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AUGUST 2014 | SERVING AMERICA’S FINEST BEER COUNTY | SAN DIEGO Chuck Silva, Dominique Friart & Alexis Briol

Green Flash Brews West Coast IPA @ St-Feuillien (La Roeulx, Belgium) Story by Sheldon Kaplan Page 19


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Dear Beer Drinker, San Diego’s active brewery count went from 91 to 90 during the month of July under terrible circumstances, as a devastating fire from an errant welding torch destroyed Wet N Reckless brewery in Mira Mesa. Proprietor Dave Hyndman sent out the following e-mail before we went to press; we’re hoping that the insurance shakes out in his favor and he will be able to rebuild. Best of luck, Dave! Hey Beer Lovers, The worst moment of my life was last night. As I drove back to the brewery after a quick trip to my day job site I saw smoke. When I pulled into the parking lot flames were shooting out of the front windows. My world collapsed. By the time our valiant fire fighters got the flames out, there was nothing left. And it had been such a good day up to that. A huge chunk of what is Dave went up in smoke last night leaving an indescribable emptiness. It’s as though a limb were amputated and I no longer know how to survive without it. Over the years of growing the brewery I have learned that it is me incarnate in the form of a business. The style and attitude is unwashed, unabridged, unadulterated Dave and the fact that you wonderful folks have enjoyed it has given me validation as a human being and We hope to see Dave this happy again very soon that has brought me to feel as though you folks are friends and family and has made it worth the fact that outside of my regular job, this has left no time for much else in my life and it has been an absolute labor of love. It has been part of almost every waking moment for almost 3 years. I’ve been in a daze all day long unable to focus but have been thinking about what the brewery means to me and what it means to not have it and the single biggest part is you guys, my customers who are also my friends. I thought of listing the people who have been part of my life through the brewery over the years, some have come and gone but are still in my heart, but the list would be too long. I have no doubt that the list would be in the hundreds. All day long I have been getting well wishes and statements of support from so many people. When I saw the thing going up last night I thought it was just game over. But, I am now thinking that I will rebuild. I really don’t know how the insurance is going to shake out, or how this works or anything, but I am getting more and more optimistic as the cloud of grief lifts. It’s times like this that we are reminded of the briefness of existence and that we must enjoy what we have when we have it. I think I’ve done that with Wet N Reckless and even if it does not rise from the ashes I will always [cherish] those years. I’ve done some things in my life, but of anything I’ve ever done, having my brewery and giving the gift of crazy beers and a nice inviting place to drink it to the precious few that have been lucky enough to make it in has truly the thing I am most proud of. I love you guys, Dave Hyndman Owner/Brewer/Minister Wet N Reckless Brewing and pile of ashes.

5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. Suite C/N San Diego, CA 92111 WED 12-8 THU 12-8 FRI 12-9 SAT 12-9 SUN 12-7


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WRITERS

West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION Founders RYAN LAMB MIKE SHESS Publisher MIKE SHESS mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor RYAN LAMB ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director KAYLA COLEMAN kayla@westcoastersd.com Graphic Designer ASHLEY DREWITZ ashley@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant TOM SHESS thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers SAM TIERNEY sam@westcoastersd.com BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ brandon@westcoastersd.com RYAN RESCHAN ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com GONZALO QUINTERO drqcbt@gmail.com Contributors MARC FIGUEROA MIKE PALMER SARAH GATHMAN SHELDON KAPLAN TIM STAHL

West Coaster, THE WEBSITE Web Manager

MIKE SHESS

Web Editor

RYAN LAMB

Web Master

JOSH EVERETT

West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location. © 2014 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”

COLUMNIST

INTO THE BREW

Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified Cicerone® exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

COLUMNIST

THE CARBOY CHRONICLES

Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into all-grain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with occasional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he attends.

COLUMNIST

PLATES & PINTS

Brandon Hernández is a native San Diegan and the author of the San Diego Beer News Complete Guide to San Diego Breweries (available on Amazon.com). In addition to his on-staff work for West Coaster, he is responsible for communications for local craft beer producer Stone Brewing Company; an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including USA TODAY, The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including The San Diego Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Ranch & Coast, San Diego Magazine and U-T San Diego.

COLUMNIST

THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE

Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D. is a San Diego native, three-time SDSU grad, career educator, and co-founder of the popular multimedia craft beer discussion craftbeertasters.wordpress.com. An avid homebrewer, Cicerone Certified Beer Server, and seasoned traveler, Dr. Quintero takes great pride in educating people about craft beer and the craft beer culture. By approaching the subject from the perspective of a scholar and educator, Dr. Quintero has developed a passion for spreading the good word of local beer.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS COLUMNS 16-17

The Doctor’s Office

Dr. Q talks GMO ingredients and gives us an extra bit on an upcoming bar in La Mesa 25-26

Plates & Pints

Brandon Hernández profiles Mike’s Beer Cheese which is returning to Stone’s big party this month 28

Into the Brew

Sam Tierney discusses the types of agents that cause contamination in your beer 30

The Carboy Chronicles

Ryan Reschan goes over some of the more useful items that homebrewers can have on-hand

6

PLUS +

Brews in the News

COEDO is coming to SoCal, and the LA Brewers Guild plans big events, that include #sdbeer 8

Pizza Port

Bressi Ranch now offering tours; learn some of things Marc Figueroa heard while visiting 11-13

#sdbeer

Another collection of our favorite photos on Instagram, continued on page 22 14-15

Funky Beers

Sarah Gathman profiles what makes wild beers from her UCSD class 19-21

Brewed in Belgium

Green Flash now brewing West Coast IPA in Belgium thanks to great collaborative effort; story by Sheldon Kaplan 33

Interview

Interview with first place winner of West Coaster’s homebrew contest, Nicholas Rakovec 35-37

East to West

Tomm Carroll ponders the beer availability question; why don’t we get many East Coast beers? 42-44

Get Down Low

Netherlands beer scene is booming; story sounds surprisingly similar to San Diego 47-51

Craft Beer Directory & Map Are we missing any locations? E-mail directory@westcoastersd.com

ON THE COVER: Green Flash Brewmaster Chuck Silva, in Belgium with Dominique Friart and Alexis Briol of St-Feuillien, where West Coast IPA is now being brewed. Photo courtesy Green Flash


BREWS IN THE NEWS

COEDO Coming to SoCal Beers from popular Japanese brewery COEDO, located to the northwest of Tokyo, will soon start popping up in Southern California — from San Diego to Santa Barbara — via Stone Distributing Co. Craft Imports, LLC – based in Long Beach — will be in charge of getting the beers here, fully refrigerated. “We’re going after high-end sushi accounts with bottles, and there will be some draft at craft accounts as well,” said Eli Raffeld, co-founder. “You’ll be able to drink COEDO within 30-45 days of packaging.” You may recognize the brewery’s name from their collaborations with both Ballast Point and Coronado. Beginning August 1, three of COEDO’s beers will be available: Shiro (hefeweizen), Ruri (pilsner), and Shikkoku (black lager). A fourth brand, Kyara (India pale lager), will make its way overseas soon thereafter, with events currently being planned for the month of September.

LA Beer Week Returning in September The newly-formed Los Angeles County Brewers Guild (LABG) has taken the reins of organizing Los Angeles Beer Week, a 10-day event which will launch with a newly revitalized LA Brewers Beer Week Kick-off festival at a new location in Downtown LA on September 20th featuring an invitationalstyle roster of California breweries and the largest-ever showing of LA beer represented. “The founders of LABW did a great job creating a structure around which the culture of craft beer was able to grow and flourish over the past five years,” LABG President Jeremy Raub said. “The LA Brewers Guild aims to continue building on that strong foundation, adding more interactive and educational components that will engage and energize the LA beer community.” LA Beer Week will be entering its sixth year and will feature over 100 events around the greater Los Angeles area. This year’s event will be produced by the Guild’s Events Committee spearheaded by El Segundo Brewing’s Tom Kelley. “The group of passionate advocates that have held the reins all these years has now entrusted them to the Guild, and we couldn’t be more excited,” said Kelley. “It’s a natural progression for LA Brewers to take over, and we are certainly up to the task of showcasing all the great beer being made in LA County.” One particularly awesome event of note is the Meeting of the Guilds on September 25 at Mohawk Bend. There, Los Angeles breweries, San Diego breweries, and San Francisco breweries will each be represented by 15 taps in a fantastic showing of California’s great brewing communities. It seems that LABG has also taken note of the popular San Diego beer hashtag #sdbeer, as they’re asking drinkers to post with #labeer and #LABW6.


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Left: Barrel-aged Eukaryst awaits its chance to rise again Middle: Pizza Port’s Jill Davidson giving a tour Right: An empty can of Ponto SIPA on the line

10 THINGS I LEARNED ABOUT PIZZA PORT BRESSI RANCH NOW OFFERING TOURS BY MARC FIGUEROA

Good pizza. Great beer. And even better people. It’s as simple as that for Pizza Port Brewing Company. Actually, that’s been the mantra since Gina and Vince Marsaglia opened up in Solana Beach back in 1987. But there’s much more to the Pizza Port story, as I learned while visiting the Bressi Ranch location, which is now offering brewery tours. I was lucky enough to experience BR’s maiden tour on Saturday, June 12, and thanks to tour guide Jill Davidson, Pizza Port sales and brand ambassador, I came away with 10 nuggets I had not heard before. So here’s 10 Things I Learned About Pizza Port:

1

The 30-barrel brewery at Bressi Ranch produces up to 14,000 barrels a year. Currently the brewery holds five 150-barrel fermentors and three 30-barrel fermentors, but there’s plenty of room for more. Over the next 3-5 years, the plan is to get to 50,000. That’s a lot of Swami’s.

2

The best-selling beer in the Pizza Port family is Chronic Amber Ale. “It’s very palatable,” Davidson said. “It goes with everyone’s taste buds. It goes with pizza. Very sessionable. Great beer. But our best seller in cans is Swami’s, hands down.”

3 4 5

Speaking of cans, the canning line cranks out 192,000 cans each month – about 775 barrels worth. The tap lines that serve the upstairs bar at Bressi Ranch are 200 feet long. That’s because the lines for the downstairs and upstairs taps double draw off the same keg.

Bressi Ranch services the four other Pizza Port locations, so it always has about 50,000 pounds of roughly 50 different types of specialty malt on hand. It also usually carries 50 different hops. “We run this location like a commissary,” Davidson said. “This is the hub.”

8 | August 2014

6

Beer is one thing, but Pizza Port wouldn’t be Pizza Port without those scrumptious pies. Every week, Bressi Ranch makes about 9,000 pounds of pizza dough, which is then delivered to Ocean Beach, Carlsbad, Solana Beach and San Clemente.

7 8 9 10

Pizza Port is also in the ice cream business, producing up to 40 gallons every week. Top-selling flavors are Chocolate Oreo, Horchata, and Peanut Butter Banana.

Pizza Port doesn’t waste its spent grain. Each week, Schaner Farms in Valley Center picks about 40,000 pounds and uses it to feed its livestock. The amount of spent grain can easily double Schaner’s food supply. Bressi Ranch runs 70 percent on solar energy. And those sturdy six-pack can holders are made up of about 96% recyclable material.

Pizza Port makes beer in honor of two house bands. Eukaryst Sinister Stout, an Imperial stout made with Mexican cocoa nibs, is named after Ocean Beach assistant brewer Gino Fontana’s metal band. The Burning of Rome, a West Coast style IPA, pays homage to OB/Bressi Ranch bartender Joe Aguilar’s band of the same name. “While both beers are fermenting, we play the albums of the respective bands above the tanks so that the music is literally infused into the beer,” Davidson said.

Pizza Port Bressi Ranch Tours Every Saturday: 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 p.m. $5 includes a can & koozie


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sunday, auGust 24

over 100 Brews. Come ThirsTy. DEL MAR

Beer Fest is back with more than 100 local and international brews. try one of the 100 plus top-rated international imports on Pacific Classic day, august 24. We start pouring at 1:00 p.m. at the seaside stage. Come meet local brewers, check out cool merchandise and much more. Beer Fest admission is free and five 7 oz. samples cost only $18. Pre-sale packages available at the delmarscene.com online ticket office. Racing starts at 2:00 p.m. Check it out at delmarscene.com


#sdbeer Over the next three pages we’ll share some of our favorite photos from Instagram that were uploaded using the hashtag #sdbeer. Warning: Thirst for a tasty, locally-brewed beer may occur.

@32northbrewingco

@airng619_brewbuzz

@alysiak

@beeralien

@boozebros

@carlosrobles

@channel5news

@chipsliquor

@chito55 WestCoasterSD.com | 11


@craftbeerd

@diningoutsd

@donalddenningjr619

@drunkenmasterchef

@frannyfullpint

@fsavinon

@ghostdog619

@grillfellasbbq

@irish_ihadabeer

@jasonstockbeer

@labeerlife

@manamonzavi

Follow @westcoastersd on Instagram, and don’t forget to use #sdbeer in your uploads


Our favorite #sdbeer photos will appear in the September issue of West Coaster San Diego

@mikefogz

@proper_pour

@rachelwcamacho

@roughdraftalex

@sdbrewers

@stevepete

@tejotta

@thebrewvangelista

@thefunthusiast

@troy_stsinphony

@vagoscribe

@wifetrapbrewery

More on page 22!


SOUR BEERS BY SARAH GATHMAN

I

am a big fan of sour beers. Whenever a friend of mine proclaims they do not like beer, I usually buy them a sour beer to see if I can change their mind. Sours defy the confines of perceived beer notions; they are a gateway beer for wine drinkers and fruity cocktail people. Whenever I feel burned out on IPAs and stouts, I reach for a sour beer to blow me away with new and wild flavors. I have to admit, before the UCSD Extension Barrel Aging class taught by Tomme Arthur and Patrick Rue, I wasn’t really sure what defined the style of sour beer. Traditional sour beers are lambic, geuzeze (a mix of one, two, and three year old lambics), Berliner weisse, Flanders reds, and fruit beers. The sour taste is just a characteristic of these traditional styles, and you are sure to get a strange look if you try and order a “sour beer” in Europe. In the United States sour beers encompass a broad category of beer that is fermented with some form of wild yeast and bacteria. Breweries can follow traditional methods of making sour beer by exposing the wort to air in a coolship, or they may inoculate their wort with a pure culture of wild yeast or Brettanomyces (available at White Labs). Some breweries may use a combination of these methods, exposing the wort to open air to collect wild yeast and bacteria from the environment and also inoculating with a known yeast or bacteria culture that will dominate the fermentation. Other breweries may add the wort to barrels and allow the natural yeast and bacteria in the wood to ferment the beer. Russian River Brewery, for example, uses a coolship to make the 100% wild fermented beer Beatification. We watched an interesting video in class which demonstrates the traditional method of making lambic in the Cantillon brewery (search Brasserie Cantillon on YouTube). I hope someday to visit this brewery; it is in Brussels, Belgium and was established in 1900.

Bacteria ■Pediococcus – Produces lactic acid and diacetyl and can be identified by long oily strands on the top of the wort. ■Lactobacillus – Produces lactic acid and ethyl lactate which contribute fruity and tart qualities to beer. ■Enterobacter – Produces acetic acid, lactic acid, ethyl acetate, and dimethyl sulfide. Flavors associated with enterobacter include vegetal, smoky, moldy and “baby diaper.” This human pathogen can cause illness but does not survive in the final product due to decreasing pH and increasing alcohol concentration during fermentation.

MICRO-ORGANISMS INVOLVED IN SOUR BEER PRODUCTION:

■Acetobacter – Aerobic bacteria that are responsible for the production of vinegar. These bacteria metabolize oxygen and alcohol to make acetic acid.

Yeast

(Source: WildBrews: Beer Beyond the Influence of Brewer’s Yeast, Jeff Sparrow)

■Wild yeast – Saccromyces contribute most of the alcohol production for sour beers. ■Brettanomyces – The name means “British Brewing Fungus” and is a type of yeast that produces a lot of acetic acid along with ethanol. It has the ability to ferment long chain sugars and cellulose. Some flavors associated with Brett fermentation include: band-aids, barnyard, and horse stable. If you want to try a 100% Brettanomyces fermented beer, try Crooked Staves Brewery in Colorado or The Lost Abbey in San Marcos.

14 | August 2014

Although these microorganisms may be considered contaminates in “clean” beer, they add acids and esters that create the desired sour flavor profile in sour beers. Sour beers were on the verge of extinction due to Louis Pasture’s discovery of how to obtain pure yeast cultures and increased knowledge of sanitation, but they have been increasing in popularity over the past decade. Sour beers can teeter on the edge of a quality control disaster; I don’t think many people want to drink straight vinegar. They are often blended with other sour beers or “clean” (non-sour) beers to achieve the favor profile the brewer is


looking to achieve. Blending sour beers is a true art form. On a trip up to the Bay Area I had the chance to stop by a new sour beer brewery called The Rare Barrel. The Rare Barrel ferments their beer with Brettanomyces, Lactobacillus, and Pediococcus and never uses standard brewer’s yeast. They brew offsite and transport the wort back to the warehouse for fermentation and

blending. Beer is stored in barrels for aging all around the warehouse and tasting room. I loved roaming amidst the barrels and trying to identify the origin of each barrel. I tried All Systems Go, Batch 2, which was a dark sour beer aged in oak with coffee beans. My Mom even loved the Sourtooth Tiger, and she does not even like beer! If you are interested in learning more about sour beers, I would recommend the books Wild Brews and Farmhouse Ales. Sarah Gathman is part of the first cohort of students in UCSD Extension’s Brewing Certificate Program, and she created a personal blog (ucsdbrewingprogram. com) to give an insider look into the brewing world of San Diego and her experiences in the program. Sarah has a degree in Molecular Biology from UCSD and has worked as a enzymologist/fermentation scientist in the biotech industry. Follow her on Instagram @sarahgbrewgirl or email her via sarah@ ucsdbrewingprogram.com

WestCoasterSD.com | 15


THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE

G

America contain these same corn (maize) ingredients.” This assertion is quite well-worded, clear, and concise, but also quite at odds with what Mitch Steele, brewmaster for Escondido’s Stone Brewing Co., had to say. “The first step in brewing a great craft beer is securing great ingredients - the best barley malt and perfect hops. It takes a lot of work to identify top quality growers and suppliers of these ingredients, and Stone thinks it’s worth the effort. We are fortunate that

MO. What does it mean? It is an abbreviation that has become a buzzword synonymous with food ingredients that are bad for you, although, when you ask people “Why are GMOs bad?” their answer is often unclear. Plainly, a GMO is a genetically modified organism that has been engineered to favor certain desirable physiological traits, or the production of desired biological products. In fact, genetically modifying organisms have been a part of conventional livestock production, crop farming, and even pet breeding for many years, as it has long been the practice to breed select individuals of a species to produce offspring that have desirable traits. BY GONZALO J. QUINTERO, ED.D Moreover, GM foods have been approved . for human consumption in the United States since 1995. There are, however, quite a few benefits of GMOs. Engineered crops dramatically increase crop yields, have led to reduced use of chemical insecticides, improved the effect of herbicides, enhanced the endurance of some crops to extreme weather, and have even been vitamin and nutrientfortified to combat food shortages for human populations! the So what’s the fuss? Some worry that problems with c r a f t GMOs may arise because their creation is random. While brewing industry uses only GMOs have benefited human society in many ways, some natural ingredients, and we documented disadvantages such as increased application of work closely with our barley chemical pesticides and herbicides in the soil due to oddly resisand hops growers to understand tant GMO plants have been documented. Additionally, there is fear their breeding and growing procedures, of a lack of nutritional value in some GMO crops or their long term which in turn allows us to commit 100% to effects on humans. Despite these concerns, the U.S. Food and Drug using the best ingredients in our beers.” Administration has concluded that GM foods are safe, according to These sentiments were echoed and expounded upon by Grant Encyclopedia Britannica. Fraley, Co-founder and Brewmaster at Ramona-based craft brewRecently the craft beer community joined the GMO discussion ery ChuckAlek. “At ChuckAlek Independent Brewers we craft our when buzz grew around an online article “exposing” macro beers recipes with ingredients primarily from Germany and the UK. The by listing their harmful ingredients, including GMOs, surfaced. In folks at Weyermann in Germany produce some wonderful malt the realm of craft beer brewing, there’s an assumption made that that is certified to be GMO free. Crisp Maltings in the UK has not only is it brewed in a traditional way, but that it’s brewed utilizagreements with their barley and wheat growers that prohibit GMO ing traditional high caliber ingredients. What follows are the assergrain from entering the malt house. Weyermann, Crisp, and Simptions of three different sized producers of beer and their views on sons have all been around since the late 1800s, which is a time pesecuring ingredients for the production of their beers. riod we draw much inspiration from in our brewing. Landrace hop Molson Coors Brewing Company (brewer of Blue Moon) varieties such as East Kent Goldings, Hallertauer Mittelfrüher, in have an official statement on GMO ingredients housed on their our beers have been around for centuries adapting naturally to their website. MCBS’s assertion reads as follows: “We monitor public local environment. So, it doesn’t take much effort as a craft brewer discussions regarding Genetically Modified Organism ingredients that is already selecting high quality and traditional ingredients to and are in full compliance with health, food, safety, labeling and avoid GMO in our raw materials.” ingredient regulations in each of our markets. The basic ingredients At the end of the day the argument should be less about GMO of our brews are barley malt, yeast and water, and in some prodversus non-GMO beers, and more about thoughtfully secured inucts, wheat, none of which is genetically modified... In some parts gredients that are intentionally used to make a beer crafted for the of the world, particularly North America, GMO food products are benefit of real people. Personally I like the idea of a beer that was approved for use and widely available. Our suppliers cannot guarmade with taste and integrity at the forefront of decisions made antee that the corn (maize) products that we also use in brewing about the beer from inception to digestion. are GMO free. A wide variety of foods and beverages in North

16 | August 2014


PROFILE: PALM SPRINGS LIQUOR Last month in my column we talked with several Chaldean liquor store owners, and Randy Shamoo of Palm Springs Liquor e-mailed in to give us the scoop on what he’s got planned in La Mesa. But first, let’s start with some history... WC: When did Palm Springs first open its doors? Shamoo: We opened on October 2, 1992 at 4301 Palm Avenue in La Mesa. My parents worked really hard to open this location, but were only granted a beer and wine license in the beginning. The community protested the liquor license for a long time despite the fact that the shop was, essentially, an abandoned building with boarded up windows and doors before we came in. Eventually they were granted a liquor license and the business has been growing ever since. WC: You are a Chaldean-American market owner. Are you related to any other Chaldeans prominent in San Diego’s craft beer community? Shamoo: No, but many of the Chaldeans in the San Diego craft beer community are childhood friends, since I was born and raised in San Diego, and our community is very tight-knit. Growing up Chaldean in San Diego was a lot different in the 1980s and 90s. The community was a lot smaller back then. My father ran a liquor store in downtown San Diego where I got a sense of how we were perceived. People knew us as shop owners only, they didn’t know what a Chaldean was. They looked at us as and called us “A-rabs.” Now people know us as Chaldeans, Iraqi, Catholic. I want people to know us as good and honest business people. WC: What’s unique about your approach to craft beer at Palm Springs Liquor? Shamoo: The demand for craft beer at our shop has been huge for over 10 years now. So much so, in fact, we dedicate about half of our retail

space and inventory to it. You don’t BY GONZALO J. QUINTERO, ED.D. do that on a whim. It’s the customers who drive it; the customers are everything. The craft beer customer is intelligent, knowledgeable, knows exactly what they want, what they are looking for, and they get excited when they find it. We get excited too, especially when we get people from out of town, or even out of state. My team makes it all possible, especially my beer beverage director Hector Santana, my nighttime manager Daniel Renfro, and my new bride Dena. We all work really hard to stay true to the beer. WC: In your opinion, what are some key Craft Beer businesses in La Mesa? Shamoo: Hoffers Bar & Cigar lounge in Downtown La Mesa is a mainstay craft beer bar and restaurant. As for other bottle shops there’s a BevMo here in La Mesa. They send customers our way and we try to match or beat their prices. La Mesa, unfortunately, just isn’t seen as a craft beer destination yet. WC: What can you tell me about your new venture? Shamoo: I want to improve La Mesa’s image, and for our city to be seen as a craft beer destination. As our inventory and reach have grown along with our clientele, we have decided to grow with them and give them more. We are building a brand new craft beer bar and grill known as “Randy’s Joint” just a block away from Palm Springs Liquor, at 4253 Palm Avenue. This location was previously a 7-11 for more than 30 years. We plan on serving burgers, flatbreads, subs and, to start, we will have 24 beers on tap and room for expansion. We plan on doing tastings and bringing specialty bottles in too. Originally I wanted 50 handles, but other business owners and advisors told me, ‘Maybe that’s not the best way to start, it could be a bit overwhelming.’ I’m glad I listened! We’ve been under construction for more than two months now, and we’re hoping to open this fall.


Sunday 8/10

Accordionist Lou Fanucchi and Mazurek playing live at 6pm

Join us for our nightly Happy Hour 4:30 to 6:30 pm

REGENTS pizzeria

HAND SPUN

HELP WANTED

Seeking Craft Beer Bar Manager

Looking for a Cicerone certified craft beer enthusiast for Bar Manager We serve authentic NY and Chicago style pizza 4 star reviewed on Yelp In business since 2005 Building a 120 seat, 32 tap craft beer restaurant & bar in La Jolla UTC Send resume to: Cary Reutter regentspizzeria@yahoo.com 858-550-0406


COVER STORY

BY SHELDON KAPLAN

EVOLUTION OF THE WEST COAST IPA GREEN FLASH’S FLAGSHIP NOW BEING BREWED IN BELGIUM

E

ven as a homebrewer back in Virginia in the early 90s, Chuck Silva was a “hophead.” “There were not so many hoppy beers in Virginia at the time; however, I was intrigued by the style,” says Silva, now Brewmaster and Vice President of Brewing Operations at Green Flash Brewing Co. Back in those days the choice was pretty limited and Silva had to be satisfied with some of the hoppy beers from Saranac Brewery, Harpoon Brewery’s IPA and “Tuppers Hop Pocket” from Old Dominion - the original version from when it was still an independent brewery. “That beer was really hoppy, and I loved it.” By the late 90s, after graduating from brewing school, Silva had made his way to the West Coast and began working as the assistant brewer for Paul Segura (current Karl Strauss Brewmaster) at the now defunct Hang Ten Brewing Company in Downtown San Diego. Their “Inside IPA” won plaudits from many, including that doyen of the style, Alpine Beer Co.’s Pat McIlhenney, who would drive from Alpine to Downtown for the beer. Around this time Silva started coming into contact with many more “West Coast-style” IPAs, including Pizza Port Solana’s Swamis IPA, Bear Republic’s Racer IPA, Stone IPA, and Wipe Out IPA from Pizza Port Carlsbad, amongst others. By the early oughts

Silva had moved on to be the head brewer at Hops Bistro and Brewery in UTC (also defunct). In a moment of literally delicious irony, in 2003 he won a bronze medal at the Great American Beer Festival for his Hop Maniac IPA on the same weekend that Hops was shuttered! In 2002 Mike and Lisa Hinkley had opened the original Green Flash Brewing Co location in Vista. The fledgling brewery’s then flagship beer was a slightly hoppy Extra Pale Ale that wasn’t dry hopped. “Nobody wanted it and we didn’t communicate the idea of it to our customers very well,” says Mike Hinkley, Green Flash’s CEO and Co-Founder. Earlier that year however, Hinkley had attended the Oregon Brewers Festival where he constantly heard people referring to “West Coast” IPAs - as a differentiator from the East Coast and/or traditional British style IPAs. Hinkley was really excited about trying a number of these beers that were so different from what he had been drinking before, and also so different from the beers that Green Flash was brewing at the time. This got him thinking about the West Coast IPA style a little more, and in November 2004, with Green Flash struggling, Mike decided to double down and hire Chuck Silva as the head brewer. “The beers

WestCoasterSD.com | 19


Flash beers including the West Coast IPA all received a packaging facelift, as the Hinkleys and the Green Flash team felt that the labels needed more information for the newer craft beer consumers. West Coast IPA has also found its way into other parts of the world. It is shipped in both bottles and kegs via refrigerated containers to Japan. It had also made its way to Europe (unrefrigerated) along with Green Flash’s Trippel, Le Freak and Saison; those three beers are all bottle-conditioned, and thus better suited for a two-month ocean voyage than a West Coast-style IPA. After being in Europe and tasting one too many imperfect West Coast IPAs that had suffered from the unrefrigerated transoceanic voyage and dubious storage conditions, Hinkley finally decided to stop shipping the flagship to Europe. So what to do? Enter Brasserie (Brewery) St-Feuillien of hisLe Roeulx, Belgium. A little his tory is required here; Green Flash and St-Feuillien have had a working relationship that goes back to 2010 when the breweries originally collaborated on the Bière de l’Amitié (Friendship Brew), a hopped up Belgian strong pale ale brewed in Le Roeulx on what is now St-Feuillien’s old brewhouse. In 2011, the working relationship between Chuck Silva and and Alexis Briol, St-Feuillien’s Director of Production and Head Brewer, was cemented further when Alexis visited San Diego in order to brew another collaboration brew, a Black Saison, this time

Silva was initially somewhat dubious that Hinkley would like the bitter “benchmark IPA” that he had in mind... in place since. The most recent changes were more dramatic and inspired by a extra dry hopped version of the beer that was originally made in 2013 for the brewery’s eleventh anniversary. “We increased the dry hopping by fifty percent, which led to some huge and wonderful aromatics,” says Hinkley. In the reformulation, they also changed the malt bill slightly, with the removal of some caramel malt, and the addition of some two row in order to help raise the ABV to 8.1%. During this period the full range of Green

20 | August 2014

went from pretty good to superb,” says Hinkley, and “in January of 2005, I mentioned to Chuck that I wanted to him to brew a benchmark West Coast-style IPA that I wanted to call West Coast IPA.” Silva was initially somewhat dubious that Hinkley would like the bitter “benchmark IPA” that he had in mind, however, in March of 2005 Silva brewed an IPA bittered with Simcoe, Columbus and Cascade, and then dry hopped with Simcoe, Cascade, Amarillo and Centennial - the West Coast IPA. The original batch came in at around 7.8% ABV which was later adjusted down to 7.3% ABV. The rest as they say is history - by the summer of 2005 West Coast IPA was Green Flash’s number one beer. “It made us as a company,” says Hinkley. “The phone began ringing off the hook with people looking for the beer.” The success of the West Coast IPA also enabled Green Flash to become, according to Hinkley, “a national specialty brand, brewing specialty ales rather than brewing to specific styles.” None of the pre-West Coast IPA beers are brewed at Green Flash anymore. Initially, from 2005 to 2008, the growth was faster on the East Coast than on the home front. “The East Coast (market) understood it. In New York and Boston they knew it was something different,” says Hinkley. Something different indeed. The beer now accounts for more than fifty percent of Green Flash’s total production, and in 2013, the ninth year of its production, half barrel sales of West Coast IPA grew by fifty-two percent in the San Diego region alone. Forty seven percent of Green Flash’s current total brewery output is currently sold in the eastern half of the United States. In order to better supply the East Coast and surrounding markets, Green Flash will break ground on a new brewery in Virginia Beach in October of this year. The new brewery, which will hopefully be online by early 2016, will brew the same beers as the Mira Mesa brewery, which again will mean that more than fifty percent of the output of the new brewery will most likely be the West Coast IPA. The beer has also now fully evolved into a Double IPA, though there have been other adjustments along the way. In 2012, a hop shortage caused Green Flash to be shorted around thirty percent reof their Amarillo hop allocation. A decision was then made to re place the Amarillo with Citra hops, a change which has remained


at Green Flash’s then brand new brewery in Mira Mesa. “Fortunately, I have some schoolboy French,” says a smiling Silva. In 2013 he again travelled to St-Feuillien to brew a collaboration Belgian Coast IPA as part of St-Feuillien’s 140th anniversary celebrations. “A bold choice for them,” says Silva, noting St-Feuillien’s respected long-time lineup of more typical and traditional Belgian beer styles. The Belgian Coast IPA was served alongside St-Feuillien’s regular lineup at the commissioning of their new state-of-the-art Meura brewhouse with several Green Flash employees in attendance. Over this period of collaboration brews, Mike had also developed a solid working relationship with Dominique Friart, the owner and CEO of the family-owned brewery. “We get along well, she is very smart and runs a great company,” says Hinkley, who about a year ago wrote a fake draft press release in which he described in detail the European release of a Green Flash West Coast IPA, brewed by St-Feuillien. He then emailed it to Friart. “I was both surprised and honored,” says Friart on her recollection of receiving the email. Silva and Briol then spent almost a year going over the details of how best to accomplish this plan, which included several trips between breweries for test batch brews. The dry hopping on the earlier collaboration Belgian Coast IPA also helped both brewers to better understand what it would take to dry hop the West Coast IPA on the St-Feuillien system. The West Coast IPA batch brewed in Belgium was released in Europe on July 21 and was brewed to the same specificationss as the batches from Green Flash’s San Diego brewery with the hops and yeast (White Labs 001) sent over from San Diego to Le Roeulx. The malts were sourced in Europe. The finished initial batch of beer, about 200 barrels worth, is currently being shipped in both kegs and bottles to numerous European destinations. One small difference between the United States and Belgium-brewed West Coast IPAs is that the bottled beer being released in Europe (33cl bottles) is being bottle-conditioned, which is not the case with the beers brewed in San Diego. This change is due to the bottled beer supply chain from St-Feuillien to the European markets being unrefrigerated. That said, the beer is only two days away to any of the primary European markets, and not two months away by sea, as was the case before. Judging by the escalating demand for hoppier beers in certain segments of the European beer market it is unlikely that the first batch of Green Flash West Coast IPA brewed at St-Feuillien will be the last, and Chuck Silva may well need to start brushing up on his French, aussi rapidement que possible and while he’s at it, perhaps a few other languages too!

WestCoasterSD.com | 21


Continued from page 13

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22 | August 2014

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WHAT’S YOUR LEGACY?

Oceanside’s Neighborhood Brewery

ce. experien l a n io s s Profe 25 years reen. h it w e g Gold Medals a sc jection an herit o m r r p e h G it f Clan Ross Scotch Ale rewer o g room w ating San Diego International Beer festival inning b s tastin e w u s o d f io -g r o c o a a y -t . p w t S A Plen groups owlers Hellfire IPA s, large s and Gr g ie e t K r , LA International Film festival a s p e s l t t r d t o o e p B k ings, s g boo Pints, The Chesty Irish red for meet nment is bein e l b a LA International Film festival il i a v a a t r e c e a ent ry! Event sp e brewe mplified

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PLATES & PINTS Mike’s Beer Cheese, best served with beer!

BIG CHEESE IT’S AIN’T EASY BEIN’ CHEESY, BUT STONE BREWING CO.’S MIKE PALMER SURE MAKES IT LOOK THAT WAY BY BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ PHOTOS COURTESY STONE BREWING CO.

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here are a lot of fringe benefits to working at Stone Brewing Co.— getting a monthly allotment of personal beer in bottles, kegs and growlers, discounts at Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens and getting to work with Creative Director Mike Palmer. Many don’t know the latter by his full name, but he’s a big figure in the local beer scene to be sure. And not just because he towers over most mortals and has been working for Stone almost since it came into being. Nor is it the fact that the only thing bigger than his gargantuan shoe size is his massive heart and sense of generosity. In addition to his day job, Palmer is also the innovator behind Mike’s Beer Cheese, a beloved treat that’s been pleasing local palates for over a decade. When I came at Stone, I was pleased to see my desk was within Nerf dart-firing distance of Palmer. Though the most even keel and unassuming person you may ever meet, the guy is hilarious, so there are daily reasons to relish his presence and close proximity, but nothing trumps when he breaks up an otherwise mundane workday by sauntering into the office with copious amounts of Mike’s Beer Cheese. It is, without a doubt, the biggest inhibitor to productivity at Stone — and we work at a beer company! Sometimes mild, often piquant and always over-the-top garlicky, that all-natural, spreadable edible is irresistible. It’s become something Palmer is known for — people line up like rats at a feeder bar (or beer nerds at a rare beer booth) whenever he strips out of his gargoyle-ensconced work wear and into his Mike’s Beer Cheese personae. Given this, it’s hard to believe that this beer-infused fromage originates from a long lost recipe unearthed in most random fashion. “Back before the Internet was such an easy source for recipes and the term ‘blog’ existed, I’d go to new and used book stores,

antique shops and eBay to find cookbooks for every cuisine as well as Old World ways of doing things,” says Palmer. “Along the way, I came across The Heritage of Southern Cooking by Camille Glenn from 1986, and there I found a recipe for ‘Old Kentucky Beer Cheese.’” Palmer dog-eared the page, determined to try out the recipe someday. Someday turned out to be the night before a Super Bowl party at his cousin’s house in 2001. Despite adding a flavorful beer, Stone Smoked Porter, the concoction turned out rather bland. So, in an effort to make the beer cheese worthy of mass public consumption, he took steps to bend it to his palate. In the process, he also bent his machinery, bringing his food processor to a grinding, smoking halt. But it was worth it, for the world was forever changed. Palmer brought five pounds of beer cheese to the party, his cousin adorned the bowl with a Post-It reading Mike’s Beer Cheese, it was promptly devoured and the rest is history… or at least, his story. Mike’s Beer Cheese still isn’t a business, but it enjoys cult status all the same, thanks in part to high quality and exposure in association with Stone. At Stone’s 4th Anniversary Celebration, Palmer crafted and offered a trio of home-brewed sodas. They were wildly popular. And since imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, the next year, some homebrewers approached Stone CEO Greg Koch, asking if they could bring some of their sodas and such. Koch OK’d it and, knowing the sodas were kind of Palmer’s thing, asked if there was anything else he could bring to the 5th Anniversary Celebration. Palmer knew just the thing—his beer cheese! Koch loved the idea (enough that he tapped a friend at Whole Foods to send over a 10-pound block of premium Cheddar) and the debut of Mike’s Beer Cheese was set in Stone. It was quite the success. Partly because it had a professional-

WestCoasterSD.com | 25


looking logo, but mostly because it tasted so damned good, people assumed Mike’s Beer Cheese was an established brand. They started asking where they could buy some. “Somehow, the answer, ‘oh, I just did this to help out for the anniversary…I do Stone’s website,’ didn’t register with people,” says Palmer. “They’d give me a confused look and go, ‘but you have a logo,’ or, ‘quit your job and make cheese!’ Either way, people loved the stuff, and for the past 13 years it’s become synonymous with the Stone Anniversary Celebrations.” The flavor combinations Palmer has explored over the past decade-plus are built to be harmonious, just as a finished dish would be. Varieties include Stone Pale Ale with sundried tomatoes and basil, Stone Ruination IPA with fresh hops and mustard, Stone Old Guardian Barley Wine with honey and chives, Stone Imperial Russian Stout with ricotta and cocoa, and Stone Levitation Ale with cheddar Palmer smoked himself. Then there’s the line of cheeses as in-your-face as the beer used to make them — Hot Bastard, Napalm Bastard and Nuclear Bastard. I have had those last three and, though aggressively spicy, they bring a great deal of flavor to the party just as Palmer did back at that Super Bowl fete. So, with a tantalizing stock of recipes like that and longstanding consumer demand, why not ascend to the pro cheesemaking ranks? “I keep having lofty plans, but my career at Stone has always kept me busy enough. I’d love to get a Kickstarter campaign together and think there would be a lot of momentum,” says Palmer. “But I’ve kind of settled into a place where I love my job, spending time with my wife, being a dad to my two girls and getting involved in making my hood…Normal Heights…a better place. Don’t give up on me, but right now Mike’s Beer Cheese isn’t Priority Number One.” But this column wasn’t written to tell you of a spectacular treat that’s out of your reach. Quite the opposite! One of the key opportunities to get your taste buds wrapped around some of this garlicky delight will come this month at the Stone 18th Anniversary Celebration and Invitational Beer Festival at California State University, San Marcos. The event will take place over two days, with a more intimate Brewer’s Reception on Friday, August 15, followed by a fullblown, two-session brew fest on Saturday, August 16. Volunteers will be slathering several varieties of Mike’s Beer Cheese onto crackers, gratis no less. And for those who prefer fests focused Mike Palmer, serving up his specialty

on fromage, he’ll also have a presence at The Wedge, a cheese festival held each fall in downtown Escondido. While I was unable to wrangle away the secrets to turning lackluster Old Kentucky Beer Cheese into phenomenal Mike’s Beer Cheese—it just might be a business someday, after all— Palmer was kind enough to share a recipe for a dish that’s also proven a hit with partygoers (at a recent bachelor soiree for Edson Ruiz, an artist who has both drawn numerous iconic gargoyles for Stone and served as best man at Mike’s wedding). Use it in good health and, if you get the chance, definitely brave the lines for Palmer’s eponymous specialty.

BEST MAN BACON-WRAPPED STEAK MEDALLIONS WITH MOLE BEER CHEESE SAUCE Yield: 4 servings 1 cup espresso coffee ¼ cup light brown sugar 2 Tbsp jarred Doña Maria mole paste 22 ounces stout (or porter, to substitute) 16 ounce ribeye steak, sliced into 2 inch-thick cubes, fat discarded ½ pound bacon, sliced slightly longer than the circumference of steak medallions ½ cup heavy cream 1 cup sharp Cheddar cheese, shredded 2 Tbsp bacon fat sea salt (or kosher salt, to substitute) to taste fresh peppers, diced In a medium saucepan over high heat, add the espresso, brown sugar and mole paste. Cook for 5 to 10 minutes, stirring constantly, until all of the ingredients are completely dissolved. Reduce heat to low. Pour an 8 ounce glass of stout to enjoy while cooking. Gradually stir in the remaining beer to the espresso mixture. Keep stirring until the mixture reaches a smooth consistency. Let simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature. Cover the outside of the steak medallions with bacon so there is a slight overlap. Push a toothpick through the point where the bacon overlaps. Place the medallions in a mixing bowl and pour the marinade over them. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour. Remove the medallions from the refrigerator, strain the marinade into a saucepan. Place the saucepan over high heat and cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture comes to a boil. Reduce heat to low and whisk in the heavy cream. Stir in the cheese, a little at a time. Once all of the cheese has completely melted into the sauce, remove from heat, cover and reserve. Melt the bacon fat in a skillet over high heat. Add the medallions, baconside down. Sear, rotating the medallions every minute for 8 to 10 minutes until the entire strip of bacon is fully cooked. The medallions should be cooked to rare doneness with the bacon fully cooked and crispy. Cook the medallions an extra minute on each of the steak’s exposed sides. Transfer the medallions to a plate lined with paper towels and season with salt. Remove the toothpicks from each medallion.

Every Stone anniversary, Palmer and friends make 300lbs of beer cheese and spread it over 15,000 crackers, all for charity

Ladle beer cheese sauce onto each plate. Place the medallions on top of the sauce, garnish with peppers and enjoy. (NOTE: Win extra points with your guests by serving with fried potatoes.)


INTO THE BREW

SPOILAGE ORGANISMS IN THE BREWERY B eer is a living product, created by billions of microscopic yeast cells eating their way through the array of malt and other sugars that brewers add to water to make wort. During the brewing process, wort is boiled in order to sterilize it, and then cooled so that yeast can be added to begin fermentation. After the cooling process, it is imperative that the wort is transferred to a sanitary environment for fermentation. The introduction of any microorganisms other than brewers’ yeast can cause off-flavors and ruined beer from what is commonly referred to as “infection,” though one of my brewing professors once proclaimed “Beer doesn’t get infected. Beer isn’t a person. Beer gets contaminated!” Beer-spoilage-organisms fall into two groups: wild yeasts and bacteria. Wild yeast strains are any yeast strains other than those specifically cultured for use in beer fermentation. This includes wild strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is the species of ale yeast and some wine yeasts and baking yeasts, yeasts of the Brettanomyces genus, and less commonly of the Candida and Pitchia genera. Wild yeast species commonly produce phenolic (spicy, plastic, smokey) off-flavors and uncontrollable amounts of fruity esters and fusel alcohols. They also tend to be non-flocculent, leading to visible turbidity if present in finished beer. Brettanomyces species also have the ability to break down and ferment longer chain sugars that b r e w e r s ’ yeast cannot, creating the possibility of overcarbonation and exploding bottles. The types of bacteria of most concern to brewers as potential beer-spoilers are lactic acid bacteria (LAB) of the Lactobacillus and Pediococcus genera. Some species of these genera are resistant to the anti-microbial properties of hop acids, making them very dangerous to brewers. Both types produce sour flavors via lactic acid during fermentation, and some Pediococcus species also produce large amounts of diacetyl, giving beer a buttery aroma and slick mouthfeel. In some cases, Pediococcus will produce an extracellular polysaccharide that gives beer a thick, viscous texture often called “ropy” because the beer will look like rope pouring from the bottle. While both of these genera are avoided in lager and ale production, pure strains of some species are used by brewers for making sour beer styles. Lactobacillus is key for

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BY SAM TIERNEY

Berliner weisse, while Pediococcus is also used for many American wild ales and the sour red and brown ales of Flanders. Wild forms of both are also found in wild lambic fermentations in the Senne Valley of Belgium, where the acid they produce is key to the flavor profile of the style. Other types of bacteria are less dangerous to brewers but can still be problematic in certain circumstances. Acetic acid bacteria such as Acetobacter species can metabolize alcohol to produce acetic acid, which is the acid in vinegar and has a very strong flavor. Luckily, acetic acid bacteria can only grow in the presence of oxygen, which is typically at very low levels in packaged beer and almost nonexistent in brewery fermentation tanks after fermentation has started. Where Acetobacter can become a problem is in barrel aged beer because of the oxygen introduction through the wood of the barrel, or in cask beer that is exposed to air after it is tapped. Two other types of bacteria that can grow in the presence of oxygen are the Pectinatus and Megasphaera genera, which while rarely an issue, can cause horribly offensive aromas reminiscent of feces and vomit. If you are unlucky enough to taste a beer contaminated with one or both of these, you’ll never forget it. Luckily for beer drinkers, modern brewing technology makes it relatively easy for brewers to ensure that their beers remain free from spoilage organisms, and even when beers do become contaminated, none of the microbes that can grow in beer can actually make us sick. They might make a beer taste awful, but there’s no chance of a trip to the hospital. To avoid microbiological contamination, brewers thoroughly sanitize all hoses, tanks, and containers that will contact beer. This can be done with heat or chemicals, and brewers will typically clean with anti-microbial detergents at high heat before finishing with another food-safe sanitizing agent such as ethanol, iodophore, or paroxyacetic acid. As a final level of security, most large brewers also pasteurize their beer, which involves heating it to a specific temperature for a set amount of time in order to kill any microbes present. This can be done with either a flash pasteurizer before packaging or a tunnel pasteurizer after beer has been bottled or canned. Conversely, almost all small brewers choose to not pasteurize their beer as it can have a negative flavor impact; plus, the equipment is expensive. As such, there is always a risk of a contaminated beer going to market. If you do come across one, hopefully you can now take a good guess at which microbe is the guilty party. Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park


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THE CARBOY CHRONICLES

MISCELLANEOUS BREWING EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES

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BY RYAN RESCHAN

xtract and brew-in-a-bag (BIAB) brewers have the advantage of needing the least amount of equipment in their process. An extract brewer might have only a large kettle, a spoon and/or whisk to stir in malt extract, and a thermometer. A BIAB brewer is likely to have a similar setup but with a larger pot and a huge grain bag. With all-grain brewing, the amount of equipment increases. A simple setup will include a hot liquor tank (HLT), mash tun, and boil kettle. So other than different brewing setups, what else might a brewer need? Spray bottles are one of my favorite pieces of equipment. Fill them with sanitizer solution for whenever you need to spray down equipment, and remember to mix with distilled or reverse osmosis water for best long-term storage. Aluminum foil and plastic wrap are useful as well, as both can be used to cover up anything you need to remain sanitized, like a fermentor, airlock, thermometer, spoon, flask, or thief. Spray or soak either in sanitizer and use as desired. Aluminum foil is also great if you don’t have a sparge arm and you need to disperse the sparge water on top of the grain bed; take a piece of aluminum foil, punch holes throughout, and put it on top of your grain bed. This will prevent the sparge water from tunneling and creating a less efficient extraction of sugars from the grain. Towels are also essential, as brewing can potentially create a big mess. They can also be used as a lid if you don’t have one for your kettle, keeping out insects or debris from your boil kettle, or helping get your wort up to a boil. Just make sure you keep them away from open flames. Dried malt extract (DME) is beneficial even if you’re an all-grain brewer. While you can always use some leftover wort for a yeast starter, using DME can be more convenient when you need to grow up yeast for a high gravity beer. Malt extract is also great to have on hand when you might miss your target gravity or need a gravity boost for a high ABV beer. Sugar is in the same boat. If you are bottle conditioning, priming sugar can be used to carbonate your beer. Sugar is also great for

30 | August 2014

a gravity boost in your beer. Most types of corn or cane sugar are 100% fermentable and will help dry out a beer while boosting the alcohol percentage. Dry yeast is another helpful tool, even if you are primarily using liquid yeast for fermentation; there might be that time when you are all ready to brew, only to realize that you forgot to get liquid yeast or make a yeast starter. Dry yeast is also great for bottled conditioning when the primary yeast strain has been pushed to its limit and is no longer capable of refermenting in the bottle. Strainers and fine mesh bags are also great to have around. A double mesh stainless steel strainer can be used to remove grain that got in your boil kettle, or it can remove hot break. Sanitize it and prevent trub from getting into your fermentor also. Mesh bags are great for adding more exotic ingredients (like coconut into your IPA) in the boil, secondary, or keg. For keeping your wort cleaner, coarse mesh bags can hold hops. Just make sure you leave plenty of space for expansion if using hop pellets. Plastic tubing and airlocks are cheap, so it’s always a good idea to have plenty around in case you find previously used tubing and airlocks to be too dirty to clean and sanitize. When fermentation gets very active, you’ll often have krausen rising up through your airlock leaving a deposit of yeast and trub that can be hard to clean. The same can happen with blow off tubing, so you might as well skip the risk for contamination. Yeast nutrient can be added to the boil or a starter, even though malt should have enough essential nutrients for happy and healthy yeast, it doesn’t hurt to have some yeast nutrient on hand to add to the boil or a starter. Yeast nutrient is cheap so I add some to every batch. Lastly, lactic or phosphoric acid is a great way to help lower the pH of your wort during mashing or lautering, while using a clarifier in the boil such as Irish moss will also help precipitate haze-causing proteins and beta glucans. Cheers and Happy Brewing!


Mira Mesa westcoastersd.com

August 23, 2014 20+ Brewers • Food • Live Music

Mira Mesa Community Park • 8575 New Salem St., Mira Mesa (Right next to Mira Mesa Recreation Center ballfields)

Tickets on sale NOW

www.miramesabeerfest.com Proceeds To Benefit The Mira Mesa Chamber Of Commerce Brewers subject to change • This is a rain or shine event


A CHAT WITH “BREW LOCAL” 1ST PLACE WINNER, NICHOLAS RAKOVEC

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ecently I came up with the concept and organized West Coaster’s first homebrew competition. Entrants had to submit beers, meads, and ciders that used a local ingredient; creativity was encouraged. Six local judges sat down and in the end were thoroughly impressed with the caliber of entries in this competition. I recently sat down with first place winner, Nicholas Rakovec, to discuss his beer and his brewing experience. WC: First off, congratulations on your win in our homebrew competition. Your beer, the strangely delightful Jalapeño Serrano Mango Sparkling Ale, really stood out. Rakovec: Thank you sir. Basically, I just call it a Mango Chili Ale, but it is based on a sparkling ale and then fermented with jalapeño and serranos peppers, as well as mango extract, which happened to be local. WC: What is a sparkling ale? Isn’t it a big Aussie style? Rakovec: From my understanding, it is basically the British version of an IPA. Typically it’s a bit more mild and a bit heavier on the carbonation. WC: When I think British IPA my mind goes to Meantime IPA. Your beer was really mild tasting like a light sparkling amber. Rakovec: That was the genre I was going for. I wanted some of the styling of an IPA but a bit more mild and light to let the chili flavor come through and balance with the mango. I had to be careful to not let the spice overpower the other elements. I wanted the flavor of the chilies, but not the burn. WC: You definitely nailed it. The beer was light and mellow. Really soft. Then the serranos and jalapeños really came out in the aroma and flavor. The same with the mango. No heat at all. No throat tickle going down. What inspired you to brew that beer? Rakovec: It was really a combination of influences. I wanted this to be something that you could drink all day. I liked the idea of chili beers and recently had the Ballast Point Habanero Sculpin IPA and the Green Flash Serrano Stout. I liked the idea of them, but they were too much; I couldn’t drink a full pint of it. Then I saw my jalapeño plant just filled with peppers and thought I’d give it a go. Then, I was looking through some books and found some sparkling ale recipes in Randy Mosher’s Radical Brewing and thought that would balance the flavors well. The last piece of the puzzle is that my wife is the production manager at Viva Pops, and they do a Mango Chile Pop, so it all came together from there.

WC: So, how did you get into homebrewing?

BY BRIAN TROUT

Rakovec: I started when I was in college back in Madison, Wisconsin. Some of my good friends all lived in a house together and started brewing. I naturally joined in. It was one of those cases we were all sitting around and were like, “We all like good beer, we should make some.” And it kind of snowballed from there. A lot of us were engineers and we all liked creating and doing stuff with our hands, so it started getting pretty big, pretty quick. We did a handful of partial grain brews in the kitchen and probably within a month decided to step it up to all-grain with 15 gallon keggles. At our prime we were brewing two batches per week because we’d have days off class. WC: That downtime had to be good for the meditation and recipe formulation. Rakovec: Yeah, we’d all get excited about who got to be the next brewmaster. We basically had mini homebrew competitions within our own little group. WC: So back to your pepper beer. How much pepper is the right amount? Jalapeño has a pretty wide Scoville range. How do you predictably brew with it? Rakovec: That depends on who is drinking the beer and what peppers you use. I was brewing with peppers from my garden, so I had a pretty good idea of how spicy they were. Then I just started small and made a few batches, increasing until I got it right. I ended up using three jalapeños and three serranos for a four-gallon batch. WC: Was this secondary? Rakovec: Yep, I deseeded and broiled them for about 10 minutes, then put them in a hop bag and put them in the secondary for a week. The variability of the peppers definitely makes it difficult. WC: And the mango? We liked it because it wasn’t too sweet. Rakovec: The mango is actually a liquid extract from Capella Flavors Inc. in San Marcos. I toyed with using fresh mango, but didn’t think it would provide the flavor and intensity I wanted. It only took 1 teaspoon for the full batch. WC: Thanks for the great info and for sitting down to chat about brewing. Rakovec: Thank you, it was fun to be a part of the competition. You are invited to come brew with me whenever you would like, I just may have some Mango Chili on tap for you.

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WISHFUL DRINKING EAST VS. WEST: THE BEER AVAILABILITY QUESTION BY TOMM CARROLL

Sierra Nevada is officially christening their Mills River, North Carolina August 3. When will there come a time that East Coast-based breweries open facilities here in the West? Photo via Sierra Nevada

W

hy are there so many of our West Coast craft beers available on the East Coast, but so few East Coast counterparts to be found here? And it’s not just the Eastern seaboard beers we are lacking; most Midwestern, Southern and even some Mountain state brews are MIA on California tap handles and in bottle shops. If you don’t travel to other parts of the country much, you may not notice this dichotomy, or even care. Now I understand things had to start that way, given that the “microbrewery” craze (which ultimately transitioned into the American craft beer movement) began on the West Coast several decades ago with the likes of the Fritz Maytag-run Anchor Brewing in San Francisco (whose first batch of Anchor Steam wasn’t released until 1971), New Albion Brewing (Sonoma, CA, 1976), Sierra Nevada Brewing (Chico, CA, 1980) Bert Grant’s Yakima Brewing & Malting Co. (WA, 1982), Hopland Brewery/Mendocino Brewing (CA, 1983), and Columbia River Brewing/BridgePort Brewing (Portland, OR, 1984). By contrast, the pioneer craft brewery back East was Boston Beer Co. (MA, 1984). When I left New Jersey for Los Angeles back in 1981, there was practically nothing decent beer-wise happening, just the macros (a few more of them back then than there are now) and imports. The only thing that possibly could be considered local (and no, it wasn’t the Newark-brewed Budweiser!) was D.G. Yuengling & Son in Pottsville, PA, a still extant regional brewery with the claim to fame of being the oldest continually operating brewery in the

nation. It was established in 1829 and survived the Prohibition era (1920-33) by producing “near beer” (0.5% abv), legal under the 18th Amendment. Yuengling’s ubiquitous Lager was a step above the macro versions, but then so ostensibly was Heineken and even Michelob; its Porter and Black and Tan (a blend of the lager and porter), however, were much more flavorful, but not easy to find in Central Jersey. Between journeys East to visit family and business trips to New York City, I was back in the tri-state area (NJ, NY, PA) at least every two-to-three years, always hoping, looking for good beer to drink. By the late 1980s, Boston Beer’s flagship Samuel Adams Lager became available (as it had in California), and some brewpubs began opening (and then closing) in New York and Philly. By the middle of the next decade, I could find Sierra Nevada Pale Ale and Anchor Steam (finally, great beers!) in liquor stores (and occasionally on draught), and two still-in-existence small-production breweries opened in Central and South Jersey: River Horse Brewing in Lambertville (now in Ewing), and Flying Fish Brewing in Cherry Hill (now in Somerdale), respectively. Nearly 20 years later, things have changed radically. The East Coast and other areas of the country have certainly climbed aboard the craft beer bandwagon. They are still following the West Coast’s lead, but have definitely come into their own with some outstanding and unique beers. Now when I’m back there, with one stop at a liquor store or bottle shop I can quickly fill up my beer suitcase with a dozen or so 750 ml or 22 oz. bottles of craft beers I’ve never

WestCoasterSD.com | 35


The distribution map for Bell’s Brewery, who recently began distributing in San Diego. Graphic via Bell’s Brewery had, and sometimes never even heard of before, to bring back to LA. I could easily fill another couple cases as well. These breweries include Brooklyn, Blue Point, Captain Lawrence, Carton, Dogfish Head (the special releases), Kane, Maine, Neshaminy Creek, New Holland, Sly Fox, Southern Tier, Starr Hill, Stoudt’s, Terrapin, Weyerbacher, Yards and many others. And yet, the list of West Coast beers available in the East just keep growing as well. I recall several years ago traveling to Washington, DC on a business trip, and bringing my suitcase full of West Coast beers to share with my friends living there. Among my stash were a few of the more rare releases from The Bruery. To my surprise, they could get most of them at their local Whole Foods! On East Coast shelves there is an amazing array of Cali-craft, from Stone, Port, Lost Abbey, Green Flash and Ballast Point to The Bruery, Firestone Walker, Lagunitas, Bear Republic, Anderson Valley, Anchor and Sierra Nevada, among others. There’s also some Oregon and Washington beers, and several from Colorado, including a few breweries (Breckenridge, Left Hand) that don’t distribute to Southern California!

Russian River beers are the West Coast brews the East Coast folks really crave — unless they live in Philly, the only city (but not the state of Pennsylvania) the justly heralded Santa Rosa brewery distributes to east of the Mississippi. Okay, about now, you may be thinking, “What’s the big brewhaha? Who cares if East Coast beer isn’t easy to find here?” There are some self-deemed hopheads, always jonesing for those big, dank, additions of West Coast hops, who just don’t get East Coast American IPAs, let alone the British-style ones. I used to feel that way about pizza when I moved west. I spent a couple years trying to find pizza in LA that was at least close to New York/New Jersey pizza — or tomato pie, as we called it in Trenton. But I finally stopped thinking of these different takes on pizza as the same thing, and began enjoying both for what they were: East Coast- and West Coast-style pizza. While local is definitely better for many styles of beer (including the almighty IPA), I don’t subscribe to the “East is Least and West is Best” mentality. And I, for one, would prefer to find East Coast and other region beers on local shelves rather than trading,


picking them up during travels, relying on family and friends to bring them on visits, or resorting to LetsPour and other companies that ship out-of-state beer. Not that there’s anything wrong with those methods, many of which I take advantage of. In fact, I recently had some friends visit from Charlotte, NC, about a week after the World Beer Cup at the Craft Brewers Conference in Denver, where Charlotte’s own NoDa Brewing struck Gold in the most competitive (244 entries) category, American-Style India Pale Ale, with its Hop, Drop ‘n Roll. Of course they brought along a couple of four-packs of 16-oz. cans of the award-winning beer. It’s a tasty brew, made with West Coast hops, including late-boil additions of Citra and Amarillo. Its flavor is much more balanced than many of our West Coast IPAs, so it would likely get lost among all the hop-bomb IPAs here. But drinkers who know and appreciate good, balanced beer would embrace it. And speaking of North Carolina, it is at the center of the recent trend of Western breweries setting up Eastern outposts to save costs and energy in shipping to the East Coast market. Sierra Nevada, New Belgium and Oskar Blues already are operating or still ramping up in the Tar Heel state; Green Flash is expanding to Virginia; and Stone is eyeing a location in the Southeast, possibly South Carolina. All of which means more Western beer for that coast. Notably, there is no sign yet of a reverse trend. Very occasionally, we do see distribution of their beers coming to our coast. Most recently, on May 1, the acclaimed Bell’s Brewing of Kalamazoo, MI — which had already expanded its reach to Arizona — entered the San Diego market. “We’re taking it one step at a time,” Amy Burns Barr, co-owner of California Craft Distributors, which is handling Bell’s in San Diego, told me at the Bell’s booth at the recent Firestone Walker Invitational Beer Festival in Paso Robles. “We plan to expand to LA and the rest of the state, but we don’t want the demand to outpace the supply.” Indeed, that is the simple answer to my quandary: The West Coast — and California in particular — is a huge market to enter for out-of-state breweries. Not only is it tough to carve out a niche with all those dominant West Coast styles (though great breweries like Bell’s should be able to do so), the increased production necessary to satisfy that niche is of utmost importance. Many breweries are simply unable to accommodate it, or to expand. Also, While San Diego and the Bay Area are each large established markets themselves, they aren’t really expanding that much anymore — unlike greater LA, which is a potential mega-market, with the number of craft beer drinkers increasing exponentially in the last half-dozen years or so and no plateau yet in sight. So ironically, it seems to me that the growing popularity of craft beer in Southern California is making it even less likely that we’ll be seeing any more out-of-state beers debuting here soon. C’est la vie. Now what was my password for LetsPour? Tomm Carroll is the LA correspondent for Celebrator Beer News. Feel free to let him know what you think (and drink); send comments, criticisms, kudos and even questions to beerscribe@earthlink. net


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GET DOWN LOW THE NETHERLANDS BEER SCENE IS BOOMING BY SHELDON KAPLAN

S

o you’ve presumably read my cover story about Green Flash brewing in Belgium, so for those of you planning a beer pilgrimage, try to plan a stop in the Netherlands too; keep going north from Belgium, you can’t miss it! Dutch beer is currently undergoing a renaissance. It is one that that has been in the works some years now, though recently it has been on a tear. Sound familiar? The interesting thing is that most of the recent new growth in Dutch brewing is the brewing of “New World style beers” and in some cases also a “new world” tweaking of traditional Dutch beers. This influence is being spread by American craft beers that are now available in the Netherlands, with a special nod to the IPA, as well as the fact that brewers in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and the United Kingdom have adopted and subsequently adapted U.S. craft beer styles. I had the recent good fortune of attending North Holland Beer Festival in the town of Alkmaar in early June. Twenty one breweries served their beer in the Grote Kerk (Great Church), a building from the Middle Ages that is now also used for various community functions, including fortunately beer festivals. I guess there is a god after all. One of the first “breweries” in the Netherlands to brew “New World style” beers were the guys from Stichting Noordhollandse

Alternatieve Bierbrouwers (SNAB), which was founded by specialty brewers from North Holland in January, 1991. SNAB is a “labor of love” and the current principals Gert Roos, Peter Kost and Marcel Vermeulen also all have regular day jobs. Roos is a field manager for medical teams who assess the mentally disabled, Kost works for a wastewater management company, and Vermeulen is a manager at KLM, the national airline of The Netherlands. The SNAB guys don’t own their own brewery, but rather contract brew out of De Proef Brewery in Belgium, and currently only contact brew about 420 barrels a year. Contract brewing is not uncommon in the Netherlands, where the barriers to entry are relatively low for this type of arrangement. The bureaucracy and associated paperwork is a lot less than for an equivalent brewer in the United States. In addition, contract brewing does not raise eyebrows to the same extent as it does here. Even respected and established Dutch craft breweries such as De Molen will contract brew for others when they have available capacity. “I believe that we brewed the first U.S.-style pale ale commercially available in Europe. I think that was about fifteen or sixteen years ago,” Roos tells me, referring to their SPA, or Snab Pale Ale, a 6.3% dry hopped pale ale. “Not only did we use American hops, we also got our yeast sent over from Wyeast.” Not a big deal nowadays, sure, but it would have certainly taken some effort six-


teen years ago. For low volume brewers, the SNAB guys have a fairly large and eclectic line up of ten different beers including Maelstrom, an American-style Barley wine that is dry hopped with Cascade and Amarillo and has an 9.2% alcoholby-volume. “There are approximately two hundred small breweries in the Netherlands and around twenty-five percent of them are focusing on New World styles,” says Michel Ordeman, who owns the Jopen Brewery (and restaurant) with his wife Lydian Zoetman, who takes care of sales. “Of the new setups (breweries), about ninety percent are focused on American-style beers,” Ordeman told me. The Jopen Brewery is situated in an old church (had I mentione there being a god?) in the town of Haarlem, a twenty minute train ride due west of Amsterdam. At almost twenty years old (their anniversary is later this year), Jopen is one of the more established Dutch breweries making “New World style beers” in addition to traditional Dutch beers, which is how the brewery originally got its start. Jopen currently has an 18 barrel brewhouse and brews around

Dutch beer is currently having a renaissance...most of the recent new growth...is the brewing of ‘New World style beers’... 11,000 barrels per year. According to Ordeman, “the plan is to expand soon to either a 30 or 60 barrel brewhouse with a production goal of 54,000 barrels a year within four to five years.” Amongst other Jopen beers on tap at the festival was Jacobus RPA, a Rye Pale Ale at 5.5% ABV, and Mooie Nel IPA, a 6.5% ABV fruity IPA made with Nelson Sauvin hops and dry hopped with Simcoe and Glacier. This growing love of the hop is found predominantly in the Randstad, a conurbation of the four largest Dutch cities: Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht. (Out in the rural areas not that much has changed.) One of the primary beer bars that has


name, Uyleman (Uyle rhymes with uil, which is Dutch for owl, so Uyleman = “Owlman”). Uyleman was first a bartender at Jopen Brewery’s bar before graduating to a brewing position at Jopen, a job he still holds. He is conveniently able to contract his brews at Jopen and a sampling of the beers he was pouring at the festival included Bosuil (Bush Owl), a Black IPA with 6% ABV, Uil (Owl) Pale Ale, unfiltered and coming in at 6.8% ABV, Steenuil (Stone Owl), a double IPA at 9% ABV, and a Pepperspray Porter made with Carolina Reaper peppers reaching 8.4% ABV. Het Uiltje’s attitude is deliberately irreverent and echoes that of his fellow young brewers who have interest in the past, and will pay some homage, but are blazing a new trail of their own. As Het Uiltje’s “motto” states: “Fucking good bier maken, punt uit” or in English “To make fucking good beer, period.” Amen in any language, bro. For more information on Dutch breweries a good place to start is www.cambrinus.nl Unless you speak Dutch go straight to this page: http://www.cambrinus.nl/cambrinus/ brouwerij.html There you’ll find a list of most if not all of Netherthe active breweries or commercial brewers in the Nether Bierlands. Under each brewery’s listing you will see Categorie: Bier brouwerij = Category: Brewery OR Categorie: Brouwerijhuurder = Category: Contract brewed. If you happen to be in Amsterdam and want to try Dutch beers in one convenient place, Peter van der Arend, the owner of the Beer Temple, also owns ’t Arendsnest, a bar on the Heerengracht in Amsterdam. In addition to having over 100 bottled Dutch beers and 30 Dutch beers on tap, there is also a comprehensive collection of Dutch “jenever” (gin) and other spirits. Thankfully, you won’t need to know much Dutch to get around; most folks in the Netherlands speak English. Cheers!

helped push this movement is the Beer Temple, a specialty craft beer bar in Amsterdam which opened in 2009. Owned by Peter van der Arend, who was once upon a time Jopen’s first sales rep, the bar specializes in American beers or U.S.-influenced beers such as those from Brewdog and Mikkeller. The bar has 30 taps and over 60 U.S. bottled beers. A number of bartenders at the Beer Temple have been influenced by these “New World style” beers and are now brewing their own beers of similar styles. Sander Mederveen from Oedipus is one of these guys; he and three partners recently crowdfundraised money for a small brewery in Amsterdam with a crowdfund ing campaign. The Oedipus offerings on tap at the festival included Mama, an American-style pale ale with Centennial and Motueka

‘Fucking good bier maken, punt iut’ or in English ‘To make fucking good beer, period.’ hops coming in at a “sessionable” 5% ABV, and a decidedly nonsessionable Double IPA at 9.5% ABV, dry hopped with Simcoe, Amarillo, Nelson Sauvin, Sorachi Ace and Centennial. Other “New World style” proponents at the festival who deserve mention were Two Chefs - Martijn Disseldorp and Sanne Slijper - who contract brew at De Proef. On tap was Green Bullet IPA (5.7% ABV) and Howling Wolf, an 8% ABV Imperial Porter. Lastly, I have to mention Robert Uyleman of Het Uiltje, which in English translates to The Little Owl, and it’s a play on his last

44 | August 2014


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1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com 3. Barleymash 600 5th Ave. | 619.255.7373 www.BarleyMash.com 4. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 5. Ciro’s Pizzeria Gaslamp 536 Market St. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 6. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 7. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 8. Ironside Fish & Oyster Bar 1654 India St. | 619.269.3033 www.IronsideFishandOyster.com 9. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 10. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 11. Ogawashi 1100 5th Ave. | 619.358.9170 www.Ogawashi.com 12. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 13. Queenstown Public House 1557 Columbia St. | 619.546.0444 www.BareBackGrill.com/Queenstown 14. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 15. Stone Brewing Tap Room 795 J St. | 619.727.4452 www.StoneBrewing.com 16. Stone Company Store 1202 Kettner Blvd. | 619.450.4518 www.StoneBrew.com 17. Taste and Thirst 715 4th Ave. | 619.955.5995 www.TasteAndThirst.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bacchus Wine Bar & Market 647 G Street | 619.236.0005 www.BacchusWineMarket.com 2. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 3. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

BREW PUBS 1. Ballast Point Little Italy 2215 India St. | www.BallastPoint.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

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HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com

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BREWERIES 1. Mike Hess Brewing (North Park) 3812 Grim Ave. | 619.255.7136 www.HessBrewing.com 2. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com 3. Thorn St. Brewery 3176 Thorn St. www.ThornStreetBrew.com

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BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Bottlecraft 3007 University Ave. www.BottleCraftBeer.com

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1 3 5

3. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 4. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 9. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

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www.SeaRocketBistro.com 16. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 17. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com 18. The Haven Pizzeria 4051 Adams Ave. | 619.281.1904 www.TheHavenPizzeria.com 19. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 20. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 21. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 22. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 23. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 24. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 25. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net 26. Waypoint Public 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.facebook.com/WaypointPublic

1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com 2. Belching Beaver North Park 4223 30th St. | 760.703.0433 www.BelchinBeaver.com 3. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com 4. Carnita’s Snack Shack 2632 University Ave. | 619.294.7675 www.CarnitasSnackShack.com 5. Coin Op Game Room 3926 30th St. | 619.255.8523 www.CoinOpSD.com 6. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com 7. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 8. DiMille’s Italian Restaurant 3492 Adams Ave. | 619.283.3153 www.DiMilles.com 9. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 10. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 11. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 12. Nate’s Garden Grill 3120 Euclid Ave. | 619.546.7700 13. Polite Provisions 4696 30th St. | 619.677.3784 www.PoliteProvisions.com 14. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 15. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049

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18. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 19. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com 20. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 21. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 22. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

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LA JOLLA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eureka! 4545 La Jolla Village Dr. Ste E-25 858.546.8858 | www.EurekaBurger.com 2. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 3. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 4. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 5. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 6. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 7. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 8. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brewing Company 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.246.6759 www.LaJollaBeer.com 3. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306 619.857.8023 www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

D

PACIFIC BEACH MISSION BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Barrel Republic 1261 Garnet Ave. | 858.270.9922 www.BarrelRepublic.com 3. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 4. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 5. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 6. Latitude 32 Pub 5019 Cass St. | 858.273.0501 www.Latitude32Bar.com 7. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 8. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 9. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 10. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com

11. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com 12. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com 13. The Bar Key 954 Turquoise St. | 858.488.8200 www.BarKeyPB.com 14. The Promiscuous Fork 3801 Ingraham St. | 858.581.3663 www.ThePromiscuousFork.com 15. Turquoise Cellars 5026 Cass St. | 858.412.5377 www.Facebook.com/TurquoiseCellars 16. Woodstock’s Pizza 1221 Garnet Ave. | 858.642.6900 www.WoodstocksPB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Chip’s Liquor 1926 Garnet Ave. | 858.273.1536 2. Heidi’s Liquor & Deli 980 Turquoise St. | 858.488.7474

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

E

POINT LOMA OCEAN BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Fathom Bistro 1776 Shelter Island Dr. | 619.222.5835 www.FathomBistro.com 2. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 3. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 4. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 5. OB Kabob 4994 Newport Ave | 619.222.9700 www.OBKabob.com 6. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 7. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 8. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 9. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 10. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 11. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 12. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 13. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 14. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com 15. Tom Ham’s Lighthouse 2150 Harbor Island Dr. | 619.291.9110 www.TomHamsLighthouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com 2. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens (Liberty Station) 2816 Historic Decatur Rd. | 760.294.7899 www.StoneWorldBistro.com

BREWERIES 1. Modern Times Beer 3725 Greenwood St. | 619.546.9694 www.ModernTimesBeer.com

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MISSION VALLEY CLAIREMONT BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Balboa’s Tap House 4421 Genesee Ave. | 858.277.8226 www.Facebook.com/DonDiegosTacoBar 2. Dan Diegos 2415 Morena Blvd | 619.276.2100 www.DanDiegos.com 3. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.SanDiego.edu/Dining/LaGranTerraza 4. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 5. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 6. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 | www.RJGrill.com 7. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Del Mesa Foods & Liquor 6090 Friars Rd. | 619.299.1238 www.Facebook.com/DelMesaLiquor 2. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com 3. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION? Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com www.BestPizzaAndBrew.com 2. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. Ste G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com 3. Woody’s Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 9430 Scranton Rd. | 858.458.4290 www.KegNBottle.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

BREW PUBS

BREWERIES

1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

1. 2Kids Brewing Co. 8680 Miralani Dr. #123 | 858.480.5437 www.TwoKidsBrewing.com 2. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 3. Ballast Point Brewing and Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 4. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com 5. Intergalactic Brewing Company 9835 Carroll Ctr. Rd. | 858.750.0601 www.IntergalacticBrew.com 6. Mike Hess Brewing (Miramar) 7955 Silverton Ave. Ste 1201 619.887.6453 | www.HessBrewing.com 7. Pacific Brewing Company 8680 Miralani Drive | 303.819.7086 www.PacificBrewingCo.com 8. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. Ste D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 9. Saint Archer Brewing Co. 9550 Distribution Ave. | 858.225.2337 www.SaintArcherBrewery.com 10. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. Suite 132 858.480.9381 | www.WetNReckless.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Benchmark Brewing Co. 6190 Fairmount Ave. Ste G | 619.795.2911 www.BenchmarkBrewing.com 3. Coronado Brewing Co. (Knoxville) 1205 Knoxville www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com 4. Council Brewing Company 7705 Convoy Ct. | 858.256.0038 www.CouncilBrew.com 5. Groundswell Brewing Company 6304 Riverdale St. | 619.795.2337 www.GroundswellBrew.com 6. Helm’s Brewing Co. 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. | 858.384.2772 www.HelmsBrewingCo.com 7. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.SocieteBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

G

SORRENTO VALLEY MIRA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Best Pizza & Brew 9172 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 858.566.9900

48 | August 2014

= NEW LOCATION

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

H

NORTH COUNTY COASTAL BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 83 Degrees 660 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.7904 www.83Degrees.net 2. Board & Brew 201 Oak Ave. | 760.434.4466 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Dani P’s Cork & Tap 560 Greenbrier Dr. | 760.967.0128 www.DaniPsCorkTap.com 4. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy. | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 5. Tap That Tasting Room 3207 Roymar Rd. | 760.529.5953 www.TapThatKegNow.com 6. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.Facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.BeerOnTheWall.com 2. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Bottle-Shop 3. Stone Company Store-Oceanside 301 N. Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 4. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com

BREW PUBS

1. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. Ste C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com

BREWERIES 1. Arcana Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.ArcanaBrewing.com 2. Legacy Brewing Company 363 Airport Rd. | 760.705.3221 www.LegacyBrewingCo.com 3. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 4. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real Suite G www.OTTBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com


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CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP

I

EAST COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Boll Weevil 53 9621 Mission Gorge Rd. 619.334.5353 www.BollWeevil53.com 2. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Find us on Facebook! 3. Hooleys Irish Pub 2955 Jamacha Rd. | 619.670.7468 www.Hooleys.com 4. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 5. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 6. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Fletcher Hills Bottle Shop 2447 Fletcher Pkwy | 619.469.8410 www.FletcherHillsBottleShop.com 4. Garden Farms Market 12580 Lakeshore Dr. | 619.334.5550 5. Helix Liquor 444 West Chase Ave. | 619.444.0226 6. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com 7. Windy City Liquor 701 Broadway | 619.588.8404 www.WindyCityLiquor.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. BNS Brewing & Distilling 10960 Wheatlands Ave. | 619.208.9799 www.BnsBrewingAndDistilling.com 2. Butcher’s Brewing 9962 Prospect Ave. | 619.334.2222 www.ButchersBrewing.com 3. Manzanita Brewing Company 10151 Prospect Ave. Ste D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. Ste G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

J

NORTH COUNTY INLAND BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 2. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 3. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 4. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 5. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 6. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 2. La Vista Liquor 993 S. Santa Fe Ave. | 760.758.8900 3. Vista Wine & Spirits 755 Shadowridge Dr. | 760.727.2017

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet 2. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E. Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com 3. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. Ste 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Barrel Harbor Brewing 2575 Pioneer Ave. | 760.734.3949 www.BarrelHarborBrewing.com 3. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 4. Booze Brothers Brewery 2545 Progress St. | 760.295.0217 www.BoozeBrothersBrewery.com 5. Dos Desperados 1241 Linda Vista Dr. | 760.566.6209 www.DosDesperadosBrew.com 6. Fallbrook Brewing Co. 136 N Main Ave. www.FallbrookBrewing.com 7. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 8. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Wy. Ste 101 760.216.6500 | www.IronFistBrewing.com 9. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. Ste 104 760.913.7333 | www.Lat33Brew.com 10. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 11. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 12. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Wy. Ste 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 13. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Ave. | 760.481.3141 www.RipCurrentBrewing.com 14. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 15. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com 16. Valley Center Brewery 28477 Lizard Rocks Rd. www.ValleyCenterBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 2. Smokin Beaver 146 N Kalmia St. | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

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POWAY RANCHO BERNARDO BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brother’s Provisions 16451 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 855.850.2767 www.BrosProvisions.com 2. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 3. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com

= NEW LOCATION 4. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Don’s Liquor 13337 Poway Rd. | 858.748.7500 4. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855 5. PW Mart 12906 Pomerado Rd. 858.748.7693 6. Welldeck Liquor 14168 Poway Rd. | 858.486.5552

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. 858.592.7883 | www.CMR.Oggis.com

BREWERIES 1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. Ste 105 858.513.8070 | www.LightningBrewery.com

L

SOUTH BAY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Brandy Wine Liquor 1655 Brandywine Ave. | 619.421.1970 2. Keg N Bottle 2335 Highland Ave. | 619.474.7255 www.KegNBottle.com 3. South Bay Liquor 1355 Broadway | 619.422.1787 4. Sprouts Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

BREWERIES 1. Border X Brewing 8684 Avenida De La Fuente Ste. 8 619.787.6176 | www.BorderXBrewing.com

M

COLLEGE LA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 2. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 3. Hooleys Irish Pub 5500 Grossmont Center Dr. 619.713.6900 www.Hooleys.com 4. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 5. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 6. The Ugly Dog 6344 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.269.8204 www.TheUglyDog.com 7. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 8. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd. 9. Woodstock’s Pizza 6145 El Cajon Blvd | 619.265.0999 www.WoodstocksSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

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ENCINITAS DEL MAR BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Bier Garden 641 S. Coast Hwy. | 760.632.2437 2. Board & Brew 1212 Camino Del Mar | 858.481.1021 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Del Mar Rendezvous 858.755.2669 www.DelMarRendezvous.com 4. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 5. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Country Rd. 858.481.7883 | www.DelMar.Oggis. com 7. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 8. Priority Public House 576 N. Coast Hwy 101 | 858.204.6656 www.PriorityPublicHouse.com 9. San Diego BeerWorks 437 S. Highway 101 | 858.353.7174 www.SanDiegoBeerWorks.com 10. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 11. Sublime Tavern 3790 Via de la Valle | 858.259.9100 www.SublimeTavern.com 12. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 13. The Regal Seagull 996 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.479.2337 www.RegalSeagull.com 14. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Farr Better Spirits 398 N. El Camino Real | 760.753.7137 2. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

BREWERIES 1. Culture Brewing Co. 111 S. Cedros Ave. | 858.345.1144 www.CultureBrewingCo.com

O

CORONADO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Park Place Liquor 1000 Park Place | 619.435.0116

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

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MISSION HILLS HILLCREST BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brooklyn Girl Eatery 4033 Goldfinch St. | 619.296.4600 www.BrooklynGirlEatery.com 2. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 3. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 4. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 5. San Diego Brew Project 1735 Hancock St. | 619.234.5757 www.SDBrewProject.com 6. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 7. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 8. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 9. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com 10. Toma Sol 301 W Washington St. | 619.291.1159 www.TomaSolTavern.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

BREWERIES 1. Acoustic Ales Brewing Experiment 1795 Hancock St. | 619.299.2537 www.AcousticAles.com

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ALPINE BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

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RAMONA BREWERIES

1. ChuckAlek Independent Brewers 2330 Main St. Ste C | 513.465.9768 www.ChuckAlek.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Ramona Brew Supplies 369 Main St. | 760.440.7727

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JULIAN BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

BREWERIES 1. Nickel Beer Company 1485 Hollow Glen Rd. | 760.765.2337 www.NickelBeerCo.com


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Back Street Brewing Co

15 Main St. Ste 100 lamppostpizza.com/backstreet

Aztec Brewing Co

2330 La Mirada Ste 300 aztecbrewery.com

Latitude 33 Brewing Co 1430 Vantage Ct Ste 104 lat33brew.com

Mother Earth Brew Co

Iron Fist Brewing Co

204 Main Street motherearthbrewco.com

1305 Hot Springs Way #101 ironfistbrewing.com

Prohibition Brewing Co

Indian Joe Brewing Co

2004 E. Vista Way prohibitionbrewingcompany.com

2379 La Mirada Dr indianjoebrewing.com

Belching Beaver Brewing Co

Barrel Harbor Brewing Co

Visit Vista in North San Diego County to enjoy a large selection of award winning craft beer. Ten breweries with more breweries opening soon. Vista - it’s a craft brew destination.

Associate Member:

980 Park Center Dr Ste A belchinbeaver.com

2575 Pioneer Ave. Ste 104 barrelharborbrewing.com

Booze Brothers Brewing Co

Valley Center Brewery 12650 Cumbres Rd Ste B Valley Center ValleyCenterBrewery.com

2545 Progress St Ste D boozebrothersbrewery.com

www.vistabrewersguild.com


GRAPEFRUIT SCULPIN

Profile for Advanced Web Offset

West Coaster  

August 2014

West Coaster  

August 2014