer Drinker, This is an exciting time in the beer world, with more and more people drinking the good stuff. In mid-April San Diegans will compete at the World Beer Cup in Denver. In 2012 our local brewers won five gold medals, three silver and eight bronze on home turf (the awards skip a year, hence no competition in 2013). 799 breweries entered 3,921 beers from 54 countries two years ago, and we’re excited to find out who will take home hardware this time around. We’re also coming up on festival season again. The CityBeat Festival of Beers, which sells out every year, returns to North Park on April 19, benefitting the San Diego Music Foundation. Then in early May the San Diego Brewers Guild is back at it, helping promote the Harrah’s Rhythm & Brews fest in Vista, which also gives back to the Relay For Life cause. Stay tuned for lots more fun beer events, including the release of “25 Years Behind Bars,” a special ginger and lemongrass-infused witbier brewed at Karl Strauss’ downtown brewery restaurant by Bonnie Peterson and brewer Sean Albrecht. Bonnie has been with the company since its inception, and funnily enough brought a copy of Beer for Dummies to the brew day. When asked what’s different about the beer scene now compared to 25 years ago, Bonnie said that “IPAs have really surged, but recently people are starting to return to classic flavors, like Karl Strauss Amber.” Her special brew will be available starting April 3. This month, WC welcomes designers Kayla Coleman and Ashley Drewitz to the team. Kayla is taking over as our new art director, and Ashley is providing a big assist by putting together many of the ads you see. Cheers, ladies! Salud,

Ryan Lamb Executive Editor West Coaster Bonnie Peterson brewing up “25 Years Behind Bars” at Karl Strauss Downtown. Photos by Tim Stahl


West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION Founders RYAN LAMB MIKE SHESS Publisher MIKE SHESS mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor RYAN LAMB ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director KAYLA COLEMAN kayla@westcoastersd.com Graphic Designer ASHLEY DREWITZ ashley@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant TOM SHESS thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers SAM TIERNEY sam@westcoastersd.com BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ brandon@westcoastersd.com RYAN RESCHAN ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com GONZALO QUINTERO drqcbt@gmail.com Contributors BRETT NELSON BRIAN TROUT JAROD FLUKE KIM LUTZ KRISTINA YAMAMOTO PAIGE MCWEY TIM STAHL

West Coaster, THE WEBSITE Web Manager MIKE SHESS Web Editor RYAN LAMB Web Master JOSH EVERETT West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location.

FEEDBACK: Send letters to the Editor to ryan@westcoastersd.com Letters may be edited for space. Anonymous letters are published at the discretion of the Editor.

© 2013 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”


WRITERS

COLUMNIST

INTO THE BREW Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified Cicerone® exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

COLUMNIST

PLATES & PINTS Brandon Hernández is a native San Diegan and the author of the San Diego Beer News Complete Guide to San Diego Breweries (available on Amazon. com). In addition to his on-staff work for West Coaster, he is responsible for communications for local craft beer producer Stone Brewing Company; an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including USA TODAY, The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including The San Diego Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Ranch & Coast, San Diego Magazine and U-T San Diego.

COLUMNIST

THE CARBOY CHRONICLES Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into all-grain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with occasional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he attends.

COLUMNIST

THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D. is a San Diego native, three-time SDSU grad, career educator, and co-founder of the popular multimedia craft beer discussion craftbeertasters.com. An avid homebrewer, Cicerone Certified Beer Server, and seasoned traveler, Dr. Quintero takes great pride in educating people about craft beer and the craft beer culture. By approaching the subject from the perspective of a scholar and educator, Dr. Quintero has developed a passion for spreading the good word of local beer.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

19-20

COLUMNS

The Carboy Chronicles

Ryan Reschan discusses how QUAFF homebrew club members are branching off into their own beer-related fields

23-24

Into the Brew

27-28

The Doctor’s Office

32-33

Plates & Pints

11-12,14

Sam Tierney talks old beer recipes and the influence Ron Pattinson is having on brewers like Ramona’s ChuckAlek Gonzalo Quintero (“Dr. Q”) takes a closer look at bottletrading to dispel myths and explore the lesser-known subculture Brandon Hernández plays with your senses by dishing up a waffle that won’t exactly be what meets the eye

PLUS +

Brews in the News

Paragraph-sized clips of SD beer news. Got tips on stories? E-mail info@westcoastersd.com

16

Chicks for Beer

17

Kim Lutz

Every third Tuesday The High Dive hosts a brewery, with proceeds going to the Susan G. Komen Foundation Q&A with the head brewer of Saint Archer, who recently brewed a batch of the company’s Pale Ale in the UK

34-36

SDIIPA

39-43

Craft Beer Directory & Map

44

QUAFF’s “brewing machine” Brian Trout goes over our signature style, the “sessionable” San Diego Pale Ale Are we missing any locations? E-mail directory@westcoastersd.com

Glossary

Terms that start with “S” straight from the beer educators at CraftBeer.com

ON THE COVER: Beer-battered mahi fish tacos with mango salsa, napa cabbage, and shredded carrots; paired with Big Swell IPA at the Chicks for Beer dinner featuring Maui Brewing Co. in late March. See page 16 for more info on The High Dive’s signature event. Photo by Kristina Yamamoto


A food, farm and craft beer pairing event celebrating the unique role of craft brewers, local growers, and restaurateurs in cultivating community and health. Proceeds from this event benefit Community Health Improvement Partners’ efforts to tackle obesity through the development of a healthy, sustainable and regional food system.

SUNDAY MAY 18, 2014 1:00-4:00pm

$55 for General Admission $25 for Designated Driver Visit: www.sdchip.org/brew to purchase tickets Sponsorships Available

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SILO in Makers Quarter 753 15th Street San Diego, CA 92101 SAN DIEGO’S TOP BREWERS, RESTAURANTS, AND FARMS FEATURED INCLUDE: Stone Brewing Company Coronado Brewing Company Ballast Point The Lost Abbey URBN Alchemy Cultural Fare & Cocktails The Grill, Lodge at Torrey Pines Sadie Rose Baking Co. Stehly Farms Organics Sage Mountain Farm Connelly Gardens ....and many more!

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BREWS IN THE NEWS

GREEN FLASH/ALPINE COLLABORATION In early March Green Flash lent their system to Alpine Beer Company in order to produce 250 barrels of their Nelson IPA in a fantastic embodiment of the collaborative spirit of San Diego breweries. Pictured are Green Flash brewmaster Chuck Silva (right), Alpine owner Pat McIlhenney and Green Flash co-founder and CEO Mike Hinkley. Photo by Tim Stahl In other Green Flash news, the company’s packaging is undergoing a big overhaul, and the team is prepping for their next Supper Club event on April 21 featuring Verde y Crema from Mexico, with an assistant by Angel Miron at Let’s Go Clandestino. In more Alpine news, West Coaster is launching its second “Behind the Brew” video focusing on Nelson IPA early April; visit youtube.com/westcoastervideos to view.

MIKE HESS AND SAINT ARCHER START CANNING In the month of March both North Park-based Mike Hess Brewing and Miramar’s Saint Archer started canning their beers. The Mike Hess beers included Grazias Vienna Cream Ale, Habitus Rye IPA, Jucundus Orange Honey Wheat and rotating IPA Solis Occasus, which loosely translates to West Coaster. Miramar’s Saint Archer started with their Blonde Ale before continuing on to the White Ale, Pale Ale, and IPA. The list of local breweries currently canning their beers now includes Ballast Point, Modern Times, Pizza Port, and Manzanita. Manzanita is utilizing Mobile West Canning, and soon Benchmark Brewing will be too; they hope to have cans out in the market by their anniversary at the end

of June.

NEW BREWS Two new breweries welcome beer drinkers in San Diego in March, both with grand openings on March 29. Dos Desperados Brewery has a Wild West theme in San Marcos and is run by Steve and Dora Munson, while Pacific Brewing Company in Miramar is helmed by former Stone brewers Andrew Heino and Chris Chalmers. The county of San Diego breweries is now at 87.

MAY 6: SDBG QUALITY SUMMIT From 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. the San Diego Brewers Guild is hosting the first in their new semiannual educational series. The “quality summit” will focus on key elements of starting a brewery quality assurance program, good manufacturing practices, true-to-brand evaluation, and more! Guild members receive special pricing for attendance ($95/person before April 21; $150/person after April 21). Non-members are also welcome to attend at the price of $125 before April 21 and $225 after April 21. The series is a collaborative effort between the San Diego Brewers Guild and SoCal BOB, LLC who presented two successful continuing education symposia in 2013. The summit will be moderated by Jeremy Pritchard from FM 94/9, with topics including key elements of starting a quality program and grow-


ing it to match increased business demands,selection and use of analytical equipment commonly found in brewery QC labs, discussion of good manufacturing practices (GMP), defining appearance, aroma and flavor parameters to set up a true-to-brand sensory evaluation, a detailed discussion of pairing food with your beer and examples and samples provided, legal and safety update, plus a beer social hour. Presenters include Rick Blankemeier (Stone Brewing Co. Quality Assurance Supervisor), Gwen Conley (Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey Production & QA Director), Mike Sardina (Societe Brewing Company Assistant Executive Office and Chief Legal Officer), Chris White (White Labs Founder President & CEO), Scot Blair (Hamiltons Tavern, Monkey Paw Brewery and Small Bar Owner/ Operator), Michael Brewer (Alcholic Beverage Consulting Service President), Brian Scott (Karl Strauss Brewing Company Maintenance & Packaging Supervisor/SDBG President), Shawn Steele (Karl Strauss Brewing Company Quality Assurance Manager), and Dan Drown (Drown Consulting LLC Owner).

CRAFT EXPORTS ON THE RISE Also from the Brewers Association came the results of a recently-completed industry survey, showing that craft beer export volume increased by 49 percent in 2013, representing 282,526 barrels and an estimated $73 million. Canada remained the industry’s largest export market, with shipments increasing 92 percent by volume (up to 131,511 barrels) in 2013. Sweden

(15.5 percent) and the United Kingdom (7.9 percent) remained the next two largest markets, with Australia (5.4 percent) and Japan (3.2 percent) following.

STONE AHA RALLY Chris Banker, pictured above in a photo by Tim Stahl, will soon get to brew his Mexican Mocha Milk Stout on the Stone Brewing Co. system having won their 2014 Homebrew Competition, which doubled as an American Homebrewers Association (AHA) rally.

WEST COASTER VIDEOS In addition to our print and blog material, West Coaster is now producing online videos. The first, a “Behind the Brew” look at Ballast Point’s Sculpin IPA, was released in March. The second video, BTB with Alpine Nelson IPA, will be released in early April. Stay tuned and subscribe at youtube.com/ westcoastervideos

BREWBIES @ BAGBY BEER 2014’s iteration of the Brewbies Festival, benefiting the Keep A Breast Foundation, was held beside yet-to-open Bagby Beer Company in Oceanside on March 1. Event organizer Melanie Pierce told WC that more than $45,000 was raised for the cause, and that a Brewbies Fest in Italy is in the works. Photo by Tim Stahl


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A look at the upcoming AleSmith facility, online in 2015. Photo courtesy AleSmith Brewing Company

ALESMITH: EXPANDING Utilizing Urban Contracting, Marcatects and Pacific Rim Mechanical, AleSmith Brewing Company will soon began renovations on a 105,000 sq. ft. building at 9990 Empire Street in order to build a brand new production facility, tasting room and gift shop. The new digs, less than a mile from AleSmith’s current location in Miramar, will allow the company to grow by up to 25 employees. The $10 million project includes an 80-barrel brewhouse, bottling line and fermentors from German company Krones. While AleSmith plans to produce 15,000 barrels in 2014 and 25,000 barrels in 2015, the growth model could see them making up to 150,000 barrels annually. Owner Peter Zien, a BJCP-Certified Grand Master Level One Beer Judge, is also bringing his side-project CheeseSmith into the fold, and it will be San Diego’s first creamery since the 1930s. The plan is to have the brewery up-and-running by January 1, 2015. Zien is hoping to sell the old brewery turnkey, while possibly staying on as an equity partner. AleSmith Brewing Co. beat out more than 16,000 other breweries worldwide to earn the title of 2013’s “Top Brewer In The World” from RateBeer.

In Los Angeles, Eagle Rock Brewer Lee Bakofsky (left) brews up Dairy Tank Collaboration Milk Stout with AleSmith Head Brewer Ryan Crisp and Eagle Rock Co-Founder Jeremy Raub in late February. The beer is an homage to the tanks bought from AleSmith by Eagle Rock to get the brewery up-and-running in 2009. Try the collaboration at Hamilton’s Tavern on April 18, alongside “dueling casks” of a TBD-Eagle Rock beer and AleSmith’s Old Ale, plus more draught selections from both breweries. Photo via @ eaglerockbrew on Instagram


CHICKS FOR BEER @ THE HIGH DIVE PHOTOS BY KRISTINA YAMAMOTO Every third Tuesday of the month, The High Dive in Bay Park hosts a brewery for a ladies-only beer pairing dinner on the patio. In March, Maui Brewing Co. was featured, with Mainland Operations Manager (M.O.M.) Anita Lum (pictured in the center of the group shot) leading attendees through five courses (with vegetarian options). Anita’s son, San Diego native Garrett Marrero, founded the islandbased brewery in 2005. Chicks for Beer events have raised more than $25,000 for the Susan G. Komen Foundation since being founded by The High Dive’s owner Ingrid Alvarez, honorary breast cancer survivor at 2011’s Race for the Cure in San Diego.

In April, Chicks for Beer welcomes San Marcos’ Rip Current Brewing on the 15th, before Ballast Point graces taps on May 20th. Visit highdivesd.com for more info.


We hear you recently went more of a natural citrus highlight; we’re on a trip to the UK? using Navel orange puree and fresh peel Yea, I went with my fiancée from a company in Covina, as well as Heather (of Bird Rock Cof- 9.5 pounds of coriander per 30-barrel fee Roasters). We brewed batch. The coriander is an Indian vari300 barrels (1039 casks x 9 ety that comes from Santa Rosa. gallons) of Saint Archer Pale What’s the story behind the Saint Ale at Banks’s Brewery in Archer Double IPA? Wolverhampton. We wanted We first formulated that beer Lutz and friends at the three-year anniversary to brew the Coffee Brown, when Yiga arrived. The hops are of Eagle Rock’s Women’s Beer Forum. Photo which uses Heather’s beans, similar to a single IPA I brewed courtesy Kim Lutz but the logistics just didn’t at Maui called Freight Trains uswork out. Yiga (Miyashiro, ing Chinook, Citra and Simcoe. Director of Brewing Opera- We played around a bit with the tions) passed on the trip be- base recipe and how much we hopped it. Today we’re brewing a new cause of his role in this big canning project. I was lucky enough to get 60-barrel batch for the tasting room and select draft accounts. chosen to go; cheers to Mitch Steele from Stone who mentioned us as Saint Archer recently launched distribution in LA. Have you been well as Jesse from Golden Road and others. We met with managers of to any events in the area? the J D Wetherspoon pubs where the casked beers will I recently went to Mohawk Bend for their Pink Boots be served. Tap Takeover, which featured beers from Saint ArWhat was your experience like at the Intercher, Stone, Golden Road, and the Three Weavers national Women’s Collaboration Brew Day collaboration with Golden Road. I could only stay (IWCBD) at Stone Brewing World Bistro & for an hour but I met with Alex from Three WeavGardens on March 8? ers and we talked about the new brewhouse and It was fun – a lot of women at once in one room! bottling line that they are waiting on. She told me Working with Devon (Randall, Pizza Port Solana about some places to hit up in London because she Beach head brewer) and Laura (Ulrich, Stone and Jesse (Houck, Golden Road brewmaster) went small batch brewer) was awesome. We came last month. That same night I went to Eagle up with the recipe a few weeks before and deRock’s women’s beer forum, which was reKim Lutz brewing Unite Pale Ale for International cided on a rye pale ale with Mosaic, Cascade, ally successful. I was a bit nervous at first as I Women’s Collaboration Brew Day at Stone Brewing Centennial and Mandarina hops from Hallerdescribed my history in the brewing industry World Bistro & Gardens - Liberty Station. Photo by tau, Germany. There was a very small allocaand tasted through Saint Archer’s lineup, but Tim Stahl tion of Mandarina hops to brewers this year, in the end it went really well. I even had a few and Saint Archer luckily got 110 pounds of it, laughs here and there about my brew stories. so I think I’m going to do an all-Mandarina Ting (Su, Eagle Rock co-founder) was amazpale lager, and I’ll mostly be focusing on the hop’s aromatic qualities. ing as the emcee and helped transition from one beer to the next. It How similar is the new Saint Archer White Ale to the award-win- was a crowd of about 50 women, some homebrewers, of all different ning witbier you brewed at Maui Brewing Co., La Perouse White? knowledge levels. Heather and I talked about our coffee beer and how White beers are pretty simple, so you can’t really get away from mak- our industries connect. I really enjoyed it! ing them similarly. In Maui, I sourced local Mandarian oranges and Join Kim and brewmaster Yiga at The Lodge at Torrey Pines’ beer dinprocessed them myself, which was fine for the brewpub but over- ner on April 23. The Grill chef/beer enthusiast Daniel Boling is planwhelming on the big system. In that beer, the coriander was the star, ning a Hawaiian-themed feast; tickets available at lodgetorreypines. with citrus notes coming from the oranges. This Saint Archer beer has com/beer


THE CARBOY CHRONICLES The new taps going in at Downtown Johnny Brown’s. Photo courtesy Sean Cole

QUAFF MEMBERS EXCEL IN FIELDS OTHER THAN BREWING

B

ack at the 2011 National Homebrewers Conference in San Diego, AleSmith owner Peter Zien discussed how the knowledge gained through homebrewing can be beneficial to other hobbies. In his case, brewing had gotten him into cheesemaking. The list of QUAFF (Quality Ale and Fermentation Fraternity) members who have become professional brewers grows every year, but recently a few have branched out into fields that tie in with brewing. Chef Jered Greenwald and his friend Mike Sangiorgi have been selling their handmade sausage under the umbrella of H.G. Sausageworks. Greenwald, a graduate of The Culinary Institute of America, has been making sausage for over 15 years now. “Mike and I just decided that with the growing interest in locally-produced and hand-made foods, as well as the exploding craft brew scene, it just made sense to bring our products to market,” Greenwald told WC. “Besides, there isn’t a better food and drink pairing in this world than sausage and beer.” The sausage-making has even influenced their homebrewing; a south Asia-inspired saison with galangal, lemongrass and kaffir lime leaves is in the planning stages. Back in winter, a Christmas sausage incorporated Russian imperial stout to hit their desired flavor profile. Beer is being incorporated into several of their other products as well. “We start by looking at pairing a beer style with an ingredient that will be prominently seen in the sausage, as we want to both complement and enhance the flavors of the sausage with the beer.” The bacon, cheddar and jalapeño sausage always includes IPA and was developed using The Apprentice from Societe. They’ve The taps and beer board at The Ugly Dog. Photo courtesy Larry Stein

BY RYAN RESCHAN


also made a flourless chocolate stout cake using Benchmark’s Oatmeal Stout. Other wild ideas include hop-cured bacon smoked with hickory and hop pellets, and a semi-classic British banger packed with spent grains and an English-style beer. On the other side of the bar, current QUAFF president Larry Stein just opened his first pub and is working on the second. Stein was an electronics engineer for 25 years and a photographer for 12 years before he and his wife Gail decided they were ready to try something different. “We had always thought about opening a small restaurant featuring good beer, wine, cheese and good pub food, so we decided now was the time,” said Stein. They found a spot near their house in Tierrasanta, but negotiations fell through and they searched for another location. They eventually found McMurphy’s Pub up in the college area thanks to fellow QUAFF member

Sean Cole (more on Sean in a bit). “We really liked the feel of the pub and quickly bought the business,” said Stein, who re-opened the space as The Ugly Dog in January. Right after this purchase, the property manager of the space in Tierrasanta came back with a new proposal and they decided to take on opening a second pub, Steins. The Steins are hoping to open Steins in May. Busy with one spot open and another on the way, Stein hasn’t had much time to homebrew in recently, but he continues to make cider and mead, two other types of fermented beverages that are available at The Ugly Dog more than anywhere else in the county. His knowledge of BJCP (Beer Judge Certification Program) style guidelines means that the chalkboard will be anything but onedimensional. “We have range of styles from American light lagers to RIS to West Coast IPA, with knowledgeable servers helping our

customers discover their preferred flavors.” Larry and Gail will be taking a similar approach to beverages served at Steins to pair with the unique pub fare that is in the works. The aforementioned Sean Cole is also busy in the pub scene, having recently bought Downtown Johnny Brown’s. “As I travelled to events such as GABF and the National Homebrewers Competition it occurred to me the best way to taste, promote, and share the best craft beers available was to go into the business of selling it,” said Cole. Homebrewing sparked his interest in beer styles beyond light lager. He quickly learned the science behind the brewing process and starting brewing all-grain batches, making as many styles as he could. It’s this appreciation for the technical and artisanal aspects of brewing that makes him a fan of everything from beers that are “to style” as well as the more creative and non-traditional modern day craft beers. “A critical aspect of homebrewing is sanitation and cleanliness, both in brewing and serving. As I went from bottling my beers to kegging them I learned the ins and outs of building and managing my small sixtap keezer draught system at home. Clean beer lines, shanks, faucets and couplers cleaned on a regular regimen are a must,” said Cole. Right now he is in the process of replacing the current draught system at Johnny Brown’s, doubling the number of taps. Because of the work involved with owning a bar, Cole has been unable to homebrew as often, so now he’s making larger batches and splitting the wort between two fermentors, playing around with different yeast in each one. Cole cites QUAFF as a big influence on what he wants to do with Johnny Brown’s. “Joining QUAFF not only amped up my brewing game and rocketed up my knowledge base, it put me in a position where I was associating with other motivated and dedicated people who were bringing their own entrepreneurial dreams to reality. Look around the room at QUAFF meeting or gathering and you can feel the excitement and fulfillment craft beer has brought us and the San Diego brew scene.” For the latest beer events and tappings, you can follow The Ugly Dog at @theuglydogpubsd and Downtown Johnny Brown’s at @DTJohnnyBrowns on Twitter. To find out which brewery H.G. Sausageworks will be at next, follow them at @HGSausageworks

Another Greenwald/Sangiorgi creation. Photo via @hgsausageworks on Instagram


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INTO THE BREW

LOOKING BACK RON PATTINSON’S NEW BOOK REVEALS HISTORICAL BEER RECIPES

P

retty Things Beer and Ale Project has a series of beers called “Once Upon A Time” which are brewed according to recipes pulled from the old, dusty brewing logs of bygone breweries in the United Kingdom. In an ongoing collaboration with Amsterdam-based beer writer and historian Ron Pattinson, they have selected a number of actual brewing logs to recreate as closely as possible. The beers have ranged from a 10.5% ABV mild ale originally brewed in 1832 to a 2.8% ABV mild ale originally brewed in 1945, hitting several other points on the spectrum between the two. I have only had the pleasure of trying a couple of these beers but have been captivated by the idea since first hearing about them several years ago. Much closer to home, Ramona’s ChuckAlek Independent Brewers have also been working with Ron Pattinson in their line of “Archive” beers. On April 25, Hamilton’s Tavern in South Park will be tapping all four of the beers (1850 Running Porter, 1890 Double Stout, 1880 Irish Single Stout, and 1912 Triple Stout) as well as a cask of the 1912 Triple Stout dry-hopped with Cascade hops from local growers Star B Ranch, also in Ramona. Pattinson will be visiting San Diego May 14-18, but in the meantime, check out his blog called Shut Up About Barclay Perkins (barlcayperkins. blogspot.com), which is a wonderfully varied collection of posts on old brewing logs, texts, and travel accounts. One of my favorite features of the blog has been a series of posts in collaboration with brewer Kristen England, in which they have adapted scores of old recipes to homebrew scale, giving

BY SAM TIERNEY brewers everywhere the ability to follow in the footsteps of Pretty Things Beer and Ale Project in recreating beers from the past. Luckily for us brewers, Pattinson finally decided to round up many of these recipes into an easily digestible collection, which was recently released in the US by Quarry Books. The Home Brewer’s Guide

The Home To Vintage Beer comBrewer’s Guide To bines a selection of Vintage Beer old recipes scaled to homebrew size, along with an introduction section detailing historical brewing ingredients and methods. The recipes are divided

into style groups, accompanied by a short history of each style. Most recipes are British, but there are a few old, obscure European styles tacked onto the end, such as broyhan and kotbusser. Reading through The Home Brewer’s Guide To Vintage Beer is a fascinatingly varied and concise look into British brewing history from about 1800 to the 1950s. We get to see porter in its transition phase, now brewed with a base of pale malt instead of the old brown malt from the 18th century, but just previous to the invention of black roasted malt, which would forever change the style into what we recognize today. Then again after World War One as it had diminished to a weak shadow of its former self, knocking on deaths door. We also see the original Russian imperial stout, hopped beyond belief for the Russian court, a beer not at all out of place in the modern extreme beer movement. And so it goes with the history of most British styles, as recipes decreased in strength and hoppiness almost across the board starting in the early 20th century. We get to see pale ale and bitter, which were mostly quite pale, hoppy and strong across the board, slowly morph into the darker, weaker beers that we recognize as British bitters today. We get to see that India pale ale and pale ale/bitter recipes were practically interchangeable in most cases for much of their history. While non-brewers will likely have little use for this book, as it is very heavy on recipes (I recommend Martyn Cornell’s Amber Gold And Black as an excellent


The ChuckAlek brew release calendar, curated by CraftBeerd

British beer styles history for non-brewers and brewers alike), the ability to quickly scan the recipes of a single style of beer over a 150-year period gives us a powerful perspective. Style becomes a living, breathing, aging, and sometimes dying creature. These were the beers that fueled the British Empire from London to Bombay, and you can recreate them. Having a collection of historical recipes for easy reference is a great way to compare our current brewing techniques with those of years past. Looking over the various styles, a few things become apparent. For one, this was a tight-knit family of beverages. Ingredients didn’t vary by much and differences often came down to one or two minor tweaks in strength or aging before sale. In the 19th century, mild ale was strikingly similar to IPA and pale ale, with less hopping but still highly hopped by modern standards. And it was served fresh, versus the extended aging that IPA was given. In fact, the weaker 19th century milds (yes weaker, as the strong milds were akin to a modern barley wine) were in some ways similar to modern American IPA. A far cry from the modern idea of mild ale as dark, low in alcohol, and almost devoid of hops! The chapter on Scottish ales is also a revealing look into what is a very misunderstood brewing history. There were hops, and lots of them in the 19th century. Scottish brewers also liked their beers pale and kept wort boils shorter than most English brewers in order to achieve this. The main notable difference to me was the low level

of attenuation that these beers had, likely giving them a sweeter overall balance than comparable English examples. Also, in the early 20th century, Scottish brewers hit the adjuncts hard. A strong shilling ale (160/-) from Younger in 1913 contains 43%(!) corn as an adjunct, which makes it look as much like an American malt liquor as a Scottish ale. Overall trends that would likely surprise many modern brewers are the wide use of invert sugars as adjuncts, and the use of American malt and hops, even in the 19th century. Also, British brewers loved coloring beers with caramel, which seems to be the rule rather than exception in dark burton, mild, and brown ales. Malts were much less varied in the past, and sugars and caramel were an alternate way to get darker color and alternate flavors into a beer. Almost all the porters and stouts detailed in the book contain pale, brown, and black malt, with the occasional appearance of amber and sometimes crystal, especially in the 20th century. American 6-row pale malt was also used in significant proportions in many recipes, due to the lack of an adequate domestic supply. Hops were also much simpler back then, with goldings and fuggles doing almost all the work, supplemented by American cluster for bittering and the occasional Continental noble hop for an aromatic guest shot. The UK grew out of its domestic hop supply in the 19th century, and American hops were used as a bittering substitute, though their aroma was considered infe-

rior and only noble Continental hops were swapped with domestic for late additions. Late hopping was also practically non-existent back then in contrast with the favored techniques these days, which usually rely on the majority of hops being added at the end of the boil for hoppy beers. Additions at 90, 60, and 30 minutes were the standard, with dry hopping only for some pale ales and IPAs. A beer like the 1909 Maclay PI 60 Shilling is a great example of this varied use of ingredients. This was the brewery’s IPA at the time, and contained American 6-row malt as a base, with flaked corn and pale invert sugar adjuncts making up almost a third of the extract, and just a touch of UK 2-row pale for good measure. It was bittered with American cluster hops, with German Hallertau and UK fuggles rounding out the later additions. At 4.63 ABV and 47 IBUs, it looks most equivalent to a bitter American cream ale if viewed through our modern lens. Not what you might expect out of a roughly 100 year old British IPA. I simply can’t recommend this book strongly enough to brewers looking to dive into the history of British brewing. It’s far from a beginners text, and assumes you can take a list of ingredients, times, and temperatures and make a good beer out them, but I think advanced brewers will find the brevity refreshing. Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park


ISO:FT THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE

THE BEER TRADE

via BottleTrade’s Facebook page

I

BY DR. GONZALO J. QUINTERO, ED.D. SO:FT. You may have seen this abbreviation on various beer forums, or on social media. It means “In Search Of” and “For Trade” respectively. In the realm of craft beer it has to do with the social phenomenon of bottle trading. WC spoke with Charles Eck, co-founder of BottleTrade.com, the world’s first social media network dedicated to craft beer trading, in an effort to learn more about the hobby. “Craft beer enthusiasts from all over the country have been using forum-based websites for years to communicate what they have and what they’re looking for,” said Eck. “For example, someone in Michigan can easily get their hands on some Founders Brewing, an incredible brewery that makes some of the most sought-after beers in the country, but they have zero presence on bottle shop shelves here in California. Something similar can be said about San Diego’s Modern Times; they are putting out some amazing brews, but they’re distribution market is limited to California.

This is where we have witnessed the re-invigoration of the oldest form of commerce known to man: trading.” So how do these trades take place? “Once a connection is made, traders will exchange contact info and addresses, then ship out their beer hauls,” Eck continued, adding that there’s an inherent degree of risk and trust in such agreements. BottleTrade offers users the ability to sign up for a profile and create a personal “Cyber Cellar” that displays their goods. After trades are made, traders can leave reviews for other users to see. “This has the effect of holding users to a standard of reliability that, if not met, will exclude them from others wanting to lock into trades with them.” The question of liability inevitably comes up when you discuss shipping alcohol. We found that although there is obviously nothing wrong with two private citizens trading beers in person, it is illegal for an individual without a liquor license to resell the beers, or to involve the United

States Postal Service (USPS) or private couriers in a way that doesn’t fit with their policy. USPS restricts customers from sending or receiving alcohol – although there has been chatter that this could change in the future – while FedEx will accept shipments when both the shipper and recipient are either licensed wholesalers, licensed dealers, licensed distributors, licensed manufacturers or licensed importers (subject to additional requirements and all applicable laws and regulations, of course). They’ll also ship wine to consumers under the right conditions. UPS is similarly strict. Does that keep Eck up at night? Not exactly. “One thing we make perfectly clear on the terms and conditions of our site is that we are not liable for any trades conducted between traders on our site,” he told WC. “We are simply a means of communication between registered BottleTrade users and that is it. We have an age verification process on our site and you must be 21 years of


age or older to use the BottleTrade network.” So aren’t most bottle traders shipping beer illegally? “Yes and no. It is illegal to ship alcohol of any kind via USPS since it is a federal institution and we do not encourage it at all. Shipping alcohol via FedEx and UPS is legal if you have the proper permits or licenses to do so. These permits are generally reserved for businesses such as beer-of-the-month clubs, bottle shops, distributors, et cetera. For beer traders, it really is a risky game that boils down to being extra careful with packaging bottles and making sure that when that shipping institution asks what’s in the box, you tell them you’re shipping yeast samples.” Eck doesn’t mind acting in these gray areas. “When we say we want to revolutionize the movement, we’ve had to keep in mind that people can’t throw a revolution without stepping on some toes in the process. If we can eventually affect a change in distribution laws that make the playing field level for all craft breweries, then we might not have a need for a revolution anymore.” Bottle trading is indeed a growing phenomenon, as craft beer drinkers are trading beers locally, nationally, and internationally. We spoke with a few enthusiasts to gain their perspective about the culture behind bottle trading. None of them are brewing industry professionals, but they’re all extremely passionate about beer. Arthur Ricario (Chulavista40oz – Beer Advocate) “I bottle trade because I want to try as many beers as humanly possible. I know if I limit myself to the San Diego market, I’m limiting myself. Therefore, when financially possible, I make trades. The craft beer industry as a whole is a great industry to be a part of. I’m proud to be from San Diego for so many other reasons besides beer, but knowing I’m part of a worldwide industry, I take pride in spreading the wealth to as many people as humanly possible. I will be part of this great industry in some facet or another until the day I die.” JQ (dietbeers - Beer Advocate) “There are so many glorious beers in this world that are not distributed to California. I see information on their releases,

reviews on websites, or fellow traders around the nation talking about them on social media. I love craft beer and all its varieties, sharing them with my friends and exploring the different things that make each beer special. However, due to distribution, I cannot always get beers from places around the states and world. Also, places cannot ship you beer through different postal services without the proper licenses. Twice I’ve had a package intercepted. Once was when a label fell off the box and they opened the box to see if there was any clues as to where the box was going. They would not ship the beer back to me, as the rules required me to have a liquor license to ship or receive the beer. A local bottle shop was kind enough to receive my package for me, after I supplied the courier with their liquor licenses and more. The second time my package froze in transit. The courier would not allow the remaining bottles to be delivered and instead sent them straight back to me.” Andre Curtis (DreTheProphet - Beer Advocate) “I think beer trading is positive for the industry because it gives people a chance to try different brews they don’t have the chance to

get in their area. It allows people to share all of the great craft beer that is being made across the country. It brings people together, and can create lasting friendships. When I trade, I’m often not only looking for beers for myself, but I am looking to get beer that I know my friends will enjoy as well. On the other hand, I think the perceptions of what makes trading negative for the industry varies. Some feel that ‘hoarding’ is ruining craft beer, but what some people don’t realize is that person may be getting beer in bulk to send or share with friends. I can see both sides of the argument, however the community has been nothing but positive in my experience and I choose to focus on that. Overall, beer trading has been overwhelmingly positive for me. I have met some great people in various parts of the country through trading, and have met some great people here in San Diego who share the same passion as I do. My wife is also very supportive of this hobby, which can get expensive at times, but we both enjoy trying new brews, so it’s worth it. If you’re getting into beer trading your first trade will not be your last. It’s a great way to meet new people, and share some great beer in the process.”

via BottleTrade’s Facebook page


PLATES & PINTS

APRIL FOOLS’

DISHES DESIGNED TO LOOK LIKE ONE THING AND TASTE LIKE ANOTHER

Wafffles! Photo by Brandon Hernández

BY BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ These days, the words “molecular gastronomy” are readily recognizable by adventurous eaters. Fueled by game-changing culinary innovations from the likes of Ferran Adrià, José Andrés and Grant Achatz, chefs from Spain to Sao Paulo to San Diego have been working to present common ingredients in new, uncommon ways. Fruits, vegetables and herbs are being transformed into foams, gels, pearls, sorbets, sheets, sprays, leathers, break-apart spheres, incredibly silken purees and just about anything else daring chefs can imagine. Most of the time, certain chemical compounds and multi-syllabic food additives are used to facilitate these reinventions, and though they are food-grade and perfectly

palatable, my inner purist keeps me from veering that far into this brave new world. But that doesn’t mean I don’t like to push the boundaries and come up with clever dishes. I actually love creating food far different than what’s readily available in restaurants or typically prepared in a home environment. I liken it to the mentality of creative homebrewers crafting beers unlike the many they can easily get at their local bottle shop. They crave something beyond the barriers of tradition and want to experiment…and so do I. Usually, I keep my more out-there dishes to myself, but with April Fools’ Day upon us, it felt the right time to unleash a

pair of fun recipes on readers. Both provide the opportunity to present items that look sweet, but are in fact savory. It’s a well I like to dip into often—coming up with salty, earthy, herbal and meaty versions of dessert dishes, and sugary iterations of savory classics. In addition to the satisfaction that comes from solving such puzzles, it’s fun to see the puzzled look on the faces of those who expect one thing, then taste something completely different. For our first dish, we’re taking breakfast for dinner to new territory. Our vehicle for doing so will be the humble waffle. Now, at their base, waffles aren’t really all that sweet. Most recipes include just a touch of sugar that’s barely detectable in the fin-


ished product. It’s the syrup that brings the massive sweetness, making it rather easy to turn a plate of waffles into a savory dish— provided you can find a substitute to syrup that brings its viscous mouthfeel and appearance without all that cloying tree sap. Let’s tackle the waffle first. For our recipe, we’ll go completely sugarless. But we won’t stop there. Instead of sticking solely with perfectly reliable (but admittedly a bit boring) all-purpose flour, we’ll incorporate some buckwheat flour. Doing so will bring darker, earthier, breadier flavors into the mix. Think of it as upping the malt bill and adding specialty varieties to add depth to a homebrew. Additional depth will also be provided by using buttermilk. And speaking of butter, waffles just aren’t waffles without a healthy pad of butter lopped on top to melt into their many crevices. Plain butter will work, but in honor of going the savory route, I recommend the use of the herb known as savory. Delicately earthy, it will provide a nice segue to the syrup component, which in this case will be a beer demi-glace, a thick reduction of beef stock made using malty beer in place of the more traditional red wine. The best options for this recipe are a bready doppelbock (Celebrator is the perfect choice…and I’m not just saying that because I am the San Diego columnist for Celebrator Beer News) or a British-style brown ale (as opposed to hoppier American versions of the style). By following the recipe below, you will end up with a rich, viscous brown sauce that pours slowly and creeps across the dented surface of the waffles before spilling over in elongated drops much like maple syrup. Even if your guests are let in on what you’re working to accomplish, they’re bound to be taken aback by how completely normal and breakfast-like this dinner course appears, yet how meaty and hearty it tastes. For our second recipe, I implore you to keep your subterfuge completely under wraps. Admission will, at best, get you a lot of weird looks and an inevitable barrage of questions, while springing the surprise component on diners will surely turn up all sorts of fun expressions ranging from incredulous to downright shocked. After all, who wouldn’t be surprised if, after being served a steaming hot bowl of soup, their host busted out a hand scoop and plopped a chilled orb of ice cream into said soup? Now that I have your attention, I’ll explain the origins of this very special soup accoutrement. One of the riskier dishes I’ve ever attempted is a deconstructed Asian-

style noodle soup bringing together numerous traditional elements, each with a different textural approach. This “soup” included a gelee made from a soy-infused beef broth, fried noodles, freeze-dried pearls of homemade sriracha, rice wine vinegar brittle, Thai basil “paint”...and hot mustard ice cream. Although far-reaching, all of the individual items turned out as planned (though the gelee was a little overly firm compared to what I’d envisioned). But it was that ice cream that not only stood out as a success in the mind-bending sense, but showed the most potential for a repeat performance. And April Fools’ Day is the perfect—heck, perhaps the only—date to revisit this crazy culinary creation. Even though it’s odd, the purpose behind the ice cream is quite simple. It’s just another way of folding the flavor of spicy Asian-style mustard into a bowl of soup. The key is to use a small ice cream scoop so that you don’t bring too much of that horseradish-like heat and overwhelm an otherwise balanced broth. You also want to be sure to serve the soup as hot as you can possible get it so that when the ice cream melts, it brings the soup to the perfect level of warmth rather than cooling it to an unpalatable temperature. The old adage directs us to never play with our food. Of course, there was no such thing as molecular gastronomy or the courageous culinary experimentation it inspired when that dictum was forged. Nowadays, it’s perfectly acceptable to take liberties with standard dishes…even if it is just one night a year.

BUCKWHEAT WAFFLES WITH BEER DEMI-GLACE & SAVORY GARLIC BUTTER Yield: 4 to 8 servings

1 stick unsalted butter, softened 1½ Tbsp fresh savory, finely chopped ½ tsp garlic, finely minced ½ tsp plus pinch salt 1½ cups all-purpose flour 1½ cups buckwheat flour 1 Tbsp baking powder ¼ tsp white pepper, ground 1½ cups buttermilk 1½ cups whole milk 4 large eggs 6 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted Beer Demi-Glace (recipe follows)

Place the softened butter in a bowl and stir in the savory, garlic and pinch of salt until it is completely incorporated. Roll out a sheet of plastic wrap or parchment paper and use a spatula to lay the butter in a relatively even row along one long edge of the sheet. Starting with the end of the sheet closest to the butter, roll the butter into an even cylinder. Roll and secure the edges of the cylinder to keep the butter firmly in place. Refrigerate until the butter has fully hardened. Preheat oven to 200 degrees F. Preheat a waffle iron. In a large bowl, combine the flours, baking powder, pepper and remaining salt. In a separate bowl, whisk the milk, buttermilk and eggs together until they are completely incorporated. Whisk the egg mixture into the flour mixture along with the melted butter. Apply butter or non-stick spray to the waffle iron and spoon enough batter into the waffle iron to make one waffle. Cook until golden brown, then remove from the waffle iron, transfer to a plate and place in the oven to keep warm before serving. Repeat process with the remaining batter. To serve, place 1 or 2 waffles on a plate (depending on preferred serving size). Slice the savory butter into ½ tablespoonsized pads and place one atop the waffle. Pour the warm over the waffle and serve immediately.

BEER DEMI-GLACE Yield: 4 cups

3 Tbsp unsalted butter 3 Tbsp all-purpose flour 1 Tbsp olive oil ½ cup yellow onion, finely chopped ¼ cup carrots, peeled and finely chopped ¼ cup celery, peeled and finely chopped salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 2 tbsp tomato paste 1 tsp garlic, minced 1 cup dark beer (preferably doppelbock or British-style brown ale) 7 cups low-sodium beef stock (preferably home-made)


5 sprigs fresh thyme 10 black peppercorns 3 sprigs fresh Italian parsley In a small pan over low heat, stir together the butter and flour and continue cooking, stirring constantly, until the mixture is brown in color, but not burned, about 30 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onions, carrots and celery, season with salt and pepper, and cook until soft and tender, about 6 minutes. Add the tomato paste and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the beer and 3 cups of the stock, season with salt and pepper. Place the thyme, peppercorns and parsley together in a piece of cheesecloth. Wrap the cheesecloth around the ingredients and tie shut using butcher’s twine. Add the bouquet garni (the cheesecloth-wrapped herbs) to the pot, bring the mixture to a boil and let simmer for 45 minutes. Use a ladle to skim any impurities that rise to the surface of the liquid every 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and pass through a fine mesh strainer. Combine the strained liquid with the remaining stock in a pot over high heat. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to medium and let simmer until the liquid reduces by half, 1 to 1½ hours. Skim any impurities that rise to the surface of the liquid every 30 minutes. When the mixture has thickened to a glossy, viscous consistency, season with salt and pepper as needed. Serve warm.

HOT MUSTARD ICE CREAM Yield: 1 pint

1 cup heavy cream ½ cup whole milk pinch salt 3 large egg yolks 3 Tbsp Chinese-style hot mustard Whisk the cream, milk and salt together in a double boiler over medium-high heat. Bring the mixture to a scald (when small bubbles start to form around the edge of the cream mixture. Whisk the eggs together in a separate bowl. Use a ladle to slowly whisk ½ cup of the cream mixture into the yolks. Whisk the egg mixture into the double boiler and lower the heat to medium-low. Cook, stirring until the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon. Remove from the heat and strain the mixture into a non-reactive bowl. Whisk in the mustard until it is fully incorporated. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour. Transfer the mixture to the bowl of an ice cream maker that has been chilled overnight. Follow the manufacturer’s specifications to churn the ice cream mixture. Transfer the ice cream to a sealable container and chill for at least 2 hours before serving. To serve, place a small scoop of ice cream into a piping hot bowl of ramen or pho soup. — Recipes courtesy Brandon Hernández


Y Y P P P P JOY JOY HO HO Crafting Your Classy San Diego IIPA

A

well-crafted West Coast San Diego IIPA is a hop aroma and flavor showcase. Malt plays a subservient role; it’s simply a vehicle for unleashing an astonishing amount of hoppy goodness upon your face. This beer is thirst-quenching, crisp, and refreshing. While it does have a firm bitterness, the best ones aren’t tongue-buckling, and they won’t administer that grippy feeling on the roof of your mouth. The finish is dry and the aftertaste should not linger. It’s a hop rollercoaster in a glass. Each and every time you remove the glass from your lips you should be beaming and really want another ride. A great San Diego IIPA is highly drinkable and dangerously clean. Sometimes, in jest, it gets called by its other name around

BY BRIAN TROUT town, The “Sessionable” San Diego Pale Ale. Key Elements to Brewing your own San Diego IIPA: ■ Light color – Save those reddish IIPAs for some other non-San Diego place. ■ Healthy and proper quantity of yeast to pitch. A good choice yeast is one with a clean balanced profile and higher attenuation. ■ Ferment at a steady 66-69°F or as close to it as you can. ■ Highly fermentable. All-grain brewers mash 152°F or a bit cooler. Extract brewers use a simple light malt extract. ■ Adding 5-10% of bill as table sugar or dextrose works wonders. ■ Don’t sweat the original gravity much. ■ Final gravity is really what matters to

assure it has that crisp dryness. 1.012 FG or less. Feel free to cut back or eliminate the Crystal 40L from this recipe. ■ 8-9.5% ABV is a perfect zone. Sneaky alcohol. Not obvious booziness, until you stand up and walk home after drinking too many. ■ Late hop heavy. Dry hop it at least twice. The aroma should be smelled across the room when you pour a glass. (The clack clunk of the chains that pull the rollercoaster cars up a big ass hill. Anticipation.) ■ Always keep that oxygen and light out in the dry-hopping and packaging. ■ Brew more wort than usual (+1 gallon in a 5 gallon batch) than usual to allow for leaving that hop sludge behind. ■ Substitute your own favorite hops into this recipe. A variety blend or try a single


varietal version to experience the full range and expression of a particular hop. ■ Name it with a ludicrous hop pun. Case in point, my Ren & Stimpy Show inspired San Diego IIPA.

HOPPY HOPPY JOY JOY IIPA All-Grain, Batch Sparge, 5 Gallons 80 Minute Boil 1.079 OG 1.011 FG 8.9% ABV 163 IBUs (IBUs are in Rager and all hops are pellets) 8 SRM – San Diego coastal sunset golden, brilliantly clear Carbonation: 2.7 Vols CO2 Water: Filtered San Diego water works well for this style. FERMENTABLES: 16 lbs. 8 oz. 83.0% US Pale 2-Row 14 oz. 4.4% Cara-Pils 6 oz. 1.9% Crystal 40L 6 oz. 1.9% White Wheat Malt 152°F Mash Temp for 60 minutes 171°F Sparge Water Temp 8.8% Dextrose (or Table Sugar) 1 lbs. 12 oz.

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HOP SCHEDULE: 2 oz. 104.1 Warrior (16.0% AA) T-60 min. 0.75 oz. 15.6 Centennial (12.5% AA) T-30 min. 0.75 oz. 17.5 Citra (14.1% AA) T-30 min. 0.75 oz. 16.2 Simcoe (13.0% AA) T-30 min. 0.75 oz. Citra (14.1% AA) T-15 min. 1 Tablet Whirlfloc T-10 min. 2.2 g White Labs Yeast Nutrient T-10 min. 1 oz. Centennial (12.5% AA) K.O. / Whirlpool* 1 oz. Citra (14.1% AA) K.O. / Whirlpool* 1 oz. Simcoe (13.0% AA) K.O. / Whirlpool* *Around 170°F and Chilling. ■ Chill to around 65°F and pitch the proper amount of WLP001 California Ale Yeast. ■ Ferment for 2-3 weeks at 67°F. ■ When finished chill to 38°F for 3-5 days to brighten. ■ Transfer as quietly as possible with as little air as possible to a keg. ■ Rest in keg for a day as it slowly reaches room temp. ■ Let the dry-hopping begin! Note: I like using large size fine mesh bags (nylon paint strainer bags will even work), five food- grade marbles, and unwaxed, unflavored dental floss. Make sure everything is sanitized and the hops have plenty of space. You might need to use keg lube if the floss causes your Lid O-Ring to leak. Tip: Assure that you purge a lot with CO2. I often trickle a bit through the dip tube. I push it to 10 psi every other day through the dip-tube and purge just a bit during dry hopping to get maximum exposure from this “tea bagging” method. DRY-HOPPING STAGE #1 T-8 DAYS 1 oz. Centennial (12.5% AA) 1 oz. Citra (14.1% AA) 1 oz. Simcoe (13.0% AA) Dry-Hopping Stage #2 T-4 Days 1 oz. Centennial (12.5% AA) 1 oz. Citra (14.1% AA) 1 oz. Simcoe (13.0% AA) Then reel those hops out of there. Purge with CO2, chill to serving

temp, and start carbonating. Finally keg-fine this beer (gelatin or biofine clear) after 1-2 days of being in the keezer. Carbonate to 2.7 volumes and let sit undisturbed for three days to achieve a jewel-like clarity. Often it is said that this beer is best when super fresh, but it can be an abrasively jarring enamel-melter right away. I find that this ale really sings at about two weeks in (after fining) once the true hop flavors marry and start to really pop. IIPA is best served in a goblet, tulip, or maybe one of those gimmicky Spieglau IPA glasses. It is also food friendly; pairing well with food such as Mexican seafood, Thai, Indian, and Cajun (Crawfish Etoufee or Blackened Catfish Po Boys). It might be lesser known that it also pairs incredibly well with creamy rich desserts like cheesecake, flan, crème brulee, or play off those citrus notes with a slice of key lime pie. The longer days of spring will soon be at our doorsteps and this is a perfect style to brew now. Throw your own unique San Diego Style into crafting a truly classy IIPA.


WOODY ROLLS INTO TOWN MID-APRIL Deschutes Brewery’s giant beer barrel on wheels, Woody, returns to San Diego from Oregon this month for several Base Camp for Beer Fanatics events. This year, they’re partnering up with San Diego Coastkeeper to raise some money to protect our shoreline. TUESDAY, APRIL 15

FRIDAY, APRIL 18

For $30 enjoy side-by-side samples of beers from both breweries paired with small bites from Deschutes Brewery executive chef Jeff Usinowicz and Coronado executive chef Casey Chapman. Your ticket cost also includes brewing supplies (clone recipe booklets and whole flower hops), a formal Q&A session with the brewers, and a commemorative snifter.

Special pizzas are being made just to pair with beers like Mirror Pond Pale Ale, Black Butte Porter, Chainbreaker White IPA, Inversion IPA, Hop in the Dark Cascadian Dark Ale, and Fresh Squeezed IPA.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16

Woody is parking on the north end of historic Belmont Park for events with Wave House (starting at 11 a.m.), Coaster Saloon, and Sandbar. Each spot will have unique menu items paired with Deschutes beers.

5:00 - 9:00 p.m. Hats Off to Homebrewers @ Coronado Production Facility

4:00 - 7:00 p.m. Bikes, Beers & Bites @ Pacific Beach

Start the beer crawl at Bicycle Discovery on Felspar (rentals are $10), before heading to Ciro’s Pizzeria, Bare Back Grill and SD TapRoom, where each bar will have special beers and appetizers for crawlers ($15 total). TapRoom caps the ride with a “Flights and Bites” event featuring several Deschutes beers.

6:00 - 10:00 p.m. Pizza, Pints & Prizes @ Pizza Port Ocean Beach

SATURDAY, APRIL 19

11:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Beach Bash @ Belmont Park

Follow @dbwoody and @deschutesbeer on Twitter and Instagram; hashtag #BeerBaseCamp

THURSDAY, APRIL 17

5:00 - 9:00 p.m. Landmarks Beer Dinner @ Urge Gastropub

In Rancho Bernardo four stations will showcase a Deschutes beer named after a popular Central Oregon landmark and a paired plate. Chefs and brewers will educator visitors about cooking with beer, pairing food with beer and more.

THURSDAY, APRIL 17

8:00 - 11:00 p.m. Beer-lesque: Tastings and Tassels @ 98 Bottles

Hosted by “Naughty Pierre,” this event in Little Italy is $5 to attend. The ladies will feature a Deschutes beer in each of their burlesque and variety stage acts.

The ladies of Pizza Port hang out with Woody in 2010. Photo courtesy flickr.com/deschutesbrewery


CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP 17. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 18. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

DOWNTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com 3. Barleymash 600 5th Ave. | 619.255.7373 www.BarleyMash.com 4. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 5. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 6. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 7. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 8. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 9. Ogawashi 1100 5th Ave. | 619.358.9170 www.Ogawashi.com 10. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 11. Queenstown Public House 1557 Columbia St. | 619.546.0444 www.BareBackGrill.com/Queenstown 12. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 13. Stone Brewing Tap Room 795 J St. | 619.727.4452 www.StoneBrewing.com 14. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 15. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com 16. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bacchus Wine Bar & Market 647 G Street | 619.236.0005 www.BacchusWineMarket.com 2. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 3. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

BREW PUBS 1. Ballast Point Little Italy 2215 India St. | www.BallastPoint.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

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UPTOWN

1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com 2. Belching Beaver North Park 4223 30th St. | 760.703.0433 www.BelchinBeaver.com 3. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com

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HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com

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BREWERIES 1. Mike Hess Brewing (North Park) 3812 Grim Ave. | 619.255.7136 www.HessBrewing.com 2. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com 3. Thorn St. Brewery 3176 Thorn St. www.ThornStreetBrew.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

LITTLE ITALY

5

BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Bottlecraft 3007 University Ave. www.BottleCraftBeer.com 3. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 4. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com

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5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 9. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

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18. The Haven Pizzeria 4051 Adams Ave. | 619.281.1904 www.TheHavenPizzeria.com 19. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 20. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 21. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 22. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 23. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 24. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 25. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net 26. Waypoint Public 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.facebook.com/WaypointPublic

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

St India

1

4. Carnita’s Snack Shack 2632 University Ave. | 619.294.7675 www.CarnitasSnackShack.com 5. Coin Op Game Room 3926 30th St. | 619.255.8523 www.CoinOpSD.com 6. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com 7. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 8. DiMille’s Italian Restaurant 3492 Adams Ave. | 619.283.3153 www.DiMilles.com 9. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 10. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 11. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 12. Nate’s Garden Grill 3120 Euclid Ave. | 619.546.7700 13. Polite Provisions 4696 30th St. | 619.677.3784 www.PoliteProvisions.com 14. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 15. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com 16. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 17. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com

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= NEW LOCATION

Market St


CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP

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LA JOLLA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eureka! 4545 La Jolla Village Dr. Ste E-25 858.546.8858 | www.EurekaBurger.com 2. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 3. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 4. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 5. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 6. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 7. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 8. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brewing Company 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.246.6759 www.LaJollaBeer.com 3. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306

619.857.8023 | www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

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PACIFIC BEACH MISSION BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 3. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 4. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 5. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 6. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 7. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 8. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com 9. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com 10. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com

11. The Bar Key 954 Turquoise St. | 858.488.8200 www.BarKeyPB.com 12. Turquoise Cellars 5026 Cass St. | 858.412.5377 www.Facebook.com/TurquoiseCellars 13. Woodstock’s Pizza 1221 Garnet Ave. | 858.642.6900 www.WoodstocksPB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Chip’s Liquor 1926 Garnet Ave. | 858.273.1536 2. Heidi’s Liquor & Deli 980 Turquoise St. | 858.488.7474

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

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POINT LOMA OCEAN BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Fathom Bistro 1776 Shelter Island Dr. | 619.222.5835 www.FathomBistro.com 2. Gabardine 1005 Rosecrans St. | 619.398.9810 www.GabardineEats.com 3. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 4. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 5. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 6. OB Kabob 4994 Newport Ave | 619.222.9700 www.OBKabob.com 7. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 8. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 9. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 10. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 11. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 12. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 13. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 14. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 15. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com 16. Tom Ham’s Lighthouse 2150 Harbor Island Dr. | 619.291.9110 www.TomHamsLighthouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

= NEW LOCATION

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com 2. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens (Liberty Station) 2816 Historic Decatur Rd. | 760.294.7899 www.StoneWorldBistro.com

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION?

BREWERIES 1. Modern Times Beer 3725 Greenwood St. | 619.546.9694 www.ModernTimesBeer.com

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MISSION VALLEY CLAIREMONT BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Dan Diegos 2415 Morena Blvd | 619.276.2100 www.DanDiegos.com 2. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.SanDiego.edu/Dining/LaGranTerraza 3. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 4. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 5. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 | www.RJGrill.com 6. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Del Mesa Foods & Liquor 6090 Friars Rd. | 619.299.1238 www.Facebook.com/DelMesaLiquor 2. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com 3. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Benchmark Brewing Co. 6190 Fairmount Ave. Ste G | 619.795.2911 www.BenchmarkBrewing.com 3. Coronado Brewing Co. (Knoxville) 1205 Knoxville www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com 4. Groundswell Brewing Company 6304 Riverdale St. | 619.795.2337 www.GroundswellBrew.com 5. Helm’s Brewing Co. 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. | 858.384.2772 www.HelmsBrewingCo.com 6. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.SocieteBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

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SORRENTO VALLEY MIRA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Best Pizza & Brew 9172 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 858.566.9900 www.BestPizzaAndBrew.com 2. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. Ste G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com

Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com 3. Woody’s Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 9430 Scranton Rd. | 858.458.4290 www.KegNBottle.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

2. Board & Brew 201 Oak Ave. | 760.434.4466 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Dani P’s Cork & Tap 560 Greenbrier Dr. | 760.967.0128 www.DaniPsCorkTap.com 4. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy. | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 5. Tap That Tasting Room 3207 Roymar Rd. | 760.529.5953 www.TapThatKegNow.com 6. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.Facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BREWERIES

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. 2Kids Brewing Co. 8680 Miralani Dr. #123 | 858.480.5437 www.TwoKidsBrewing.com 2. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 3. Ballast Point Brewing and Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 4. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com 5. Intergalactic Brewing Company 9835 Carroll Ctr. Rd. | 858.750.0601 www.IntergalacticBrew.com 6. Mike Hess Brewing (Miramar) 7955 Silverton Ave. Ste 1201 619.887.6453 | www.HessBrewing.com 7. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. Ste D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 8. Saint Archer Brewing Co. 9550 Distribution Ave. | 858.225.2337 www.SaintArcherBrewery.com 9. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. Suite 132 858.480.9381 | www.WetNReckless.com

1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.BeerOnTheWall.com 2. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Bottle-Shop 3. Stone Company Store-Oceanside 301 N. Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 4. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

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NORTH COUNTY COASTAL BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 83 Degrees 660 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.7904 www.83Degrees.net

BREW PUBS

1. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. Ste C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com

BREWERIES 1. Arcana Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.ArcanaBrewing.com 2. Legacy Brewing Company 363 Airport Rd. | 760.705.3221 www.LegacyBrewingCo.com 3. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 4. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real Suite G www.OTTBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com


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CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP

I

EAST COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Find us on Facebook! 2. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 3. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 4. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Helix Liquor 444 West Chase Ave. | 619.444.0226 4. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com 5. Windy City Liquor 701 Broadway | 619.588.8404 www.WindyCityLiquor.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. BNS Brewing & Distilling 10960 Wheatlands Ave. | 619.208.9799 www.BnsBrewingAndDistilling.com 2. Butcher’s Brewing 9962 Prospect Ave. | 619.334.2222 www.ButchersBrewing.com 3. Manzanita Brewing Company 10151 Prospect Ave. Ste D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY

1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. Ste G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

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NORTH COUNTY INLAND BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 2. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 3. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 4. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 5. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 6. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 2. La Vista Liquor 993 S. Santa Fe Ave. | 760.758.8900 3. Vista Wine & Spirits 755 Shadowridge Dr. | 760.727.2017

2. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E. Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com 3. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. Ste 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Barrel Harbor Brewing 2575 Pioneer Ave. | 760.734.3949 www.BarrelHarborBrewing.com 3. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 4. Booze Brothers Brewery 2545 Progress St. | 760.295.0217 www.BoozeBrothersBrewery.com 5. Fallbrook Brewing Co. 136 N Main Ave. www.FallbrookBrewing.com 6. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 7. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Wy. Ste 101 760.216.6500 | www.IronFistBrewing.com 8. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. Ste 104 760.913.7333 | www.Lat33Brew.com 9. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 10. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 11. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Wy. Ste 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 12. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Ave. | 760.481.3141 www.RipCurrentBrewing.com 13. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 14. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 2. Smokin Beaver 146 N Kalmia St. | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

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POWAY RANCHO BERNARDO BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brother’s Provisions 16451 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 855.850.2767 www.BrosProvisions.com 2. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 3. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com 4. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855 4. Welldeck Liquor 14168 Poway Rd. | 858.486.5552

BREW PUBS

BREW PUBS

1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet

1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. 858.592.7883 | www.CMR.Oggis.com

= NEW LOCATION BREWERIES 1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. Ste 105 858.513.8070 | www.LightningBrewery.com

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WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION?

SOUTH BAY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

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BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 2335 Highland Ave. | 619.474.7255 www.KegNBottle.com 2. South Bay Liquor 1355 Broadway | 619.422.1787 3. Sprouts Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

BREWERIES 1. Border X Brewing 8684 Avenida De La Fuente Ste. 8 619.787.6176 | www.BorderXBrewing.com

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COLLEGE LA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 2. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 5. The Ugly Dog 6344 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.269.8204 www.TheUglyDog.com 6. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 7. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd. 8. Woodstock’s Pizza 6145 El Cajon Blvd | 619.265.0999 www.WoodstocksSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

N

ENCINITAS DEL MAR BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bier Garden 641 S. Coast Hwy. | 760.632.2437 2. Board & Brew 1212 Camino Del Mar | 858.481.1021 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 4. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com 5. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Country Rd. 858.481.7883 | www.DelMar.Oggis. com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170

directory@westcoastersd.com www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 7. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 8. Sublime Tavern 3790 Via de la Valle | 858.259.9100 www.SublimeTavern.com 9. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 10. The Regal Seagull 996 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.479.2337 www.RegalSeagull.com 11. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Farr Better Spirits 398 N. El Camino Real | 760.753.7137 2. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

BREWERIES 1. Culture Brewing Co. 111 S. Cedros Ave. | 858.345.1144 www.CultureBrewingCo.com

O

CORONADO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Park Place Liquor 1000 Park Place | 619.435.0116

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

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MISSION HILLS HILLCREST BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brooklyn Girl Eatery 4033 Goldfinch St. | 619.296.4600 www.BrooklynGirlEatery.com 2. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 3. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com

4. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 5. San Diego Brew Project 1735 Hancock St. | 619.234.5757 www.SDBrewProject.com 6. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 7. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 8. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 9. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com 10. Toma Sol 301 W Washington St. | 619.291.1159 www.TomaSolTavern.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

BREWERIES 1. Acoustic Ales Brewing Experiment 1795 Hancock St. | 619.299.2537 www.AcousticAles.com

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ALPINE BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

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RAMONA BREWERIES

1. ChuckAlek Independent Brewers 2330 Main St. Ste C | 513.465.9768 www.ChuckAlek.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Ramona Brew Supplies 369 Main St. | 760.440.7727

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JULIAN BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

BREWERIES

1. Nickel Beer Company 1485 Hollow Glen Rd. | 760.765.2337 www.NickelBeerCo.com


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T

is for Thorn St. This glossary of terms comes straight from the beer educators at CraftBeer.com, with San Diego breweries listed in bold Tannins - A group of organic compounds contained in certain cereal grains and other plants. Tannins are present in the hop cone. Also called “hop tannin” to distinguish it from tannins originating from malted barley. The greater part of malt tannin content is derived from malt husks, but malt tannins differ chemically from hop tannins. In extreme examples, tannins from both can be perceived as a taste or sensation similar to sampling black tea that has steeped for a very long time. Thorn St. Brewery - There’s a big barrel-aging program growing at Thorn St. in North Park, in addition to the monthly brunch starting up this month featuring Carnitas’ Snack Shack on April 6. Read more in the March 22 post on westcoastersd.com. Top Fermentation - One of the two basic fermentation methods characterized by the tendency of yeast cells to rise to the surface of the fermentation vessel. Ale yeast is top fermenting compared to lager yeast, which is bottom fermenting. Beers brewed in this fashion are commonly called ale or top-fermented beers. Trub - Wort particles resulting from the precipitation of proteins, hop oils, and tannins during the boiling and cooling stages of brewing. Turbidity - Sediment in suspension; hazy, murky. Two Kids (2kids) Brewing Co. - Co-owner Sam Dufau recently teamed up with Erika Raye, assistant brewer at Intergalactic, to brew a version of the International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day Unite Pale Ale, which will be available this month.

San Diego natives Eric O’Connor (left) with Dennis O’Connor (no relation) at Thorn St. Brewery. Not pictured is business partner Dan Carrico


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April 2014

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April 2014