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SEPTEMBER 2014 | SERVING AMERICA’S FINEST BEER COUNTY | SAN DIEGO Pat McIlhenney,founder of Alpine Beer Co. Photograph by Nicholas Gingold

SELECT EXCERPTS FROM CALIFORNIA BREWMASTERS: Portraits and Profiles of the Golden State’s Brewing Icons page

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West Coaster, THE PUBLICATION

WRITERS

Founders RYAN LAMB MIKE SHESS Publisher MIKE SHESS mike@westcoastersd.com Executive Editor RYAN LAMB ryan@westcoastersd.com Art Director KAYLA COLEMAN kayla@westcoastersd.com Graphic Designer ASHLEY DREWITZ ashley@westcoastersd.com Media Consultant TOM SHESS thomas.shess@gmail.com Staff Writers SAM TIERNEY sam@westcoastersd.com BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ brandon@westcoastersd.com RYAN RESCHAN ryan.reschan@westcoastersd.com GONZALO QUINTERO drqcbt@gmail.com Contributors BRUCE GLASSMAN MITCH STEELE NICHOLAS GINGOLD SHELDON KAPLAN TIM STAHL

West Coaster, THE WEBSITE Web Manager Web Editor Web Master

MIKE SHESS RYAN LAMB JOSH EVERETT

West Coaster is published monthly by West Coaster Publishing Co., and distributed free at key locations throughout Greater San Diego. For complete distribution list - westcoastersd.com/distribution. Email us if you wish to be a distribution location. © 2014 West Coaster Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

INTO THE BREW

THE CARBOY CHRONICLES

Sam Tierney is a graduate of the Siebel Institute and Doemens World Beer Academy brewing technology diploma program. He currently works as a brewer at Firestone Walker Brewing Company and has most recently passed the Certified Cicerone® exam. He geeks out on all things related to brewing, beer styles, and beer history.

Ryan Reschan is a long time resident of North County San Diego, and he first got into craft beer during his time at UC San Diego while completing a degree in Electrical Engineering. Skipping the macro lagers, he enjoyed British and Irish style ales before discovering the burgeoning local beer scene in North County and the rest of the country. After his introduction to brewing beer by a family friend, he brewed sparingly with extract until deciding to further his knowledge and transition into all-grain brewing. Between batches of beer, he posts video beer reviews on YouTube (user: StumpyJoeJr) multiple times a week along with occasional homebrew videos and footage of beer events he attends.

PLATES & PINTS Brandon Hernández is a native San Diegan and the author of the San Diego Beer News Complete Guide to San Diego Breweries (available on Amazon.com). In addition to his on-staff work for West Coaster, he is responsible for communications for local craft beer producer Stone Brewing Company; an editor for Zagat; the San Diego correspondent for Celebrator Beer News; and contributes articles on beer, food, restaurants and other such killer topics to national publications including USA TODAY, The Beer Connoisseur, Beer West, Beer Magazine, Imbibe and Wine Enthusiast as well as local outlets including The San Diego Reader, Edible San Diego, Pacific San Diego, Ranch & Coast, San Diego Magazine and U-T San Diego.

THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D. is a San Diego native, three-time SDSU grad, career educator, and co-founder of the popular multimedia craft beer discussion craftbeertasters.wordpress. com. An avid homebrewer, Cicerone Certified Beer Server, and seasoned traveler, Dr. Quintero takes great pride in educating people about craft beer and the craft beer culture. By approaching the subject from the perspective of a scholar and educator, Dr. Quintero has developed a passion for spreading the good word of local beer.

“No beer was wasted in the making of this publication.”

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TABLE OF CONTENTS COLUMNS 16-17

Plates and Pints

33-34

The Doctor’s Office

37-42

The Carboy Chronicles

44

Brandon Hernández tells the story of the guys behind True Gentlemen’s Jerky, which can be found at Green Flash events and the Little Italy Farmers Market Dr. Q talks with Jeff Motch (co-founder of Blind Lady Ale House and Tiger!Tiger!) about the best new addition to Balboa Park: Panama 66, right next to Museum of Man Ryan Reschan gets some IPA brewing tips from a few of San Diego’s top homebrewers: Kelsey McNair, Chris Banker, and Robert Masterson

Into the Brew

Sam Tierney looks at KeyKeg technology, popular in Europe but without a huge following in the U.S. Could this be a viable alternative for some small breweries?

PLUS + 8-9

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13-14, 46

North County Beer Symposium

In early August, politicians, brewers and media alike met in Vista to discuss the current state of craft beer in North County, aka “The Hops Highway”

Matters of Quality

Stone’s Brewmaster Mitch Steele goes over one of the most important aspects of craft beer -- quality -- in this blog post originally published on hoptripper.com

Brews in the News

Live Music Craft Beers & Meads Viking Encampments off-site parking with free shuttle

September 27 10am-8pm September 28 10am-6pm

Norway Hall 2006 E. Vista Way Vista, CA 92084 (760) 726-6526 www.VikingFestivalVista.com

New breweries, new craft beer-focused bars & restaurants, events, and more in this month’s Brews in the News. Got tips for stories? Drop us a line!

19-20

#sdbeer

23-30

Cover Story

52

Viking Festival

Another collection of our favorite photos on Instagram, which is fast becoming the best platform for breweries and drinkers to show off their beers Select excerpts from California Brewmasters: Portraits and Profiles of the Golden State’s Brewing Icons

Brew Cutlery

Local guys raise more than 200% of their Kickstarter goal for forks, knives and spoons with built-in bottle openers; they’re hoping to have more available for the holidays

This month we have the privilege of publishing eight excerpts from California Brewmasters: Portraits and Profiles of the Golden State’s Brewing Icons. More than a dozen San Diego beer barons were featured in the book, and we’re still working on getting them all to sign our copy! ON THE COVER: Pat McIlhenney, founder of Alpine Beer Co., as photographed by Nicholas Gingold for California Brewmasters: Portraits and Profiles of the Golden State’s Brewing Icons.

Celebrate the Industry

Craft Brewery Staff Brewers Guild Home Brewers Association members

$1 off all brews (excludes tasters)

Open 7 Days a Week Sunday | 4 pm - close Follow us@GroundswellBrew 6304 Riverdale Street San Diego, CA 92120 | groundswellbrew.com


GEM100 Craft_Brew_Ad_Half_Horiz.pdf

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8/19/14

4:59 PM


NORTH COUNTY CRAFT BREW SYMPOSIUM AUGUST 6, 2014 | CITY OF VISTA CIVIC CENTER

A report from The National University System Institute for Policy Research (NUSIPR) estimated that craft breweries generated a $500 million direct economic impact in San Diego County by the end of 2013. By December 2013, NUSIPR found that 2,279 industry jobs had been created (which doesn’t include craft beer-focused restaurants and bars), a 40% increase from 2011. San Diego Beer Week returns in November for its fifth iteration, and it will undoubtedly be larger than 2011, when $469,307 was yield in hotel revenue (3,612 room nights), according to a VisionQuest Wealth Management analysis. The North County San Diego city of Vista is now home to ten breweries, with Toolbox Brewing the latest to join the list that also includes Aztec, Back Street, Barrel Harbor, Belching Beaver, Booze Brothers. Latitude 33, Mother Earth, Iron Fist, and Prohibition. This symposium, with nearly 250 attendees, covered a wide range of topics that affect beer in North County San Diego.

Omar Passons pictured with Ronda Coyle (right) and Julie Wartell of PubQuest (pubquest.com). Passons has been a passionate supporter of San Diego’s craft beer movement, moderating for several panels and symposiums over the years. He is Senior Counsel at Stutz Artiano, Shinoff & Holtz.

In San Diego County, more than half of the brewery licenses have been issued since 2011, with San Diego leading the way amongst California’s craft beer communities in terms of sheer number of ABC licenses.

Stone Brewing Community Relations Manager Chris Cochran hosted a Q&A with Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) North County District Supervisor Melissa Ryan, giving brewers the opportunity to pose questions about regulation.

8 | September 2014


Gina Marsaglia of Pizza Port joined Economic Development Director of Vista, Kevin Ham, who frequently visits the Vista Brewers Guild meetings, and Greg Elias (not pictured), CPA & Partner at Think, LLP, along with moderator Andrew Shutak, Client Solutions Manager at Willis Insurance.

Tomme Arthur of Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey asks a question during the session; Arthur is an expert on the inner workings of breweries in the region.

Stone CEO & Co-Founder Greg Koch was part of a panel with Gonzalo Quintero, Ed. D. (Co-Founder at Craft Beer Tasters), West Coaster Publisher Mike Shess, and Vince Vasquez of NUSIPR. Not pictured was the panel with Carrie Brooks (Senior Trade Specialist at the U.S. Dept. of Commerce), Melody Campbell (President of the Vista Brewers Guild), and Andrew Shutak of Willis Insurance.

Plan 9 Alehouse’s Aaron Calles joins Naomi Higgins from Hilton Torrey Pines (which has a burgeoning craft beer program), San Diego Brewers Guild President Brian Scott, and URGE Gastropub’s Grant Tondro in a discussion of business practices in the “Beer Outside of Beer” segment.

WestCoasterSD.com | 9


MATTERS OF QUALITY

BY MITCH STEELE, STONE BREWING CO. BREWMASTER

D

uring the keynote session of the Craft Brewers Conference, Paul Gatza, Director of the Brewers Association, gave his annual state of the industry talk. In that discussion, he told a story about going to a beer festival and trying many really bad beers from newer brewers. These brewers thought their beer was fantastic, and were buoyed by the positive response they had received from their customers, so they had no idea their beer, from a technical standpoint, was flawed. This is cause for concern. Paul’s takeaway message: “QUALITY QUALITY QUALITY and ‘don’t f*@k it up’ for the rest of us.” A lot of craft brewing people have spent years building this industry, and one serious quality issue could really ruin the great momentum that has been built. In the biggest honor of my career, right after Paul’s opening address, I was awarded the Brewers Association Russell Schehrer Award for Innovation in Craft Brewing, and as I walked up on the stage to say a few words, I decided then and there that I would follow up Paul’s comments with a few of my own, which ended up being something about how the growth of this industry is great, but if you are starting a brewery, please, please, please hire a brewer who knows what the hell they are doing. A few hours later, Dr. Michael Lewis from UC Davis gave a seminar where he stressed the importance of having technically trained brewers on your staff. And he took it a step further, saying that it is also important that they have an independent certification of their mastery of the craft. Recently, my friend Jeremy Danner from Boulevard Brewing Company posted on Facebook the following: “Fellow brewer

10 | September 2014

types, as you plan your trips to GABF this fall, if you can afford a week in CO, you can afford a microscope. Buy one.” I loved this post… If you’ve read my previous blog posts (@ www.hoptripper. com) you already know that beer quality is very important to me. It is important that, as brewers, we all strive to make the highest quality, most consistent beer that we can. As the saying goes, a rising tide raises all boats. On the other hand, a craft brewer making lousy beer can drive fledgling craft beer drinkers permanently to other beverages, like wine or spirits. And that’s bad news for all of us. Unfortunately, there are some brewers starting up who don’t understand the importance of this, and worse yet, how to achieve it. I teach the Wort Production and Recipe Formulation for the UC San Diego Extension Brewing Certification Program, and one thing I constantly preach to my classes is that if you are starting a brewery, at a minimum you need to invest in a microscope, a pH meter, and hydrometers. Basic stuff, right? But I’ve walked into so many new breweries that have none of this, or perhaps just hydrometers to check gravity, and it just makes me shake me head. And not enough brewers out there have had any formal sensory training, and know how to identify off-flavors in their beers, and subsequently, how those off flavors are formed, and how to fix them or prevent them. Again, beer quality, as defined by most brewers, has a very clear meaning: The ability to brew beer with no off flavors, the ability to brew the same beer consistently from batch to batch, to recognize and fix quality issues before the beer gets packaged, having the recognition of when it’s best to simply dump a beer that has gone south, and the ability to evaluate beer ingredients to brew the best beer possible. Notice I did not mention formulation. To me, that’s where the consumer comes in. Once all the brewers master the art of quality, their formulations can come under fair scrutiny by beer drinkers, who then use their purchasing power to determine which beers thrive and which beers don’t. I’ve seen many people take the opinion that having poor quality beer out there won’t affect the overall growth of craft beer. In other words, beer customers won’t turn away from craft after having a poorly brewed beer. In some respects that is true – one bad apple won’t spoil the whole bunch. But here is a reason why brewing quality matters: The craft industry is now a major factor in overall beer consumption. Big brewers are starting to really focus on craft beer, and they have the marketing power to exploit poor quality beer and generalize that across the entire craft beer scene. This is not a joke or an idle threat; look what Anheuser-Busch did to craft beer in the 1990s, when they drove the exposé on Dateline with Sam Adams and the concept of “who really brews your beer.” The fallout on craft beer started immediately afterwards, and it took years for the craft beer business to recover, and most contract brewers disappeared. These big brewers understand quality, and have a lot of power, and if they ever figure out how to effectively combine these two elements to convey their message it could have a very bad effect on the rest of the industry. Fortunately, for us, their Executives and Marketing folks still don’t “get” what craft beer is all about, so they haven’t been able to effectively talk about this with any credibility. As Michael Lewis says, it’s not good at all for craft brewers to get smug with our success, spend too much time patting ourselves on the back, and rest on laurels, since a potential quality disaster is just around the corner. ■


WestCoasterSD.com | 11


BRE WS IN THE NEWS BUSY TIMES @ TWISTED MANZANITA In addition to putting the finishing touches on their Pacific Beach tasting room, the Twisted Manzanita team is also working on variations of their Witch’s Hair Pumpkin Ale, brewed in August. At time of press, the brew crew was looking to create more than 10 variations on the seasonal beer, buoyed by the fact that they’ll now have two tasting rooms at which to empty kegs. Be on the lookout especially for nitro versions, which the brewery is looking to do more of all around.

NEW BREWERIES IN AUGUST Several new breweries began brewing in August. Now operational Ballast Point’s new Miramar expansion, Beer Brewing Co. in Oceanside, Bagby Beer Company and Bolt Brewery. None of the breweries are open to the public at time of press, but the fact that they are now making beer is a good indicator that tasting room and draft accounts are not far away. The total count of operational breweries as of late August is 93. In addition, West Coaster is tracking 42 breweries that are planning on opening in San Diego County. Knox Corners in El Cajon, Belching Beaver’s brewpub in Vista, Bay City Brewing in Loma Portal, Green Flash’s Poway expansion, Jamul Town Brewery & Tap and 32 North Brewing Co. in Miramar all popped up on our radar in August. Check out westcoastersd.com/sd-brewing-industry-watch for info on current and up-and-coming breweries.

Twisted Manzanita brewer Dan Cady works on a batch of the company’s annual Witch’s Hair Pumpkin Ale in late August WestCoasterSD.com | 13


BARREL REPUBLIC EXPANDS Pacific Beach’s pour-it-yourself beer bar Barrel Republic is expanding to two new locations in Oceanside and Carlsbad. Carlsbad’s Barrel Republic will have 52 taps and a kitchen headed by former Churchill’s chef A.G. Warfield and is slated to open by San Diego Beer Week 2014. The Oceanside location is still TBD.

Eric March of Star B Ranch pouring hops at ChuckAlek. Be on the look-out for wet hop beers this month!

OKTOBERFESTS If you can’t make it to Munich, there are plenty local Oktoberfest celebrations in San Diego. Fathom Bistro’s 2nd annual Octo-Bier-Fest is Friday September 26th and starts at 3PM. The Smokehouse Kings, an offshoot chef collaboration from Carnitas Snack Shack, will have their huge smoker on the pier cooking up sausages. The bar will serve 8 German & German-style beers on tap along with a glass giveaway. Beer drinkers looking for authenticity should seek the German American Society of San Diego’s Oktoberfest which takes place September 26-28 & October 3-5 in El Cajon. Enjoy bratwurst, ox-on-the-spit, sauerkraut and, of course, German beer. More info: germanclubsandiego.org/events/oktoberfest Perhaps the most SoCal Oktoberfest, Ocean Beach’s 10th annual celebration will be October 12 & 13. Gaze into the Pacific through the bottom of your glass, hear tribute bands jam in the Beer Garden Band Slam and cheer on the winner of the Ms Oktoberfest Bikini Contest. Pizza Port Ocean Beach will be serving beer, too. Buses depart to OB from Pacific Beach & Downtown. More info: oboktoberfest.com New this year: South Park’s version of Oktoberfest will take place on October 11th from 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Dubbed Parktoberfest, the event will be held in the Gala Foods Parking. There will be a beer tent featuring 10 local breweries, a kid’s carnival, live music and more. Search Facebook for Parktoberfest to get more info. There’s also Oktoberfests in La Mesa, Carlsbad, Julian, Ramona and Encinitas. Visit sandiego.org/campaigns/fall-in-san-diego/oktoberfests.aspx for a listing.

TWO CONS, ONE WEEKEND The weekend of the 23rd saw two beer conferences. The 4th annual Beer-Con took place in Marina Village in Mission Bay and featured speakers such as Dr. Bill Sysak, Ambassador of Stone Brewing Co.; Shawn DeWitt, Founding Partner & Director of Brewery Operations at Coronado Brewing Co.; Doug Constantiner, Co-Founder & Brewer of Societe Brewing Co. and several other speakers who elaborated on topics such as “The Future & Current State of Craft Beer”, “Beer in Baja” and “Getting Into the Beer Industry.” Across town at the Marriott Mission Valley, the Beer Bloggers Conference hosted around 150 bloggers from around the country with topics ranging from “Social Media Best Practices” to “Beer Journalism Ethics” with a keynote speech from Ken Grossman of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. See page 46 for reflections from four bloggers in attendance. Disclosure: West Coaster was a media sponsor for both conferences

MORE DRAFTS IN OB With the recent openings of OB Warehouse with 24 taps and Bar 1502 with 40 taps, there’s now even more good beer flowing in the eclectic seaside neighborhood. The two new locations strengthen the existing beer circuit present with Raglan Public House, OB Kebab, Newport Pizza, OB Noodle House, The Joint, Olive Tree Market’s tasting room, Wonderland and Pizza Port OB.

ThreeBZine’s live podcast at 4th Annual Beer-Con

CONTINUED ON PAGE 46 >> 14 | September 2014


PLATES & PINTS

TRUE GENTLEMEN BEEF JERKY THAT GOES BEYOND THE REALM OF CAVEMEN, INCLUDING A LOCAL BREWERY TASTING ROOM

T

wo college students growing close over finals cram sessions. That’s a familiar story for those familiar with the university buds who founded West Coaster. Their friendship yielded a business, and so, too, did that of former collegiate roommates Michael Carvalho and Jason Kurpjuweit. During their cohabitation, the duo would take breaks from late-night studying and scour their East Village hood in search of snacks. Both elected to slay ravenous hunger with dried strips of red meat, but most nights, the only places that were open were liquor and convenience stores. That meant eating lowest-common-denominator jerky; mass-produced foodstuffs high in nitrates, sodium, fat and sugar listing “mechanically separated chicken” among its primary ingredients. They wanted something better, so they took a popular page out of the homebrewer handbook, deciding to create something better with their own four hands and a Nessco dehydrator. Jason’s father had a recipe for jerky, so the pair used it as the base for their operation, tweaking it to include fresh, premium ingredients including USDA Grade-A cuts of meat and low-sodium soy sauce. At one point, they even tried grass-finished beef, but found the marbling to be far less in the

16 | September 2014

BY BRANDON HERNÁNDEZ garden-variety bovine. That attention to detail led to extremely tasty jerky, the kind that, once they shared it, led friends to ask if they could buy some. This set off a light bulb for Michael, who was studying for his MBA at the time—why not go into business selling superior forms of jerky? He got online and found zero registrations for jerky manufacturing operations. It was surprising to him, considering the artisanal surge in San Diego. While doing his research, he learned there were 120 active or pending registrations for breweries throughout San Diego County. To him, there isn’t much difference between craft beer and what is, essentially, craft jerky. “The same person who reaches for the bottle of Laphroaig Scotch instead of cheap whisky may also prefer a premium nutrition jerky for a dollar or so more,” says Alex Macksoud, who teamed with Michael, Jason and a trio of carnivores to found True Gentlemen’s Jerky. The business is headquartered in Point Loma, and already gaining traction throughout California. The highest profile venue True Gentlemen’s has found success at is the Little Italy Farmer’s Market, arguably San Diego’s most popular and highly regarded pop-up shopping experience. But the brand has also found allies in one of San Diego’s most


foodie-friendly brewery operations, Green Flash Brewing Company. True Gentlemen’s reached out to the county’s fourth largest brewing company via Twitter and eventually found their way to Tasting Room Manager Dave Adams, a well-known bon vivant in local beer circles (he handles Supper Club beer-pairing dinners and culinary-themed classes for the company’s). Dave allowed True Gentlemen’s to come into Green Flash’s Mira Mesa-based tasting room and showcase their product. It went so well, that they now have a standing engagement every Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m. So, what makes this jerky so good it earned the guys a weekly gig? “Our jerky is gluten- and nitrate-free. It’s almost a super food with how high in protein-per ounce and significantly lower in fat, sodium, sugar and calories it is, especially compared to the mass-produced brands. We hope to show consumers not all jerky is equal” says Macksoud. He says each bag of his company’s jerky contains 26 grams of protein—more than a three-egg omelet. Additionally, unlike most jerky, True Gentlemen’s is cut “French fry-style,” like a shoestring frit, meaning there’s no need for those snacking on it to test their dental mettle trying to tear off a piece. They even include floss in each bag, quite the upscale touch for what’s considered an everyman treat. “Beef

jerky doesn’t have to be barbaric caveman food. We use the eye of the round so that when we go to cut our meat, we are not cutting through multiple muscles and, therefore, do away with that stringy white substance you often find in the bottom of jerky packages.” Clearly a lot of thought has been put into this project by people who are really, really into jerky. It reminds me of homebrewers going to the next level, and it’s nice to see that degree of care and attention being applied to something as noble and, largely, taken for granted, by most. Currently, True Gentlemen’s Jerky is available in two flavors—Original Gentlemen-Peppered and Sinsa-Korean BBQ. The last has a mild chili kick and mild sweetness to it. Mango-habanero is also in the works along with a vegan-friendly variety made using coconut meats, but those are still being perfected. When asked for a recipe, the True Gentlemen’s team opted to appeal to the fact that most people don’t have a fleet of high-powered dehydrators in their kitchens. So, instead of providing a method for creating jerky, they’ve come up with something that deliciously pays homage to their friendly relationship with Green Flash, a Bloody Mary made with the company’s flagship West Coast IPA and garnished with their jerky. Compromise accepted! ■

WEST C O AS T IP A B L O O D Y M ARY WITH J ERKY G A R N I SH Yield: 2 servings 2 lime wedges, split half-way down the middle celery salt, plus more for rim 1 cup tomato juice 1 cup (8 ounces) West Coast-style India pale ale (preferably Green Flash West Coast IPA) 1 Tbsp lime juice 1 tsp lemon juice ½ tsp Sriracha hot sauce ½ tsp Worcestershire sauce ¼ tsp creamy horseradish ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper Ice cubes True Gentlemen’s Jerky for garnish 2 celery stalks for garnish olives for garnish pickled vegetables for garnish Insert the rim of a pint glass into the split in 1 lime wedge. Run the lime along the entire rim of the glass, squeezing gently to coat the rim with juice. Repeat the process with another pint glass and the remaining lime wedge. Pour celery salt into a shallow, even layer on a small plate. Place the glass upside-down on the plate, turn slightly and lift so that celery salt lines the rim of the glasses. Set aside. Combine the tomato juice, beer, lime juice, lemon juice, Sriracha, Worcestershire sauce, pepper and horseradish in a large cocktail shaker half-way filled with ice. Shake, then strain the mixture into the pint glasses. Garnish with jerky, celery, olives and pickled vegetables. Serve immediately. Recipe courtesy Alex Macsoud IV, Co-founder, True Gentlemen’s Jerky


#sdbeer Over the next two pages, we’ll share some of our favorite photos from Instagram that were uploaded using the hashtag #sdbeer. Warning: Thirst for a tasty, locally-brewed beer may occur.

@aylon

@aztecbrewery

@barritusbrewery

@breweryadvertising

@cabrewmasters

@chivorichard13

@cody_threebzine

@culturebrewingco

@d0ndada

WestCoasterSD.com | 19


Follow @westcoastersd on Instagram, and don’t forget to use #sdbeer in your uploads

@dandydani81

@diningoutsd

@drunkenmasterchef

@el_brewchacho

@enelle

@fallbrookbrewing

@frannyfullpint

@fsavinon

@grillfellasbbq

@hoppybastard

@labeerhal

@liberated_roots

Our favorite #sdbeer photos will appear in the October issue of West Coaster San Diego


PRESENTS

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Funded in part (or in whole) by the San Diego Tourism Marketing District Corporation with City of San Diego Tourism Marketing District Assessment Funds.


22 | September 2014


COVER STORY

CALIFORNIA BREWMASTERS

PORTRAITS AND PROFILES OF THE GOLDEN STATE’S BREWING ICONS For more than two years, photographer Nick Gingold traveled up and down the state of California in a quest to find the state’ state’s greatest beer and the dedicated people who brew it. He had been inspired by his own love of craft beer and his passion for photography, and he wanted to create a project that would celebrate both. Nick’s book, California BrewMasters, features intimate portraits and profiles of 46 brewers, which range from the brewers/founders of Sierra Nevada, Stone, and Anchor to smaller guys who have become craft beer “cult figures.” Through their photographs and interviews, these brewers share their philosophies of life, the things they love, and the beer they make. All in all, 14 San Diego brewers are represented in the book, which is a tribute to the dynamic nature of our beer scene as well as to the incredible talents and skills of our brewers. Following are selected excerpts from 8 of the profiles in California BrewMasters. You can find the entire 196 pages (in glorious jacketed hardcover) at georgianbaybooks.com, cabrewmasters.com, as well as amazon.com. — Bruce Glassman, Publisher

DOUG CONSTANTINER & TRAVIS SMITH // Societe Nick: What is it about beer that you love so much? Travis: Beer is fucking awesome. Pretty plain and simple. Beer is fantastic, it’s something to be passionate about. It is worthy of passion, worthy of my attention. It’s a huge part of my life, it’s a huge part of many of our lives and it brings a lot of joy to me here. Doug: Beer is my number one love in life. I’d put it ahead of all other things, and I love my fiancé to death, that’s different. I wake up in the morning and I think about beer, I go to bed and I think about beer. It’s everything in the world to me. I’m not religious but I’ve had . . . Travis: Religious experiences. Doug: Religious experiences with beer. I mean I can probably name 90 or 95 percent of the beers I’ve ever had in my life and I have had a lot of different beers. I fucking love it.

WestCoasterSD.com | 23


PAUL SEGURA // Karl Strauss Nick: Do you remember the first home brew you ever made? Paul: My first home brew was a batch of brown ale and it was all extract out of a can. It was so rudimentary it was ridiculous. I just took the can, took the label off, put it in a pot of boiling water to get it to flow out of the can easily, and mixed that with water. I think it was hop extract, too. I didn’t even have to add hops to it. I just boiled that for like an hour and put it into a plastic bucket with a packet of yeast and let it sit in the bathtub for a week or so. It bubbled away and I drank it and went “Wow. I can do this. This is fun.” It wasn’t the best tasting beer I’d had, but it was a real source of pride that I’d made it. And it was pretty cheap to make and I drank it. That little piece of early success got me excited, got me fired up to learn more. How was that extract made? What went into that? Obviously somebody took some malted barely and did that whole thing. I started reading up on it, doing a lot of independent research. I found myself becoming a nerd about it. I bought a book called The Complete Joy of Homebrewing by Charlie Papazian, one of the earlier editions. I started learning a little bit more about the science. Then I bought another book. I just started buying these books, reading more and more and more. As I said, I was going to San Diego State and I was taking a lot of science classes, so the books weren’t too far out there for me. I understood them. The whole thing progressed out of curiosity, passion for beer, and being a nerd.

24 | September 2014


PETER ZIEN // AleSmith Nick: Do you have any wisdom to impart to new or possible home brewers? Peter: Yeah: think outside the box. Don’t just blindly follow recipes. Use them as templates to get yourself started. Always have an eye towards how you and your abilities can make something different and something new to the world. We’re all different. We all have different perceptions in the way we taste. Another little thing I would tell home brewers is: taste and smell and look and listen to everything you put into your home brews. The home brew shops will let you taste things, smell it. The grains should taste fresh and crunchy, not stale. It should have a bread-like flavor. Your hops should smell citrusy and nice and fresh, no cheese-like aromas. Use your olfactory as your laboratory and that will take you far.

WestCoasterSD.com | 25


CHUCK SILVA // Green Flash Nick: What was your first job in brewing? Chuck: …After [my service in the Navy and] 5 years in the defense industry, I had an opportunity to relocate to my home state of California, which was very appealing to me. So I quit my day job and started preparing myself to move to San Diego. Of course, I needed to find a new job, and as I was looking for work, I began to seriously consider pursuing work in brewing beer. By the time I was ready to move I had decided to give a brewing career a shot. Since I had discovered the American Brewers Guild, I figured this was my best chance to break into the industry. I enrolled and began brewing school in February 1998. After completing brewing school, I landed my first brewing job as an assistant brewer working for Paul Segura at Hang Ten Brewing Company (he’s now the brewmaster at Karl Strauss Brewing Co.) Almost a year and a half later, a position opened up at Hops Bistro & Brewery where I had apprenticed during brewing school. I jumped at that opportunity and landed the job as head brewer. I had a great time during my 4–5 year stint at Hops. I brewed numerous beer styles, orchestrated monthly beer dinners, and actually received my first medals at the World Beer Cup and the Great American Beer Festival. Unfortunately, the lease ended and Hops closed in 1993, so I called on my buddy Paul Segura over at Karl Strauss and he put me to work brewing again. That’s where I gained some exposure to production brewing.

26 | September 2014


COLBY CHANDLER // Ballast Point Nick: Do you remember the first home brew that you tried to make and how that turned out? Colby: It was an extract pale ale (MacTarnahan’s Amber clone). It was from Ocean Beach Home Brewing Supplies. Basically, I remember the instructions were written out on the back of a business card. And it was horribly over carbonated but you could definitely taste the hops in there. It wasn’t perfect— probably not finished out and not done fermenting— but it was good. It definitely got the bug going. Nick: What was your first specialty beer? Colby: Probably Crystal Pier Double IPA. I remember the first time serving it—it was at the second annual Strong Ale Festival at Pizza Port in December of 1998. I think we added a little bit of Belgian candied sugar in there to boost up the alcohol. It was a hoppy 8% ABV beer with all Crystal hops. So the first couple of runs of it was called Crystal Pier Double IPA. Today that beer is known as Dorado Double IPA. Back then I had never had a double IPA. I had heard of Russian River Brewing’s Blind Pig and Pliny the Elder, those may have just started to be brewed, but I don’t think I had had it yet.

WestCoasterSD.com | 27


TOMME ARTHUR // The Lost Abbey Nick: Can you talk about Lost Abbey’s basic mission and your goal of pushing the limits and developing truly imaginative beers? Tomme: Part of what drives me as a brewer are the possibilities, imagining what beer can be; what it is and where it might take you. I say that a lot. How beer takes me to places that I never thought possible. It’s really a fascinating thing to think of beer as a vehicle. In order to do that, you have to make that conversation endearing; you have to be endearing. It’s easy to be in this seat and to imagine great beers and flavorful things. It’s another thing to pull the trigger and spend the money and time, and commit the resources to doing them. I knew that once we established this facility, we’d be able to do so, because I knew that my partners were committed to that kind of brewing. We didn’t open our doors chasing volume. We didn’t open up with six-packs or beer going out on draught. We went after better beer establishments in the form of, not necessarily funky beer, but definitely not what you would align with being a mainstream beer.

28 | September 2014


PAT McILHENNEY // Alpine Nick: What got you into brewing? Pat: I started off in my formative years wondering why people drank the macro beers that were available out there. I didn’t find any joy in drinking them. It wasn’t until I came across a fancy European beer that I discovered that there was more to beer than just being bland. I was into good beer at a very young age. Too young to actually mention. It wasn’t until I was in the fire service, working in Northern California (Mendocino County) that I discovered Mendocino Brewing Company. That was my first exposure to really good craft beer and something different and flavorful. It wasn’t until about a year later—1983—that I discovered you could make your own beer. I started home brewing with an intent of someday opening my own brewery. Not just the casual home brew. I purchased scientifically, I took notes, I submitted the beers to judging, made the adjustments, and would submit again until I was winning awards. Then I would move on to another style, trying to perfect it. I would submit it until I was winning a really good prize for it. By the time I felt I was ready, I had 8 core recipes under my belt. Finding the equipment was easy. But finding a location was a little harder. It took over a year to find a location in Alpine. I never felt that the mainstream beers were worthy of drinking and, once I realized you can make your own, look out.


MITCH STEELE // Stone Nick: Have your experiences brewing in other parts of the United States given you a unique perspective on California? Mitch: Yeah, living in other parts of the country has influenced me. One very specific example is the Black IPA that we did for the 11th anniversary. That was inspired by a beer I had in Boston. I’d never had a Black IPA before. I think it was still kind of a fledgling style. I’d never seen one, I’d never heard of one. I had one at the Beer Advocate Extreme Beer Fest. It was brewed by Shaun Hill. It turns out, as I’ve researched the style, the first ones were brewed in Vermont. It was Greg Noonan’s Vermont Pub and Brewery in the late 80’s or early 90’s that brewed one. Shaun was inspired by that, and I was inspired by Shaun’s beer. I kind of pushed for it to be our 11th Anniversary Ale, which became Sublimely Self-Righteous Ale. I West-Coasted it up a bit. I’m a West Coast guy. I’ve got a pretty strong love for the West Coast hop profile and approach to brewing IPAs and things. Back to living in different parts of the country. . . . Living in Colorado in the early 90’s didn’t suck. That was pretty cool. They approach brewing a little bit differently. They tend to be a little bit more malt-centric, as opposed to the West Coast thing. New England brewers tend to be a little bit more traditional, I think. I was excited by a lot of the beers in New England. There were some really good IPAs being brewed there. ■

30 | September 2014


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THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE

PANAMA 66

BALBOA PARK’S NEWEST ADDITION By Gonzalo J. Quintero, Ed.D.

Facing west, the California Tower breaches the horizon. Panama 66 is located in the courtyard under the Museum of Art banners shown in this photo bottom right. Photo by Tim Evanson / Creative Commons 2.0

Balboa Park. The name alone conjures up images in our mind’s eye of beautiful architecture, gorgeous landscaping, scenic vistas, world-class museums, and fun-filled days spent soaking up the San Diego sun. In 1868, however, San Diego’s iconic park was known simply as “City Park” and sprawled along 1,400 acres of unkempt nature and undeveloped land. Nearly 50 years later, “City Park” was set to host the 1915 Panama-California Exposition. Park commissioners, wanting a grand name for the park to go along with the grand event, sought to rename City Park and chose to honor Spanish-born Vasco Nuñez de Balboa, who was the first European to spot the Pacific Ocean while on exploration in Panama. Many of the ornate buildings that stand today were influenced by Spanish-Renaissance style architecture, which was, in turn, chosen to honor the exposition. Moreover, the first homage to the exposition happened in 1926 when the San Diego Museum of Art, the region’s oldest and largest art museum, was founded, according to Balboa Park’s online collaborative.

WestCoasterSD.com | 33


Nearly 90 years later San Diego’s Museum of Art, in the heart of Balboa Park, welcomes a new tenant to its outdoor garden, offering “locally sourced food, local draught beer, (and) craft cocktails.” That tenant? Panama 66. I recently met with Jeff Motch, who, along with Lee and Jenniffer Chase, and his wife Clea Hantman, are founders of Panama 66, their third bar/restaurant along with Normal Heights’ Blind Lady Ale House and North Park’s Tiger!Tiger!. Jeff rolled up in his locally made Tesch road bike, taking full advantage of the park’s ease of access for bike riders and pedestrians. I asked Jeff about park accessibility and what it means for San Diego’s latest craft beer haven. “When people come to town, they’re enjoying the zoo, enjoying the park, but we want them to experience all of San Diego. I believe that is why we were allowed to be open here. We will serve only San Diego beers. That will be our emphasis for food and drink – keeping it local. Local beer from local craft beer breweries along with local food sourced from local farms such as Suzie’s. No Sysco, no US Foods, no Bud, Miller, or Coors. If it is a product only distributed by a major corporation, you’ll never see it here. Visitors will, eventually, have access to 20 local beers, and 12 more lines for wine, cocktails, and other non-alcoholic local offerings.” Looking at the taps I noticed that there were only clean metal handles at each spout, and no commercial handles. When asked why this was so, Jeff responded, “This space is, first and foremost, a museum garden; it’s not a marketing opportunity for everybody. So, no, no tap handles.” Returning his focus back on Panama 66’s philosophy, Jeff added, “I also believe that the park is underutilized by locals. Maybe you bike or jog through, but you don’t stay. Maybe we can attract locals, entice them to stay, and when they’re here they will see what’s in the park.” So why this space, and what’s with its name? “On a personal level, I have a degree in fine art. We pay rent to a museum – The San Diego Museum of Art. If we are successful we will be paying thousands of dollars to a museum! How many bars and restaurants have that kind of landlord? As for the decor, we want the attitude to reflect what we do and our style of service. For us to come to this setting and try to recreate Blind Lady or Tiger!Tiger! it wouldn’t feel right. All four of us want to respect and complement the space we are in. We aren’t what you would

34 | September 2014

Jeff Motch outside Panama 66 call restauranteurs; we are two couples who randomly found opportunities three different times. With this space we are taking our time to do it right. The name Panama comes from Plaza de Panama and the 1915 exposition. The “66” comes from the fact that the garden in which we are situated was founded in 1966. Also, Panama, during the 1960s, had some great music, and tropical drinks, and Mod architecture. We aren’t necessarily going for that look or menu, but we want that feel. So we mulled it over and said aloud ‘Panama... 1966... Panama 66’ and here we are. We want this space to be something that works for the park as a whole, in step with locals, visitors, and park workers.” How do you want people to feel when they visit Panama 66? “To feel inspired by the city. To taste beers they’re excited for, maybe beers they came to San Diego explicitly for. They’re here, enjoying the park, and maybe they taste a Modern Times Beer and realize how close they are to the brewery and then they visit it. Maybe they taste our food made with local produce and they head south to Suzie’s Farm. It used to be people came to San Diego for the beach and the weather, but that’s all changed. People are coming for a beer. The world, and San Diego in particular, has moved away from a two-top dining table society; drinking is a very social thing. People want to get back to knowing their neighbors. We want to add big picnic tables where travelers, locals, and regulars all interact and share their stories, where the picnic table becomes a hub of information. If we can make something like that, then we will have made something that we can be proud of.” ■


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THE CARBOY CHRONICLES

Robert Masterson and Karl Strauss Carlsbad brewer Greg Turk (right) work together in August to brew Masterson’s IPA recipe for entry in the GABF Pro-Am

BREWING IPAS TIPS FROM SAN DIEGO’S BEST HOMEBREWERS By Ryan Reschan

The ‘Best Beers In America’ voted by American Homebrewers Association (AHA) Members in the July/August 2014 issue of Zymurgy magazine once again voted Russian River’s Pliny The Elder as the best a sixth year in a row. Eight of the top 10 beers are IPAs, with local favorites Ballast Point Sculpin IPA and Stone Enjoy By IPA being third and eighth respectively. Homebrewers not only love to drink IPAs, but brew them as well. So what does it take to brew a great IPA? I thought I’d ask some of the best local homebrewers about their philosophies, breaking down the four main ingredients used in brewing. Award winning homebrewers Kelsey McNair, Robert Masterson, and Chris Banker have given me some insight into their brewing process for hoppy beers. Kelsey has won multiple awards for his Hop Fu! IPA that most recently won him another Gold Medal at the National Homebrewers Competition. He also won Stone’s homebrew competition in 2010 with his San Diego County Session Ale, collaborating with Colby Chandler of Ballast Point and Even Keel fame for the big brew. Robert collaborated with me on R&R Coconut IPA for our win in the 2013 Stone homebrew competition and recently won Karl Strauss’ Pro-Am competition with his Hops Til Ya Drop Double IPA. Chris won a Gold Medal and Best Of Show with his Double IPA in the 2013 America’s Finest City Homebrew Competition, a huge competition run by local homebrew club QUAFF. So let’s see how these local homebrewers have to say.

WestCoasterSD.com | 37


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WATER Rip Current spent a pretty penny to get the best water system around. As a homebrewer, there are ways you can treat your water inexpensively

It’s the largest component in beer, but often gets overlooked by homebrewers. There’s a few different ways to approach brewing water. One is you can start with reverse osmosis (RO), de-ionized (DI), or distilled water and build you water profile by adding in brewing salts. Another method is carbon filtering your water and making adjusts based on your water profile. Carbon filtering will help remove chlorine, sediment, odor, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Carbon filtering however does not remove salts, minerals, and dissolved organic compounds. Your local water report will help you figure out whether you want to leave your water alone, soften it with RO water, or harden it with salts. Pre-boiling your water will have another effect, driving off chlorine and CO2 while CaCO3 (chalk) precipitates out of the water. Generally speaking, harder water is best of IPA since it bring out more hop character. Calcium sulfate, also known as gypsum, is often added to brewing liquor to accentuate hop bitterness and a drier, crisper finish to the beer. Chris uses a fine carbon filter with his drinking water while Robert cuts his carbon filtered drinking water in half with RO water and then adds gypsum back. Kelsey will build his water profile from scratch, adding in calcium sulfate (gypsum), calcium chloride, and perhaps some magnesium sulfate in situations where sugar is added. Magnesium will aid in yeast metabolization of adjunct sugars. Overall, Kelsey wants a 5:1 ratio of sulfate to chloride with around 250ppm of sulfate and 100 to 125ppm of calcium for yeast health and mash pH. He also warns that “bicarbonate is your enemy. Get that below 40ppm and build [your water] back up.” If you don’t know much about water, then it’s probably best to leave it alone besides carbon filtering. Most water profiles in San Diego are suited to making hoppy beer.

WestCoasterSD.com | 39


MALT

Because it’s cheap and widely available, most homebrewers are using premium American 2-row pale malt as their base for IPA. 2-row will give you plenty of fermentables for the higher than average gravity style but often brewers will add dextrose (corn or cane sugar) to boost the ABV and help dry out the beer. Kelsey likes to use dextrose for 5-7% of his grist for Double IPAs. He balances out the sugar with Dextrine/Carapils malt which will add body to the beer without adding a significant flavor. Kelsey is also using a small percentage of Crystal malt (usually from the U.K.) in the 1 to 1.5% range for a subtle nuance to the malt character saying that we are “not trying to taste caramel here in San Diego.” Chris is mostly using 2-row malt as his base but has been experimenting with some Maris Otter malt from the U.K. In addition to 2-row, Chris uses corn sugar for an alcohol boost and dryness and like Kelsey, adds some Carapils back in to add body to the beer. He also uses some Crystal 20L and 40L to add additional body and a slight caramel flavor. Robert constructs a similar grist to both Chris and Kelsey but has some other malts he’ll use for complexity such as Vienna, Maris Otter, Munich, Honey, Carafaom (Carapils), and Pilsner malt (not all at the same time) to go along with 2-row pale malt. Robert only uses sugar in his Double IPAs where it accounts for 5 to 8% of the grist.

Barley growing in Sierra Nevada’s Chico garden

As you can see, all three brewers use little to no crystal malt and use a dextrin malt to add body to the beer. The largest percentage of the grist is the base malt with specialty malts kept to a small percentage. Sugar is a great way to boost the alcohol percentage and dry out the beer but is kept to less than 10% of the fermentables. The goal is to have a nice malt background without getting in the way of the hops.

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YEAST Like with the malt, the yeast you use should not get in the way of the hops. Using a neutral yeast strain is very common when making IPA. Yeast can also influence either hop or malt character through fermentation. With the tasting room at White Labs, you can go and taste this difference between strains with the same wort. Kelsey says White Labs’ WLP001 California Ale strain “is bar none the best strain for making a classic west coast IPA. Clean, well attenuated/dry, hop-focused... perfect for the style.” Chris response to what yeast he uses for IPA as “WLP001 always”. Robert also uses WLP001 “because the hops can show their own nuances.”

Peter Perrecone innoculates wort at the Society of Barley Engineers’ 2014 Lambic Brew Day

But a new strain has become well known on the east coast after several Vermont breweries started using it in their hoppy ales. Known as Conan, Vermont Ale, or Northeast Ale yeast depending on the manufacturer, this strain is less attenuating than California Ale and has a great fruity ester character reminiscent of peaches, apricots, and other stone fruits. This character can work really well with the new hop varietals that have a lot of stone fruit, bright citrus, and tropical fruit notes. Robert has used Conan yeast for several beers and has also blended it with WLP001 for more attenuation. Kelsey has also played around with German Ale yeast, fermenting it in the low 60s F. He’ll pair this yeast with the more dank and resinous hops for an “old school hop bomb.”


HOPS Japatul Farms hops in a ChuckAlek August brew

Of course, we have to save the best for last. IPA is all about letting the hops shine. There so many new hop varietals hitting the market these days that it’s hard to keep track. Finding your favorite combination can take years. There are also plenty of hopping techniques to discuss such as how to use bittering hops (traditional versus first wort hopping), dry-hop temperature and length, and timing of hop additions. No matter who you ask, you’ll likely get a different answer. Chris likes to use Magnum hops for his bittering addition. Magnum is known for its clean bitterness and high alpha acid content so you won’t be filling your kettle with too much hop material right away. Warrior is another cleaner, high alpha acid that can be used. Chris will also usually add some Chinook as a first wort hop (FWH) addition to add some character. His typical hop combination will be Citra, Centennial, Amarillo, and Simcoe, with Simcoe being a lesser addition due to its potency. Late hop additions are added at 10 minutes to go in the boil and at flameout. Robert likes using Citra, Mosaic, Amarillo, Simcoe, Centennial, and Galaxy hops in his IPAs. Hop combinations will vary but he uses Centennial for a FWH addition for 1/3 to ¼ of his total IBUs. He then back loads the end of boil with 10 minute and flameout additions to get to his IBU total. If he has time, Robert will dry-hop in two stages over 6 days with the second addition going in 3 days before packaging. His dry-hopping is done at either fermentation or room temperature. For hops, Kelsey has been using Citra since 2009. It’s prominent hop in his award winning Hop Fu! IPA. “Chinook as a First Wort Hop is sort of a signature in my IPAs. I like the old-school ragged high co-humulone grapefruit pith bitterness that you get from Chinook early in the boil.” Mosaic is a new favorite of his but “is a tricky hop to work with. In the right application it is super dank, try it in the whirlpool and/or dry hop.” He’s a big proponent of 0.75 oz. to 1.00 oz. of hops per gallon ratio for flameout or whirlpool additions with as much as 1 oz. of hops per gallon if he’s using his hopback. Lastly, Kelsey leaves this advice: “My dry hop method is the same as the one Vinnie Cilurzo [of Russian River Brewing Co.] has talked about on many occasions. It works. Not broken, no need to fix.” Vinnie employs a two stage dry-hop method in hopes of getting more aroma from the hops as the beer comes into contact with the hops twice. There are many ways to brew a great IPA but hopefully some tips from some of the best in San Diego County will help you out with your next IPA brewday. A special thanks to Kelsey, Robert, and Chris for sharing their knowledge and processes. And of course there always one last recommendation when brewing an IPA, add more hops! ■

Hopefully your keg cooler is this full of IPAs one day soon!


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INTO THE BREW

44 | September 2014

DRAFT

OR DAFT?

U

nbeknownst to most beer fanatics, Heineken recently rolled out a new proprietary draught beer system called BrewLock. The promotional material shows pictures of something like a large paintball CO2 canister with a dial on the top that reads either “locked” or “unlocked” as a braided steel hose seemingly delivers beer to some unseen faucet. I was intrigued so I took a look at the promotional videos to see what this new system was all about. It turns out that BrewLock kegs are a plastic cylinder with an internal bag that contains the beer, all encased in a cardboard box shell. I realized that I’ve seen this system before, as it’s essentially the same design that KeyKegs employ. KeyKegs hit the market a few years ago as an alternative to the industry standard stainless steel Sankey kegs that most American brewers use. Stainless steel kegs have been the standard for draught beer for decades and are almost universally used and accepted as the best way to package beer, but they also have drawbacks, mainly that they are heavy and need to be returned to the brewery to be cleaned and refilled. KeyKeg offered an alternative that solved these issues as well as others by coming out with a lightweight plastic keg that uses a bag-in-shell design. KeyKegs are designed to be a oneway product that is fully recyclable after use, eliminating the need to ship heavy keg shells back to the brewery and saving on water, energy and chemicals to clean kegs for reuse. KeyKegs also have the advantage of maintaining a barrier between the beer and the gas used to push the beer to the draught faucet. In normal kegs, the carbon dioxide or blended carbon dioxide/nitrogen mix blankets the remaining beer in the keg, exposing it to any impurities, contamination, or pressure differences that can lead to flat or over-carbonated beer. When a KeyKeg is dispensed, the inner bag is squeezed by added gas pressure and the beer remains isolated. The Heineken system differs slightly in that it includes an air compressor that connects to the keg coupler to provide dispense pressure, whereas KeyKeg couplers work with any dispense gas that you choose, including existing carbon dioxide or beer gas mixes that bars already have set up for regular kegs. So, in essence, KeyKeg is designed to work with an existing system with only a new keg coupler needed, while BrewLock fully replaces the gas-to-keg side of the system. For the drinker, the impact is the same: no possibility of over-carbonated or flat beer due to improper settings in the gas system, and also no possibility of contamination. When a bar empties a keg, they simply put it in the recycling bin and tap another. For a brewery like Heineken that does a huge export business, adopting a one-way keg system makes huge sense from an environmental and economic standpoint, and a proprietary system incentivizes bars to keep their beer on tap. Shipping empty keg shells long distances is hugely wasteful and something that many

A LOOK AT KEYKEG TECHNOLOGY

By Sam Tierney

Pallets of KeyKegs. Photo via Christer Edvartsen / Creative Commons 2.0 breweries struggle with. Many smaller European breweries already make use of KeyKegs for this very reason. Even for small American breweries that distribute mostly locally, maintaining a keg fleet is costly. Breweries have to ensure that they have enough of a “float” of kegs so that they don’t run out before their empties get back to the brewery; this isn’t easy, and keg theft and misplacement can also be problematic. MicroStar Logistics has remedied some of these problems for small brewers by offering a keg-rental system where brewers order the kegs that they need at any given time, and then MicroStar manages the tracking and return of kegs once they are sent out to wholesalers. This vastly cuts down on shipping in most cases because so many breweries use their system, and kegs are sent to any brewery that needs them, as opposed to kegs owned by a single brewery. As with any capital cost, breweries have to decide which keg system makes the most sense for their business model. As far as environmental impact, I have not seen any studies done, but my assessment is that for local distribution, reusable stainless kegs should easily beat producing new recyclable kegs, but for long-distance exports such as transatlantic shipping, recycling kegs makes more sense than shipping empties. Ideally, the MicroStar model may be the best, but many breweries still find it advantageous to maintain their own keg fleet. At Firestone Walker, we use a mix of all three systems to utilize the strengths of each where they provide the most benefit. ■ Into the Brew is sponsored by The High Dive in Bay Park


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BREWS IN THE NEWS CONT. BEER BLOGGERS CONFERENCE 2014 RECAP

PAUL D. MCGUIRE // SAN DIEGO HOP ADDICT sdhopaddict.com What drew me into attending the Beer Bloggers’ Conference (BBC) was the chance to meet some of the big brewers and getting to know the people behind the beer. I got to learn about the story behind some of the breweries that have become mainstays in the craft beer scene such as Karl Strauss, Sierra Nevada, Green Flash, AleSmith, and Lost Abbey.

ASTRID COOK // BROOKLYN BEER BITCH brooklynbeerbitch.com Among the quirkier and more challenging sessions was the “Live Beer Blogging” event where the 150 or so bloggers were courted by nine different breweries (and one specialty food company) for five minutes of meet-greet-drink-blog. The challenge was to appreciate beers while having mere seconds to “live blog” about them. One of the most interesting pours was from Stone Brewing Co., which previewed this year’s Homebrew Competition and AHA Rally winner Chris Baker’s beer: Insurgente Xocoveza, an 8% ABV Mocha Stout with a balanced but super spicy profile is meant to reflect the flavors of Mexican hot chocolate. The collaboration beer is scheduled for limited release (22-ounce bottles and draft) on September 8th. Other vendors at this year’s Live Beer Blogging included Firestone Walker, Goose Island, Green Flash, Rogue Farms, Rough Draft, Samuel Adams, The Lost Abbey and Warsteiner-USA.AleSmith, and Lost Abbey.

GINA WILLIAMS // CRAFT BEER HOUND craftbeerhound.com As a first time visitor to the conference it was enlightening, inspiring and sometimes surprising! San Diego was the host city so the weather was gorgeous, the beer delicious and the schedule absolutely packed. While brewery visits and hearing from craft beer greats were highlights, the beer was the star of the show. We tried vast quantities of really stunning brews. Two standouts came from Lagunitas Brewing Company “Cruising with Ruben and the Jets”, an imperial stout aged six years, followed by a “Mandaraison”, a saison brewed with all kinds of citrus including lime peels! Tasting these two beers came complete with an after-party with a totally chill live band and hop-vaping station---very Lagunitas.

KRISTEN BAYUSIK // NOW BEER THIS nowbeerthis.com The Beer Bloggers Conference is somewhat of a testament to how much craft beer has grown. There are not only enough topics for beer to have blogs written about, there enough writers for there to be a conference for them. The focus of many of the day panels was marketing, in a broad sense. Nearly every speaker spoke on ways in which to improve blog and writing quality. Julia Herz of Craftbeer. com & The Brewers Association, who opened the conference, stated that all of the writers in attendance were responsible for creating a face of craft beer to the beer-drinking world. In that sense, improving a beer blog is actually improving craft beer. In addition, representatives from Wordpress, one of the most popular blogging systems on the Web, showed us a variety of plug-ins to make publishing content much more streamlined. Finally, Red Door, a marketing company, brought forth a discussion of how beer bloggers can successfully work together with beer brands in a way that benefits both.


CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP 544 5th Ave. | 619.232.9840 www.TheField.com 19. The Hopping Pig 734 5th Ave. | 619.546.6424 www.TheHoppingPig.com 20. The Local 1065 4th Ave. | 619.231.4447 www.TheLocalSanDiego.com 21. The Tipsy Crow 770 5th Ave. | 619.338.9300 www.TheTipsyCrow.com 22. Tin Can Alehouse 1863 5th Ave. | 619.955.8525 www.TheTinCan1.Wordpress.com 23. Union Kitchen & Tap Gaslamp 333 5th Ave. | 619.795.9463 www.GaslampUnion.com

DOWNTOWN

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 98 Bottles 2400 Kettner Blvd. | 619.255.7885 www.98BottlesSD.com 2. Bare Back Grill 624 E St. | 619.237.9990 www.BareBackGrill.com 3. Barleymash 600 5th Ave. | 619.255.7373 www.BarleyMash.com 4. Bub’s @ The Ball Park 715 J St. | 619.546.0815 www.BubsSanDiego.com 5. Ciro’s Pizzeria Gaslamp 536 Market St. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 6. Craft & Commerce 675 W Beech St. | 619.269.2202 www.Craft-Commerce.com 7. Downtown Johnny Brown’s 1220 3rd Ave. | 619.232.8414 www.DowntownJohnnyBrowns.com 8. Ironside Fish & Oyster Bar 1654 India St. | 619.269.3033 www.IronsideFishandOyster.com 9. Knotty Barrel 844 Market St. | 619.269.7156 www.KnottyBarrel.com 10. Neighborhood 777 G St. | 619.446.0002 www.NeighborhoodSD.com 11. Ogawashi 1100 5th Ave. | 619.358.9170 www.Ogawashi.com 12. Quality Social 789 6th Ave. | 619.501.7675 QualitySocial.comm 13. Queenstown Public House 1557 Columbia St. | 619.546.0444 www.BareBackGrill.com/Queenstown 14. Searsucker 611 5th Ave. | 619.233.7327 www.Searsucker.com 15. Stone Brewing Tap Room 795 J St. | 619.727.4452 www.StoneBrewing.com 16. Stone Company Store 1202 Kettner Blvd. | 619.450.4518 www.StoneBrew.com 17. Taste and Thirst 715 4th Ave. | 619.955.5995 www.TasteAndThirst.com 18. The Field Irish Pub & Restaurant

BREW PUBS 1. Ballast Point Little Italy 2215 India St. | www.BallastPoint.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1157 Columbia St. | 619.234.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery 805 16th St. | 619.358.9901 www.MonkeyPawBrewing.com 4. The Beer Company 602 Broadway Ave. | 619.398.0707 www.SDBeerCo.com

BREWERIES 1. Mission Brewery 1441 L St. | 619.818.7147 www.MissionBrewery.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

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1. The Homebrewer 2911 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.450.6165 www.TheHomebrewerSD.com

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1. Bine & Vine 3334 Adams Ave. | 619.795.2463 www.BineAndVine.com

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BREWERIES 1. Mike Hess Brewing (North Park) 3812 Grim Ave. | 619.255.7136 www.HessBrewing.com 2. Poor House Brewing Company 4494 30th St. www.PoorHouseBrew.com 3. Thorn St. Brewery 3176 Thorn St. www.ThornStreetBrew.com

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BREW PUBS 1. Blind Lady Ale House/Automatic Brewing Co 3416 Adams Ave. | 619.255.2491 www.BlindLadyAleHouse.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Best Damn Home Brew Shop 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 Find us on Facebook!

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BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

BOTTLE SHOPS

2. Bottlecraft 3007 University Ave. www.BottleCraftBeer.com 3. Boulevard Liquor 4245 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.281.0551 4. Clem’s Bottle House 4100 Adams Ave. | 619.284.2485 www.ClemsBottleHouse.com 5. Kwik Stop Liquor & Market 3028 Upas St. | 619.296.8447 6. Mazara Trattoria 2302 30th St. | 619.284.2050 www.MazaraTrattoria.com 7. Pacific Liquor 2931 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.282.2392 www.PacificLiquor.com 8. Henry’s Market 4175 Park Blvd. | 619.291.8287 www.HenrysMarkets.com 9. Stone Company Store - South Park 2215 30th St. 3 | 619.501.3342 www.StoneBrew.com/Visit

15. Ritual Tavern 4095 30th St. | 619.283.1618 www.RitualTavern.com 16. Sea Rocket Bistro 3382 30th St. | 619.255.7049 www.SeaRocketBistro.com 17. Small Bar 4628 Park Blvd. | 619.795.7998 www.SmallBarSD.com 18. Station Tavern 2204 Fern St. | 619.255.0657 www.StationTavern.com 19. The Haven Pizzeria 4051 Adams Ave. | 619.281.1904 www.TheHavenPizzeria.com 20. The Rose Wine Pub 2219 30th St. | 619.280.1815 www.TheRoseWinePub.com 21. The South Park Abbey 1946 Fern St. | 619.696.0096 www.TheSouthParkAbbey.com 22. Tiger!Tiger! Tavern 3025 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.487.0401 www.TigerTigerTavern.com 23. Toronado San Diego 4026 30th St. | 619.282.0456 www.ToronadoSD.com 24. True North Tavern 3815 30th St. | 619.291.3815 www.TrueNorthTavern.com 25. URBN Coal Fired Pizza 3085 University Ave. | 619.255.7300 www.URBNNorthPark.com 26. Urban Solace 3823 30th St. | 619.295.6464 www.UrbanSolace.net 27. Waypoint Public 3794 30th St. | 619.255.8778 www.facebook.com/WaypointPublic

UPTOWN

1. Alchemy San Diego 1503 30th St. | 619.255.0616 www.AlchemySanDiego.com 2. Belching Beaver North Park 4223 30th St. | 760.703.0433 www.BelchinBeaver.com 3. Bourbon Street Bar & Grill 4612 Park Blvd. | 619.291.0173 www.BourbonStreetSD.com 4. Carnita’s Snack Shack 2632 University Ave. | 619.294.7675 www.CarnitasSnackShack.com 5. Coin Op Game Room 3926 30th St. | 619.255.8523 www.CoinOpSD.com 6. Counterpoint 830 25th St. | 619.564.6722 www.CounterpointSD.com 7. Cueva Bar 2123 Adams Ave. | 619.269.6612 www.CuevaBar.com 8. DiMille’s Italian Restaurant 3492 Adams Ave. | 619.283.3153 www.DiMilles.com 9. Farm House Cafe 2121 Adams Ave. | 619.269.9662 www.FarmHouseCafeSD.com 10. Hamilton’s Tavern 1521 30th St. | 619.238.5460 www.HamiltonsTavern.com 11. Live Wire Bar 2103 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.291.7450 www.LiveWireBar.com 12. Modern Times Flavordome 3000 Upas St. www.ModernTimesBeer.com 13. Nate’s Garden Grill 3120 Euclid Ave. | 619.546.7700 14. Polite Provisions 4696 30th St. | 619.677.3784 www.PoliteProvisions.com

1. Bacchus Wine Bar & Market 647 G Street | 619.236.0005 www.BacchusWineMarket.com 2. Best Damn Beer Shop (@ Super Jr Market) 1036 7th Ave. | 619.232.6367 www.BestDamnBeerShop.com 3. Bottlecraft 2161 India St. | 619.487.9493 www.BottlecraftBeer.com

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BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Eureka! 4545 La Jolla Village Dr. Ste E-25 858.546.8858 | www.EurekaBurger.com 2. Home Plate Sports Cafe 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.657.9111 www.HomePlateSportsCafe.com 3. La Jolla Strip Club 4282 Esplanade Ct. | 858.450.1400 www.CohnRestaurants.com 4. La Valencia Hotel 1132 Prospect St. | 858.454.0771 www.LaValencia.com 5. Porters Pub 9500 Gilman Dr. | 858.587.4828 www.PortersPub.net 6. Public House 830 Kline St. | 858.551.9210 www.The-PublicHouse.com 7. The Grill at Torrey Pines 11480 N Torrey Pines Rd. | 858.777.6645 www.LodgeTorreyPines.com 8. The Shores Restaurant 8110 Camino Del Oro | 858.456.0600 www.TheShoresRestaurant.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Bristol Farms 8510 Genesee Ave. | 858.558.4180 www.BristolFarms.com 2. Whole Foods La Jolla 8825 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.642.6700 www.WholeFoodsMarkets.com

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 1044 Wall St. | 858.551.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brew House 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.456.6279 www.LaJollaBrewHouse.com 3. Rock Bottom Brewery Restaurant 8980 Villa La Jolla Dr. | 858.450.9277 www.RockBottom.com/La-Jolla

BREWERIES 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5985 Santa Fe St. | 858.273.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. La Jolla Brewing Company 7536 Fay Ave. | 858.246.6759 www.LaJollaBeer.com 3. New English Brewing Co. 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. 305 & 306 619.857.8023 www.NewEnglishBrewing.com

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PACIFIC BEACH MISSION BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Bare Back Grill 4640 Mission Blvd. | 858.274.7117 www.BareBackGrill.com 2. Barrel Republic 1261 Garnet Ave. | 858.270.9922 www.BarrelRepublic.com 3. Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse 967 Garnet Ave. | 619.696.0405 www.CirosSD.com 4. Coaster Saloon 744 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.4438 www.CoasterSaloon.com 5. Draft 3105 Ocean Front Walk 858.228.9305 www.BelmontPark.com/Restaurants/ Draft 6. Firefly 1710 W Mission Bay Dr. | 619.225.2125 www.TheDana.com 7. Latitude 32 Pub 5019 Cass St. | 858.273.0501 www.Latitude32Bar.com 8. Luigi’s At The Beach 3210 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.2818 www.LuigisAtTheBeach.com 9. Pacific Beach Fish Shop 1775 Garnet Ave. | 858.483.4746 www.TheFishShopPB.com 10. SD TapRoom 1269 Garnet Ave. | 858.274.1010 www.SDTapRoom.com 11. Sandbar Sports Grill

718 Ventura Pl. | 858.488.1274 www.SandbarSportsGrill.com 12. Sinbad Cafe 1050 Garnet Ave. B | 858.866.6006 www.SinbadCafe.com 13. Sneak Joint 3844 Mission Blvd. | 858.488.8684 www.SneakJointSD.com 14. The Bar Key 954 Turquoise St. | 858.488.8200 www.BarKeyPB.com 15. The Promiscuous Fork 3801 Ingraham St. | 858.581.3663 www.ThePromiscuousFork.com 16. Turquoise Cellars 5026 Cass St. | 858.412.5377 www.Facebook.com/TurquoiseCellars 17. Woodstock’s Pizza 1221 Garnet Ave. | 858.642.6900 www.WoodstocksPB.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Chip’s Liquor 1926 Garnet Ave. | 858.273.1536 2. Heidi’s Liquor & Deli 980 Turquoise St. | 858.488.7474

BREW PUBS 1. Amplified Ale Works/California Kebab 4150 Mission Blvd. | 858.270.5222 www.AmplifiedAles.com 2. Pacific Beach Ale House 721 Grand Ave. | 858.581.2337 www.PBAleHouse.com

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POINT LOMA OCEAN BEACH BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Fathom Bistro 1776 Shelter Island Dr. | 619.222.5835 www.FathomBistro.com 2. Harbor Town Pub 1125 Rosecrans St. | 619.224.1321 www.HarborTownPub.com 3. Kecho’s Cafe 1774 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. | 619.225.9043 www.KechosCafe.com 4. Newport Pizza and Ale House 5050 Newport Ave. | 619.224.4540 www.OBPizzaShop.com 5. OB Kabob 4994 Newport Ave | 619.222.9700 www.OBKabob.com 6. OB Noodle House 2218 Cable St. | 619.450.6868 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 7. OB Noodle House Bar 1502 4993 Niagara Ave. | 619.255.9858 www.OBNoodleHouse.com 8. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2562 Laning Rd. | 619.876.5000 www.LibertyStation.Oggis.com 9. Phils BBQ 3750 Sports Arena Blvd. | 619.226.6333 www.PhilsBBQ.net 10. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St. | 619.794.2304 11. Restaurant @ The Pearl Hotel 1410 Rosecrans St. | 619.226.6100 www.ThePearlSD.com 12. Sessions Public 4204 Voltaire St. | 619.756.7715 www.SessionsPublic.com 13. Slater’s 50/50 2750 Dewey Rd. | 619.398.2660 www.SanDiego.Slaters5050.com 14. Tender Greens 2400 Historic Decatur Rd. | 619.226.6254 www.TenderGreensFood.com 15. The Joint 4902 Newport Ave. | 619.222.8272 www.TheJointOB.com 16. Tom Ham’s Lighthouse 2150 Harbor Island Dr. | 619.291.9110 www.TomHamsLighthouse.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 4001 W Point Loma Blvd. | 619.223.4397 www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Fuller Liquor 3896 Rosecrans St. | 619.296.1531 www.KegGuys.com 3. Olive Tree Marketplace 4805 Narragansett Ave. | 619.224.0443 www.OliveTreeMarket.com

4. Sea Trader Liqour & Deli 1403 Ebers St. | 619.223.3010 www.SeaTraderLiquorAndDeli.com

WANT TO ADD YOUR LOCATION?

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Ocean Beach 1956 Bacon St. | 619.224.4700 www.PizzaPort.com 2. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens (Liberty Station) 2816 Historic Decatur Rd. | 760.294.7899 www.StoneWorldBistro.com

BREWERIES 1. Modern Times Beer 3725 Greenwood St. | 619.546.9694 www.ModernTimesBeer.com

Send submissions to:

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MISSION VALLEY CLAIREMONT BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Balboa’s Tap House 4421 Genesee Ave. | 858.277.8226 www.Facebook.com/DonDiegosTacoBar 2. Common Theory Public House 4805 Convoy St. | 619.495.3689 www.CommonTheorySD.com 3. Dan Diegos 2415 Morena Blvd | 619.276.2100 www.DanDiegos.com 4. La Gran Terraza 5998 Alcala Park | 619.849.8205 www.SanDiego.edu/Dining/LaGranTerraza 5. O’Brien’s Pub 4646 Convoy St. | 858.715.1745 www.OBriensPub.net 6. Postcards Bistro @ The Handlery Hotel 950 Hotel Circle North | 619.298.0511 www.SD.Handlery.com 7. Randy Jones All American Sports Grill 7510 Hazard Center Dr. 215 619.296.9600 | www.RJGrill.com 8. The High Dive 1801 Morena Blvd. | 619.275.0460 www.HighDiveInc.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Del Mesa Foods & Liquor 6090 Friars Rd. | 619.299.1238 www.Facebook.com/DelMesaLiquor 2. Keg N Bottle 3566 Mt. Acadia Blvd. | 858.278.8955 www.KegNBottle.com 3. Mesa Liquor & Wine Co. 4919 Convoy St. | 858.279.5292 www.SanDiegoBeerStore.com

BREW PUBS 1. Gordon Biersch 5010 Mission Ctr. Rd. | 619.688.1120 www.GordonBiersch.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2245 Fenton Pkwy. 101 | 619.640.1072 www.MissionValley.Oggis.com 3. San Diego Brewing Company 10450 Friars Rd. | 619.284.2739 www.SanDiegoBrewing.com

BREWERIES 1. Ballast Point/Home Brew Mart 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.295.2337 www.HomeBrewMart.com 2. Benchmark Brewing Co. 6190 Fairmount Ave. Ste G | 619.795.2911 www.BenchmarkBrewing.com 3. Coronado Brewing Co. (Knoxville) 1205 Knoxville www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com 4. Council Brewing Company 7705 Convoy Ct. | 858.256.0038 www.CouncilBrew.com 5. Groundswell Brewing Company 6304 Riverdale St. | 619.795.2337 www.GroundswellBrew.com 6. Helm’s Brewing Co. 5640 Kearny Mesa Rd. | 858.384.2772 www.HelmsBrewingCo.com 7. Quantum Brewing 5375 Kearny Villa Rd. #116 www.QuantumBeer.com 8. Societe Brewing Company 8262 Clairemont Mesa Blvd www.SocieteBrewing.com

directory@westcoastersd.com HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Home Brew Mart/Ballast Point 5401 Linda Vista Rd. 406 | 619.232.6367 www.HomeBrewMart.com

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SORRENTO VALLEY MIRA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Best Pizza & Brew 9172 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 858.566.9900 www.BestPizzaAndBrew.com 2. Bruski House Burgers & Beer 9844 Hibert St. Ste G10 | 858.530.2739 www.BruskiHouse.com 3. Woody’s Burgers 7070 Miramar Rd. | 858.578.8000 www.Bangin-Burgers.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 9430 Scranton Rd. | 858.458.4290 www.KegNBottle.com

BREW PUBS 1. Callahan’s Pub & Brewery 8111 Mira Mesa Blvd | 858.578.7892 www.CallahansPub.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 9675 Scranton Rd. | 858.587.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com

BREWERIES 1. 2Kids Brewing Co. 8680 Miralani Dr. #123 | 858.480.5437 www.TwoKidsBrewing.com 2. AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. | 858.549.9888 www.AleSmith.com 3. Ballast Point Brewing and Spirits 10051 Old Grove Rd. | 858.695.2739 www.BallastPoint.com 4. Green Flash Brewing Company 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. | 760.597.9012 www.GreenFlashBrew.com 5. Intergalactic Brewing Company 9835 Carroll Ctr. Rd. | 858.750.0601 www.IntergalacticBrew.com 6. Mike Hess Brewing (Miramar) 7955 Silverton Ave. Ste 1201 619.887.6453 | www.HessBrewing.com 7. Pacific Brewing Company 8680 Miralani Drive | 303.819.7086 www.PacificBrewingCo.com 8. Rough Draft Brewing Co. 8830 Rehco Rd. Ste D | 858.453.7238 www.RoughDraftBrew.com 9. Saint Archer Brewing Co. 9550 Distribution Ave. | 858.225.2337 www.SaintArcherBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. American Homebrewing Supply 9535 Kearny Villa Rd. | 858.268.3024 www.AmericanHomebrewing.com

OTHER 1. White Labs 9495 Candida St. | 858.693.3441 www.WhiteLabs.com

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NORTH COUNTY COASTAL BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. 83 Degrees 660 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.7904 www.83Degrees.net 2. Board & Brew 201 Oak Ave. | 760.434.4466 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Dani P’s Cork & Tap 560 Greenbrier Dr. | 760.967.0128 www.DaniPsCorkTap.com 4. Local Tap House Oceanside 308 S Coast Hwy. | 760.547.1469 www.LocalTapHouse.com 5. PCH Sports Bar & Grill 1835 S Coast Hwy. | 760.721.3955 www.PCHSportsBarAndGrill.com 6. Tap That Tasting Room 3207 Roymar Rd. | 760.529.5953 www.TapThatKegNow.com 7. The Compass 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.434.1900 www.Facebook.com/TheCompassCarlsbad

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Beer On The Wall 3310 Via De La Valle | 760.722.2337 www.BeerOnTheWall.com 2. Pizza Port Bottle Shop 573 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Bottle-Shop 3. Stone Company Store-Oceanside 301 N. Tremont St. | 760.529.0002 www.StoneBrewing.com 4. Texas Wine & Spirits 945 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.729.1836 www.TexasWineSpirits.com

BREW PUBS 1. Breakwater Brewing Company 101 N Coast Hwy. Ste C140 | 760.433.6064 www.BreakwaterBrewingCompany.com 2. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 5801 Armada Dr. | 760.431.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 3. Pizza Port Carlsbad 571 Carlsbad Village Dr. | 760.720.7007 www.PizzaPort.com

BREWERIES 1. Arcana Brewing Co. 5621 Palmer Way www.ArcanaBrewing.com 2. Legacy Brewing Company 363 Airport Rd. | 760.705.3221 www.LegacyBrewingCo.com 3. Oceanside Ale Works 1800 Ord Way | 760.310.9567 www.OceansideAleWorks.com 4. On-The-Tracks Brewery 5674 El Camino Real Suite G www.OTTBrew.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Hydrobrew 1319 S Coast Hwy. | 760.966.1885 www.HydroBrew.com


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CRAFT BEER DIRECTORY & MAP

I

EAST COUNTY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Boll Weevil 53 9621 Mission Gorge Rd. 619.334.5353 www.BollWeevil53.com 2. Eastbound Bar & Grill 10053 Maine Ave. | 619.334.2566 Find us on Facebook! 3. Hooleys Irish Pub 2955 Jamacha Rd. | 619.670.7468 www.Hooleys.com 4. Main Tap Tavern 518 E Main St. | 619.749.6333 www.MainTapTavern.com 5. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 9828 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.449.6441 www.Santee.Oggis.com 6. Press Box Sports Lounge 2990 Jamacha Rd. | 619.713.6990 www.PressBoxSportsLounge.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. B’s Kegs 1429 East Main St. | 619.442.0265 www.KegBeerAndWine.com 2. Beverages 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Beverages4LessInc.com 3. Fletcher Hills Bottle Shop 2447 Fletcher Pkwy | 619.469.8410 www.FletcherHillsBottleShop.com 4. Garden Farms Market 12580 Lakeshore Dr. | 619.334.5550 5. Helix Liquor 444 West Chase Ave. | 619.444.0226 6. Valley Farm Market 9040 Campo Rd. | 619.463.5723 www.ValleyFarmMarkets.com 7. Windy City Liquor 701 Broadway | 619.588.8404 www.WindyCityLiquor.com

BREW PUBS 1. El Cajon Brewing Company 110 N Magnolia Ave. www.Facebook.com/ElCajonBrewery

BREWERIES 1. BNS Brewing & Distilling 10960 Wheatlands Ave. | 619.208.9799 www.BnsBrewingAndDistilling.com 2. Butcher’s Brewing 9962 Prospect Ave. | 619.334.2222 www.ButchersBrewing.com 3. Manzanita Brewing Company 10151 Prospect Ave. Ste D | 619.334.1757 www.ManzanitaBrewing.com 4. URBN St. Brewing 110 S Magnolia Ave. | 619.328.6922 www.URBNStBrewing.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. All About Brewing 700 N Johnson Ave. Ste G | 619.447.BREW www.AllAboutBrewing.com 2. Homebrew 4 Less 9181 Mission Gorge Rd. | 619.448.3773 www.Homebrew4LessInc.com

J

NORTH COUNTY INLAND BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Churchill’s Pub and Grille 887 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.8773 www.ChurchillsPub.us 2. Cool Hand Luke’s 110 Knoll Rd. | 760.752.3152 www.CoolHandLukes.com 3. Mike’s BBQ 1356 W Valley Pkwy. | 760.746.4444 www.MikesBBQ.us 4. Phils BBQ 579 Grand Ave. | 760.759.1400 www.PhilsBBQ.net 5. Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneWorldBistro.com 6. Sublime Ale House 1020 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.510.9220 www.SublimeAleHouse.com 7. The Bellows 803 S Twin Oaks Valley Rd. 760.290.3912 www.BellowsWoodFire.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Holiday Wine Cellar 302 W Mission Ave. | 760.745.1200 www.HolidayWineCellar.com 2. La Vista Liquor 993 S. Santa Fe Ave. | 760.758.8900 3. Vista Wine & Spirits 755 Shadowridge Dr. | 760.727.2017

BREW PUBS 1. Back Street Brewery/Lamppost Pizza 15 Main St. | 760.407.7600 www.LamppostPizza.com/Backstreet 2. Prohibition Brewing Co. 2004 E. Vista Way | 760.295.3525 www.ProhibitionBrewingCompany.com 3. San Marcos Brewery & Grill 1080 W San Marcos Blvd. | 760.471.0050 www.SanMarcosBrewery.com

BREWERIES 1. Aztec Brewing Company/7 Nations 2330 La Mirada Dr. Ste 300 | 760.598.7720 www.AztecBrewery.com 2. Barrel Harbor Brewing 2575 Pioneer Ave. | 760.734.3949 www.BarrelHarborBrewing.com 3. Belching Beaver Brewery 980 Park Center Dr. | 760.703.0433 www.TheBelchingBeaver.com 4. Booze Brothers Brewery 2545 Progress St. | 760.295.0217 www.BoozeBrothersBrewery.com 5. Dos Desperados 1241 Linda Vista Dr. | 760.566.6209 www.DosDesperadosBrew.com 6. Fallbrook Brewing Co. 136 N Main Ave. www.FallbrookBrewing.com 7. Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Dr. | 760.295.3945 www.IndianJoeBrewing.com 8. Iron Fist Brewing Co. 1305 Hot Springs Wy. Ste 101 760.216.6500 | www.IronFistBrewing.com 9. Latitude 33 Brewing Company 1430 Vantage Ct. Ste 104 760.913.7333 | www.Lat33Brew.com 10. Mother Earth Tap House 206 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 11. Offbeat Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Pl. | 760.294.4045 www.OffbeatBrewing.com 12. Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey 155 Mata Wy. Ste 104 | 760.720.7012 www.LostAbbey.com 13. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Ave. | 760.481.3141 www.RipCurrentBrewing.com 14. Stone Brewing Co. 1999 Citracado Pkwy. | 760.471.4999 www.StoneBrew.com 15. Stumblefoot Brewing Co. 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr. www.Stumblefoot.com 16. Toolbox Brewing 1495 Poinsettia Ave #148 760.598.1477 www.ToolboxBrewing.com 17. Valley Center Brewery 28960 Lilac Road www.ValleyCenterBrewery.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Mother Earth Retail Store 204 Main St | 760.599.4225 www.MotherEarthBrewCo.com 2. Smokin Beaver 146 N Kalmia St. | 760.747.2739 www.SmokinBeaver.com

K

POWAY RANCHO BERNARDO BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brother’s Provisions 16451 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 855.850.2767 www.BrosProvisions.com 2. Company Pub and Kitchen 13670 Poway Rd. | 858.668.3365 www.CompanyPubAndKitchen.com 3. Phileas Fogg’s 11385 Poway Rd. | 858.486.4442 www.PhileasFoggs.com

= NEW LOCATION 4. URGE American Gastropub 16761 Bernardo Ctr. Dr. | 858.637.8743 www.URGEGastropub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Barons Market 11828 Rancho Bernardo Rd. 858.485.8686 | www.BaronsMarket.com 2. Distiller’s Outlet 12329 Poway Rd. | 858.748.4617 www.DistillersOutlet.com 3. Don’s Liquor 13337 Poway Rd. | 858.748.7500 4. Piccadilly Marketplace 14149 Twin Peaks Rd. | 858.748.2855 5. PW Mart 12906 Pomerado Rd. 858.748.7693 6. Welldeck Liquor 14168 Poway Rd. | 858.486.5552

BREW PUBS 1. Karl Strauss Brewing Co. 10448 Reserve Dr. | 858.376.2739 www.KarlStrauss.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 10155 Rancho Carmel Dr. 858.592.7883 | www.CMR.Oggis.com

BREWERIES 1. Lightning Brewery 13200 Kirkham Wy. Ste 105 858.513.8070 | www.LightningBrewery.com

L

SOUTH BAY

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. La Bella Pizza 373 3rd Ave. | 619.426.8820 www.LaBellaPizza.com 2. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 2130 Birch Rd. | 619.746.6900 www.OggisEastlake.com 3. The Canyon Sports Pub & Grill 421 Telegraph Canyon Rd. 619.422.1806 | www.CYNClub.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Brandy Wine Liquor 1655 Brandywine Ave. | 619.421.1970 2. Keg N Bottle 2335 Highland Ave. | 619.474.7255 www.KegNBottle.com 3. South Bay Liquor 1355 Broadway | 619.422.1787 4. Sprouts Market 690 3rd Ave. | 619.409.7630 www.HenrysMarkets.com

BREWERIES 1. Border X Brewing 8684 Avenida De La Fuente Ste. 8 619.787.6176 | www.BorderXBrewing.com

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COLLEGE LA MESA BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Cheba Hut 6364 El Cajon Blvd | 619.269.1111 www.ChebaHut.com 2. Hoffer’s Cigar Bar 8282 La Mesa Blvd. | 619.466.8282 www.HoffersCigar.com 3. Hooleys Irish Pub 5500 Grossmont Center Dr. 619.713.6900 www.Hooleys.com 4. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 5. Terra American Bistro 7091 El Cajon Blvd | 619.293.7088 www.TerraSD.com 6. The Ugly Dog 6344 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.269.8204 www.TheUglyDog.com 7. The Vine Cottage 6062 Lake Murray Blvd. | 619.465.0138 www.TheVineCottage.com 8. West Coast BBQ and Brew 6126 Lake Murray Blvd. 9. Woodstock’s Pizza 6145 El Cajon Blvd | 619.265.0999 www.WoodstocksSD.com

BOTTLE SHOPS

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Keg N Bottle 6060 El Cajon Blvd. | 619.265.0482 www.KegNBottle.com 2. Keg N Bottle 1827 Lemon Grove Ave. | 619.463.7172 www.KegNBottle.com 3. KnB Wine Cellars 6380 Del Cerro Blvd. | 619.286.0321 www.KnBWineCellars.com 4. Palm Springs Liquor 4301 Palm Ave. | 619.698.6887 Find us on Facebook!

N

ENCINITAS DEL MAR BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Bier Garden 641 S. Coast Hwy. | 760.632.2437 2. Board & Brew 1212 Camino Del Mar | 858.481.1021 www.BoardAndBrew.com 3. Del Mar Rendezvous 858.755.2669 www.DelMarRendezvous.com 4. Encinitas Ale House 1044 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.943.7180 www.EncinitasAleHouse.com 5. Lumberyard Tavern & Grill 967 S Coast Hwy 101 | 760.479.1657 www.LumberyardTavernAndGrill.com 6. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 12840 Carmel Country Rd. 858.481.7883 | www.DelMar.Oggis. com 7. Oggi’s Pizza and Brewing Co. 305 Encinitas Blvd. | 760.944.8170 www.Encinitas.Oggis.com 8. Priority Public House 576 N. Coast Hwy 101 | 858.204.6656 www.PriorityPublicHouse.com 9. San Diego BeerWorks 437 S. Highway 101 | 858.353.7174 www.SanDiegoBeerWorks.com 10. Stadium Sports Bar & Restaurant 149 S El Camino Real | 760.944.1065 www.StadiumSanDiego.com 11. Sublime Tavern 3790 Via de la Valle | 858.259.9100 www.SublimeTavern.com 12. The Craftsman New American Tavern 267 N. El Camino Real | 760.452.2000 www.CraftsmanTavern.com 13. The Regal Seagull 996 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.479.2337 www.RegalSeagull.com 14. Union Kitchen & Tap 1108 S Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.230.2337 www.LocalUnion101.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Farr Better Spirits 398 N. El Camino Real | 760.753.7137 2. Royal Liquor 1496 N Coast Hwy. 101 | 760.753.4534

BREW PUBS 1. Pizza Port Solana Beach 135 N Hwy. 101 | 858.481.7332 www.PizzaPort.com/Locations/Solana-Beach

BREWERIES 1. Culture Brewing Co. 111 S. Cedros Ave. | 858.345.1144 www.CultureBrewingCo.com

O

CORONADO

BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS

1. Leroy’s Kitchen & Lounge 1015 Orange Ave. | 619.437.6087 www.LeroysLuckyLounge.com 2. Little Piggy’s Bar-B-Q 1201 First St. | 619.522.0217 www.NadoLife.com/LilPiggys 3. Village Pizzeria 1206 Orange Ave. | 619.522.0449 www.NadoLife.com/VillagePizzeria

1. Park Place Liquor 1000 Park Place | 619.435.0116

BREW PUBS 1. Coronado Brewing Co. 170 Orange Ave. | 619.437.4452 www.CoronadoBrewingCompany.com

P

MISSION HILLS HILLCREST BEER BARS & RESTAURANTS 1. Brooklyn Girl Eatery 4033 Goldfinch St. | 619.296.4600 www.BrooklynGirlEatery.com 2. Jakes on 6th 3755 6th Ave. | 619.692.9463 www.JakesOn6thWineBar.com 3. Local Habit 3827 5th Ave. | 619.795.4470 www.MyLocalHabit.com 4. R-Gang Eatery 3683 5th Ave. | 619.677.2845 www.RGangEatery.com 5. San Diego Brew Project 1735 Hancock St. | 619.234.5757 www.SDBrewProject.com 6. Shakespeare Pub & Grille 3701 India St. | 619.299.0230 www.ShakespearePub.com 7. The Range Kitchen & Cocktails 1263 University Ave. | 619.269.1222 www.TheRangeSD.com 8. The Regal Beagle 3659 India St. 101 | 619.297.2337 www.RegalBeagleSD.com 9. The Ruby Room 1271 University Ave. | 619.299.7372 www.RubyRoomSD.com 10. Toma Sol 301 W Washington St. | 619.291.1159 www.TomaSolTavern.com

BOTTLE SHOPS 1. Whole Foods Hillcrest 711 University Ave. | 619.294.2800 www.WholeFoodsMarket.com

BREW PUBS 1. Hillcrest Brewing Company 1458 University Ave. | 619-269-4323 www.HillcrestBrewingCompany.com

BREWERIES 1. Acoustic Ales Brewing Experiment 1795 Hancock St. | 619.299.2537 www.AcousticAles.com

Q

ALPINE BREWERIES

1. Alpine Beer Company 2351 Alpine Blvd. | 619.445.2337 www.AlpineBeerCo.com

R

RAMONA BREWERIES

1. ChuckAlek Independent Brewers 2330 Main St. Ste C | 513.465.9768 www.ChuckAlek.com

HOME BREW SUPPLY 1. Ramona Brew Supplies 369 Main St. | 760.440.7727

S

JULIAN BREW PUBS

1. Julian Brewing/Bailey BBQ 2307 Main St. | 760.765.3757 www.BaileyBBQ.com

BREWERIES 1. Nickel Beer Company 1485 Hollow Glen Rd. | 760.765.2337 www.NickelBeerCo.com


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Kevin Newburg (left) with co-founder Stephen Grinalds

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

USD graduates Kevin Newburg and Stephen Grinalds will soon receive finalized samples of their Brew Cutlery, funded by more than $20,000 in Kickstarter cash. “We were super excited to exceed our goal of $10,000,” said Newburg. Inspiration for the idea came as it often does: over a few pints. “We used to walk down the hill from USD to Home Brew Mart, crush a couple of tasters, and then head back to study.” Now, the team is gearing up to ship out nearly 1,000 sets of cutlery to their crowdfunding backers. After a hiccup with one manufacturer, Brew Cutlery’s staff went with a process called investment casting, which, according to Newburg, “will upgrade the quality and craftsmanship of the product.” So what’s next for the young entrepreneurs? “The excess inventory we’ll try to push through an e-commerce platform, as well as through some local shops here in San Diego,” with an estimated goal of December 2014. Eventually, they’ll look to break into the retail space in a bigger way. To learn more, visit brewcutlery.com

52 | September 2014


Tantalize your taste buds with a wide variety of locally brewed craft beer. Vista, with 11 breweries, plus more in planning, is a craft beer destination.

1 Prohibition Brewing Co 2004 E. Vista Way

2a Mother Earth Brew Co (Tasting Rm) 206 Main Street

2b Mother Earth Brew Co 2055 Thibido Rd Ste H

3 Back Street Brewing 15 Main Street

4 Indian Joes Brewing Co 2379 La Mirada Dr

5 Aztec Brewing Co

2330 La Mirada Dr Ste 300

6 Iron Fist Brewing Co

1305 Hot Springs Way #101

7 Belching Beaver Brewing Co 980 Park Center Dr #A

8 Booze Brothers Brewing Co 2545 Progress St

9 Barrel Harbor Brewing Co 2575 Pioneer Way #104

10 Toolbox Brewing Co

1495 Poinsettia Ave. #148

11 Latitude 33 Brewing Co 1430 Vantage Court #104


Profile for Advanced Web Offset

West Coaster  

September 2014

West Coaster  

September 2014