__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

JUNE 2014 | SERVING AMERICA’S FINEST BEER COUNTY | SAN DIEGO

NEIGHBORHOOD RISING:

Arsalun Tafazoli Reflects on SD Craft Culture

PLUS: Exporting San Diego Beers White Labs’ Newest Innovation Hop-Bursted Extract Pale Ale

Vol. 4 No. 7

FREE COPY


WHAT’S YOUR LEGACY?

Oceanside’s Neighborhood Brewery

.

ce experien l a n io s s Profe 5 years 2 h it w een. heritage h projection scr n a m r e r of G m wit g brewe ting roo f seating s in a n t in s w u -go Spacio Award Plenty o nd Growlers-to large groups. gs a ies, tles, Ke rts part t o o p B s , , s s t g Pin etin e for me l b a ore! il a v ce a ic and m s a p u s m t e n iv e L Ev

KEEP THE GLASS SPECIAL!

Stop by with this ad and keep the pint glass for $2.00 (a $3.00 savings).

@legacybrewingco Facebook.com/legacybrewingcompany 760-705-3221 | legacybrewingco.com 363 Airport Road Oceanside, CA 92058


FREEDOM

TO POUR

44 CRAFT BEERS

ON TAP

POUR YOUR OWN BEER 1261 GARNET AVE PACIFIC BEACH CA 92109 BARRELREPUBLIC.COM PH: 858-270-9922

DAILY 4:00 to 6:00 pm


PADRES TAILS, TROOPS & TAPS TAILGATE PARTY! S AT U R D AY, J U LY 1 9 T H V S . N E W YO R K M E T S A pre-game tailgate party & Padres game celebrating North County’s thriving craft beer industry. Drunken Pig BBQ and Belgium Delights on-site for purchase.

Tailgate Party

VIP: 2-5pm. Standard entry: 3-5pm.

Padres Game

Upper Infield sections 300-312. First Pitch at 5:40PM.

VIP-level ticket ($50):

Standard Ticket ($35):

• Padres game ticket, • 10 beer tasting vouchers • “Meet and Greet” + special beer • Souvenir koozie

• Padres game ticket • 8 beer tasting vouchers

Breweries in Attendance: Latitude 33 Brewing Company, Aztec Brewing Company, Belching Beaver Brewery, Iron Fist Brewing Co., Prohibition Brewing Company, Oceanside Ale Works, Breakwater Brewing Company, Mother Earth Brew Co., Legacy Brewing Co., Backstreet Brewery, White Labs, Arcana Brewing, and Iron Fire. Directly supported by Cigar Grotto Gives Back and Paws’itive Teams with special thanks to West Coaster Magazine and Local Wally’s Guide to San Diego.

TICKET PURCHASES: www.padres.com/northcountybrew QUESTIONS? CONTACT: Julia Speace (619) 795-5164 or jspeace@padres.com Jamie Hinde (619) 795-5118 or jhinde@padres.com

westcoastersd.com

drinkupsandiego.com


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Thank you to those who entered beers in West Coaster’s first homebrewing contest, as well as our steward (Ryan Fisher) and judges: Brian Trout, George Thornton, Kim Sparrow, Eric Woltz, and Ryan Reschan. Competition organizer and cheerleader Brian Trout had the great idea to put together this competition, which required entrants to brew with a local ingredient, more than a year ago. Now we’re looking forward to future competitions with a similar format. 1st Place Nicholas Rakovec SofaKing Sweet n Spicy Sparkling ale with mango extract addition, fermented with jalapeños and serrano chilis. Sourced from home garden, Hillcrest farmers market, and Capella Flavors Inc. (San Marcos) Prizes: (1) 55# Bag of Patagonia Extra Pale Malt (Chile) from The Homebrewer and BSG, (2) Free Vials of Yeast from White Labs, (1) BrewMasters Craft Beer Game from White Labs, (1) $50 Certificate for Beer and Food at Bella Vista Social Club, (1) T-Shirt and Private Tour from Mike Hess Brewing in North Park. 2nd Place David Crane San Diegose - Leipziger Gose Gose brewed using ocean water from Coronado Prizes: (2) Free Vials of Yeast from White Labs, (1) T-Shirt from White Labs, (1) Beer Flight and Keeper Glass from Mike Hess Brewing in North Park. 3rd Place Robert Masterson Saison dú Melange - Tangerine Farmhouse Tart Saison made with Tangerines off parents’ tree in Poway Prizes: (1) Free Vials of Yeast from White Labs, (1) T-Shirt from White Labs Honorable Mention Judd McGhee Voluntary Cider Made with fresh apples off the tree in Big Bear and spontaneously fermented Prizes: (1) Free Vials of Yeast from White Labs, (1) T-Shirt from White Labs Salud,


West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION Founders RYAN LAMB MIKE SHESS Publisher MIKE SHESS mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor RYAN LAMB ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director KAYLA COLEMAN kayla@westcoastersd.com Graphic Designer ASHLEY DREWITZ ashley@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant TOM SHESS thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers SAM TIERNEY sam@westcoastersd.com BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ brandon@westcoastersd.com RYAN RESCHAN ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com GONZALO QUINTERO drqcbt@gmail.com Contributors AJA REED AMY T. GRANITE BRETT NELSON JOHN SCHULZ MARC FIGUEROA TIM STAHL

West Coaster, THE WEBSITE Web Manager MIKE SHESS Web Editor RYAN LAMB Web Master JOSH EVERETT

Thursday 6/12

Sunday 6/15

Keith Bender book signing ‘Thrace and the Centaur’ in the Beer Garden

Big Decisions playing live 6-8pm on Father's Day

West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location.

FEEDBACK: Send letters to the Editor to ryan@westcoastersd.com Letters may be edited for space. Anonymous letters are published at the discretion of the Editor.

© 2013 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”


  

  

BEER FESTIVAL

LD

EN

TRIANGL

Free Admission Arts & Craft Vendors Bounce Houses Music & Food Trucks

ER O LU B RY C

LA JOLLA

TA

GO

   

    

GOLDENARTS TRIANGLE & CRAFT

CH

ART

ERED 19

86

Nobel Athletic Fields & Rec. Center Saturday, June 28

10AM - 4PM

10,000 Sq. Ft. Craft Beer Garden 11AM - 4PM

Craft Beer Garden Tickets $25

Purchase at: www.lajollagtrotary.org San DiegoÕ s Finest Craft Brewers

Event supports 45+ local non-profits through Rotary Club of La Jolla Golden Triangle Sponsors


WRITERS

COLUMNIST

INTO THE BREW Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified CiceroneÂŽ exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

COLUMNIST

THE CARBOY CHRONICLES Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer

scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into allgrain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with occasional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he attends.

COLUMNIST

PLATES & PINTS Brandon HernĂĄndez is a native San Diegan and the author of the San Diego Beer News Complete Guide to San Diego Breweries (available on Amazon.com). In addition to his on-staff work for West Coaster, he is responsible for communications for local craft beer producer Stone Brewing Company; an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including USA TODAY, The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including The San Diego Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Ranch & Coast, San Diego Magazine and U-T San Diego.


TABLE OF CONTENTS COLUMNS 23-24

Into the Brew Sam Tierney discusses yeast and the new innovations of San Diego’s White Labs

29-30

The Carboy Chronicles Ryan Reschan brews his “short on time” extract pale ale, while sharing his tips

35-36

Plates & Pints Brandon Hernández shares his recipe for beer can chicken, which can be made using a variety of San Diego beers

PLUS + 11-14

SD Beer Abroad Marc Figueroa shows us the export market for San Diego’s beers, with more than ten local operations shipping beer outside our borders

16

Offbeat The Escondido brewery helps Escondido’s Humane Society with a Pints for Pets drive in early May

19-21

Neighborhood Rising Amy T. Granite hears from Neighborhood’s Arsalun Tafazoli on the current San Diego craft climate

39-43

Craft Beer Directory & Map Are we missing any locations? E-mail directory@westcoastersd.com

ON THE COVER: Arsalun Tafazoli at Noble Experiment. Photo courtesy H2 Public Relations


n

OUTSTANDING SELECTION OF BARREL AGED BEERS, FINE WINES & CRAFT SPIRITS

Great Food

Patio

Daily Specials

Private Event Space

Gra

pes,H

ops,F

ine F ood

Monday

1/2 off All Wines By the Glass (all day) 2 for 1 Moscow Mules (all day)

Tuesday

Tequila and Taco Tuesday $5 Single/$7 Double Margarita (all day) $1.25 Street Taco 2 for $5 Fish Tacos (all day)

Wednesday

$3 Draft Beer (all day)

Thursday

No Corkage or Capage on Wine & Beer (all day)

Friday

Sweet Friday 2 for 1 Desserts (all day)

Saturday

Wings & Wells Half off Basket of Wings | $4 Wells (all day) Brunch with Epic Bloody Marys Bottemless Mimosas (11am-2pm)

Sunday

20% Off for Current SDSU Students (5pm-close) *Restaurant Only with Valid Student ID Brunch with Epic Bloody Marys & Bottemless Mimosas (11am-2pm)

knbwinecellars.com | 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. San Diego CA 92120 | 619.286.0321


SD BEER ABROAD

EXPORTING THE CRAFT

ABC beer on the move to Mexico. Photo courtesy Aztec Brewing Company

BY MARC FIGUEROA

S

hawn DeWitt now knows what it feels like to be a rock star. On a recent trip to Japan, the co-founder and director of brewery operations for Coronado Brewing Company was in a beer bar when the owner announced that the boys from Coronado were in the house. Before he knew it, the place turned into a mob scene as everyone suddenly surrounded them, clamoring for an autograph and photos. “It was overwhelming,” DeWitt recalled. “We signed bottles, pint glasses, even the shirts they were wearing. I’ve traveled all over the U.S. and we have never experienced anything like that.” The craft craze that’s been sweeping the U.S. is starting to go global as more and more countries are thirsting for something beyond the mass-produced stuff. The Brewers Association recently reported that in 2013 export volume increased by 49 percent over the previous year, representing 282,526 barrels and an estimated $73 million in revenue. In 2011, about 110,000 craft beer barrels were sent abroad for an estimated $23.4 million. (Note: Not all U.S. breweries that export beer are part of the BA’s export development program, which requires an additional fee.) “We are pushing boundaries, no holds barred,” said Mark Snyder, who heads the BA’s export development program. “We are making the best beers in the world. And people see that, respect that and

want our beers.” In San Diego County, more than ten breweries are exporting their craft, mainly more established operations. But there are smaller breweries, including Aztec Brewing Company in Vista, that are seeing value in reaching beyond the border. Aztec first sent its beer to Hong Kong last year, and now is sending its Chipotle IPA and Noche de los Muertos Imperial Stout to Mexico, where the brewery was originally born in 1921. The new Aztec, which opened in 2011, has a deal in place with BeerBox, a chain of 40 retail craft beer markets from Baja to Cancun. Its first delivery of 120 cases of 22-ounce bottles shipped in May, ironically on Cinco de Mayo. “We have come full circle,” said John Webster, Aztec’s marketing director. “To be developing relationships and establishing a presence in Mexico is exciting for us considering our history. I think the brand is something that resonates with them.” Aztec, which produces about 1,500 barrels a year, is considering expansion into Japan and the United Kingdom. “We do think it’s going to be a regular thing, and we want to do more in Mexico,” Webster said. Coronado, which is projecting to produce about 29,000 barrels this year, continues to expand internationally. Currently in nine coun-

WestCoasterSD.com | 11


tries with about 5 percent of its production earmarked for export, DeWitt said he could easily see that increase to 20 percent within 5 years. “I see this as only going up,” DeWitt said. Brandon Richards, who heads up sales and marketing for Coronado, said the brewery receives at least five inquiries every month from international distributors. “At one point we looked at exporting more like a hobby, but now it’s a very important part of our business,” Richards said. For New York’s Brooklyn Brewery, the largest exporter of American craft beer with sales in 17 countries, foreign sales account for 20 percent of the brewery’s annual revenue of $50 million. Brooklyn is also building a brewery in Sweden. Nagano Trading, the largest distributor of American craft beer in Japan, and Long Beach-based Global Craft Trading, which focuses on nine international markets, ships mostly San Diego beers. Since Global Craft was founded in 2011, it has experienced more than 100 percent growth every year, according to president Andrew Balmuth. “In this global economy, there are craft beer geeks everywhere and there’s craft beer everywhere,” said Balmuth, who co-founded Yokohama-based Nagano in 2006 with his wife Akemi Ohira Balmuth. “Anywhere there is craft beer being brewed, there is an interested drinker who wants to try a Sculpin or a Stone IPA. “San Diego beers are very popular in our export portfolio. The popularity has to do with the style of beers being produced by those breweries and that San Diego has done a tremendous job in branding itself as a global beer city.”

NOT FOR EVERYONE

J Mother Earth’s recent collaboration with Brasserie du Pays Flamand, at bar La Filibustere in France. Photo courtesy Craft Cask & Cork

im Crute, owner of Lightning Brewery in Poway, has considered exporting but sees too much regulatory red tape for it to make sense for his operation. “It’s almost a distraction,” he said. “In other countries there’s an entire byzantine set of alcohol trade rules and regulations. In the United States it’s a pain and overseas it doesn’t get easier. So you have to have enough volume for it to make sense for you.” Crute said he was recently approached by an international distributor who wanted to sell his Thunderweizen Ale in Japan, but said the numbers didn’t add up. “The distributor wanted a price that was lower than what we sell our beer for now,” he said. “If I was going to lower my prices, I would drop them in the U.S. first.”


SD Breweries Exporting Beer AleSmith Aztec Ballast Point Coronado Green Flash Hess Iron Fist

Karl Strauss Modern Times Mother Earth Pizza Port Port/Lost Abbey Saint Archer Stone

Lightning produced 780 barrels last year and, for now, is focused on growing locally. “Based on my interactions up to now, I am going to stay away from it,” Crute said. DeWitt agrees that exporting may not make sense for some smaller breweries. “If we were smaller, I wouldn’t even think about international distribution until I had enough capacity to do so,” DeWitt said. “I don’t know how much that does for you as a small brewery. I’d rather be strong in my own market because those customers can come to my brewery every single day.”

W

PRESERVING QUALITY

hile the increasing demand from overseas countries such as Japan, Sweden, Spain and New Zealand is an exciting proposition, maintaining a quality product is a big concern for craft breweries. Balmuth

Shanghai Tattoo keeps a fridge stocked with Karl Strauss beer. Photo courtesy Craft Cask & Cork

said the supply chain is critical to delivering the freshest beer possible. “Our supply chain is 100% cold,” he said. “That is the only way to maintain freshness. Fresh from the brewery allows the beer to develop the market in harmony with the sales efforts of the importer. Basic rule of thumb—it’s much easier to sell a fresh craft beer than one that’s old, oxidized and out of code. That is true for all markets domestic or abroad. We actually visit and monitor the market, we inspect the warehouse and delivery system and taste beers in the markets we supply. We monitor all points of the supply chain to protect the quality of the beer.” DeWitt, who works with Nagano and Global Craft, said he has visited other countries specifically to see how Coronado’s beers held up during their voyage and was satisfied with what he discovered. “The quality was better than I expected, but of course they weren’t brewery fresh,” he said. “But knowledgeable beer folks in Sweden and Japan understand that it takes time for beer to travel that far and they still feel that U.S. craft beers are still better than

Karl Strauss beer at Fortune Cookie in Shanghai. Photo courtesy Craft Cask & Cork


the beers being made in their own countries.” Balmuth said maintaining that quality and freshness is vital because that gives the beer “the chance to express the brewer’s intent.” If it’s not fresh, it can’t do that. With shipping from Long Beach to Japan taking just 12 days, many beers go out to bars less than 30 days from packaging.

SHIPPING MORE THAN BEER Brewers are learning they are exporting more than just their product. With craft beer comes a piece of American culture as well. A good example of this is found at Antenna America, the tasting room and bottle shop of Nagano Trading. In addition to eight rotating taps, the tasting room also serves cheeseburg-

Nagano Trading, the largest distributor of American craft beer in Japan, and Long Beach-based Global Craft Trading, which focuses on nine international markets, ships mostly San Diego beers. Since Global Craft was founded in 2011, it has experienced more than 100 percent growth every year, according to president Andrew Balmuth.

ers, fish tacos and wings served with Stone sauces to give visitors a complete craft experience. “We’re trying to brand American concepts around beer,” Balmuth said. Added Webster: “There was a time when Americans were looking to drink European beers but now that has flipped the other way. And San Diego beers have a particular appeal. We’re selling a lifestyle along with a liquid.” According to the Brewers Association, the largest importer of U.S. craft beers continues to be Canada with Sweden and the UK the next largest markets. Japan, Australia and Brazil are emerging quickly, and according to some insiders, Mexico and South Korea are the next two countries to take off because of recent changes in distribution laws. The bottom line is the growth of American craft beer around the world isn’t going anywhere but up. “The growth will look similar to the growth that many of these brands have had domestically,” Balmuth said. “Early export channels will become important to the future success of a brewery.”

14 | June 2014

Postcards from the original Aztec Brewing Company


our


COMMUNITY

CORNER OFFBEAT ASSISTS EHS

Rio, a 5-month-old American bulldog-sharpei mix and recent rescue from the Escondido Humane Society, visited Offbeat on Saturday, May 10 with her adoptive family.

Offbeat Brewing Company hosted a very successful support drive for the Escondido Humane Society (EHS) in early May. The second annual Pints for Pets event, which ran from May 7-11, raised $408 dollars – a 150% increase over last year – through pint sales of Felicita Session IPA and raffle tickets. Customers also packed a giant bin full of in-kind donations from the EHS wish list. Special thanks to Offbeat customer Lisa Ayotte, who donated a raffled gift basket from her company, Soul’y Raw specialty pet foods, and to the entire community for helping Offbeat support North County’s vulnerable animals.

Escondido resident Tiffani Urton, a volunteer with the Escondido Humane Society, and Duchess, a 4-year-old poodle mix, visited Offbeat Brewing’s adoption day on Saturday, May 10.

Brewmaster Tom Garcia checks the gravity on Grain-Fed Dog, Offbeat’s American Strong Ale, on the brew floor during the Pints for Pets adoption day event. GrainFed Dog is a tribute to Bailey, the Garcia’s beloved puggle.

Pebbles, the 5-month-old English bulldog, tagged along to the Pints for Pets event with Denyse Huff of San Diego.

Offbeat’s Michael Clark with customer Lauren Tomicich of Santa Cruz.

Photos by Aja Reed


COVER STORY Ballast Point’s Yuseff Cherney with Arsalun Tafazoli at the Neighborhood 5-Year Anniversary Party in 2011. Photo by Ryan Lamb

NEIGHBORHOOD

RISING Arsalun Tafazoli Reflects on SD Craft Culture By Amy T. Granite

W

hen Tafazoli opened Neighborhood Ale House in 2006, he didn’t want it to be another bar in Downtown where shiny-shirts came to get hammered. Instead, the 25-year-old San Diego native wanted a place where beer would be appreciated for having substance. “When we were starting out, young brewers would come in and tell stories about how they mortgaged their houses—put everything on the line to get their product out there,” says Tafazoli. “There was so much passion behind it. It was incredible to me that it didn’t have the same credibility as wine.” Tafazoli made moves. His staff of mostly women were pros on the ins and outs of beer styles and food pairings. He regularly

hosted meet-the-brewer nights—with out of towners like the venerable Dogfish Head and Allagash. Lee Chase (Blind Lady Ale House, Automatic Brewing Co., Tiger! Tiger!) was hired as Neighborhood’s first beverage manager. “If Lee’s behind the bar pouring you a beer—to this day— he’ll get you behind it. It’s amazing to watch,” says Tafazoli of Chase, a mad beer scientist of sorts who worked as head brewer at Stone for nearly 10 years until 2006. “That got really hip; people would come in to taste more stuff. We’d get letters saying ‘I didn’t know what good beer was before.’ We really built a community one person at a time.” Around the time of the housing market crash, there was a

WestCoasterSD.com | 19


Neighborhood in East Village. Photo courtesy H2 Public Relations

boom of creativity among brewers, says Tafazoli. And newlybroke winos took note. This is when Neighborhood took off, and gave rise to a new order of local establishments. “San Diego is littered with gastro pubs now,” Tafazoli says. “Nowadays, the word “craft,” the term “farm to table”—it’s all been commodified. It’s a trend that people exploit. You see these banners hanging in front of places everywhere say “craft beer.” It’s more than getting a tap system installed; that’s just one component in the context of this bigger picture. You have to make sure the whole story makes sense or else it doesn’t work.” Having grown from 33 breweries in 2007 to 88 at time of print, some of the craft beer scene’s original players are wary of its sustainability. “It used to be that there was this young guy starting a brewery, and you’d want to support it. And now every day it’s someone else. It’s great for the proliferation of the culture, but I think some people are getting into the business for the wrong reasons.” Tafazoli’s approach to success has launched what is today one of San Diego’s most ambitious and talked about hospitality brands, Consortium Holdings (CH). In 2008 he joined

forces with Nate Stanton (El Dorado), when both of their businesses were gaining momentum in the up and coming East Village. Since, the two have undeniably elevated drinking and dining culture in San Diego with eight successful concepts and counting. It doesn’t hurt to have a dream team behind their backs, with two-star Michelin Chef, Jason McLeod, helming kitchen operations for all the projects, and highly reputed bartenders like Erick Castro (Polite Provisions) and Anthony Schmidt (formerly of No-

We want our spaces to promote our core values. It’s why we don’t do vodka or shit beer

20 | June 2014

-Arsalun Tafazoli


ble Experiment, now headed to new project Rare Form). Then there’s local designer Paul Basile, whose past projects include Bankers Hill Restaurant + Bar and Acme Southern Kitchen. Just last year, CH won national praise for two of its projects. Speakeasy Noble Experiment (designed by Mauricio Couturier) made Esquire Magazine’s top 100 bars list and Polite Provisions won Imbibe Magazine’s Cocktail Bar of the Year. The James Beard Foundation also loved Erick Castro’s Mayan Concubine cocktail at Polite, naming it one of their favorites of 2013, from a spot that opened the same year, no less. “We want our spaces to promote our core values. It’s why we don’t do vodka or shit beer, and think about every aspect of a space—because it’s a reflection of who we are and what we want to perpetuate to our community,” says Tafazoli. “It was the Greg Kochs [Stone CEO] and the Lee Chases who reaffirmed what I thought. At first, people were coming in to Neighborhood and not getting it, and sticking to our identity and not watering it down—back when everything was on the line—that’s what made us.” CH’s first all-out culinary endeavor, Ironside Oyster, has been packed since opening in early May. In the works are North Park’s Underbelly, an East Village juice bar, and Rare Form, a Jewish Deli that will share space with Stone Brewing Company in the historic Simon Levi building next to Petco Park. Tafazoli says of the perceived “seasonal” neighborhood, “The stadium has shaped the cultural geography of East Village, and not in a good way. Too many businesses cater to the stadium crowd. It’s not about walk-by traffic for us, it’s about the great community of people who live there,” he says. “We’ll create a synergy there with the two different businesses. The idea is that our core values are very much alike. Stone knows who they are, they stuck to it, and it’s been effective. They paved the way for a lot of people. You have to respect it.” No one could have predicted the force that

craft beer would play in the trajectory of Tafazoli’s businesses, let alone its tremendous impact on the local economy. Tafazoli points out that the proof lies in a craft beer newspaper like West Coaster—something most people wouldn’t have looked twice at a decade ago. Still, Tafazoli remains cautiously optimistic about San Diego’s brewing future. “A lot of brewing companies have popped up without understanding the soul and economics of the business. Unfortunately, I don’t think a lot of these guys will be able to sustain,” he says. “In the end, I want everyone in the community to be successful, but unfortunately capitalism is harsh. I think there is a lot of local talent sitting on the sidelines, waiting to see how things play out. I see them stepping up as other people phase out. Then, we’re going to experience a stronger renaissance.”

Underbelly in Little Italy. Photo courtesy H2 Public Relations


Over 1000 Beers Wine Club members receive 15% off store wide

Underground tasting room

760.745.1200 | Holidaywinecellar.com 302 W. Mission Ave. Escondido, CA 92025


INTO THE BREW

Chris White at the 2014 Craft Brewers Conference in Denver, Colorado. Photo by Ryan Lamb

Innovations in Yeast Culture White Labs Changes the Game, Again By Sam Tierney

I

could open with some cliché about yeast making beer and brewers making wort—it always feels so appropriate when I cover yeast in this column, but you’ve heard that one already. Put another way, yeast is the most complex and important ingredient/partner in the brewing process. Most of the flavor of beer is derived from the activity of yeast, and utilizing yeast to the greatest effect is one of the most crucial parts of good brewing. The holy grail of fermentation is adding the proper amount of healthy, pure yeast to properly oxygenated wort at the proper temperature. Easier said than done. Part of the incredible growth of the brewing industry in San Diego has been due to the presence of White Labs, one of the in-

dustry’s leading yeast laboratories. White Labs maintains and sells an incredible array of yeast strains for brewing, winemaking, and distilling, as well as providing brewers with analytical laboratory services and products. At the Craft Brewers Conference in April, White Labs announced a newly revised system of yeast propagation and packaging, called FlexCell and PurePitch, which is the result of five years of research into a more streamlined and effective system of growing and packaging yeast. A single-celled fungus, yeast reproduces by asexual budding. Daughter cells bud off of mother cells in a continuous process while exposed to food and nutrients. This exponential growth leads to a very fast rate of genetic drift in populations. Breweries are all too familiar

WestCoasterSD.com | 23


“

The holy grail of fermentation is adding the

“

proper amount of healthy, pure yeast to properly oxygenated wort at the proper temperature. Easier said than done.

24 | June 2014


White Labs’ new commercial yeast packaging, via whitelabs.com/innovation. Studio Schulz Photography

with this drift. Depending on how they harvest and store yeast for use in subsequent batches of beer, the fermentation characteristics of the yeast strain continue to evolve until beer character noticeably changes, or yeast harvesting becomes too difficult to continue. To counter this drift, breweries tend to only reuse their yeast a certain number of times. Some strains can only be used several times, while others can be used a dozen or more times. Some breweries that practice open fermentation and harvest from the top of the actively fermenting beer are able to continue to use their yeast almost indefinitely, as this method tends to place little stress on the yeast. These days, most brewers harvest yeast at the end of fermentation by taking it from the bottom of closed cylindroconical tanks. At the end of fermentation, most yeast strains flocculate

(clump together) and fall to the bottom of the tank. The resulting yeast slurry is like a creamy milkshake that can be collected in a smaller vessel and stored until it is needed in the next batch of beer. The problem is that this bed of yeast is stressed by its location under all of that beer and starts to die in a short amount of time. Yeast must be harvested and reused in a short amount of time to ensure the best health and fermentation of subsequent batches. When a brewery decides to start back at a new yeast culture, they have several options. Many larger breweries maintain mother cultures in-house and can propagate a new pitch themselves. Others acquire their yeast from other breweries. The most common method these days is to purchase a yeast pitch from a lab like White Labs, Wyeast, or GigaYeast. Breweries can buy a yeast slurry directly from these labs that can then be pitched into a batch of beer. No matter how a pitchable quantity of yeast is acquired, the method of propagation is roughly the same. Yeast cultures are stored frozen, which halts genetic drift in the mother cells. The lab will select a colony of cells from the original culture and then add this to a small amount of sterilized wort. This process is done under sterile lab conditions as any contamination at this point in the process will lead to an unusable yeast culture. For healthy growth, oxygen is added to the fermenting starter beer, which the yeast utilizes to build new cell membranes. After several increasingly large growth steps in the lab, you have enough yeast to ferment a small batch of beer. Yeast labs will then continue to grow their strains to package for breweries, and breweries might step the yeast up further with small starter batches of wort in the brewery, eventually growing enough for a full-scale batch of beer. White Labs’ new FlexCell process changes this system in that the yeast propagation now takes place in a single vessel instead of multiple lab vessels and brewery tanks. This allows them to save large amounts of water, energy, plastics and chemicals in cleaning and sanitizing multiple vessels, leading to a more environmentally friendly process. It also reduces possible points of contamination during transfer to subsequent vessels. Once propagation is finished, the containers are divided into smaller amounts that then become the PurePitch packaging that is sent to breweries. This results in yeast cultures that have been in one closed, sterile environment from start to finish. This process eliminates the riskiest part of growing yeast, which is the transfer to new vessels. The new PurePitch packaging also differs from the old plastic bottle packaging in that it is a flexible, breathable package, eliminating carbon dioxide buildup, which is detrimental to yeast health. Breweries will see a rollout of the new packaging this month, but White Labs is still looking into utilizing it for its homebrew packaging, which remains the same for now.

Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park

WestCoasterSD.com | 25


Now available in San Diego, LA and Orange Counties

Crafted for your California lifestyle. We put our award-winning beer in cans so you can take it anywhere your active lifestyle takes you, including places bottles aren’t always welcome. Places like tailgating, golfing, boating, camping or by the water. Of course, our beer is also a great choice for parties, dinners with friends or just enjoying at home. Try one of five delicious styles today. Great beer for the great

2014

outdoors, and the great indoors, too. Great beer. No exceptions. No excuses.

HABITUS IPA Rye Beer Category

mikehessbrewing.com

mikehessbrewing

mhb


THE CARBOY CHRONICLES

“Short On Time” Extract Pale Ale

Screenshots via Ryan Reschan’s YouTube channel, youtube.com/StumpyJoeJr

A Quick Brew Day Experiment

By Ryan Reschan

I

spend a lot of time thinking about what kind of beer to brew next. Do I want to brew something sessionable or strong? Do I want to try to brew a style of beer I’ve never brewed before? Do I want to tweak a particular recipe I’ve liked in the past? Do I want to try new combinations of malts, hops, and/or yeast? Or do I want to challenge myself and try something on the experimental side of brewing? So for this month’s article I wanted to write about brewing with extract, something I have not done in ages. In fact I’ve never brewed a 100% extract only beer before. In my extract brewing days, I always steeped grains for color, body, and flavor. One of my favorite beers to brew on a regular basis is a hoppy American Pale Ale (although some might call it a session IPA). I always like having a low alcohol hoppy beer on draft. For these beers, I like to employ the hop bursting technique I wrote about in the December 2012/January 2013 issue of West Coaster. The technique has been quite popular with many of the session IPAs that have been popping as of late. So as a challenge to myself, I decided to brew up a 100% extract hop bursted American Pale Ale (APA). Thankfully I never threw away my plastic bucket used to get bulk extract from the homebrew supply shop. So I cleaned out the bucket and headed over to the shop. I ended up with 8 lbs. of bulk pale liquid malt extract (LME). I didn’t get the details on the extract manufacturer but I figured it would be the freshest extract available to me. Many extracts are made from traditional pale malts but often contain additional crystal malts. Because of this, I decided to stay away from any of the darker extracts and add a pound of wheat dry malt extract (DME). The particular wheat malt extract I bought contained 65% malted wheat that was blended with 35% malted barley. While I would have preferred 100% wheat extract, I figured it would still be enough to give some extra body to the beer. With such blend, you could easily make a wheat-based beer just using the 65/35 blend of malts. Wanting to use this beer as one big “starter” for the next beer I planned on brewing, I chose to use White Labs WLP007 Dry English Ale Yeast despite it not being my preferred yeast strain for an American Pale Ale. WLP007 does attenuate better than most English strains so I thought it would dry out the beer enough and add an extra bit of fruitiness that would add complexity to hop character. For hops, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to use since a lot of varieties work well in APA. Digging around in my freezer full of hops, I choose to use some older hops I’ve had for awhile. With its higher alpha acid percentage, I chose Galena to be my “bittering” hop. For flavor and aroma I went with the Falconer’s Flight® 7Cs hop blend. It’s a blend of seven different hops starting with the letter ‘C’. To reinforce the citrus character, I also wanted to use up some Cascade hops I’ve had for awhile. Cascade can often be found in many APAs and that was my homage to those early American classics. So with the recipe figured out, it was time to brew. I filled my boil kettle with about 6 ½ gallons of carbon filtered Vista water and fired up the burner. I typically add ½ tsp of gypsum to my hoppy beers so I tossed that into the kettle. I wouldn’t recommend adjusting your water unless you have a basic knowledge of water chemistry and have a water report for your water. Having not used extract in awhile, I had to remember the best way to add it to the water. Before adding in the LME, I pre-heated it by placing in a hot water bath in my sink. The hotter you can get the LME in its container, the easier it will be to pour out. When I hit 140F, I killed the heat on the burner and slowly stirred in the LME. It’s best to kill your flame so that you don’t scorch the extract which will quickly want to sink to the bottom of your kettle. Once the LME was incorporated, I turned the heat back on and whisked in the DME. DME will want to clump and float on the surface so it helps to use a whisk if you have one. As I waited for the wort to boil, I measured out the hop

WestCoasterSD.com | 29


“SHORT ON TIME” RECIPE Estimated Color: 7.6 SRM Estimated IBU: 40.7 IBUs Boil Time: 20 Minutes INGREDIENTS 1 lbs Wheat Dry Extract [Boil for 20 min] Dry Extract 11.1 % 8 lbs Pale Liquid Extract [Boil for 20 min] Liquid Extract 88.9 % 1.50 oz Galena [13.20 %] - Boil 15.0 min Hop 24.0 IBUs 1.00 oz 7 C’s [10.30 %] - Boil 10.0 min Hop 9.1 IBUs 1.50 oz Cascade [7.40 %] - Boil 5.0 min Hop 5.4 IBUs 2.00 oz 7 C’s [10.30 %] - Boil 1.0 min Hop 2.2 IBUs 2.00 oz Citra [12.00 %] - Dry Hop 6.0 Days Hop 0.0 IBUs 1.00 oz 7 C’s [10.30 %] - Dry Hop 6.0 Days Hop 0.0 IBUs 1.00 oz Cascade [5.50 %] - Dry Hop 6.0 Days Hop 0.0 IBUs 1.00 oz Galena [13.50 %] - Dry Hop 6.0 Days Hop 0.0 IBUs 1.0 pkg Dry English Ale (White Labs #WLP007) Yeast Estimated Original Gravity: 1.049-1.055 Estimated Final Gravity: 1.012-1.015 Estimated ABV: 4.8%-5.5%

additions so they were ready to go with the short intervals between additions. I placed my copper immersion chiller into kettle for sanitation. Upon reaching a steady boil, I set my timer for 20 minutes. I then proceeded to add hops at 15, 10, 5 and 0 minutes (after knockout). After whirlpooling the hops by hand for around 5 minutes, I started my chill down procedure as usual. Being a lazy brew day, I decided to not make a yeast starter, something I haven’t done in years. So after racking to the carboy and hitting the wort with some pure oxygen, I pitched the vial of yeast. After fermentation completed, I added the three hops used in the boil plus some Citra I needed to use up for dryhopping. After 5 days of dry-hopping I started to cold crash the beer and then racked over to my keg for force carbonating two days later. The beer turned out really well with lots of hop character but without the bitterness of an IPA. The malt character was present but takes a back seat to the hops. Perhaps a small addition of darker extract or more wheat extract would have made the beer better but it’s an easy drinking 5.5% ale that a lot people didn’t know it was a 100% extract beer until I told them. I added some finings to clear up it up but they didn’t work as well as I hoped but the beer leaves some fantastic lacing in a glass. So whether you are an all-grain brewer looking for a shorter brew day or an extract brewer wanting to try something different, I encourage you all to keep exploring your brewing options and techniques. Cheers!


PRESS BOX SPORTS LOUNGE East County’s Finest Craft Beer Bar 15 Minutes East of Downtown

GREAT FOOD & BEER | 32 TAPS 50¢ WING $9 BURGER & BREW MONDAYS WEDNESDAYS

HAPPY HOUR 3-7 & 10-1

1/2 Off Appetizers | 1$ Off Draft Beers | 1$ Off Well Drinks

BREWERY OF THE MONTH: LOST ABBEY/PORT Wed 6/4 @ 5PM Agave Maria, Cuvée de Tomme, Anniversary IPA, Red Barn, Angels Share Grand Cru, Serpent Stout And More!! ALL ON DRAFT!!

$4 PINTS DEVOTION ALL MONTH

KEEP THE GLASS EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Wed 6/18 @ 5PM Red Poppy, Mongo IPA, Framboise de Amarosa, Shark Attack Double Red, Wipeout IPA And More! Plus a Cask Conditioned Ale!

WE SHOW PPV UFC FIGHTS!

2990 Jamacha Rd. #120 El Cajon, CA | 619.713.6990 | PressBoxSportsLounge.com

Downtown San Diego’s First Natural Foods Store. Featuring Fresh, Natural Organic Foods, Craft Beer, Wine & Spirits. Independent & Family Owned.

Mon-Fri 7am-12am | Sat-Sun 8am-12am

Also Located Inside: Downtown’s Best Craft Beer Bottleshop & Homebrewing Supplies

1036 7th Ave. San Diego CA 92101 | krispsd.com


PLATES & PINTS

Chicken à la Can The rise of canned craft beer signals evolution of a classic American recipe

By Brandon Hernández

T

here’s nothing like impaling a land-bound fowl to reassert one’s place at the top of the food chain. In this case, our spearing mechanism will be an aluminum cylinder filled to the brim with a fermented malt beverage. But erase all mental imagery of PBR tallboys or, heaven forbid, the “silver bullet.” Any beast noble enough to give its life so that we may prolong and enrich our own deserves better than watery, nearly tasteless, macro-machined adjunct lager. It’s time we upped the time-honored recipe for “beer can chicken” to include something better—namely, craft beer. When beer can chicken came into being, it was quite the revelation. Dry yard bird is a sin, after all, so discovering that shoving a cheap, simple can of suds where the sun don’t shine did wonders to further moisten and mildly perfume poultry was a big deal. And to set the record straight, I in no way fault any of the early adopters of this cooking method for using industrial beer. For the better part of this recipe’s lifespan, Budweiser, Coors, Miller, Michelob and Pabst were about the only choices available. When American craft beer entered the market, it was mostly available in kegs. Even forward-thinking venues offering growler fills were of no help in providing a better chicken suppository, because, let’s face it, even deceased, forcing a chicken to subsume a

beer vessel that gargantuan qualifies as cruel and unusual punishment. And up until very recently, most packaged craft beer came in bottles of varying shapes and sizes, none of qualify as feasible substitutes for aluminum cans. Thus, there were few, if any quality options for evolving this recipe. But that is no longer the case. Canned beer has come a long way, shaking the “cheap” stigma attached to every 12-ouncer, tallboy and keg can in the land. Slowly but surely, drinkers are becoming wise to the fact that cans present a number of upgrades where beer packaging is concerned. They block out light far better than even brown-hued glass bottles ever could. They are completely airtight, protecting from oxidation and a host of other spoils. They are also more compact, stackable and easier to store. And for brewers, they are cheaper to fill, store, ship and dispose of. As a result, numerous craft breweries are going the canned route. Locally, Ballast Point Brewing & Spirits, Pizza Port, Saint Archer Brewery, Mike Hess Brewing Company, Mission Brewery and Modern Times Beer have installed canning lines, while Monkey Paw Pub and Brewery and Twisted Manzanita Ales have employed the likes of canning consultants The Can Van and Mobile West Canning to get their aluminum-clad products to market. Other companies here and abroad are exploring or in the process of

WestCoasterSD.com | 35


switching formats, so there is no shortage of upper echelon beer in cans, and more canned craft ale and lager on the horizon. Given that, it’s time to upgrade beer can chicken. Doing so is relatively simple. All one really needs to do is substitute the lackluster canned beer that’s been used in the past with artisanal beer and proceed with the recipe in its entirety. Of course, you don’t need a full-length column to tell you that, so we’ll take it a step further, employing various techniques to create added layers of flavor. But before we head in that direction, let’s discuss beer selection. The reason chicken is so popular worldwide is its relative delicacy. It’s not like venison, beef or even bolder flavored birds such as duck or goose. Chicken is lean, balanced and not too imposing, yet plenty tasty. It’s like vanilla ice cream—a crowd-pleaser that syncs with most any palate. But with that lack of intensity comes the chance that using a beer with too much flavor might overwhelm the protein. What we’re looking to do is use a beer with a nice aroma that will lend itself to the finished dish. For many beer enthusiasts, there is no scent better than of piney, fruity hops. If you opt for a pale ale, IPA or other hoppy style of beer, my only word of caution is to avoid anything too high in IBUs (international bittering units) or alcohol. Use of an imperial IPA is overkill, particularly if you decide to make any finishing sauces using the beer you’re cooking with. It will prove far too strong and unpalatable for the latter. Secondly, it’s a waste of a beverage that’s best-suited for drinking and, in most cases, far more expensive than a nicely hopped session beer. If hops is what you want, turn down the dial but go for big aroma and some malt character, by foregoing Ballast Point’s Sculpin IPA and opting for Calico Amber Ale, or nixing Pizza Port’s Swami IPA in favor of Chronic Ale (Session India pale ale). In San Diego, we tend to get enamored with all things imperial and in-your-face, but smaller beers with nice floral and spice character like Mike Hess Claritas Kölsch-style ale, Saint Archer White Ale, Modern Times Lomaland Saison or Twisted Manzanita Riverwalk Blonde Ale bring in olfactory and taste components that will marry well with a variety of herbs used to season the chicken. The coriander utilized in wits and some saisons will go well with ground coriander or cilantro, while white pepper notes from farmhouse ales that are truer to the traditional Belgian model with actual ground white pepper. For some, beer can chicken is all about the beer, but in my opinion, it’s better to go to every length possible to ensure a flavorful bird. So, I recommend venturing beyond the baser realm of salt and pepper and choosing a nice mixture of herbs or a zesty spice rub. The latter introduces some heat and flavors that beer can’t help infuse, while the former, when done well, helps accentuate the added complexity from the beer and vice versa. If using a spice rub, use your hands to pat it evenly onto the exterior of the chicken, but for herbs, I recommend a different technique that will prevent scorching and allow the use of fresh herbs. First off, select the herbs you want to use based on personal taste and, if you desire, the beer you are using. Best bets, in my experience, include sage leaves, savory, rosemary, oregano, thyme and parsley. If you’re going for a decidedly regional taste profile, basil and cilantro do the trick quite nicely. Once you’ve settled on a combo, take your assorted leaves, discard any stems, then toss them in a bowl with some room temperature butter, salt and pepper, and use a fork or spatula to fold

36 | June 2014

everything together. Once all of the ingredients are even incorporated, use your hands to separate the chicken’s skin from the breast meat, then spread the herb butter in-between. Since the breasts are the leanest part of the chicken, they are the most susceptible to drying out, but push the butter as far back as you can toward the thighs because a little tasty dairy fat never hurt anybody (or any chicken, as far as I know). With a flavorful dusting of seasoning on the outside, a layer of flavor under the skin and a tasty craft beer wedged into the back end of the chicken, one is assured the most delicious end result possible. (No pun intended, considering the entry point for that can of craft suds.)

Craft Beer Can Chicken

Yield: 4 servings

1 4-pound whole chicken, cleaned with giblets removed 2 Tbsp olive oil salt and freshly ground pepper to taste spice blend (optional) herb butter (optional, see directions in above article) 1 shallot 1 12-16 ounce can craft beer Prepare a grill, bringing to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Rub the chicken with olive oil and season with salt, pepper and spice blend. Separate skin from breast meat and evenly spread herb butter in-between. Wedge the shallot into the neck hole of the chicken. Pour half the contents of the beer can into a glass and consume, discard or set aside for use in accompanying pan sauce. Use a can-opener to remove the lid from the beer can. Insert the beer can into the open end of the chicken. Place the chicken on the grill, away from direct heat and use the beer can and legs to keep it upright. Cover the grill and cook for approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until the internal temperature of a meat thermometer inserted into the meatiest part of the thigh registers 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Remove from the grill and let rest for 10 minutes. To serve, carve the chicken into sections—breasts, wings, thighs, legs—and serve, family-style on a platter with desired side dishes and condiments.


STAY STAY LOCAL LOCAL AT AT THE THE BEACH BEACH North County’s premier craft beer bottleshop and tap room!

20

San Diego craft beers on tap at all times

300

bottles for sampling

Artisan snacks Local brews Lively neighbors Exceptional company SEE OUR FACEBOOK PAGE FOR OUR SPECIAL EVENTS DATES.

Located in the Beachwalk Retail Center 437 S. Highway 101, Suite 107 Solana Beach, CA 92075 www.sandiegobeerworks.com | 858.353.7174

8

YEAR ROUND DRAFTS

2

NITRO TAPS

2

CASK ALES ALWAYS ON TAP BARREL AGED

&

SPECIALTY BEERS CASK CONDITIONED ALWAYS AVAILABLE

TASTING ROOM HOURS WED-FRI 4-7PM | SAT 2-6PM

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

11545 SORRENTO VALLEY RD #305 SAN DIEGO, CA 92121 NEWENGLISHBREWING.COM


SAVE THE

BREW DATE AUGUST 23rd 2014

TH

IR S

TY

FOR KN O WL

E

DG

E

4th Annual Beer-Con 9am-8pm Marina Village Conference Center San Diego, CA

15

Hand Selected

Breweries

Industry Speakers

Special Lunch Pairing

Tickets www.beer-con.com

Swag Bag T-Shirt + More!


CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP

17. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 18. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 19. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

DOWNTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com 3. Barleymash 600 5th Ave. | 619.255.7373 www.BarleyMash.com 4. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 5. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 6. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 7. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 8. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 9. Ogawashi 1100 5th Ave. | 619.358.9170 www.Ogawashi.com 10. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 11. Queenstown Public House 1557 Columbia St. | 619.546.0444 www.BareBackGrill.com/Queenstown 12. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 13. Stone Brewing Tap Room 795 J St. | 619.727.4452 www.StoneBrewing.com 14. Taste and Thirst 715 4th Ave. | 619.955.5995 www.TasteAndThirst.com 15. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 16. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com

2. Belching Beaver North Park 4223 30th St. | 760.703.0433 www.BelchinBeaver.com 3. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com 4. Carnita’s Snack Shack 2632 University Ave. | 619.294.7675 www.CarnitasSnackShack.com 5. Coin Op Game Room 3926 30th St. | 619.255.8523 www.CoinOpSD.com 6. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com 7. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 8. DiMille’s Italian Restaurant 3492 Adams Ave. | 619.283.3153 www.DiMilles.com 9. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 10. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 11. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 12. Nate’s Garden Grill 3120 Euclid Ave. | 619.546.7700 13. Polite Provisions 4696 30th St. | 619.677.3784 www.PoliteProvisions.com 14. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 15. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bacchus Wine Bar & Market 647 G Street | 619.236.0005 www.BacchusWineMarket.com 2. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 3. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

BREW PUBS 1. Ballast Point Little Italy 2215 India St. | www.BallastPoint.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY

B

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Bottlecraft 3007 University Ave. www.BottleCraftBeer.com

B

3

22 14 5 2

University Ave

CITY HEIGHTS

Upas St

12 3

7

EAST VILLAGE5 1

ng hi rs Pe

10 1

Dr

GOLDEN HILL 94

6

Broadway

Market St

SOUTH PARK

805

15

94 47th St

5th Ave

13 4

Market St

Juniper St

30th St

15

3

F St

Fern St

10 1 8

Park Blvd

2

14 18 16

6 19 9 17 20

Broadway

10th Ave

1st Ave

Pacific Hwy

DOWNTOWN

Market St

2

4 1

Broadway

Pers hing Dr

9

12

Av e

17

30th St

6

3 Redwood St

Florida Dr

2

5 15

Fairmount Ave

5th Ave

India St

N Harbor Dr

A St

t ry S nda Bou

NORTH PARK

Euclid Ave

23 25 1 24 26

Beech St

Ha rbo rD r

35th St

1st Ave

University Ave

Adams Ave

El Cajon Blvd

1 7 21 2

4

19

4 18

8

NORMAL HEIGHTS

El Cajon Blvd

11

11

E

1

805

30th St

Hawthorn

8

Texas St

rk Pa

UNIVERSITY 2 HEIGHTS Florida St

163

d Blv

1

13

Adams Ave

97

Park Blvd

5th Ave

A

15

LITTLE ITALY

5

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com

8

1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com

St India

y Hw ific Pac

St orn awth WH

BREWERIES 1. Mike Hess Brewing (North Park) 3812 Grim Ave. | 619.255.7136 www.HessBrewing.com 2. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com 3. Thorn St. Brewery 3176 Thorn St. www.ThornStreetBrew.com

UPTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1 3 5

BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

16 3

1

3. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 4. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 9. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

16. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 17. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com 18. The Haven Pizzeria 4051 Adams Ave. | 619.281.1904 www.TheHavenPizzeria.com 19. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 20. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 21. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 22. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 23. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 24. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 25. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net 26. Waypoint Public 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.facebook.com/WaypointPublic

Ho m e

A

= NEW LOCATION

Market St


C

LA JOLLA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eureka! 4545 La Jolla Village Dr. Ste E-25 858.546.8858 | www.EurekaBurger.com 2. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 3. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 4. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 5. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 6. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 7. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 8. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brewing Company 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.246.6759 www.LaJollaBeer.com 3. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306

619.857.8023 | www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

D

PACIFIC BEACH MISSION BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Barrel Republic 1261 Garnet Ave. | 858.270.9922 www.BarrelRepublic.com 3. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 4. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 5. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 6. Latitude 32 Pub 5019 Cass St. | 858.273.0501 www.Latitude32Bar.com 7. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 8. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 9. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 10. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com

40 | June 2014

11. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com 12. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com 13. The Bar Key 954 Turquoise St. | 858.488.8200 www.BarKeyPB.com 14. Turquoise Cellars 5026 Cass St. | 858.412.5377 www.Facebook.com/TurquoiseCellars 15. Woodstock’s Pizza 1221 Garnet Ave. | 858.642.6900 www.WoodstocksPB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Chip’s Liquor 1926 Garnet Ave. | 858.273.1536 2. Heidi’s Liquor & Deli 980 Turquoise St. | 858.488.7474

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

E

POINT LOMA OCEAN BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Fathom Bistro 1776 Shelter Island Dr. | 619.222.5835 www.FathomBistro.com 2. Gabardine 1005 Rosecrans St. | 619.398.9810 www.GabardineEats.com 3. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 4. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 5. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 6. OB Kabob 4994 Newport Ave | 619.222.9700 www.OBKabob.com 7. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 8. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 9. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 10. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 11. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 12. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 13. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 14. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 15. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com 16. Tom Ham’s Lighthouse 2150 Harbor Island Dr. | 619.291.9110 www.TomHamsLighthouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

= NEW LOCATION

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com 2. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens (Liberty Station) 2816 Historic Decatur Rd. | 760.294.7899 www.StoneWorldBistro.com

BREWERIES 1. Modern Times Beer 3725 Greenwood St. | 619.546.9694 www.ModernTimesBeer.com

F

MISSION VALLEY CLAIREMONT BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Dan Diegos 2415 Morena Blvd | 619.276.2100 www.DanDiegos.com 2. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.SanDiego.edu/Dining/LaGranTerraza 3. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 4. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 5. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 | www.RJGrill.com 6. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Del Mesa Foods & Liquor 6090 Friars Rd. | 619.299.1238 www.Facebook.com/DelMesaLiquor 2. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com 3. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Benchmark Brewing Co. 6190 Fairmount Ave. Ste G | 619.795.2911 www.BenchmarkBrewing.com 3. Coronado Brewing Co. (Knoxville) 1205 Knoxville www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com 4. Groundswell Brewing Company 6304 Riverdale St. | 619.795.2337 www.GroundswellBrew.com 5. Helm’s Brewing Co. 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. | 858.384.2772 www.HelmsBrewingCo.com 6. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.SocieteBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

G

SORRENTO VALLEY MIRA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Best Pizza & Brew 9172 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 858.566.9900 www.BestPizzaAndBrew.com 2. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. Ste G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION? Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com 3. Woody’s Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 9430 Scranton Rd. | 858.458.4290 www.KegNBottle.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

BREWERIES 1. 2Kids Brewing Co. 8680 Miralani Dr. #123 | 858.480.5437 www.TwoKidsBrewing.com 2. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 3. Ballast Point Brewing and Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 4. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com 5. Intergalactic Brewing Company 9835 Carroll Ctr. Rd. | 858.750.0601 www.IntergalacticBrew.com 6. Mike Hess Brewing (Miramar) 7955 Silverton Ave. Ste 1201 619.887.6453 | www.HessBrewing.com 7. Pacific Brewing Company 8680 Miralani Drive | 303.819.7086 www.PacificBrewingCo.com 8. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. Ste D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 9. Saint Archer Brewing Co. 9550 Distribution Ave. | 858.225.2337 www.SaintArcherBrewery.com 10. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. Suite 132 858.480.9381 | www.WetNReckless.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

H

NORTH COUNTY COASTAL BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 83 Degrees 660 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.7904 www.83Degrees.net 2. Board & Brew 201 Oak Ave. | 760.434.4466 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Dani P’s Cork & Tap 560 Greenbrier Dr. | 760.967.0128 www.DaniPsCorkTap.com 4. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy. | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 5. Tap That Tasting Room 3207 Roymar Rd. | 760.529.5953 www.TapThatKegNow.com 6. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.Facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.BeerOnTheWall.com 2. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Bottle-Shop 3. Stone Company Store-Oceanside 301 N. Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 4. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com

BREW PUBS

1. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. Ste C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com

BREWERIES 1. Arcana Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.ArcanaBrewing.com 2. Legacy Brewing Company 363 Airport Rd. | 760.705.3221 www.LegacyBrewingCo.com 3. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 4. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real Suite G www.OTTBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com


Mission Blvd

5

W

1

Balboa Ave

Tierrasanta Blvd

15

G

Su nse tC liffs Bl vd

lvd

ey B

ll Va

SORRENTO VALLEY

So

4

Rd

Mission Center

1

8

2 4

MIRA MESA Ca

min

a es n Rd

nyo

Ca

6 8

805

2

ar

m ira

M

1

15 Carroll

Rd

9 3

ar Rd

H 25

3

1

Ave

3

d Blv

3

Blvd ide ns ea Oc

1

OCEANSIDE

78

1 S wy tH as Co

4

6

r eD lag Vil

d ba rls Ca

4 3 2 1

CARLSBAD

2 El Ca min o

ad rlsb Ca d Blv

5

2

3

1 1

uiz

Miram

76

Canyon

5

oR

7

M ira M Carroll

M iss ion

d rs R Fria

MISSION VALLEY

2

Bl

vd

10

2

Kearny Villa Rd

11

1

5

805

1

Mir

4

e

vd Bl

5

2

d ta R Vis da Lin

Rd Friars

2

1

lvd

sa B a Me

Camino Santa F

Ave ee nes Ge

3 M or en a

St

1

Black Mountain Rd

Convoy St

Dr nt mo ire Cla

163

6

16

1 Me sa Blv d

3 1

N Harbor Dr

3

2

5

Cla irem ont

CLAIREMONT 2

8

5

3 ve oa A Balb

14

O ce an sid e

3

6

POINT LOMA

11

Talbot St

Ba yD r

ve ett A Barn

13

El Camino Rea l

F

Clairemont Mesa Blvd

M iss ion

5

2 vd Bl

Ca単o n St

52

1 2

Sports Arena Blvd

s an cr se Ro

o

Pro sp ec tS t

wy Pk

LA JOLLA

10 MISSION 4 BEACH 7

nt

La Joll a

9 Dr

12

vd Bl

Po int Lo ma Av e

rre

4

4

St

ew po rt A Na ve rra ga ns ett Av e

3

Mi dw ay

Ro se cra ns St

12

8 1 6 2 2

4

Vo lta ire

Ch att sw or th

3 1 1

1 6 15 10 N

Ba co nS t

1

7

5

1

int Loma Blvd WPo

Ca tali na

Villa ge Dr

OCEAN BEACH

lvd itz B Nim

2

1

St ham Ingra

La Jolla

d Ave Gran

2

Av e

2 3

8

et Ave Garn

8

y Hw ific Pac

1

e se ne Ge

Torrey Pines Rd

5

805

3 15 9 11 2

nt St Lamo

TORREY PINES

6

D E

PACIFIC BEACH

Cl iffs Bl vd

14

Su ns et

7

5

St uoise Turq

el St Fanu

C

13 2 3

Re al

1 4

rt po Air ar m o l Pa

Rd

Rd


CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP

I

EAST COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Find us on Facebook! 2. Hooleys Irish Pub 2955 Jamacha Rd. | 619.670.7468 www.Hooleys.com 3. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 4. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 5. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Helix Liquor 444 West Chase Ave. | 619.444.0226 4. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com 5. Windy City Liquor 701 Broadway | 619.588.8404 www.WindyCityLiquor.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. BNS Brewing & Distilling 10960 Wheatlands Ave. | 619.208.9799 www.BnsBrewingAndDistilling.com 2. Butcher’s Brewing 9962 Prospect Ave. | 619.334.2222 www.ButchersBrewing.com 3. Manzanita Brewing Company 10151 Prospect Ave. Ste D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY

1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. Ste G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

J

NORTH COUNTY INLAND BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 2. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 3. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 4. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 5. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 6. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 2. La Vista Liquor 993 S. Santa Fe Ave. | 760.758.8900 3. Vista Wine & Spirits 755 Shadowridge Dr. | 760.727.2017

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet 2. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E. Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com

3. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. Ste 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Barrel Harbor Brewing 2575 Pioneer Ave. | 760.734.3949 www.BarrelHarborBrewing.com 3. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 4. Booze Brothers Brewery 2545 Progress St. | 760.295.0217 www.BoozeBrothersBrewery.com 5. Dos Desperados 1241 Linda Vista Dr. | 760.566.6209 www.DosDesperadosBrew.com 6. Fallbrook Brewing Co. 136 N Main Ave. www.FallbrookBrewing.com 7. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 8. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Wy. Ste 101 760.216.6500 | www.IronFistBrewing.com 9. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. Ste 104 760.913.7333 | www.Lat33Brew.com 10. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 11. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 12. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Wy. Ste 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 13. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Ave. | 760.481.3141 www.RipCurrentBrewing.com 14. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 15. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com 16. Valley Center Brewery 28477 Lizard Rocks Rd. www.ValleyCenterBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 2. Smokin Beaver 146 N Kalmia St. | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

K

POWAY RANCHO BERNARDO BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brother’s Provisions 16451 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 855.850.2767 www.BrosProvisions.com 2. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 3. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com 4. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855 4. Welldeck Liquor 14168 Poway Rd. | 858.486.5552

BREW PUBS

1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. 858.592.7883 | www.CMR.Oggis.com

= NEW LOCATION BREWERIES 1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. Ste 105 858.513.8070 | www.LightningBrewery.com

L

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION?

SOUTH BAY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Brandy Wine Liquor 1655 Brandywine Ave. | 619.421.1970 2. Keg N Bottle 2335 Highland Ave. | 619.474.7255 www.KegNBottle.com 3. South Bay Liquor 1355 Broadway | 619.422.1787 4. Sprouts Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

BREWERIES 1. Border X Brewing 8684 Avenida De La Fuente Ste. 8 619.787.6176 | www.BorderXBrewing.com

M

COLLEGE LA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 2. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 3. Hooleys Irish Pub 5500 Grossmont Center Dr. 619.713.6900 www.Hooleys.com 4. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 5. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 6. The Ugly Dog 6344 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.269.8204 www.TheUglyDog.com 7. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 8. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd. 9. Woodstock’s Pizza 6145 El Cajon Blvd | 619.265.0999 www.WoodstocksSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

N

ENCINITAS DEL MAR BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bier Garden 641 S. Coast Hwy. | 760.632.2437 2. Board & Brew 1212 Camino Del Mar | 858.481.1021 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Del Mar Rendezvous 858.755.2669 www.DelMarRendezvous.com 4. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 5. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com

Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Country Rd. 858.481.7883 | www.DelMar.Oggis. com 7. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 8. Priority Public House 576 N. Coast Hwy 101 | 858.204.6656 www.PriorityPublicHouse.com 9. San Diego BeerWorks 437 S. Highway 101 | 858.353.7174 www.SanDiegoBeerWorks.com 10. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 11. Sublime Tavern 3790 Via de la Valle | 858.259.9100 www.SublimeTavern.com 12. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 13. The Regal Seagull 996 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.479.2337 www.RegalSeagull.com 14. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Farr Better Spirits 398 N. El Camino Real | 760.753.7137 2. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

BREWERIES 1. Culture Brewing Co. 111 S. Cedros Ave. | 858.345.1144 www.CultureBrewingCo.com

O

CORONADO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Park Place Liquor 1000 Park Place | 619.435.0116

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

P

MISSION HILLS HILLCREST BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brooklyn Girl Eatery

4033 Goldfinch St. | 619.296.4600 www.BrooklynGirlEatery.com 2. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 3. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 4. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 5. San Diego Brew Project 1735 Hancock St. | 619.234.5757 www.SDBrewProject.com 6. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 7. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 8. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 9. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com 10. Toma Sol 301 W Washington St. | 619.291.1159 www.TomaSolTavern.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

BREWERIES 1. Acoustic Ales Brewing Experiment 1795 Hancock St. | 619.299.2537 www.AcousticAles.com

Q

ALPINE BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

R

RAMONA BREWERIES

1. ChuckAlek Independent Brewers 2330 Main St. Ste C | 513.465.9768 www.ChuckAlek.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Ramona Brew Supplies 369 Main St. | 760.440.7727

S

JULIAN BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

BREWERIES

1. Nickel Beer Company 1485 Hollow Glen Rd. | 760.765.2337 www.NickelBeerCo.com


nside Blvd Ocea

2 3

se Dr N Melro

67 5

Fletcher Pkwy

2

Main St

EL CAJON

78

Chase Ave Jamacha Rd

min

oD

or

te

RANCHO BERNARDO

15

CARMEL MOUNTAIN am

illi

W Ted

Pea

ks R

1

Otay Mesa Rd

d ity R mun Com rA ve ste he nc Ma

Ora nge Ave

St

Sa nD ieg oA ve

ar

el M

d

ts R

igh

He

6

1

6

5

Ind ia

St

8

Q

University Ave

3

2 HILLCREST 4

R

8

ALPINE

78

Alpine Blvd

67 1

1

RAMONA

Dr

Camino D

Del Mar

ve yA rsit ive Un

1

LA MESA

125

Main St

79 1

4

LEMON GROVE

Washington St

10

th St 10

3

Pa cific Hw y

W Victoria

1

St ton ing ash W W

1

6th Ave 5th Ave

CORONADO

Oc ean Blvd

2

d La esa Blv M

2

1st Ave

10 th

1

DEL MAR

9

ay dW ar yn Re

1

y 10

11

2

5

1

MISSION HILLS

2

st Hw

Fe Dr

Via De La Valle

El Cajon Blvd

94

P 1

3

8

Broadway

1st St

3rd St

S Coa

nta

sSa

ma

ke La

1

OTAY MESA

8

Richmond St

O

9 1

34

Main St

5

Lo

125

6

7

DEL CERRO

1

Orange Ave

4th St

1

1

Goldfinch St

5

ESCONDIDO

3

Monte zuma Rd

2

y kw ic P mp Oly

805

905

10

wy Pk lley Va

St ring Sp

h ap gr le Te

12

Santa Fe Dr

SOLANA BEACH

St

5

Encinitas Blvd

W

COLLEGE

Rd

College Ave

7

L St

EJ

on ny Ca

y Pkw tlake Eas

Saxony Rd

1 45 15

1

EASTLAKE

L M P

y Rd Valle Otay

vd Leucadia Bl

CHULA VISTA 3

3

El Camino Real

ENCINITAS

4

t GS

e d Av Thir

St

N

e n Av ulca NV 101 Hwy

oast

13 8

4

WJ

NC

2

5

t CS

1

Scripps Poway Pkwy

Au to Pa rk

2

ve nA issio WM

1 14

54

2

t th S E 24

Poway Rd

3

Rd

1

15

78

4

NATIONAL CITY

POWAY 2

Fe

d s Blv arco an M WS

15

d

2 Poway Rd

3

a nt Sa

12

2

11

y dwa Broa

56

s Pkwy

Twin

Pomerado Rd

2

ho nc Ra

Espola Rd

rdo

rna

Be

4 1

Dr er

t

n Ce

Rd

Palomar Airport Rd

13 3 6

wy Pk ity eC ntr Ce

el N

K

1

Bernardo

5

9

Bl vd

Ca

Rd po Cam

WM ission Rd

Mu rra y

cho

Ran

8 3

2

SAN MARCOS

2 4

y Wa

1

5

7

Lem on G rov eA ve

94

1

y Pkw ity eC ntr Ce

SPRING VALLEY

3

S Melrose Dr

4

SS an ta

70th S t

8

1

1

e Av Fe

Magnolia Ave

3

10

1

1 3

15

e lag Vil ta Vis

8

Broadway

VISTA

Fe de ra lB lvd

125

2nd St

1

2

Sy ca mo re Av e

52

SANTEE

4

Mission Gorge Rd

6

Dr

22

1

J

E Vista Way

Cuyamaca St

1

LAKESIDE

ve Fe A anta NS

I

1

Robinson Ave

163

Fa

S

rm

1

er

R

78

d

JULIAN 78

Banner Rd

1

79


Profile for Advanced Web Offset

West Coaster  

June 2104

West Coaster  

June 2104