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august 2013 | serving america’s finest beer county | san Diego

Societe’s Travis smiTh f lies with

JetpaCk ameriCa iN missioN Bay

reCap:

National Homebrewers Conference

Vol. 3 No. 9

and more! Free Copy


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

At Thorn Street Brewery in North Park, San Diego City Council President Todd Gloria (far left) and San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Jerry Sanders (with scissors) presided over a ribbon-cutting ceremony to mark the brewery’s grand opening on July 27

The end of summer means that San Diego Beer Week is fast approaching. This year will be different from years prior, although you may not notice it on the surface. Despite bringing in 3,612 room nights to local hotels in 2012, the San Diego Brewers Guild has substantially less money to spend on marketing to out-of-towners in 2013. This is due to the lack of funds made available to the San Diego Tourism Marketing District pending litigation that challenges a two-percent surcharge on hotel room bills. So what can you do to help? It’s time to start spreading the word of San Diego craft beer, whether it’s via social media, messenger pigeons or smoke signals. Most importantly, tell your friends and family near and far to mark November 1 and 2 on their calendars. Those dates are the beginning of Beer Week, with the Guild Festival planned for that Saturday, and a VIP event the night before. These two events are major fundraisers for the San Diego Brewers Guild, and they need to succeed. Cheers,

Ryan Lamb Executive Editor West Coaster


West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION Founders ryan lamb mike shess Publisher mike shess mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor ryan lamb ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director brittany everett brittany@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant tom shess thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers sam tierney sam@westcoastersd.com brandon hernández brandon@westcoastersd.com RYAN RESCHAN ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com Gonzalo QUintero drqcbt@gmail.com Contributors nickie peña kristina yamamoto Amy T. Granite NIKKI STOUT

West Coaster, THE website Web Manager mike shess Web Editor ryan lamb Web Master josh everett West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location.

FEEDBACK: Send letters to the Editor to ryan@westcoastersd.com Letters may be edited for space. Anonymous letters are published at the discretion of the Editor.

© 2013 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”


writers

columnist

into the brew Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified Cicerone® exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

columnist

plates & pints Brandon Hernández is a native San Diegan proud to be contributing to a publication that serves a positive purpose for his hometown and its beer loving inhabitants. In addition to his on-staff work for West Coaster, he is responsible for communications for local craft beer producer Stone Brewing Company; an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including San Diego Magazine, The San Diego Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Ranch & Coast and U-T San Diego.

columnist

The Carboy Chronicles Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into all-grain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with occasional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he attends.

columnist

the doctor’s office Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D. is a San Diego native, three-time SDSU grad, career educator, and co-founder of the popular multimedia craft beer discussion craftbeertasters.com. An avid homebrewer, Cicerone Certified Beer Server, and seasoned traveler, Dr. Quintero takes great pride in educating people about craft beer and the craft beer culture. By approaching the subject from the perspective of a scholar and educator, Dr. Quintero has developed a passion for spreading the good word of local beer.


TABLE OF CONTENTs

on the cover: Societe Brewing’s Travis Smith rides a jetpack over Mission Bay June 30, 2013. Here’s Smith’s quote about the flight: “When told about the opportunity about flying a jet pack, I had no idea what kind of jetpack or what type of experience it would be. Despite my little understanding of it, I heard the word jetpack and my initial response was, “f*ck yes!” The experience itself was not quite what I expected, as I had no control over the throttle which was very frustrating most of the time given all I wanted was more power. However, if I were to do it again in the future I believe they would allow me to control the throttle. I can see that with more experience this would be extremely fun and addicting.” You can watch a clip of Smith’s ride via Jetpack America’s YouTube channel at youtube.com/watch?v=_1eEdNSkt1k; visit JetpackAmerica.com or call 888-553-6471 for more info. Photos by Ryan Lamb

15-16

CoLUmNs

the Carboy Chronicles Ryan Reschan talks Philadelphia and the 35th Annual National Homebrewers Conference

19-20

plates & pints Brandon Hernández and Salt & Cleaver executive chef Carlos Sanmartano share sausage recipes

22-23

into the Brew Sam Tierney goes through what’s new in the world of hops, thanks to a Barth-Haas symposium

25-27

the Doctor’s office Gonzalo Quintero talks “pay-for-play” in the beer world and whether it’s happening in San Diego

10-11

13

pLUs +

Brews in the News Paragraph-sized clips of SD beer news. Got tips on stories? E-mail info@westcoastersd.com Brew talks Suds County director Sheldon Kaplan recaps Brewbound’s panel discussions at The Lost Abbey

28-38

NHC via tumblr Brian Trout kept us updated of National Homebrewers Conference fun at westcoastersd.tumblr.com

39-43

Craft Beer Directory & map Are we missing any locations? E-mail directory@ westcoastersd.com

44

Glossary Terms that start with “I”, brought to you by the beer educators at CraftBeer.com


Main Tap Tavern owner Zack Summers tends to his small hop farm off Japatul Valley Road with his dog Citra. The farm, in its second year, is quite healthy and produces five varieties of hops. Summers is looking forward to local brewers using his product in special casks and batches; Hess Brewing just received one shipment right before time of press. Lightning Brewery, Pizza Port Carlsbad and AleSmith have also expressed interest in this year’s harvest. Summers is planning to expand to eventually allow homebrewers to come pick their own hops. Photo by Ryan Lamb

10 | August 2013


BREWS IN THE NEWS THE LINKERY CLOSES, WAYPOINT PLANNED

San Diego’s original craft beer bar and restaurant, The Linkery, closed its doors on July 15 after eight years serving the North Park community. While owner Jay Porter is planning a new spot in San Francisco, Bottlecraft’s Brian Jensen and partners are taking over the space and are planning to open Waypoint Public in the fall with around 50 taps and 300 bottles. Housemade sausages and charcuterie will stay on the menu.

GREEN FLASH TO HELP ALPINE’S PRODUCTION

Alpine Beer Company’s Duet, Nelson and Hoppy Birthday will soon be produced on Green Flash’s 50-barrel system in Mira Mesa. In a great showing of craft beer camaraderie, Green Flash’s Mike Hinkley reached out to Alpine’s Pat McIlhenney about brewing on a “noncontract” basis; Green Flash will not make a profit on the beer that will be brewed in a rotation of 250-barrel batches as early as September. White Labs will help ensure that each release is consistent with Alpine’s lab testing prior to distribution.

BIG OPENINGS AND CELEBRATIONS

The last weekend in July proved to be one big party; Karl Strauss finally opened their tasting room at the Pacific Beach headquarters, Thorn Street Brewery had an official grand opening ribbon-cutting ceremony presided over by San Diego City Council President Todd Gloria and San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce CEO and President Jerry Sanders, and URGE Gastropub celebrated three years in business with a weekend-long extravaganza.

GLUTEN-FILTERED BREWERY IN-PLANNING

New York transplant and current Encinitas resident Matt Delvecchio is working on a brewery that will brew with traditional ingredients and yet finish nearly 100% gluten-free; the trick is adding a special enzyme during fermentation. Being gluten-intolerant, Delvecchio has been the guinea pig for all test batches created by himself and consultant James Petti, who has a long pedigree in the local brewing scene. If all goes well, the tasting room of Duck Foot Beer will be open by the end of the year. Delvecchio (left) and Petti with Duck Foot’s current brewing system


“Brew Talks” Begins Tour in San Diego By Sheldon Kaplan

B

rewbound.com’s “Brew Talks” kicked off at The Lost Abbey on Tuesday, July 23. According to the beer-focused website, this event series “provides beer industry professionals with an intimate opportunity to network and discuss the business of craft in beer-friendly locales”. The San Diego installment was well-attended by many local established brewers/brewery executives, including Pat McIlhenney of Alpine Beer Co, Jim Crute of Lightning Brewery, Marty Mendiola of Rock Bottom (La Jolla), Gina Marsaglia of Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey, as well as representatives from AleSmith, Karl Strauss, Aztec, Manzanita and a number of others from the now 70-plus brewing locations in the county.   The evening started out with a mixer in the tasting room and then moved to the bottling line area, where a small stage and chairs had been set up for two separate interview panel discussions, one following the other, both moderated by Chris Furnari, editor of Brewbound.com. The first set of panelists were Jacob McKean (Founder - Modern Times Beer), Jeff Bagby (Founder - Bagby Beer Company), and Shawn DeWitt (Co-Owner - Coronado Brewing Company).   This panel focused primarily on the challenges of starting a new brewery, and dealt with the vagaries of business plans, finding investors, and how to differentiate one’s brand in a growing and increasingly competitive environment. McKean noted that investors were far more interested in his potential ability to manage a business than anything else. DeWitt said that no matter how much money you think you are going to need to start a brewery, you will need more. Bagby reminded potential brewery/ brewpub owners that at the end of the day, “no one cares but you.”   The second panel consisted of Tomme Arthur (Co-Founder -

Coronado’s Shawn DeWitt, Modern Times’ Jacob McKean and Bagby Beer’s Jeff Bagby

The Lost Abbey), Chad Heath (Director of Southern California Sales - Stone Brewing Co.) and Tom Nickel (Owner - O’Brien’s Pub). Their focus was primarily on San Diego’s maturing craft beer market and also the nascent and relatively untapped - pun intended - Los Angeles craft beer market.   All the panelists agreed that although we have seen rapid growth in the number of San Diego brewing establishments, there is still room in the market for new players to enter, with a caveat that they will need to both brew good beer and also be able to differentiate their brand in the marketplace. In regard to L.A., Heath mentioned that L.A. is no longer “an afterthought” and that Stone Distributing has added numerous craft beer accounts in the L.A. area.   After the panel discussions were over most people lingered at the bar while discussing issues the panelists had raised. Some attendees were undoubtedly looking around the now well-established Port/ Lost Abbey brewery thinking “I’m next.”   Sheldon Kaplan is the director and producer of Suds County, USA, a featurelength documentary about the history of beer in San Diego.

Brewbound’s Chris Furnari, The Lost Abbey’s Tomme Arthur, Stone Brewing Co.’s Chad Heath, and O’Brien’s Pub’s Tom Nickel

WestCoasterSD.com | 13


The Carboy Chronicles

HOMEBREW

in The City Of Brotherly Love By Ryan Reschan

O

ver 3,400 homebrewers, professional brewers, and craft beer enthusiasts descended upon Philadelphia in late June for the 35th Annual National Homebrewers Conference presented by the American Homebrewers Association (AHA). According to the AHA, the conference is “a fun, educational gathering designed to enhance homebrewers’ brewing skills and knowledge and increase homebrewing camaraderie.” Not only is this the case, but there’s much more to the conference: it hosts the world’s largest beer competition, you get to see old friends, create new ones, and explore the local craft beer scene. Perhaps there’s some sightseeing in there as well.   Having created the first “Beer Week” back in 2008, Philly is one of the best cities in the country to find great craft beer. A redeye flight out of San Diego on Tuesday night was worth the trouble in order to have a full day in town before the conference started. After dropping off our luggage at the hotel, a trip to Monk’s Café was in order because of their selection of Belgian and American craft beer. The draft selection isn’t as insane as some of the bars in San Diego, but they had a good mix of beers from across the country, along with their namesake beer brewed by the Van Steenberge brewery in Belgium. There’s also a lengthy bottle list featuring even more Belgian beers, plus local choices and a good amount of California beer. The food is also very good, going beyond your typical bar fare.   The best pre-conference event was undoubtedly The Brewing Network’s Anniversary Party, which featured a variety of beer and mead, plus live music. After unlimited pours, a bus ride down to Pat’s and Geno’s was in order to see who had the better cheesesteak.

  Thanks to the sobering power of those sandwiches, it was actually easy to get up at a reasonable time in the morning and check out the Reading Terminal Market a short walk from the hotel. This indoor market has over 100 vendors that offer fresh produce, coffee, meats, baked goods, ice cream, groceries, specialty and ethnic foods, and much more. With so many great vendors to choose from, it was hard to make a decision on what to eat. Thankfully, the seminars Independence Hall. Photos by Ryan Reschan on Thursday didn’t start until the afternoon, so there was drinking back at a hotel bottle share, I knew plenty of time to check out that making it to the 9 a.m. talks the next the market. morning was just not going to happen. But   All of the Thursday seminars were reI was able to make it to the 10:15 a.m. sespeated on either Friday or Saturday, so after sion, “Science of Beer Flavor” by Roger attending John Gasparine’s talk — “AlterBarth, where I picked up a few new nuggets native Wood-Aging Techniques — I could of knowledge. The next group of seminars not pass up a trip to Tired Hands Brewincluded “Cider Revolution: How to Brew ing Company in a small town outside of Great Cider from Everyday Ingredients” by Philadelphia. Tired Hands is making some local homebrewer Chris Banker. great farmhouse-style ales to go along with   After a lunch break at Reading Termivarious hoppy beers and other barrel-aged nal Market, it was back for “Mead and concoctions. I could have spent the rest of Chocolate: Experience Excellence” by the day there, but it was time to head back Bernice Van Der Berg of Moonlight Meadto the convention center for Pro-Brewers ery. Moonlight brought some phenomenal Night. Although it’s a conference focused meads and paired them with some excellent on homebrew, plenty of professional brewlocal chocolate. After finishing up, it was ers attend and Pro Night is their time to time to check out the Exhibitor Hospitality share the beers that made them profesSuite and Liberty Well Social Club, where sional. Most of the breweries were from the beer-related companies from all over the Northeast but a few West Coast breweries country were showing off their latest and such as Stone Brewing Co. were present as greatest supplies and wares. Professional well. breweries like Dogfish Head and Widmer   Having consumed a decent amount of were pouring some of their beers along with beer at Pro Night before continuing the

WestCoasterSD.com | 15


many homebrew clubs that were set up at two long tables with jockey boxes.   This year’s keynote address featured Tom Peters, owner of Monk’s Café. Peters talked about starting up in the very early days of craft beer, and about his frequent travels to Belgium. The night ended with the spectacle that is Club Night. Homebrew clubs from all over the country set up booths, some of which were quite elaborate, and they poured their best beers in hopes of becoming the favorite club of the night. The scene is part carnival, part beer festival and is not to be missed.   Once again the early talks Saturday morning were missed due to a late night and more bottle sharing at the Liberty Well Social Club until past 2 a.m. I managed to catch “Step Up Your Starters” by Kai Troester and Mitch Steele’s “Current Techniques and Recent Developments Used For Brewing Great IPAs” before heading off to Brauhaus Schmidt for some German beer and food for lunch. The place looked like it was straight out of Germany and had many German beers I’ve never even heard of. After lunch some sightseeing was in order, so I made a brief stop to take pictures of Independence Hall. Unfortunately there was a line to see the Liberty Bell so it was back to the hotel for a brief nap before the Grand Banquet.   The Grand Banquet includes a multiple-course, beer-paired meal followed by the National Homebrewers Competition Award Ceremony. Chris White, founder of White Labs, was presented with the AHA Governing Committee Recognition Award for his outstanding service to the community of homebrewers. White joins the ranks of Randy Mosher, Jim Koch, John Palmer, Gordon

Peter Perrecone with his silver medal

Strong, Fred Eckhardt, and others who have helped us all brew better beer. Finally it was on to the brewing awards where some San Diegans took home medals. In Category 13 (Stout), Daniel Schroeder of Chula Vista won a bronze medal for his Russian Imperial Stout. Almost repeating as the winner of Category 14 (India Pale Ale), Kelsey McNair of San Diego won a silver medal for his American IPA. In Category 19 (Strong Ale), Peter Perrecone of Carlsbad won a silver medal for his English Barleywine. And in Category 24 (Traditional Mead), Harold Gulbransen of San Diego won a bronze medal for his sweet mead. Local homebrewing club QUAFF (Quality Ale and Fermentation Fraternity) had a strong showing in the first round but lost out to The Brewing Network for Homebrew Club of the Year. Annie Johnson of Sacramento became the first woman in 30 years to win Homebrewer of the Year with her Lite American Lager taking best of show, while David Barber of Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania took home the Ninkasi Award for having the most wins in the final round of competition.   If you’re like me and you missed many of the seminars at the conference, or were unable to attend altogether, AHA members have access to the audio and presentation slides at www.homebrewersassociation.org/pages/lets-brew/homebrewing-seminars. Seminars from past years are also available to members. If you haven’t joined AHA yet, it’s well worth the money for the Zymurgy publication; discounts at homebrew shops, breweries, and bars; the ability to attend NHC each year; first shot at tickets to the Great American Beer Festival; and much more.   With this year’s conference in the books, it’s time to start looking forward to next year’s festivities in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Michigan breweries produce some phenomenal beers and Grand Rapids is home of one of the best breweries on the planet, Founders Brewing Co. The city is also home to Brewery Vivant, Grand Rapids Brewing Company, and HopCat, and it’s not an unreasonable drive to Bell’s Brewery, New Holland Brewing Co., and Arcadia Brewing Company. I’m looking to forward to exploring the local scene, meeting up with friends, and gaining more knowledge about brewing.


plates & pints

Sanmartano prepares sausage at Salt & Cleaver. Photos by Brandon Hernández

Sausage

Fest

Dual methods for making seafood sausage from scratch By Brandon Hernández

I

t’s hard to believe there was a time when people had never heard of andouille sausage, or thought the only type of chorizo in the world comes from Mexico. These days, there are no missing links. Thanks to the advancing foodie and culinary culture in America, Cajun sausage is well known and widely available. It’s not so rare to see firm Spanish chaurice in the grocery store, either.   There are a number of San Diego eateries where entire sections of the menu are devoted to links, but Salt & Cleaver – a new spot in Hillcrest – is making sausage on buns its bread and butter.   At the helm is executive chef Carlos Sanmartano, formerly of Enlightened Hospitality Group, local celebrity chef Brian Malarkey’s restaurant empire. His menu includes nearly a dozen housemade creations that cram the flavor of an entire entrée into one meaty cylinder, like the duck and bacon blend. Sanmartano’s taking this form of cookery to bold new places, making him the perfect candidate to lead West Coaster readers through the grind of making sausage from scratch.

WestCoasterSD.com | 19


Make no mistake: though it looks simple, traditional sausagemaking takes a great deal of focus and repetition to master. The most difficult part involves stuffing the casings, which need to be moistened just enough – but not too much – and handled gingerly but with enough pressure to keep contents tightly packed. Each sausage stuffing apparatus is a little different, so learning one mechanism doesn’t mean you’re a pro. Additionally, fat that’s ground into sausage should be kept at ideal temperatures, which can be difficult, especially for a novice.   Have I scared you off yet?   Rather than throw readers headfirst into the deep end of sausage making, Sanmartano and I are starting you in the kiddy pool with seafood sausage. Not only does this style of sausage not require the incorporation of tempered and temperamental animal fat, in certain cases (like the home kitchen recipe I’m providing), it doesn’t even require a sausage stuffer. So come off the ledge and continue on this tasty journey.   Sanmartano’s sausage recipe incorporates two types of shellfish—shrimp and lobster. He begins by pureeing shrimp and cream in a food processor until it forms a smooth, homogenous mousse. At that point, he folds in whole ingredients – finely diced vegetables and herbs along with chopped chunks of lobster meat – to give the finished product texture. Then it’s into the sausage stuffer, then casing, a pan with clarified butter, and then off to the grill for some char before being served up to hungry customers.   Even with sausage as popular as it is right now, meat grinders and sausage stuffers are hardly everyday kitchen devices. I own a sausage-making attachment that hooks up to my Kitchen-Aid stand mixer and performs both tasks. It’s handy enough, but pales in comparison to professional equipment. So, when I developed my recipe for a seafood sausage, I came up with a method for doing so that allowed me to avoid the Kitchen-Aid altogether.

Lobster Sausage with Tarragon Aioli, Pickled Mustard Seeds & Fennel Slaw Yield: 14 servings 2½ pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined 1½ cups cream 1 pounds lobster claw meat, cut into chunks 1 bell pepper, diced small ½ leek, diced small ½ bulb fennel, cored and diced small

½ cup fresh tarragon, minced clarified butter 14 brioche hot dog buns Tarragon Aioli (recipe follows) Pickled Mustard Seeds (recipe follows) Fennel Slaw (recipe follows)

  Place the shrimp and cream in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until a smooth mixture is formed. Fold in the lobster, vegetables and herbs. Using a meat grinder fitted with a sausage stuffer attachment, force the mixture through the grinder and into a natural pork casing. Tie the casing off and portion the sausage into individual servings that will fit inside a bun.   Preheat grill. Pour a thin layer of butter in a skillet over medium heat. In batches, add the sausages and cook for 1½ minutes on each side. Remove the sausages from the skillet and place on the grill. Cook until an internal temperature of 145º F is reached, 2 to 3 minutes.   To serve, place a sausage in a bun, garnish with aioli, mustard seeds and fennel slaw, and serve immediately.

Recipes continued on page 44

20 | August 2013

  At its core, my sausage is very similar to Sanmartano’s. Both are shrimp-based and start off in the food processor. From there, however, I forego natural casings and instead lay down a rectangular sheet of plastic wrap. I then use a spatula to lay down an even line of the shrimp mixture so that I can use the wrap to roll it into a cylinder. From there, I tie off the ends as one would a sausage and, rather than sauté it in butter, gently simmer them until they set to a hot dog-like firmness made possible by the addition of egg whites. After that, I do just as Sanmartano does, grilling them up to develop a bit of caramelization before serving.   The methods are a bit different, but the result is the same: A handmade sausage that tastes delicious, especially with a corianderstoked witbier (Ballast Point Wahoo Wheat, Coronado Orange Avenue Wit), effervescent and slightly funky saison (The Lost Abbey Carnevale, Green Flash Saison Diego) or a refreshing kölsch (Ballast Point Pale Ale, Saint Archer Blonde). Salt & Cleaver serves up most of those styles, and plenty other craft beers on a daily basis. So, even if you’re not feeling up to trying your hand at sausage-making, you can still enjoy the end product as part of a perfect pairing.


into the brew

there will be

HOPS By Sam Tierney

I

’m not the biggest fan of hop puns. The incredible proliferation of hoppy beer-producing small breweries over the past several years has led to a flood of me-too beer names all clamoring to incorporate “hops” in some awkward fashion. So imagine the horror I felt when attending a symposium where Tim Kostelecky of Barth-Haas, one of the world’s largest hop suppliers, switched to a powerpoint slide listing just about every hop pun name in use. Kostelecky was delivering a presentation on hop varieties to a group of brewers who had converged on Paso Robles this past June. Brewers from as far away as Minnesota (Surly), Indiana (Three Floyds), Michigan (Bell’s), and even Europe (Birificio Italiano, Brasserie de la Senne) were in attendance, along with a collection of Californian brewers. We were eager to learn about new varieties, techniques, and scientific research, as well as discuss our own experiences. Yet as much as I wanted to roll my eyes at the puns, Kostelecky’s infectious enthusiasm for all things hop-related gave him a pass.   Barth-Haas works with growers all over the world to process and deliver hops to brewers large and small, and they also de-

22 | August 2013

velop new varieties. Technical Manager Georg Drexler flew in from Germany for the symposium, and kicked things off with a presentation and discussion of brewing techniques for emphasizing hop flavor and aroma. Whirlpool and dry hopping have been widely practiced in the American brewing industry for years now, though these techniques have been less widely adopted in Europe, and Germany especially. Up until very recently it was believed that the German Reinheistgebot, also called the “Beer Purity Law,” forbid adding hops after the end of the wort boil, but a recent reinterpretation of the law now allows dry hopping with whole hop products, though not with hop extracts, which can still only be added to boiling wort.   When wort – the malt-sugar solution that is fermented to make beer – is boiled, brewers typically add hops at least two times: once at the beginning of the boil (usually 60-90 minutes in duration) to attain a high amount of isomerization of alpha acids, which adds bitterness to beer, and again near the end of the boil time to provide more essential oil retention, which provides the characteristic flavor and aroma of hops. By the end of the boil, most of the essential

Smelling hops in Germany. Photo by Kreklau/Barth

oil from the bittering hop addition has been boiled off, and you are left with mostly just the bitterness from the iso-alpha acids in the hops, which have been made soluble by the heat of the boil.   When the wort boil ends, brewers typically whirlpool the wort, either by pumping the wort tangentially back into the kettle, or pumping it into a special whirlpool vessel. The centrifugal forces in the whirlpool cause the solid matter to form a cone in the center, allowing the liquid to be pumped off the side of the vessel. This post-boil step has become a popular time to add more hops in the search for bigger and better hop aroma, as the lack of boiling action allows more essential oil to remain. The wort is usually only a couple of degrees below boiling at this point, and you still lose some lighter oils to vaporization, especially myrcene, which is a big part of the aroma of many IPAs. At the symposium, Drexler went over new research that suggests lower whirlpool temperatures increase oil retention and overall hop aroma. Some brewers, especially homebrewers, are trying this by lowering


the temperature to about 170-180 degrees and then adding their hops before resting for about 20-30 minutes and cooling to yeast-pitching temperature. This reduced temperature can be accomplished by either recirculating some of the wort through the heat exchanger and back into the kettle/ whirlpool, running and immersion chiller for a short amount of time, or brewing to a slightly higher gravity and blending in some cold water at the end of the boil. While dry hopping remains the most effective way to get a big hop aroma in a beer, Drexler stressed that hop-focused beers lack complexity when not also given a generous dose of late-boil or whirlpool hops. Hop varieties will always lend a different aroma when added to hot wort than to fermented beer, even with intensity controlled for. The biological interactions of fermenting yeast have the capability to change aromatic compounds from hops, creating wholly different aromas than were present in the wort before fermentation. Some of these compounds, like glycosides, are combinations of hop and malt compounds that are bonded during wort boiling and then cleaved into new compounds by the yeast during fermentation. At the Bräu Beviale industry convention in Germany in 2011, Barth-Haas conducted taste tests with several single-hop beers, including dry hopped and non-dry hopped versions with German Tradition, American Citra, and New Zealand Nelson Sauvin. The results showed marked differences in aromatic impression between the two versions of each variety. The dry hopped Citra beer was the most preferred, while the non-dry hopped Citra beer was fourth, behind the non-dry hopped Tradition beer in second and dry hopped Tradition beer in third. These results can be interpreted in different ways, but they seem to confirm that the big oil profiles being developed in American hops are best expressed through dry hopping, while the noble and noblederivative hops of Germany best show their classic hop aroma when added to the boil. Poor Nelson Sauvin was relegated to last and second to last place with the dry hopped and non-dry hopped versions, respectively. I suspect that many brewers are still not on board with the powerful tropical, grassy, and white wine aromas it lends to beer. While brewers typically dry hop their beers for periods of several days to a couple of weeks, new research suggests that the main hop oils reach their peak concentration in beer in a much shorter amount

of time. A 2011 study by Peter Wolfe at Oregon State University tested extraction rates for various hop oils using both whole-cone and pelletized Cascades from that year’s harvest. While pellets generally led to better extraction, peak concentration of most oils was reached in under six hours, suggesting that much shorter dry hop times are possible. The tests were done at 23 degrees Celsius, which is warmer than what most brewers dry hop at, but Wolfe concluded that even at cold temperatures, extraction doesn’t take more than a day. New hop varieties were a big topic at the symposium, with some of the most exciting new ones surprisingly coming from Germany. The Hüll hop research center has released four new varieties in the last couple of years, all targeted at the bigger, fruitier aromas of the newer hops from the US, Australia, and New Zealand. Polaris is a high alpha hop with the highest levels yet of any variety (19-23%), and a correspondingly high oil content. Its aroma is described as floral and minty, with “ice candy” being a popular descriptor. Mandarina Bavaria is a mid-alpha hop (7-10%) with a very fruity aroma of tangerine, pear, orange, and lime. The Barth-Haas guys were very excited about this one and see it as a German answer to American hops like Citra and Amarillo. Hallertau Blanc is another mid-alpha (9-12%) hop that is similar to the popular Nelson Sauvin from New Zealand, with an aroma of tropical fruit, grass, white wine, gooseberry, and grapefruit. Hüll Melon rounds out the new group of German hops, with a lower alpha content of 6.9-7.5%, but a very fruity aroma with a distinct honeydew melon quality. While Germany is making waves with its new releases, mostly due to how different they are compared to older varieties from the country, New American variety Mosaic was released in larger quantities this past harvest after some limited availability as HBC 369 previously. Mosaic is a high alpha variety (11-13.5%) that is a cross between Simcoe and a Nuggetderived male plant. Its aroma is floral and fruity with the character of tropical fruit, berry, citrus, and pine. Lots of American brewers are experimenting with Mosaic right now so it should be relatively easy to find an IPA or pale ale with it. Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park


the doctor’s office

A Reputation On The Line By Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D.

T

he traditional three-tier system of beer was born out of The Prohibition Era in these United States. The law was set up, in theory, to provide a system of checks and balances, not unlike the idea behind the three branches of government. In terms of beer, from production to consumption, the beer starts with the brewer - who sells to a wholesaler - who distributes the beer to a retailer. You, the craft beer drinking consumer, can then buy from the retailer. In California we do, however, have the designation of being a self-distribution state and, therefore, we are an exception where brewers can distribute and sell their own beer directly to retailers and consumers. Though there are opportunities for brewers to sell there wares and distribute them directly, distributors already have the relationships with retailers such as liquor stores, bottle shops, bars, and restaurants, as well as a workforce of sales reps who can make or break a brewery’s business.

  It’s not as ominous as it sounds. There is a finite number of bars, with a finite number of tap handles. There is a finite number of markets, liquor stores, and bottle shops with a finite amount of shelf space. There is a finite number of consumers. However, what seems to be infinite is their selection on that finite number of taps and shelves. The infinite selection, in and of itself, is not a bad thing. In San Diego, with more than 70 operational breweries, there are few locations that have a tap system that could pour even one beer from each locale.   So then how do brands find themselves in a retail space? Of course, the quality of the beer is key. Also, if there are existing relationships among people in the industry, that too can be advantageous. If there is buzz for a new brand and people clamoring for it, that will help. Yet there exists something nefarious, a potential cancer in any beer market, which is the dreaded quid pro quo – “this for that” in Latin. In the business of

beer this back-and-forth, barter, commutation, swap, trade, whatever you want to call it, can mean the beginning of the end.   According to a ChicagoBusiness.com article titled “Graft Beer” by James Ylisela and colleagues, the authors divulge that their fair city – which for our purposes can serve as a cautionary tale – has faced payto-play in their craft beer industry. “Independent (Craft Beer) brewers say the brandname distributors, with deep pockets and abundant supply, often resort to pay-to-play business practices,” the report reads. “Offering cash, new tap systems, free beer and other incentives to tavern owners and retailers in exchange for taps or shelf space. Federal and state laws prevent producers and distributors from offering money, loans or anything else of value to retailers to freeze out the competition, with such exceptions as signs or ad materials under certain dollar limits. It’s also unlawful for bars to accept these gifts. For fledgling, cash-strapped

WestCoasterSD.com | 25


brewers, the practice can force a difficult choice: dig deep into their pockets and play along by giving distributors discount beer or freebies that can be passed along to bar owners—or effectively be shut out of the taps and shelf space of the businesses that serve alcohol.” In talking to local business managers and owners, these incentives, though offered, do not outweigh reputation and are indicative of a day gone by. How has that come to be; what makes San Diego special?   I spoke to Sonny Jensen, former general manager of The Beer Co. in Downtown San Diego and current operating partner of Stumbling Steer Brewing Co. in Albuquerque, New Mexico. “Pay-to-play is bad for the craft beer business. It turns craft beer into a commodity. People care about quality, local beer, and supporting local brewers. It’s crucial not to play these games.” When asked about “these games” Jensen specified: “free kegs, free shirts, and other free tchotchkes, that’s not what San Diego is about. We are about good local craft beer. Larger distributors in San Diego know not to play this game in here, at least at craft beer bars. They are, however, likely still playing those games at chain restaurants and the like. I was given pitches by these large distributors for free beer, et cetera, and I let them know that, for me, it is all about variety and new, local beers. The major concern of local craft beer bar owners, operators, and staff isn’t to get free stuff, it is to support local breweries so that they can keep making good beer. I love to buy a shirt, and wear it proudly, knowing I am supporting a local brewery.”

  Nate Soroko, of Toronado San Diego, went on the record to talk about what new trends he has seen in the realm of pay-toplay. “I guess you would say there’s a sort of pay-to-play in the craft side too.” How so? “Well in a subtle way craft beer bars play. It’s a unspoken rule that you can’t get

So then how do brands find themselves in a retail space? Of course, the quality of the beer is key. Also, if there are existing relationships among people in the industry, that too can be advantageous. If there is buzz for a new brand and people clamoring for it, that will help. Yet there exists something nefarious, a potential cancer in any beer market, which is the dreaded quid pro quo – “this for that” in Latin. In the business of beer this back-and-forth, barter, commutation, swap, trade, whatever you want to call it, can mean the beginning of the end. a company’s specialty keg without selling their core line of beers.” I asked Greg Koch, co-founder and CEO of Stone Brewing Company, to comment on this matter. From his perspective, it is less pay-to-play, and more about good business sense. “When

you have a limited beer with a limited amount of kegs, you want those kegs to go to places that have shown loyalty. This is not a shocking concept,” he said. “We have no official policy, we do things that make good business sense. You have 10 kegs, but 50 places that want them. You’re going to be smart about where you place them.”   The most important factor in San Diego for a brand to find shelf space, however, is the brand’s reputation and integrity. Reputation can mean a variety of things: quality, flavor, personality, sense of community, a name that is synonymous with beer. Integrity means having respect for San Diego’s craft beer culture and community. In San Diego one such company whose reputation is synonymous with beer is Stone Brewing Company. I asked Greg Koch if he felt that pay-to-play culture exists in San Diego. “You will always find people on both sides of the aisle when it comes to this issue. That culture still exists in spots and pockets in San Diego, but it is not pervasive.” Not pervasive? “In 1996, when we started, the culture was much more pervasive. Lots of places would lay out their desires: free shirts for staff, free glasses, and even free beer. We refused to do it. Always have. Never will,” Koch continued. Why not I wondered? If pay-to-play can get you handles and shelf space, why not play?   “This is a slippery slope. In the short term, it might get you somewhere, but it’s a lazy sales person’s sales technique. There were places in San Diego where, when Stone began, that would shake me down. One day I asked a bar owner Why? To which he responded incredulously ‘It’s


you (breweries) that taught me to do this, to expect this.’ The industry practice of buying their way in, there was an influx (in 1996). If consumers think that this will result in cheap drinks and free swag, there is no such thing. Their choices become limited if decisions are made for them ahead of time. ‘Selling out’ means ‘sold out’ and ‘selling out’ rarely leads to a better situation; that’s the nature of being a ‘sell out’ in this industry.”   I asked Koch who is responsible for pay-to-play antics? Is it the producer, the distributor, the retailer, or is it even the consumer? “Everyone.” Koch replied. “Everyone is responsible. The consumer can be responsible as to what beers they buy and where they spend their money. Brewers need to be smart about who they do business with. Distributors and retailers are responsible for not engaging in, or perpetuating this.” In his video Craft Beer Profitability (www.sellingcraftbeer.com) Koch shares his thoughts on why the beer itself should be the most important factor. Koch asserts that “Beer selection makes a big impression.” Retailers should be using their “real estate” to provide consumer with actual choice of quality. Koch also touches upon why payto-play is bad for business when he states that “free kegs lowers profits.” How so? Essentially a retailer has said that the cost of real estate is worth $0, and that their customer only deserves, in all likelihood, access to a mediocre beer. However, craft beer drinkers are looking for quality beers, will have loyalty to establishments that serve quality beers, and will, in the end, be the people who keep the lights on, not the entity that gave a free keg.   In researching this story I found people at all tiers that said pay-to-play either does not exist, or exists only in pockets of San Diego. That, to me, means it is not eradicated, and therefore, could see a reemergence, especially with the industry’s growing popularity locally, nationally, and worldwide. How will this scourge of business and ethics be eradicated? First we can establish a formal dialogue. The San Diego Brewers Guild can put out a formal statement on the matter, for example. Moreover, they, as a unified industry voice, can engage the San Diego hospitality industry and other industries within the county to educate them on the detriments of pay-to-play.   Managing the reputation of our craft beer community is everyone’s responsibility because our craft beer reputation is, in a real way, the reputation of our city. Even with an exponential increase in beer production, beer quality, beer education, and beer tourism, the craft beer movement in San Diego, though a quarter century old, is still not very well known. We have our future to think about, and that future is worth a lot more than a free t-shirt, glass or keg.

Russian River Brewpub


Beer & Loathing : On The Trail of

National Homebrewers Conference 2013

H

by Brian Trout

omebrewers are not drunks.  Well…Okay, most homebrewers are not drunks.   We are warm, caring, sharing, polite, friendly, hard-working, intelligent (to an extent at least), artistic, scientific, and geeky. At certain times we are absolutely ridiculous, and borderline insane at others. We DIY or die trying. We are problem-solving, engineering-minded BrewGyvers — conscious that necessity is the mother of invention. We are genuine and driven. We inspire and are inspired. We are true friends. We are dependable, standing by our word. We are perpetually both teachers and students. We are not rock stars. We are humble, passionate, and forever curious. We make our paths by walking. We are brewers.   Once a year, in June, homebrewers and pro brewers alike, instinctively flock en masse to attend the American Homebrewers Association’s main event, the National Homebrewers Conference.

  Homebrewers request time off work, and investments are made in order to make the pilgrimage. It lasts three days, five days, or six days? The time distortion is fueled by consistent headiness stemming from a steady diet of beer, plenty of local gastronomic adventures, and surging about in the hypnotic syncopated rhythms of humanity.   The two previous NHCs were stationed in Seattle, Washington and San Diego, where I served a key role on the organizing committee by organizing brewery tours and running the last-minute punk rock food truck fiasco – a fiasco that resulted in my phone getting filled with messages from mall security, police, and a platoon of Town & Country Resort big wigs.   The 35th Annual National Homebrewers Conference was hosted this year by the great beer town of Philadelphia. I traveled to Pennsylvania to attend my third National Homebrewers Convention with San Diego brewing comrades and Philly roommates, George Thornton (The Homebrewer) and Kevin Brewer. Our fourth roommate and homebrewing friend, Kent Shultz (a San Diegan who relocated to Austin, Texas) joined us in the City of Brotherly Love. Our room became known as Team Skinny Brewer, aka “Why do all of these shirt sizes start at XL?” Our slender silhouettes seemed starkly contrasted against the more prevalent homebrewer physique.   The conference itself offers a wide variety of topics to satisfy the interests of any homebrewer. Topics included sensory analysis (presented by San Diego’s own Kara Taylor of White Labs) and cider (again, by San Diego’s great homebrewer, Chris Banker of QuAFF). While we were in Philly, it often felt like San Diego, with around thirty familiar SD faces; there was always someone you recognized.   Some of my San Diego friends also won some awards. Kelsey NcNair of San Diego won a silver medal in Category 14 (India Pale Ale) for his American IPA. Peter Perrecone won silver in Category 19 (Strong Ale) for his English Barleywine. In Category 24 (Traditional Mead), Harold Gulbransen won bronze for his Sweet Mead. Finally, Chris White (White Labs) was awarded the AHA Recognition Award for his outstanding service to the community of homebrewers.   There was plenty of beer around with Pro-Brewers Night, Club Night, and jockey boxes of brew everywhere you looked. Drink a lot with brewing geeks and things tend to get pretty silly at times. One such case helped develop one of the worst beer recipes we could collectively come up with. It isn’t bad just to be bad; it’s a cluttered, trainwreck, buzzword encrusted Pro-Am recipe that became an ongoing game while we waited in queue for beer or events (see page 38).   The highlights of this year’s NHC included walking around the city with groups of San Diegan homebrewers and eating and drinking, as Philly boasts some of the coolest beer bars and beer-


centric restaurants you could wish for. There was a visit to Monk’s Cafe, a cozy Belgian-beer-lover’s paradise. In fact, Michael Jackson commented that it was America’s best Belgian beer bar, and many would argue that this is still true. The usual suspects partook in an orgy of sour beers with various moules frites. It was a night that might have revised my death row last meal pick. It felt right, but just wrong enough to entice me back. Night after night, we strolled through the cavernous city streets and alleys. The thick, humid air followed us under the haunting gaze of sentinel, aka City Hall. We drank, ate, and made merry. I gained new friends, reunited with old friends, and got closer to current friends. If you are passionate about brewing, I recommend going to at least one NHC. I urge you to go two days early in order to go out on the town prior to the invasion. It was announced that NHC 2014 will be in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Who’s in?

Brian Trout resides in North Park with his chubby marmalade tabby cat, Maxwell. He is an active member in homebrewing club QuAFF. Brian has been winning medals for his beers and ciders on both local and national levels. He is a BJCP beer judge, currently studying for the mead exam. Brian also teaches cider workshops at The Homebrewer on El Cajon Boulevard. He is driven by a passion for everything that immerses our senses.

Photo by Brian Trout

6/24/13 10:00pm nhC preparedness kit. (at dale street Craftsman) Often I find I get so busy between seminars, catching up with people, or umm drinking that I forget to maintain health. We’ve all been there. I carry some of this stuff in my backpack to assist in the endurance that is NHC. Granola, Ibuprofen (remember always IB and not something else when drinking), propel, nalgene with the splashgaurd inserts, emergenc, oatmeal (quick breakfast using the coffee maker in the hotel room), sandwich crackers, and antacids (just in case a particular homebrew-gone-wrong sours my tummy).

6/25/13 12:05pm

shiner bock at George bush international airport (at bubba’s bayou City Grill) First beer a 25oz. Shiner Bock. It tasted better as it got a bit warmer and some carbonation faded.

Man, I Had a Dreadful Flight 6/25/13 6:50pm the flight from George bush intercontinental airport to philadelphia was less than delightful. A long delay on the runway, a kid screaming two feet away from my left ear, an extremely awkward guy talking about hiking while hitting on the mom, and two holding patterns. upgrade! Now, I’m in a badass customized cab, sailing with windows down as the fake polar bear fur topping the back seat bristles in synchronicity with my hair. I’m reminded of The Neverending Story. FALCOR, to NHC! 6/25/13 8:15pm the Usual suspects (at marriott philadelphia downtown)

WestCoasterSD.com | 29


6/25/13 9:15pm trying Woodruff syrup with the berliner Weisse (at nodding head brewery & restaurant) Traditionally added to a crisp tart lactic tangy Berliner Weisse. It makes it look greenish. The smell and flavor of this reminded us of Lucky Charms and Play-Doh. I prefer not adding any sweet syrup.

6/25/13 10:25pm the sd crew is eating and drinking at monk’s belgian Cafe. (at monks belgian Cafe) Eating two different pots of mussels, frog legs, savory leek tart, and pomme frites. Drinking Monk’s Cafe, 2010 Baladin Nora Sour, Loverbeer Madamin cherry and almond, Loverbeer Beerbrugna - plums, etc… Be very jealous. I’m gonna have sweet dreams about this meal. Possible deathrow last meal status.

6/26/13 12:30am hiccup, name this hiccup building, hiccup. Win a beer maybe possibly. (at downtown philadelphia)

6/26/13 1:30am drank two sessionable stouts on nitro. one an decent dry irish, the other a pretty damn tasty sweet aka cream aka milk stout that had a nice velvety mouthfeel. shared some hot wings. hung out all night with the sd crew. Fun stuff! (at mcGillin’s olde ale house)


6/26/13 11:00am City hall (at City hall Court yard)

6/26/13 11:00am City hall (at City hall Court yard)

6/26/13 11:30am

mütter museum was well worth the visit. i’ve been trying to get here for years. [www.collegeofphysicians.org/muttermuseum] (at mütter museum)

6/26/13 3:00pm

bjCp reception at nhC 2013 covering judging philosophy, pilsners, and meads (at marriott philadelphia downtown)


6/26/13 5:45pm

6/26/13 5:45 pm dinner (at dinic’s roast pork and beef)

Pork with Sharp Provolone and Roasted Hot Peppers. I put some Sliced Peperoncinis and Prepared Horseradish on it as well. A bit bummed out that the broccoli rabe topping was out, but delicious sandwhich. The juices made the thick roll a bit soft on the spine. (at DiNic’s Roast Pork and Beef)

6/26/13 5:45 pm dinic’s was delicious. (at dinic’s roast pork and beef)

6/26/13 6:00pm bassett’s ice Cream (at bassett’s ice Cream) 6/26/13 6:00pm Larry eating some Bassett’s Mint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream (at Bassett’s Ice Cream) 6/26/13 9:00pm moonlight meadery Utopian and now it is apparently a month in the future. (at World Cafe live) utopian is a 16.9% semi-sweet mead aged in a Samuel Adams utopias barrel. This has lots of port notes. It retails for around about $100 a bottle. I paid free! ;-) This isn’t even my favorite moonlight mead. Recommend checking them out at a local SD bottle shop. 6/27/13 12:30am there is perfection and there is perfection. On the left my absolute favorite hefeweizen by Weinhenstephaner and my favorite Kölsch by Fruh. (at BRÜ Craft & Wurst)

32 | August 2013

6/27/13 12:50am more German perfection. My favorite Oktoberfest by Paulaner and my favorite Schwarzbier by Körstritzer. (at BRÜ Craft & Wurst) How these beers are are possible is beyond me. I really respect the nuance of a great German beer. I tend to drink a lot of them. #doublefisting

Apparently I drank enough to make it the future. Yet, somehow the guitar strummer/singer on stage is covering Goo Goo Dolls. The space time continuum is getting f*cked. If I had a Polaroid photo, the people on it would be vanishing and reappearing as the cast of a 90s romantic comedy.


6/27/13 4:15pm homebrewing expo (at marriott philadelphia downtown)

6/27/13 4:15pm brewing porn at the homebrewing expo (at marriott philadelphia downtown)

6/27/13 5:45pm nhC 2014 (at marriott philadelphia downtown)

6/27/13 8:30pm nhC pro-brewers night

6/27/13 9:15pm - drew beechum at pro-night Drew will have two books coming out in the near future, Everything Cider and Experimental Brews with Denny Conn. Does Drew Beechum sleep? Drew is really f*ckin smart and a sick sick man. He is even parts scientist and surreal artist – assimilating all that surrounds him and interpreting in delightfully strange warped ways. Always great times getting to hang out with Drew. We both speak with high-energy and passion. There is always heaps of brainstorming. Good and bad ideas tend to always be on par. Good bad ideas or bad good ideas? This has got to be done.

6/28/13 1:00am liberty Well social Club (at marriott philadelphia downtown)

WestCoasterSD.com | 33


Here, Try This... 6/28/13 9:00am NHC is a reunion of old friends, hugs, beers, beers, educational seminars, and plenty of “here.try this.” followed with a glass pushed in your face or a fill of your tasting glass with a random beer. —It ain’t bad at all. Last night I had a sour beer made with potatoes that was pretty darned good. Yesterday I went to some seminars as well. One was on Alternative Wood Aging Techniques presented by John Gasparine. The other Stepping up Your Sensory Game: How to Be a Better Taster by SD Local, Kara Taylor from White Labs. Currently, I’m at Because Not Every Beer Is Stone Enjoy By IPA: Preserving Hop Aroma presented by Stan Hieronymus.

6/28/13 11:30am Cider revolution presented by sd local homebrewer Chris banker (at marriott philadelphia downtown)

6/28/13 1:15pm Gator Gumbo, Bread Pudding with Whiskey Sauce, and Abita Root Beer (at Beck’s Cajun Cafe)

6/28/13 2:10pm mead and Chocolate pairing seminar with moonlight meadery (at marriott philadelphia downtown) Special mead substitution, just released, Destiny, a melomel, Desire, aged in a Samuel Adams utopian barrel.


6/28/13 7:00pm sd party We hosted a bottle share, cheese, and charcuterie pre-game in our room.

6/28/13 9:15pm last supper (at the Farmers’ Cabinet) We occupied the back room for this delicious dinner.

6/28/13 11:30pm leaving Club night

The Morning After Club Night

6/29/13 9:30am There are significantly less people in the morning seminars. Homebrewers; slowly shuffling bleary-eyed zombies. I’m feeling fuzzy headed. Some caffeine and food is needed. I’m deficient in fresh fruits and veggies. Currently I’m at Historic Water by Martin Brungard. I’m learning a lot about aquifers, geology, dilutions, and reduction of bicarbonate through boiling.


6/29/13 9:45am Water seminar (at marriott philadelphia downtown) 6/29/13 1:15pm philadelphia Garden Wall (at marriott philadelphia downtown)

6/29/13 10:15am Come one, Come all—Wait a minute: assessing the elastic limits of opportunity by dick Cantwell (at marriott philadelphia downtown)

6/29/13 6:45pm Familiar faces 6/29/13 1:45pm eating at brauhaus schmidt with some familiar faces. (at brauhaus schmitz)

6/29/13 6:45pm Crowd beginning to gather outside of the Grand awards banquet

6/29/13 7:30pm Grand awards banquet George shared a bottle of Kopi Luwak Speedway Stout with our table. This proved to be a superior pairing with the cheesecake.

36 | August 2013


Are You Looking For a Good Time?

6/29/13 8:00pm Grand Awards Banquet

6/29/13 11:00pm Grand Awards Buffet SD QuAFF Winners

6/30/13 12:30am City Hall

6/30/13 12:45pm Eulogy Belgian Tavern (at Eulogy Belgian Tavern) Philly, you will be missed.

6/30/13 9:15am (at Marriott Philadelphia Downtown)   “Are you looking for a good time?”  “I’m always looking for a good time.”   “What do you want, baby?”   “Well, actually, I’d like to pay you to bring me a jackalope head mounted on the wall at Brü.”   Last night we were out celebrating with an even more hyper and excited than usual (you thought this wasn’t possible, but I assure you it is) Peter Perrecone as he wore his silver medal for an English Barleywine.   Our crew last night consisted of Ryan, Peter, Chris, George, Kent, Kevin, and me. Collectively we decided that after drinking beers in the banquet line, after drinking the banquet pairing beers, after drinking the beers in the extra coolers that we toted to the banquet, it was time to head to the Liberty Well Social Club to drink beer, then we should go out drinking beer, followed by drinking beer. This seemed like the wisest decision that we collectively could make. I was pretty much on board with whatever the guy with the medal chose to do.   After the social club we walked to Brü, which is a great beer place with a solid German Beer tap list. The same place that I was blissedout double-fisting several nights, err last night, actually not sure as time has gotten distorted a bit over the course of NHC. (Consult this blog for reference.) Anyway, where was I... Oh yeah, so seeing this was Saturday night, this Brü Biergarten place changed into Brö Brogarten. It stank of assorted perfumes, hair products that create that haircut I often refer to as a hedgehog that stuck a fork in an electric socket, sweat, and Axe body spray. It was nut to butt packed. Loud music from the “DJ” was playing top 40s rap dance music. Every 20 seconds it changed to the next song fragmented, not beat matched, no flow at all — it was as if someone was simply changing stations.   We pushed our way to the bar and got our beers and just stood there trapped. My nuanced glass of German perfection that is Früh Kölsch had the aroma of douchebags trying way to hard to get laid. Goddammit! I decided this is a matter of mind over matter and moved quickly into ‘f*ck it I don’t give a f*ck’ mode. Kölsch down my throat while coveting this jackalope mount over the bar.   There were people dancing, so I decided to dance. I have a love/hate

relationship with dancing. The rare occasions when I have danced in the past, a few of the following things have happened: 1. Videos or photos are recorded of me. 2. Random girls give me their numbers. 3. Guys who are trying too hard get pissed-off because they believe somehow that they are privileged to a girl. 4. I get kicked out of establishment by staff. I danced for a few seconds as there was not enough room and #2 happened, and perhaps #1 also as I saw some smartphones out, and due to #2 I saw some dirty stare from what might have been #3. I don’t usually dance because I’m a bit shy and I do not need more trouble or chaos in my life.   The crew and I blew that popsicle stand and headed across the street to McGillin’s for a pint. I ordered the Lancaster Milk Stout on Nitro. While it was a really tasty velvety beer, I could only get half-way through before I had to throw in the towel. Stop, not due to drunkenness, but because I have officially reached critical mass and was stuffed to the gills.   I went outside and walked around Philly looking at all the great building and alleys with George. We compared it to San Diego and discussed city planning and population density.   I slept like a rock. I’m still in bed, chugging a nalgene of propel as I peck this out.   NHC 2013 in Philadelphia has been one hell of a time. I made new friends, reunited with old ones, became better friends with current friends, learned a few things to put back into my brewing, and had lots of sensory memories to step up my cooking and brewing.   Hedonism is often my religion and NHC Philly proved to be a holy place. Sacrifices were made in order to make it all possible. I have worshipped at the altar in the City of Brotherly Love. I partook in communion daily and nightly, drinking your blood and eating your body. Philadelphia, you’ve quenched when I was thirsty and nourished my soul when I hungered. You are my new friend.   We must pack and depart. Now, where’d I put that jackalope head? XOXO Cheers, Brian Trout P.S. Back to reality and self- discipline. I see running, biking, and salads in my near future. I might even give up beer for a day or two. — That is crazy talk.

WestCoasterSD.com | 37


Collateral aka

Damage

P

ro-Am Recipe as conceived at NHC 2013 by Kevin Brewer, Curtis Chism, Kent Shultz, George Thornton, and Brian Trout - Aim for starting gravity of around 1.060 OG - Dough-in at 150F and rest for 80 mins Grain bill: - 50% Weyermann pilsner - 48% White wheat - 2% Weyermann Sinamar - Cool to 83F - Immediately toss in Organic Spelt along with White Labs WLP677 Lactobacillus Bacteria - Hold for 6 days at 83F to get pretty lactic sour - Move to kettle. Stuck sparge! … eventually move to kettle - 30 minute Boil

Imperial Black Berliner Weisse Brett Bourbon Barrel Aged Belgian Double Brett Organic Bacon Point Reyes Blue Cheese Smoked IPA with Maple Syrup

- T-30 minute Hop addition U.S. Northern Brewer (75 IBUs) - Cool quickly to 66.6F and transfer into a tank for Dry Hopping process - Add a pound and half of Belma Pellet hops and dry hop for 8 days - Then transfer into prepared Bourbon Barrel (see notes for prep.) Bourbon Barrel Preparations: - Use a spent bourbon barrel. Make certain that there is not any bourbon character in the barrel. Steam and rinse sufficiently to assure no bourbon flavor is in your barrel - Treat barrel for aging by dumping in seven handles of Organic Free Range Bacon and California’s Point Reyes Blue Cheese-infused Popov Vodka - Pitch White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis and WLP653 Brettanomyces Lambicus at barrel fill

- Age for 6 weeks at warm 70F temp for around 6 weeks. Any barrel loss should be topped off with a candied fruit sweet Belgian Beer (recipe pending). Transfer to bottling once dry Keg-Washer Smoked Beer Incident: - During an extremely bizarre incident, a keg washer affectionately known as “Sid the Kid” seemingly spontaneously combusts while assisting transferring this beer. - The silver lining to our loss of a true friend is this amazingly complex smoke note that blends flawlessly with the double Brett. However, sadly we lost two-thirds of our barrels. Also sadly, we lost a friend and our keg washer who worked really hard for just beer - The mysterious immolation incident is still under OSHA investigation

- Add a dosage of Grade B Vermont Maple Syrup at bottling for second Brett bottle-conditioning. - Bottle in reused Olde English 800 40oz bottles reinforced in duct tape and hand-labeled and signed by all brewers in black sharpie One bottle of this beer is available per customer This beer must be consumed at the brewery and CANNOT leave Sid Forever!!! Disclaimer: West Coaster does not endorse the claims of the authors of this recipe and takes no responsibility for any nasty hangovers resulting from the consuming of any beverage resulting from an attempt to follow it. But if you do attempt to make this beer, good luck. You’re going to need it!


Craft Beer Directory & Map 5. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com 6. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 7. DiMille’s Italian Restaurant 3492 Adams Ave. | 619.283.3153 www.DiMilles.com 8. El Take It Easy 3926 30th St. | 619.291.1859 www.ElTakeItEasy.com 9. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 10. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 11. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 12. Nate’s Garden Grill 3120 Euclid Ave. | 619.546.7700 13. Polite Provisions 4696 30th St. | 619.677.3784 www.PoliteProvisions.com 14. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 15. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com 16. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 17. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

DOWNTOWN

1. Bacchus Wine Bar & Market 647 G Street | 619.236.0005 www.BacchusWineMarket.com 2. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 3. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com 3. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 4. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 5. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 6. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 7. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 8. Ogawashi 1100 5th Ave. | 619.358.9170 www.Ogawashi.com 9. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 10. Queenstown Public House 1557 Columbia St. | 619.546.0444 www.BareBackGrill.com/Queenstown 11. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 12. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 13. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com 14. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 15. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 16. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 401 G St. | 619.231.7000 www.RockBottom.com/San-Diego 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

B

UPTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com 2. Belching Beaver North Park 4223 30th St. | 760.703.0433 www.BelchinBeaver.com 3. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com 4. Carnita’s Snack Shack 2632 University Ave. | 619.294.7675 www.CarnitasSnackShack.com

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HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com

B

LITTLE ITALY

4

BREWERIES 1. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com 2. Thorn St. Brewery 3176 Thorn St. www.ThornStreetBrew.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

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BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com 2. Bottlecraft 3007 University Ave. www.BottleCraftBeer.com 3. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 4. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447

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6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 9. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

8

16 3

1

18. The Haven Pizzeria 4051 Adams Ave. | 619.281.1904 www.TheHavenPizzeria.com 19. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 20. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 21. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 22. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 23. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 24. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 25. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net

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Craft Beer Directory & Map

C

LA JOLLA

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eureka! 4545 La Jolla Village Dr. Ste E-25 858.546.8858 | www.EurekaBurger.com 2. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 3. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 4. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 5. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 6. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 7. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 8. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306

619.857.8023 | www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

D

PACIFIC BEACH MISSION BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 3. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 4. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 5. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 6. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 7. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 8. Sandbar Sports Grill 718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com 9. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com

40 | August 2013

10. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com 11. The Bar Key 954 Turquoise St. | 858.488.8200 www.BarKeyPB.com 12. Turquoise Cellars 5026 Cass St. | 858.412.5377 www.Facebook.com/TurquoiseCellars 13. Woodstock’s Pizza 1221 Garnet Ave. | 858.642.6900 www.WoodstocksPB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Chip’s Liquor 1926 Garnet Ave. | 858.273.1536 2. Heidi’s Liquor & Deli 980 Turquoise St. | 858.488.7474

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

E

POINT LOMA OCEAN BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Fathom Bistro 1776 Shelter Island Dr. | 619.222.5835 www.FathomBistro.com 2. Gabardine 1005 Rosecrans St. | 619.398.9810 www.GabardineEats.com 3. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 4. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 5. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 6. OB Kabob 4994 Newport Ave | 619.222.9700 www.OBKabob.com 7. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 8. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 9. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 10. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 11. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 12. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 13. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 14. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 15. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com 16. Tom Ham’s Lighthouse 2150 Harbor Island Dr. | 619.291.9110 www.TomHamsLighthouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com

= new location 4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION?

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com 2. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens (Liberty Station) 2816 Historic Decatur Rd. | 760.294.7899 www.StoneWorldBistro.com

F

MISSION VALLEY CLAIREMONT BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Dan Diegos 2415 Morena Blvd | 619.276.2100 www.DanDiegos.com 2. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.SanDiego.edu/Dining/LaGranTerraza 3. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 4. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 5. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 | www.RJGrill.com 6. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Del Mesa Foods & Liquor 6090 Friars Rd. | 619.299.1238 www.Facebook.com/DelMesaLiquor 2. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com 3. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Benchmark Brewing Co. 6190 Fairmount Ave. Ste G | 619.795.2111 www.BenchmarkBrewing.com 3. Coronado Brewing Co. (Knoxville) 1205 Knoxville www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com 4. Helm’s Brewing Co. 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. | 858.384.2772 www.HelmsBrewingCo.com 5. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.SocieteBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

G

SORRENTO VALLEY MIRA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Best Pizza & Brew 9172 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 858.566.9900 www.BestPizzaAndBrew.com 2. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. Ste G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com 3. Woody’s Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com

Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 9430 Scranton Rd. | 858.458.4290 www.KegNBottle.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

3. Dani P’s Cork & Tap 560 Greenbrier Dr. | 760.967.0128 www.DaniPsCorkTap.com 4. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy. | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 5. Tap That Tasting Room 3207 Roymar Rd. | 760.529.5953 www.TapThatKegNow.com 6. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.Facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BREWERIES

BOTTLE SHOPS

1. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 2. Ballast Point Brewing and Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 3. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com 4. Hess Brewing 7955 Silverton Ave. Ste 1201 619.887.6453 | www.HessBrewing.com 5. Intergalactic Brewing Company 9835 Carroll Ctr. Rd. | 858.750.0601 www.IntergalacticBrew.com 6. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. Ste D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 7. Saint Archer Brewing Co. 9550 Distribution Ave. | 858.225.2337 www.SaintArcherBrewery.com 8. Wet ‘N Reckless Brewing Co. 10054 Mesa Ridge Ct. Suite 132 858.480.9381 | www.WetNReckless.com

1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.BeerOnTheWall.com 2. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Bottle-Shop 3. Stone Company Store-Oceanside 301 N. Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 4. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

H

NORTH COUNTY COASTAL BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 83 Degrees 660 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.7904 www.83Degrees.net 2. Board & Brew 201 Oak Ave. | 760.434.4466 www.BoardAndBrew.com

BREW PUBS

1. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. Ste C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com

BREWERIES 1. Arcana Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.FezziwigsBrewing.com 2. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 3. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real Suite G www.OTTBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com


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Craft Beer Directory & Map

I

EAST COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Find us on Facebook! 2. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 3. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 4. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com 4. Windy City Liquor 701 Broadway | 619.588.8404 www.WindyCityLiquor.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. Butcher’s Brewing 9962 Prospect Ave. | 619.334.2222 www.ButchersBrewing.com 2. Manzanita Brewing Company 10151 Prospect Ave. Ste D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. Ste G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

J

NORTH COUNTY INLAND BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 2. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 3. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 4. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 5. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 6. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 2. La Vista Liquor 993 S. Santa Fe Ave. | 760.758.8900 3. Vista Wine & Spirits 755 Shadowridge Dr. | 760.727.2017

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet

42 | August 2013

2. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E. Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com 3. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. Ste 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 3. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 4. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Wy. Ste 101 760.216.6500 | www.IronFistBrewing.com 5. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. Ste 104 760.913.7333 | www.Lat33Brew.com 6. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 7. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 8. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Wy. Ste 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 9. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Ave. | 760.481.3141 www.RipCurrentBrewing.com 10. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 11. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 2. Smokin Beaver 348 State Pl. | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

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POWAY RANCHO BERNARDO BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 2. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com 3. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855 4. Welldeck Liquor 14168 Poway Rd. | 858.486.5552

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. 858.592.7883 | www.CMR.Oggis.com

BREWERIES 1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. Ste 105 858.513.8070 | www.LightningBrewery.com

= new location

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SOUTH BAY

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION?

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 2335 Highland Ave. | 619.474.7255 www.KegNBottle.com 2. South Bay Liquor 1355 Broadway | 619.422.1787 3. Sprouts Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

Send submissions to: directory@westcoastersd.com

BREWERIES 1. Mad Lab Craft Brewing 6120 Business Ctr. Ct. | 619.254.6478 www.MadLabCraftBrewing.Wordpress.com

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COLLEGE LA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 2. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 5. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 6. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd. 7. Woodstock’s Pizza 6145 El Cajon Blvd | 619.265.0999 www.WoodstocksSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

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ENCINITAS DEL MAR BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bier Garden 641 S. Coast Hwy. | 760.632.2437 2. Board & Brew 1212 Camino Del Mar | 858.481.1021 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 4. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com 5. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Country Rd. 858.481.7883 | www.DelMar.Oggis.com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com

7. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 8. Sublime Tavern 3790 Via de la Valle | 858.259.9100 www.SublimeTavern.com 9. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 10. The Regal Seagull 996 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.479.2337 www.RegalSeagull.com 11. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Farr Better Spirits 398 N. El Camino Real | 760.753.7137 2. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

BREWERIES 1. Culture Brewing Co. 111 S. Cedros Ave. | 858.345.1144 www.CultureBrewingCo.com

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CORONADO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Park Place Liquor 1000 Park Place | 619.435.0116

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

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MISSION HILLS HILLCREST BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brooklyn Girl Eatery 4033 Goldfinch St. | 619.296.4600 www.BrooklynGirlEatery.com

2. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 3. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 4. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 5. San Diego Brew Project 1735 Hancock St. | 619.234.5757 www.SDBrewProject.com 6. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 7. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 8. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 9. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

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ALPINE BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

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RAMONA BREWERIES

1. ChuckAlek Independent Brewers 2330 Main St. Ste C | 513.465.9768 www.ChuckAlek.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Ramona Brew Supplies 369 Main St. | 760.440.7727

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JULIAN BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com


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Continued from page 20

Pickled Mustard Seeds Yield: 1 cup 2 cups white vinegar 1 cup fresh thyme leaves 1 cup garlic 1 cup mustard seeds

is for Iron Fist This glossary of terms comes straight from the beer educators at Craft Beer.com, with San Diego breweries added in bold

I Indian Joe - The Vista brewing company is named after owner Max Moran’s great-great uncle, Joe, who was known in the Native American communities for his homebrewing in the early 1900s.

Infusion Mash - A method of mashing which achieves target mashing temperatures by the addition of heated water at specific temperatures. Inoculate - The introduction of a microbe such as yeast or microorganisms such as lactobacillus into surroundings capable of supporting its growth.

Intergalactic - This space-themed brewery is the newest to Miramar and already added another 1200 square feet by expanding into the suite next door.

International Bittering Units (IBU) - The measure of the bittering substances in beer (analytically assessed as milligrams of isomerized alpha acid per liter of beer, in ppm). This measurement depends on the style of beer. Light lagers typically have an IBU rating between 5-10 while big, bitter India Pale Ales can have an IBU rating between 50 and 70. Irish Moss - Used as a clairifier in beer. Modified particles or powder of the seaweed Chondrus crispus that help to precipitate proteins in the kettle by facilitating the hot break.

Place the vinegar, garlic and thyme in a large pot over high heat. Bring to a boil and let steep for 30 minutes. In a separate pot over mediumlow heat, toast the mustard seeds just until they become fragrant. Transfer the seeds to an airtight container. Strain the vinegar liquid over the mustard seeds and let cool to room temperature. Seal the container and refrigerate for at least 3 days.

1 bulb fennel, cored, halved and thinly sliced juice of 1 lemon salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Toss the fennel and lemon juice together in a mixing bowl. Season with salt and pepper and serve.

—Recipes courtesy of Carlos Sanmartano, Executive Chef, Salt & Cleaver

Shrimp Sausage

and will be turning three in October. Check their website for an interactive “where-to-buy” tool.

2 pounds medium raw peeled shrimp 4 egg whites ½ cup scallions, green parts only, chopped ½ cup parsley, chopped

fish that is sometimes added to beer to help clarify and stabilize the finished product.

Place the egg yolks in a blender and turn the machine on. Slowly drizzle in ½ cup of the oil. Turn off the machine. Add the tarragon, shallot and garlic and blend until all of the ingredients are completely incorporated. Turn off the machine. Add the lemon juice, turn the machine, then add the remaining oil.

Yield: About 1½ cups

Yield: 8 servings

Isinglass - A gelatinous substance made from the swim bladder of certain

3 egg yolks 1 cup fresh tarragon leaves 1 shallot 3 cloves garlic juice of 1 lemon

Fennel Slaw

Iron Fist - This ever-expanding Vista brewery hosted a prom night June 28,

The team at Iron Fist, after a Golden Age bottling run

Tarragon Aioli Yield: About 1 cup

1½ Tbsp crushed garlic 2 tsp hot sauce 2 tsp salt ½ tsp white pepper clarified butter

  Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor and pulse until all of the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated. Transfer an eighth of the mixture at a time onto a sheet of plastic wrap laid out on a flat surface. Form the mousse into an even strip and roll into a log. Wrap tightly, tie off on both ends to create a tight sausage and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.   Heat a gallon of water in a large pot over medium heat. Place the plasticwrapped shrimp in the pot, making sure to keep them from bending. Place a plate atop the sausages to fully submerge them in the water. Cook until the shrimp mixture has solidified, about 10 minutes. Use tongs to remove the plate from the pot. Remove the sausages and let cool to room temperature.   Preheat a flatiron grill to medium-high. Unwrap the sausages. Brush the grill with butter and place the sausages on the grill. Cook until browned on the outside and warmed through, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from the grill and serve immediately, either served in a bun with whole grain mustard, aioli or any preferred condiments.

—Recipe courtesy of Brandon Hernández

44 | August 2013


Profile for Advanced Web Offset

West Coaster  

August 2013 edition

West Coaster  

August 2013 edition